US20070003369A1 - Sediment control wattle - Google Patents

Sediment control wattle Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070003369A1
US20070003369A1 US11/174,397 US17439705A US2007003369A1 US 20070003369 A1 US20070003369 A1 US 20070003369A1 US 17439705 A US17439705 A US 17439705A US 2007003369 A1 US2007003369 A1 US 2007003369A1
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sheath
wattle
sediment control
apron
sediment
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US11/174,397
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Robert Hanson
William Casey
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Hanson Robert N
Casey William J
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Priority to US11/174,397 priority Critical patent/US20070003369A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B3/00Engineering works in connection with control or use of streams, rivers, coasts, or other marine sites; Sealings or joints for engineering works in general
    • E02B3/04Structures or apparatus for, or methods of, protecting banks, coasts, or harbours

Abstract

A sediment control wattle including a sheath formed of a geotextile, the sheath containing a filler media. An apron extends from the sheath providing an element that may be pinned or otherwise attached to a terrain in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment underneath the wattles. The sediment control wattle may also include a joint wrap which permits adjacent wattles to be joined to form a sediment control system in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment between wattles.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Technical Field
  • The present invention relates generally to erosion control devices, and more particularly to a sediment control wattle including a durable synthetic sheath containing a polymeric fill material.
  • 2. Background
  • The prior art includes a variety of assemblies directed towards reducing the effects of soil erosion. Straw and excelsior wattles, logs and rolls, in common use, are configured as elongated tubes of compacted straw or excelsior encased in flexible netting material. See www.earth-savers.com for general descriptions and specifications of wattles. Wattles are installed along contours or at the base of slopes to reduce soil erosion and retain sediment. Straw and excelsior wattles, logs and rolls have been state-of-the-art in erosion and sediment control for many years, and are considered best management practice or BMP in current Clean Water Act regulations and guidelines. Yet, the rice straw wattle testing and properties table claims only 58% minimum soil loss effectiveness for a 9-inch wattle.
  • Additionally, the prior art includes U.S. Pat. No. 6,855,650 to Bohannon, Jr., entitled Synthetic Fiber Filled Erosion Control Blanket, discloses a resilient erosion control blanket including a recycled filler including polyethyleneterephthalate in the form of recycled soda bottles which has been converted into a crimped, highly resilient fibrous filler contained within an open-meshed material of natural or synthetic fibers.
  • U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,641,335 and 6,527,477 to Allard, entitled Erosion Control Rolls, discloses an erosion control device including a walled elongated core member is disclosed having a first open end, a second end, an interior space and one or more openings in the wall communicating the interior space with the exterior of the core member. An outer filter member surrounds the core member. One or both the first and second ends of the core member can be open. One or both of the open ends can comprise couplers or connectors for connecting one core member to one or two complimentary core members. The core member may comprise a flexible plastic pipe, such as high-density polyethylene pipe having a plurality of perforations.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,786,281 to Prunty, et al., entitled Erosion Control Blanket and Method of Manufacture, discloses an environmentally sound vegetation growth-enhancing erosion control blanket formed from an elongated rectangular excelsior/wood wool mat. The mat is held together with adhesive and a surface pattern is embossed therein. As ground vegetation grows, it ultimately replaces the blanket which decomposes providing nutritive mulch.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,678,954 to Bestmann, entitled Ecological Coir Roll Element and Shoreline Protected Thereby, discloses a generally cylindrical fiber roll consisting essentially of coir material with a netting material about the exterior surface of the roll.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,651,641 to Stephens, et al., entitled Geosynthetics, discloses a mat formed of scrim which is tufted with a number of tufted ends in order to provide high tensile strength, greatly porous and flexible mats contain a number of interstices for capturing root systems, retaining soil, and controlling the flow of water.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,519,985 to Dyck et al., entitled Machine for Producing Straw-Filled Tubes of Flexible Netting Material discloses an apparatus and method of filling tubes of flexible, large mesh, netting material with compacted rice straw, or the like. The finished straw tubes are on the order of nine inches in diameter, twenty five feet in length and thirty pounds in weight; and lend themselves to use in controlling or mitigating the effects of erosion and to promoting revegetation.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,405,217 to Dias, et al., entitled Device for Erosion Control, discloses an elongated tubular assembly including a plurality of tubular units disposed in end-to-end relationship, each unit including a lower section composed of a variably rigid impermeable contact base and an upper section with a variably rigid protruding hull. The lower and upper parts are connected to each other to provide an internal space into which ballast can be admitted.
