US20060277330A1 - Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems - Google Patents

Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060277330A1
US20060277330A1 US11/141,106 US14110605A US2006277330A1 US 20060277330 A1 US20060277330 A1 US 20060277330A1 US 14110605 A US14110605 A US 14110605A US 2006277330 A1 US2006277330 A1 US 2006277330A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
usb
priority
data
serial bus
class
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/141,106
Inventor
Wilhelmus Diepstraten
Aart Jan Geurtsen
Steven Strauss
Mark Trafford
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Agere Systems LLC
Original Assignee
Agere Systems LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Agere Systems LLC filed Critical Agere Systems LLC
Priority to US11/141,106 priority Critical patent/US20060277330A1/en
Assigned to AGERE SYSTEMS INC. reassignment AGERE SYSTEMS INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DIEPSTRATEN, WILHELMUS, GEURTSEN, AART JAN, TRAFFORD, MARK, STRAUSS, STEVEN E.
Publication of US20060277330A1 publication Critical patent/US20060277330A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/12Dynamic Wireless traffic scheduling ; Dynamically scheduled allocation on shared channel
    • H04W72/1205Schedule definition, set-up or creation
    • H04W72/1242Schedule definition, set-up or creation based on precedence or priority of the traffic information
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L47/00Traffic regulation in packet switching networks
    • H04L47/50Queue scheduling
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L47/00Traffic regulation in packet switching networks
    • H04L47/50Queue scheduling
    • H04L47/62General aspects
    • H04L47/6215Individual queue per QOS, rate or priority
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L47/00Traffic regulation in packet switching networks
    • H04L47/50Queue scheduling
    • H04L47/62General aspects
    • H04L47/6285Provisions for avoiding starvation of low priority queues

Abstract

Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms and facilities are introduced into USB-based wireless Local Area Networking (LAN) communication systems. Techniques are provided for managing multiple priority queues in USB-based wireless communications systems, and for ensuring that lower priority traffic is not precluded from accessing the medium during sustained periods of use by high(er) priority traffic. A method is provided to resolve Quality of Service issues in emerging high-speed USB-based communications systems by offering support for multiple queue management within the system. A further embodiment provides an escalation mechanism for the purposes of mitigating low priority class data starvation in these communications systems, when it becomes an issue. QoS initiatives escalate a lower priority traffic class for the purposes of mitigating low priority class data starvation of the present invention, and/or use a single data buffer with management techniques to temporarily block or flow control data on a lower priority channel.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to queuing systems, and more particularly to priority queue methods and apparatus in communication systems such as Universal Serial Bus systems, including wireless USB systems.
  • 2. Background of the Related Art
  • Generally speaking, data to be transmitted (or received) is often passed through a transmit (or receive) queue. Once in a queue, data is generally transmitted in queue order.
  • In systems passing various types of data (e.g., voice, data, streaming video, etc.), data passing through the queue is given different priorities in an effort to transmit the highest priority data more quickly. One technique for ensuring that data of all priorities gets transmitted (or received) at a desired speed is to provide multiple queues, one for each priority level. In systems that do not offer multiple queues to support multiple priority class traffic scenarios, a boundary condition is effectively placed on the system software or driver requiring that in the transmit direction the software apply a minimum packet queuing strategy in the available system host transmit buffers in systems that want to establish multiple-class priority traffic scenarios. (Transmit being defined as packets from local system memory that traverse through the system out onto the medium. Receive is defined as incoming packets from the medium that are demodulated and placed into system memory.) This requirement is placed on the system in an effort to prevent a potentially large delay situation when a high priority packet is passed down to the driver from the operating system. The underlying assumption or solution is that such a priority frame cannot easily be ‘inserted’ in the existing queue, because the potential ownership or consumption of that available buffer is unknown (i.e., may have already been relinquished to the device already).
  • Quality of Service (QoS) is an all-encompassing phrase that denotes that different types of communications traffic are treated differently. In telecommunications systems, QoS is typically tied to voice and video services where users, who are accustomed to using the telephone, expect high quality voice (because historically, voice was considered the money maker and therefore that traffic received priority). In data communications systems, QoS is typically tied to multi-media services. In this context, multi-media refers to data systems that handle all kinds of data streams (‘streaming services’) that require no ‘automatic’ priority or re-transmission if a data packet is somehow lost in real-time.
  • Telecom systems are inherently stream oriented whereas data streams are inherently ‘bursty’ in nature. In the circuit switched world of telecom systems, ‘control’ is the model solution for all problems. This ‘control’, however, is fine for constant rate applications like voice and video where prediction of future is easy but loses some efficiency when handling data communications. On the other hand, data systems are complex and contain mixes of data sources and sinks called applications. Breaking data streams into packets makes it possible to serve many sources efficiently by multiplexing many data streams; the price of doing this, however, is in the form of delay. In many instances the application needs to bound or at the very least minimize this delay component, whereas some applications are immune to delivery latencies (herein referred to as ‘best-effort’ delivery.
  • Wireless systems also add a second level of uncertainty (and hence potential delay) in that the traffic flows are unpredictable in no small part due to the unpredictability of the radio links as well as external interference sources. Thus, use of rigid controls to manage traffic classes in wireless LANs can cause problems.
  • Universal Serial Bus (USB) is a popular standard for personal computer (PC) pericpheral devices because of its versatile peripheral interconnection specifications. USB not only provides simplified hardware connectors but also provides support for various bus traffic, such as isochronous and bulk transfer activities. Although the USB specifications do provide a way for users to specify the upper bound on the number of bytes for each data transfer in a 1 millisecond (mS) time frame, little work has been done within the industry to provide QoS guarantees for devices (e.g., the lower bound on the bytes for each device type in a 1 mS time frame) and a mechanism in enforcing those guarantees.
  • Conventional methods are generally employed at the Kernel level or via hardware to implement and reserve both “Bulk” and “Isoch” pipes for support. However, such conventional methods have several problems, including increased complexity, increased silicon area, and requiring separate and distinct buffers for each ‘pipe’, all of which leads to increased overall costs. Generally, too, the conventional solutions address only a 2-tiered priority strategy: high priority and non-priority data traffic classes. A key requirement in QoS-managed systems is that all devices have to implement a given model and policy and not play ‘rogue’.
  • In present communications systems, transmit packets flow from host memory to an internal transmit buffer (e.g., a transmit packet buffer) usually under the control of a resident data movement or DMA engine, which in turn is commanded by the system driver or software. The Media Access Controller (MAC) retrieves transmit data from this packet buffer, frames it appropriately, and forwards it to a physical network layer. Likewise, receive packets flow to the MAC from the receiver. The MAC extracts packet data from surrounding header and CRC, while packet management logic determines whether each packet should be discarded, buffered, or merely decoded for network flow control and power management. Each packet which reaches the receive buffer is forwarded to the host computer via a data movement engine, again operating under host driver control. Generally, the functional implementation of on-device buffers limits the number of physical data that can be brought onto the device-i.e., packet memory is generally limited due to cost and area concerns.
  • FIG. 6 shows a block diagram of a conventional non-priority based management system in a media access controller (MAC).
  • In particular, FIG. 6 shows that in these present communication systems, packets are sequentially queued and managed on a ‘best-effort’ basis.
  • In non-priority managed system offerings, generally a single queuing structure is used to buffer up packets at the system level. Using this strategy when priority traffic is available, however, a boundary condition is effectively placed on the device driver requiring that in either the Tx or Rx directions, the software apply a minimum packet queuing strategy to the available buffer. This requirement is placed on the system in an effort to prevent a potential large delay situation when a high priority packet is passed down to the driver. This underlying assumption is that such a priority frame cannot easily be ‘inserted’ in the existing queue, because it is unknown if the ownership of the available buffer has been relinquished to the device already.
  • There is a need for a fair and efficient queuing method and apparatus useful in USB type systems, particularly in wireless USB systems.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a media access controller in a USB system comprises a plurality of data queues having different priorities, at least one escalation data queue, and a channel access interface. A queue manager manages the plurality of data queues for service by the channel access interface. The queue manager places data from a lower priority one of the plurality of data queues into the at least one escalation data queue to alleviate a data starvation possibility to a lower priority one of the plurality of data queues.