  • U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,330,828 and 5,484,501 to Jacobsen, Jr., et al., entitled Wood Fiber Mat for Soil Applications, discloses a wood fiber mat comprised of a mixture of thermo-mechanically processed wood and synthetic fibers.
  • U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,249,893 and 5,358,356 to Romanek et al., entitled Erosion Control Mat, discloses an erosion control mat formed as a composite fabric including a scrim formed of polypropylene, polyester, nylon, rayon, polyethylene, cotton, or combinations thereof, and uniform lightweight web secured to the scrim.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,207,020 to Aslam, Jr., et al., entitled Biodegradable Slit and Expanded Erosion Control Cover, discloses an erosion control blanket made of recycled, biodegradable slit and expanded sheets of paper.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,635,576 to Bowers, entitled Stitched Woodwool Mat, discloses a soil erosion control blanket formed from a mat of interlocking woodwool fibers, the mat of woodwool being retained as a coherent structure by means of longitudinal rows of stitching.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,592,675 to Scales, et al., entitled Revetment Panel with Staggered Compartments discloses a revetment panel including a fabric web having a plurality of compartments that are staggered in relation to each other and separated by selvage. The web is formed of two fabric layers, which are woven separately to form the compartments and fastened together to form selvage separating them. The web is transported to its installation site and placed. The compartments in the web are then inflated with the filler material, which may be cementitous slurry or mortar.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,342,807 to Rasen, et al., entitled Low Density Matting and Process, discloses a matting consisting essentially of melt-spun thermoplastic macrofilaments which are self-bonded or fused at random points of intersection without using any bonding agent or reinforcing inserts.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,353,946 to Bowers, entitled Erosion Control Means, discloses an erosion control blanket formed from wood wool fibers retained in a coherent structure with a biodegradable mesh.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,517,514 to Visser, entitled Soil Protection Mats discloses mats of non-woven fabric having randomly oriented polypropylene fibers.
  • While the prior art provides any of a number of devices aimed at controlling or reducing the effects of soil erosion, it appears that few if any of the disclosed devices or systems provide a very effective means for reducing flow beneath the device or a means for joining two or more wattles, or other erosion control devices together to reduce flow or migration of sediment between the individual devices. Additionally, many of the previously disclosed devices are constructed of materials that are relatively absorbent and therefore are not prone to removal and reinstallation. Additionally, increased weight and volume contribute to increased cost of transportation and handling.
  • Therefore, advantage may be found in providing a relatively lightweight sediment control wattle, constructed of a durable fabric having a lightweight fill that is relatively non-absorbent. Additionally, advantage may be found in providing a sediment control wattle that is constructed in such a manner that permits adjacent wattles to be joined to form an erosion and sediment control system in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment between wattles. Additionally, advantage may be found in providing a sediment control wattle that is constructed in such a manner that provides a means for securing the sediment control wattles to a hillside or slope in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment underneath the wattles. Further advantage may be found in reduced excavation required for installation and reduced labor and cost for transportation, handling and installation of a small lightweight sediment control wattle. Additionally, advantage and savings may be found in the ability to re-use the sediment control wattle from project to project over a period of several years.
  • Therefore, an objective of the present invention is providing a relatively lightweight sediment control wattle, constructed of a durable fabric having a lightweight fill that is relatively non-absorbent. An additional objective of the present invention is providing a sediment control wattle that is constructed in such a manner that provides a means for securing the sediment control wattle to a hillside or slope in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment underneath the wattles. Additionally, an objective of the present invention is providing a sediment control wattle that is constructed in such a manner that permits adjacent wattles to be joined to form a sediment control system in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment between wattles. A further objective of the present invention is providing small lightweight sediment control wattles that allow reduced excavation for installation and reduced labor and cost for transportation, handling and installation of the wattles. Additionally, an objective of the present invention is providing a durable sediment control wattle capable of being re-used from project to project over a period of several years.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an sediment control wattle comprising a sheath formed of a geotextile, the sheath containing a filler media. The sheath includes an apron constructed along a length of the sheath, extending from the sheath. The apron provides an element that may be pinned or otherwise attached to a terrain in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment underneath the wattles. In a preferred embodiment, the sediment control wattle also includes a joint wrap, which permits adjacent wattles to be joined, in an end to end configuration, to form a sediment control system in a manner that reduces migration and flow of fluid and sediment between wattles.
  • The present invention is also directed to a relatively lightweight sediment control wattle, constructed of a geotextile fabric having a lightweight fill that is relatively non-absorbent. In addition, the invention is directed to a sediment control system including a plurality of sediment control wattles constructed according to the teaching of the present invention, the plurality of sediment control wattles being connected at adjacent ends.
  • Additional advantages and novel features of the invention will be set forth in part in the description that follows, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following, or may be learned by practice of the invention. Additionally, the advantages of the invention may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a representative perspective view of a sediment control wattle according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a representative perspective view of a sediment control system including a plurality of joined sediment control wattles according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a representative top view of a sediment control wattle according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle wrap according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle mid-section according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle end stitching according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle end tie according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a representative top view of a sediment control wattle system according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 9 is a representative cross sectional view of the two joined sediment wattles at the joint wrap in an installed condition, according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 is a representative top view of a sediment control wattle according to an alternate embodiment of the of the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 12 is a representative cross sectional view of a sediment control wattle according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 and 3, sediment control wattle 10 is shown including sheath 11 formed of a geotextile fabric. Sediment control wattle 10 also includes apron 12 and joint wrap 14. In the preferred embodiment, sheath 11 is configured as a tubular sheath formed by rolling first edge 18 back towards second edge 19 and sewing longitudinal seam 15 along a length of the geotextile fabric. Longitudinal seam 15 is positioned along line L located between first edge 18 and second edge 19 resulting in the formation of tubular sheath 11 and apron 12. In the preferred embodiment, end stitching 16, located at first end 21, and a self-locking cable tie 17, located at second end 22, are used to contain a filler media inside sheath 11. Generally speaking, a geotextile is a fabric or textile that is designed to work in conjunction with a geological environment to enhance a particular environmental or geological objective, for instance soil erosion control or containment of soils. A geotextile may be woven or non-woven, formulated of natural or synthetic materials. A geotextile may be constructed of a rot-proof and/or ultra violet resistant material or, in the alternative the geotextile may be constructed of a material that is biodegradable. A geotextile may be impermeable or permeable to water and often the rate of permeability is a controlled feature of the construction of a geotextile. A geotextile may be made from staple or continuous filaments. Synthetic materials, including for instance, polypropylene, nylon and polyester and natural fibers including hemp, ramie, and jute provide satisfactory materials from which geotextiles may be fabricated. A permeable geotextile appropriate for the present invention may range in weight from 65 g/m2, (or approximately 2 ounces per square yard), to 700 g/m2, (or approximately 21 ounces per square yard). Permeable woven and non-woven geotextiles are characterized by relatively uniform, distinct and measurable percentages of open area. This assures that both water and soil particles up to a maximum size will have passage through the geotextile. Permeable woven and non-woven fabrics having relatively little open area, often trap soil particles within the fabric, clogging the geotextile.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a sediment control system 50 is shown including a plurality of sediment control wattles 10A and 10B, including sheath 11A and 11B, apron 12A and 12B and joint wrap 14A and 14B respectively. Sheath 11A and sheath 11B are each configured as tubular segments formed by sewing longitudinal seam 15A and longitudinal seam 15 b respectively. As shown, sediment control wattles 10A and 10B include sheath 11A and 11B, apron 12A and 12B and joint wrap 14A and 14B respectively. Aprons 12A and 12B are construed to extend laterally from sheath 11A and 11B respectively. Sheath 11A includes first and second ends 21A and 22A formed by end stitching 16A and self-locking cable tie 17A respectively. Similarly, sheath 11B includes first and second ends 21B and 22B formed by end stitching 16B and self-locking cable tie 17B respectively. As shown, second end 22A of sediment control wattle 10A is placed adjacent to first end 21B of sediment control wattle 10B and inside joint wrap 14B with an axis A of sediment control wattle 10A and 10B lying substantially in line. Apron 12A is laid directly over apron 12B at the joint wrap when installing 10A and 10B end to end.