  • A method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different USB endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation in accordance with another aspect of the invention comprises grouping a plurality of groups of data into respective classes for queuing and transmission. Data of a lower priority is escalated to a highest class as quality of service rules require. The lower priority class traffic is allowed to be transmitted periodically on a communication medium during sustained periods of high(er) class priority traffic transmission.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows the introduction of Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms and facilities in Universal Serial Bus (USB) based wireless Local Area Networking (WLAN), in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows a hardware-based priority management provision in a MAC of a USB wireless communications system, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 depicts the inclusion of a bypass queue at a highest priority, along with regularly classed queues such as a high priority queue to a low priority queue, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 shows a state diagram of overall priority management, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is an exemplary flow chart showing a transmit queue priority management system, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 shows a block diagram of a conventional non-priority based management system in a media access controller (MAC).
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS
  • The invention provides a method to resolve Quality of Service issues in emerging high-speed USB-based communications systems by offering support for multiple queue management within the system. A further embodiment provides an escalation mechanism for the purposes of mitigating low priority class data starvation in these communications systems, when it becomes an issue.
  • Currently USB-based communications systems operate as a scheduled or reserved medium, meaning that scheduling methods are used to reserve USB bandwidth for devices in an on-demand fashion.
  • FIG. 1 shows that the present invention introduces Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms and facilities 100 allowing communications between two USB-based wireless Local Area Networking (LAN) communication systems 102, 104. In particular, techniques are provided for managing multiple priority queues in USB-based wireless communications systems, and for ensuring that lower priority traffic is not precluded from accessing the medium during sustained periods of use by high(er) priority traffic.
  • In accordance with the principles of the present invention, in a USB system, a separate high or multi-priority transmit queue or queues are added to allow more low priority packets to be queued independently of a high priority traffic queue, offering significant throughput and efficiency advantages at the system level.
  • The present invention relates particularly to USB-centric applications, though it more generally can be applied to Quality of Service initiatives in other similar wireless Local Area Networking communication systems. The present invention adds multiple data queues into communications systems that, when used with simple control mechanisms, allow multiple classes of communications traffic with different latency and delivery objectives to be treated differently over a Universal Serial Bus (USB).
  • These multiple queue management mechanisms and escalation techniques can be leveraged by existing WLAN systems. Basic goals of any managed WLAN system are to: (1) retain the basic ‘collision avoidance’ approach used currently; (2) use adaptive flow control to keep priority traffic flowing, meaning a progressive reduction of service rate for lower classes of service as the medium load goes up; (3) use medium load feedback to drive local service rate decisions-per Service Class; and (4) use drop rate feedback to tell the application if a new ‘connection’ is possible. While queue management techniques can be implemented in either hardware or software, an overall advantage to offering multiple queues and using queue management and escalation techniques within a given piece of hardware can be used to increase the overall system efficiency and throughput.
  • The invention provides any USB-based networking system with two or more priority queuing mechanisms, and methods to flow control a lower priority traffic class on a different endpoint for the purposes of supporting Quality of Service (QoS) initiatives. It also provides any USB-based networking system having two or more priority queuing mechanisms and supporting QoS initiatives with methods to escalate a lower priority traffic class for the purposes of mitigating low priority class data starvation. In this way, lower priority class traffic is allowed to be transmitted periodically on the communication medium during sustained periods of high(er) class priority traffic transmission.
  • A separate or multiple high priority queue(s) allows more low priority packets to be queued independently of the high priority traffic queue. When high priority traffic is then available, a mechanism exists within the system that allows the resident on-chip data movement engine to retrieve data from the priority queues/buffers if it exists prior to servicing the best-effort queues.
  • In emerging systems, multiple classes of traffic having different latency and delivery objectives are being considered (e.g., See IEEE 802.11(e) SPECIFICATION). IEEE 802.11(e) is currently a four class tier defined as (in order of lowest to highest priority): Best effort (lowest priority) Excellent effort Video (& Audio) Voice (highest priority)
  • In accordance with the present invention, the four available classes are regrouped as a three class system, leaving one priority level free to accommodate QoS and management initiatives, allowing a channel for passing low priority data at a highest priority level to prevent starvation of the low priority data.
  • As an example, a lowest priority class would be for ‘best effort’ traffic (i.e., non time-sensitive traffic), then one for priority class traffic (i.e., traffic having some latency demands), and lastly one for very high priority (i.e., voice applications). In this proposed three class system, for convenience the excellent effort and video traffic classes have been grouped together, though other combinations of otherwise conventional classes may be grouped together into three of the four class system, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows a hardware-based priority management provision in a MAC of a USB wireless communications system, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • In particular, as shown in FIG. 2, a Media Access Controller 100 of a USB system 150 includes a transmit direction management 160 and a receive direction management 170, passing data to and from a medium (e.g., wired or wireless connection).
  • The transmit direction management 160 includes a plurality of queues 200 a, a scheduler/queue management system 210 a, and a channel access function 220 a. The receive direction management 170 similarly includes a plurality of queues 200 b, a scheduler/queue management system 210 b, and a channel access function 220 b.
  • The scheduler/queue management systems 210 a, 210 b function at two levels. At one level both transmit and receive packets are managed according to ordinary priority classes. However, importantly, the scheduler/queue management systems 210 a, 210 b also operate at a second level, making use of a highest priority, or bypass, queue.
  • FIG. 3 depicts the inclusion of a escalation (bypass) queue 300 at a highest priority, along with regularly classed queues such as a high priority queue 302 to a low priority queue 304. In this context, an additional register or registers is/are added to allows high(er) priority transmit packets to be queued up and sent through the network in a escalation queue 300 independent from ‘best-effort’ transmit packets.
  • Use of the escalation queue 300 allows increased system flexibility from a driver perspective as it removes otherwise conventional boundaries on minimizing the number of queued transmit packets residing in a given buffer structure. In the receive direction it is assumed that packets will be moved off of the device into the system memory quickly such that priority class management of incoming (receive) packets is not required. However, similar techniques as described to manage the transmit direction can also be leveraged at the receive level as well.
  • FIG. 4 shows a state diagram of overall priority management, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • In particular, as shown in FIG. 4, when management of both transmit and receive packets needs to be considered, a simple rotating priority scheme may be implemented between a Transmit (Tx) state 402 and a Receiver (Rx) state 404. Preferably, one state (Tx state 402 or Rx state 404) does not have absolute priority over the other state (Rx state 404 or Tx state 402) which could cause a starvation condition to occur.
  • Given the limited size of an on-chip receive packet buffer in many applications, it is preferred for many applications that a general priority should be given to quickly bursting those packets from on-chip storage registers into system memory for processing as quickly and efficiently as possible. This is because it is appreciated that it is more difficult to flow control data that is being sent from a remote station then it is to control data that is already placed in a local system buffer.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, when the controller leaves either the Tx state 402 or the Rx state 404 and reaches the IDLE state 410, the state machine looks to see if another pending transfer is required and if so will arbitrate between the Transmit and Receive sections on a rotating priority basis as discussed above.
  • It should be noted that this constraint applies for both the Tx and Rx directions. Further, this constraint effectively results in the desired automatic rotating priority scheme without the need to explicitly handle the case that both events are active.
  • Upon accounting for the rotating priority scheme within either receive or transmit directions, we consider the ability to accommodate priority traffic on a per service basis (used in this context to mean either a transmit service or a receive service). First considering the transmit service side, the ability to accommodate priority traffic in the transmit direction is added into the system by supporting additional dedicated priority buffers (i.e., better than ‘best effort’). This requirement removes the conventional queuing issue encountered with a single buffer or queue and allows more low priority packet queuing to occur (in its own separate and distinct buffer), while not affecting high priority traffic.