  • FIG. 4 is a section taken through joint wrap 14 of sediment control wattle 10 shown in FIG. 3, wherein sheath 11 and apron 12 are left un-sewn to form joint wrap 14. End stitching 16 can be seen at the inside of joint wrap 14.
  • FIG. 5 is a section taken through a mid-section of sediment control wattle 10 shown in FIG. 3. Sediment control wattle 10 includes sheath 11 configured as a tubular segment formed by rolling first edge 18 back towards second edge 19 of apron 12 and sewing longitudinal seam 15. Sheath 11 is shown filled with filler media 20. In a preferred embodiment, filler media 20 includes a plurality of irregular globules formed of foam polystyrene, for instance Styrofoam® “peanuts”. Alternately, filler media 20 may comprise any of a variety of shapes including substantially spherical shapes, solid polygons or irregular solids. Preferably, erosion control baffle 10 may include any natural or synthetic fill having an absorption capacity under 2.0% by volume. Additionally, the preferred filler media exhibits a dimensional stability with under 10% linear change. Additionally, the preferred filler media exhibits a minimum compressive strength of 138 g/cm2 or approximately 5 lb/in2.
  • Referring to FIG. 6, sediment control wattle 10 including apron 12, constructed according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, is shown in cross section at end stitching 16, which forms a closure at first end 21 of sheath 11, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 3. Preferably, end stitching 16 is oriented vertically to provide a vertical section having a height H that is at least equal to a diameter D of wattle 10. As seen in FIG. 6, longitudinal seam 15 is located with respect to end stitching 16 such that leg 25 is formed. Leg 25 assists in maintaining a generally vertical orientation of end stitching 16 when wattle 10 is in use. This construction results in a configuration that tends to eliminate slump between wattles 10A and 10B of sediment control system 50 at joint wrap 14B, as shown in FIG. 2.
  • Referring to FIG. 7, sediment control wattle 10, constructed according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, is shown in cross section at the self-locking cable tie 17, which is used to contain filler media 20 after the sheath 11 is filled with filler media 20 as shown in FIG. 5. To attach self-locking cable tie 17, a pointed end of the plastic cable tie is pushed through the apron 12 and wrapped around the gathered sheath 11. The pointed end of the cable tie is then threaded through the cable tie self locking mechanism and pulled tight. It will be noted that self-locking cable tie 17 may be removed and replaced as desired to either add or remove filler media as desired.
  • Referring to FIG. 8, sediment control wattles 10A and 10B are shown laid out end to end for installation along their respective axes represented by the reference character A As shown, sediment control wattles 10A and 10B include sheath 11A and 11B, apron 12A and 12B and joint wrap 14A and 14B respectively. Aprons 12A and 12B are construed to extend laterally from sheath 11A and 11B respectively. Sheath 11A includes first and second ends formed by end stitching 16A and self-locking cable tie 17A. Similarly, sheath 11B includes first and second ends formed by end stitching 16B and self-locking cable tie 17B. As shown, second end of sediment control wattle 10A is placed adjacent to first end of sediment control wattle 10B and inside joint wrap 14B with an axis A of sediment control wattle 10A and 10B lying substantially in line. Apron 12A is laid directly over apron 12B at the joint wrap when installing 10A and 10B end to end.
  • Referring to FIG. 9, installation of sediment control wattle 10A inside, and 10B, outside, are shown in cross section installed on terrain T. Sediment control wattles 10A and 10B are positioned in a cut C made substantially perpendicular to a slope, shown generally by vector SL, of terrain T. Aprons 12A and 12B are pinned to terrain T employing a plurality of pins shown generally as pin P1. Joint wrap 14B is shown wrapped about a circumference of sheath 11A of sediment control wattle 10A and pinned to terrain T by pin P2. Fill F is then placed over aprons 12A and 12B.
  • Sediment control system 50 provides a sediment control device which minimizes migration of soils from an upper side of joined sediment control wattles 10A and 10B to a lower or downhill side of sediment control system 50 as aprons 12A and 12B are pinned and fill F is placed over aprons 12A and 12B thereby providing that a flow along slope SL of water and sediment would be against rather than underneath sediment control wattles 10A and 10B. Additionally, sediment control system 50, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 8, provides a means for combining a plurality of adjacent sediment control wattles in an end-to-end arrangement that eliminates migration of soils between adjacent sediment control wattles, as each pair of adjacent sediment control wattles 10A and 10B in FIGS. 2 and 10A and 10B in FIG. 8, are coupled by a joint wrap, in this case 14B.
  • Referring to FIG. 10, an alternate configuration for a sediment control wattle 100 including apron 112 and joint wrap 114 is shown. Sheath 111 is shown closed at first end 121 by stitching 116 and self-locking cable tie 117 located at second end 122. In this alternate embodiment, joint wrap 114 is configured as a panel that extends to sheath 111 and apron 112 of sediment control wattle 100. Joint wrap 114 may be wrapped around the ends of sediment control wattle 100 and an adjacent sediment control wattle and secured to the ground with pins, similar to that described for FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 above.
  • FIG. 11 shows an alternate apron configuration in cross section for sediment control wattle 200. Apron 212 formed by first and second layers 213 and 214 of geotextile sewn together at longitudinal seam 215 and at apron stitching 221 near an outside edge of apron 212 forming pocket 225 and filled with an anchoring media 222 such as pea gravel. Anchoring media 222 may be bound to apron 212 with an adhesive to assure consistent distribution. The sheath 211, longitudinal seam 215 and sheath filler media 220 are similar to that described for FIG. 5. The purpose of this embodiment is for use on hard surfaces such as asphalt and concrete without the use of pins to fasten the sediment control wattle in place.
  • FIG. 12 shows an alternate apron and sheath configuration in cross section for sediment control wattle 300, having an apron 312 formed by two layers 313 and 314 of geotextile extending to both sides of the sheath 311, and sewn together at apron stitching 321A and 321B located at the outside edges of layers 313 and 314 forming pocket 325 which may be filled with an anchoring media 322 such as pea gravel. Anchoring media 322 may be bound to apron 312 with an adhesive to assure consistent anchoring media 322 distribution. An alternate sheath configuration is shown in FIG. 12, wherein sheath 311 is formed from a rectangular piece of geotextile separate from the apron 312. As shown, sheath 311 is sewn to the top of apron 312 along both sides of the sheath 311 at longitudinal seams 315A and 315B. Sheath filler media 320 is similar to that described for FIG. 5. The purpose of this embodiment is for use on hard surfaces such as asphalt and concrete without the use of pins to fasten the sediment control wattle in place.
  • In an alternate embodiment, an apron includes a plurality of discreet or separate pocket compartments similar to those shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 to reduce migration of the anchoring media. In yet another alternate embodiment, pockets of the type shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 may be configured as re-closable so that anchoring media may be added or removed as desired.
  • It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiment shown and described above. Various other embodiments of the invention may be made and practiced without departing from the scope of the invention, as defined in the following claims.