  • FIG. 5 is a flow chart showing an exemplary transmit queue priority management system, in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • In particular, it is preferably that the Tx priority registers do get absolute priority over the ‘best-effort’ or ‘normal’/best effort buffers should both be active concurrently. However, without certain policy management in place and further assuming constantly filled buffers for all traffic classes, the potential for low priority data starvation becomes an issue caused by the strict priority handling of the (video and best/excellent effort) buffers.
  • Handling the video and best/excellent effort buffers with a weighted round robin’ scheduling as depicted in FIG. 4 is one method that may be employed to ensure that data starvation does not occur.
  • A weighted round robin rotating priority scheme can be implemented fairly simply by servicing the queues in a given sequence. As an example sequence, the queues may be serviced in an order such as video, video, normal, video, video, normal, etc. Because of the nature of voice traffic, it can still be serviced with strict priority. However, in another embodiment of the invention provisions are added to ensure that the ‘best-effort’ traffic is not ‘starved out’ by the engine servicing these high(er) priority queues that are not as rigid as the aforementioned ‘weighted round robin’ scheme. These provisions may be controlled by the device firmware or scheduling mechanism by means of supplying a bit or bits in a local device register. These bits are used to indicate to he device data movement engine that the Low Priority data buffer is being starved and should be serviced first even if a pending High Priority or [Medium] Priority data packet is waiting in its respective data buffer.
  • As shown in FIG. 5, the priority rules remain intact and require the state machine to provide a fixed priority between a plurality of regular class service queue transmit buffers (e.g., three queues Tx, PTx, and HPTx), while at the same time preferably maintaining the rotating priority scheme between the Tx state 402 and the Rx state 404 as were shown in FIG. 4.
  • In the transmit queue priority management shown in step 516, the process starts in a transmit idle state.
  • In step 514, a register is read to determine if a low priority escape bit is set indicating that a starvation condition is active. If so, the process skips to servicing of the low priority buffer as shown by step 502, and if data is in the Tx buffer queue, then the Tx buffer is read in step 504, and the process returns to the Tx idle state of step 516. If no data is in the Tx buffer queue, then the process simply returns to the Tx idle state of step 516.
  • If the lop priority escape bit is not set in step 514, then the process continues to monitor if data is in the highest priority queue (in this case a high priority transmit buffer (HPTx) in step 510. If so, the HPTx buffer is read in step 512, and the process returns to the idle state in step 516. If not, then the process continues to monitor the next priority queue lower than the previous queue, as shown in step 506. If data is in the next priority queue (e.g., PTx buffer), then the PTx buffer is read in step 508, and the process continues to the idle state shown in step 516. If not, the process continues to the next lowest priority queue shown in step 502, reading data from the Tx buffer in step 504, and returning to the Tx idle state in step 516.
  • The techniques and apparatus provided by the present invention are now discussed with respect to the Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface.
  • USB supports a polling based protocol implying that the host issues messages that inform the functions (which in this context is attached hardware-based devices) that they can send data upstream, or prepare to receive information from the [USB] host. These messages are called token packets. The only control functions have over data delivery is a negative acknowledgement (NAK) reply. A NAK means that the function is not capable sending or receiving the requested data, and the host should try the request again later. Data delivery is guaranteed through the use of standard CRC and resend mechanisms.
  • Endpoints and pipes are the basic constructs of any communication link between a USB host, hub, or function. Endpoints are the termination points of unidirectional communication paths, which can be uniquely referenced by USB devices using a device address, an endpoint number, and a dataflow direction. Pipes are logical links from client software (running on the PC) and endpoints of USB devices. The idea here is that a number of Endpoints are logically collected into pipes. Pipes provide some unified interface to a function.
  • A function has at least one pipe, called the default control pipe. This pipe is created when a USB device is connected to the host and is properly detected. This control pipe is used to configure the USB device, and to carry any control requests made by either the host or the function. This default pipe always uses two endpoints (one in each direction) and these two endpoints are given endpoint number 0 (zero). Pipes can be configured to use a structured packet format or use a unidirectional, unstructured stream. Pipes that use the structured packet format are called message pipes, while pipes that ship unstructured streaming data are called stream pipes.
  • Handshake packets are used for flow control and used as responses to various requests. A handshake packet may be an acknowledgement (ACK), a NAK, or a STALL. ACKs are sent by either the host controller or the function when data packets are received correctly. NAKs indicate that a function did not receive a data packet correctly in response to an OUT request, or that the function has no data (or is not able to send data) in response to an IN request.
  • In general, USB does not support priority mechanisms within the system-traffic to multiple endpoints is happening concurrently, and this traffic will interleave with other transfers on the USB. USB is designed to support many types of devices, such as human interface devices (e.g., key-board and moust), block devices (e.g., disks), communication transceivers, stereo speakers, video cameras, etc. The data transfer modes on USB could be classified into four categories: isochronous transfer, interrupt transfer, control transfer, and bulk transfer.
  • Isochronous transfer and interrupt transfer are periodic data transfers, while control transfer and bulk transfer each introduce aperiodic bus activities. Different types of devices require different bandwidths and ways to interact with USB host controllers, where a host controller manages the bandwidth of a USB bus. For example, a human interface device (HID) demands a periodic but light bus workload. A storage device requires a best-effort service from the corresponding host controller. On the other hand, an operating system must manage a number of devices through USB simultaneously, and devices would compete for a limited bus bandwidth. How to properly manage USB bandwidth is of paramount importance if reasonable QoS requirements are, indeed, considered.
  • In an effort to support a multi-tiered (i.e., more than 2) priority strategy, a USB system architecture is realized that negotiates for N endpoint (EP) resources where N is the number of desired traffic classes to support. To minimize silicon area, the architecture considers a single data buffer for all of the N bulk endpoints. Having multiple bulk endpoints sharing the same memory resources allows separation of management and data transfers, and also allows implementation of priority across the USB interface.
  • In a four priority class system, four distinct end points can be negotiated within the system. Mapping of priority structures to dedicated endpoints provides the possibility to implement QoS.
  • Table 1 shows endpoint internal priorities with respect to traffic types. TABLE 1 Endpoint # Priority Traffic Type 1 1 USB messages containing management data 3 2 Interrupt in messages towards the host 7 3 USB mesg containing frame structure w/ priority 3 traffic 6 4 USB mesg containing frame structure w/ priority 4 traffic 5 5 USB mesg containing frame structure w/ priority 5 traffic 4 6 USB mesg containing frame structure w/ priority 6 traffic
  • The architecture interprets the priority classes within the table such that the lower the priority value is in Table 1, the higher the traffic priority. Note that the priority of the endpoints numbers [7:4] as defined in Table 1 may be ordered in any desired manner.
  • Given this unified data buffer structure, there can be only one transfer active to the device on the USB at any given time. Accordingly, a method or methods to ‘flow control’ or block additional data requests on disparate endpoints is required. To allow sharing, the architecture needs additional control over what is accepted in the unified buffer.
  • Some very simple rules are employed by a resident controller to ensure proper handling of multiple priority channels in a USB-based system. In its simplest embodiment, this controller is an arbiter that accepts requests and issues grants to agents desiring access to the unified buffer structure.
  • Rule (1): Packets coming in from the medium will be sent to the system as soon as possible. Device to host packets come in sequentially and can use a single bulk endpoint for data transfers.
  • Rule (2): An incoming packet (in this context, incoming refers to the host-to-device, or in USB parlance ‘OUT’ pipes) should be completed in its entirety prior to acceptance of any other data on another endpoint. An incoming packet can be contained in a single USB data transfer/cycle or spread out over multiple cycles. Given the unified buffer structure for all bulk endpoints, there can be only one transfer active at a given time. Any interleaved transfer to other endpoints will consequently be ‘flow controlled’ automatically because there is no buffer resource available to receive these OUT frames.
  • In USB, this is referred to as: NACK or NYET and the actual response is dependent on USB mode. For USB 1.1: NACKs are used, for USB 2.0 HS: NYETs shall be used.
  • The controller interleaves request frames for endpoints that have been NYET'd in a round robin fashion, while doing the OUT transfer to one of the endpoints.