Claims (19)

1. A sediment control wattle comprising:
a sheath formed of a geotextile;
a filler media contained within the sheath, the sheath closed at a first end and a second end for containing the filler media; and
an apron extending from the sheath along the length of the sheath.
2. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 further comprising a joint wrap extending from an end of the sheath, the joint wrap adapted to permit attachment of the sediment control wattle to an adjacent sediment control wattle.
3. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath further comprises an end stitching forming a closure at a first end of the sheath.
4. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath further comprises an end stitching forming a closure at a first end of the sheath, the end stitching including a generally vertical orientation.
5. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath further comprises an end stitching forming a closure at a first end of the sheath, the end stitching including a leg element.
6. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath and apron further comprise a geotextile selected from the group of geotextiles including woven geotextiles, non-woven geotextiles.
7. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath and apron further comprise a geotextile selected from the group of geotextiles including woven, non-woven polypropylene monofilaments, polypropylene yarns, polypropylene filaments, polypropylene slit films, nylon, rayon, polyester, cotton, hemp, ramie and jute.
8. The sediment control wattle of claim 2 wherein the sheath, apron and joint wrap further comprise a geotextile selected from the group of geotextiles including woven geotextiles, non-woven geotextiles.
9. The sediment control wattle of claim 2 wherein the sheath, apron and joint wrap further comprise a geotextile selected from the group of geotextiles including woven, non-woven polypropylene monofilaments, polypropylene yarns, polypropylene filaments, polypropylene slit films, nylon, rayon, polyester, cotton, hemp, ramie and jute.
10. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the filler media is a media from the group comprising: polystyrene packing peanuts, synthetic globules, synthetic spheres, natural fibers, synthetic fibers, excelsior, straw, wood shavings, synthetic shavings, bark, wood chips, rock, gravel and sand.
11. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the apron further comprises joined top and bottom layers joined to form a pocket, the pocket adapted to contain an anchoring media.
12. The sediment control wattle of claim 11 wherein the apron further comprises a plurality of separate pocket compartments.
13. The sediment control wattle of claim 11 wherein the apron further comprises at least one re-closable opening.
14. The sediment control wattle of claim 10 wherein the anchoring media further comprises an anchoring media selected from a group comprising: rock, gravel, pea gravel, sand, bark chips, wood chips, synthetic globules, rubber, metal, concrete, asphalt, soil and adhesive.
15. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the filler media is contained inside the sheath using a closure element selected from a group of closure elements comprising: stitches, self-locking cable ties, adhesives, thermal welding, metal hog rings and staples.
16. The sediment control wattle of claim 1 wherein the sheath further comprises at least one re-closable opening.
17. A sediment control system comprising:
a first sediment control wattle including a first sheath formed of a geotextile, the first sheath containing a filler media, the first sheath closed at a first end and a second end for containing filler media, an apron extending from the first sheath along the length of the first sheath, the first sheath including a first joint wrap;
a second sediment control wattle including a second sheath formed of a geotextile, the second sheath containing filler media, the second sheath closed at a first end and a second end for containing filler media, an apron extending from the second sheath along the length of the second sheath, the second sheath including a second joint wrap; and
the second end of the first sediment control wattle inserted inside the second joint wrap with the second end of the first sheath placed adjacent to the first end of the second sheath.
18. The sediment control system of claim 17 further comprising a wattle securing element insertable through the first apron, the second apron and the second joint wrap for securing the first sediment control wattle and the second sediment control wattle to a terrain.
19. The sediment control system of claim 18 wherein the wattle securing element further comprises a securing element selected from the group of securing elements including nails, landscape fabric staples, and re-usable landscape fabric pins.
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US10253474B2 (en) 2016-01-20 2019-04-09 Douglas Paul Allard Apparatuses and methods for fiber rolls
US10323401B2 (en) * 2015-08-21 2019-06-18 Granite Environmental, Inc. Curb inlet filter
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US20200132354A1 (en) * 2018-10-31 2020-04-30 James Youngstrom Method for creating ice structures
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