  • The controller maintains knowledge of what endpoint has traffic pending, and further maintains knowledge of when a multi-fragment packet is pending and completed. A single fragment packet can be handled easily with very little additional effort. A multi-fragment packet requires that the resident controller block the buffer resource for other requesting endpoints until completed.
  • The controller has the ability to quickly parse or delimit the multi-fragment frames.
  • When the controller knows that the interface is receiving a frame structure over one of the USB EP[3:6] structures (through an ‘agent’ request and then the subsequent grant), it remembers all incoming requests for EPs[3:6]. Whenever the controller receives a request from a higher priority class endpoint, than the priority class of the endpoint it is currently serving, it shall serve the highest priority directly after completion of the current transfer in the current frame structure. Furthermore, when the controller is receiving a frame structure over one of the EPs [3:6], it starts to NAK/NYET the endpoint as soon as it received the whole frame structure is received over that endpoint. By capturing the request frames that could not be acknowledged due to unavailability of a buffer, a given implementation can use this data to prioritize the next request. In this context, the controller will acknowledge the highest priority (i.e., non-blocked) request only after the OUT buffer resource becomes available.
  • To support the priority mechanisms of the present invention, including the interjection of an escalation (i.e., bypass) queue at a highest priority, it is preferred that a ‘request history’ buffer be maintained. It is also preferred that any subsequent request that is lower priority then the highest priority captured in the history buffer be blocked. Moreover, it is also preferred that the request be cleared when serviced.
  • In a further aspect of the present invention, the architecture is enhanced to include an accessible register in which a higher order entity (like an on-board co-processor or arbitration request counting logic) can make settings that enable the USB host interface logic controller with the capability to block USB packets (via NAK/NYET mechanisms) for certain endpoints as a function of frame structures waiting in the incoming data queues.
  • In this aspect, the architecture is able to block an endpoint temporarily. This is valuable to ensure that memory buffers remain available for other priorities as well as allow an endpoint block to occur when enough frames are in the queue for a given priority level. This consideration ensures that buffers will still remain available for other priorities' slots.
  • As soon as various queues do empty to an acceptable level (due to frames being transmitted), the higher order entity may then release the block by toggling a bit in a support register. Note that this arbitration mechanism is consistent with the low priority escalation mechanism described earlier.
  • Currently for the USB bus, three maximum data rates have been defined: 1.5 Mbps (USB2.0 Low Speed), 12 Mbps (USB 2.0 Full Speed), and 480 Mbps (USB 2.0 High Speed). When a device is in one of these modes, the supported data rate has to be shared between all devices that are connected to the host via a specific USB. This mode is likely required for the higher data rates currently being envisioned for wireless data communications systems. However, the techniques provided within this paper do not preclude the use of the lower speed and earlier generation USB interfaces (referred to as USB 1.1).
  • The invention can be implemented in a fairly straight forward manner into existing WLAN systems in general by offering support for multiple queue management within the system with the ability to escalate a lower-priority entity during sustained periods of higher priority traffic.
  • It is anticipated that due to the cost effectiveness of emerging communication systems (i.e., wireless LAN solutions), multiple devices in consumer space will become linked to high speed home networked devices and computers for the purposes of automation and data sharing. Accordingly, the ability to provide a simple real-time method to support multiple traffic classes becomes extremely valuable, especially in emerging applications where Quality of Service (QoS) objectives are highly desired. Furthermore, escalation mechanisms that mitigate low priority class data starvation in these communications systems using a bypass queue adds value to these systems.
  • The present invention builds on the proven success of the current 802.11 MAC, and can be retrofitted into existing designs. It also adds QoS features that are adaptive and robust, and fits well with existing traffic models. It also maintains efficient channel filling of the basic wireless MAC by filling empty service levels.
  • Though described with respect to a USB communications system, the principles of the present invention relates to other communications systems that support multiple packet queue management, e.g., 802.11(e) conforming systems. In accordance with the QoS initiatives and/or methods to escalate a lower priority traffic class for the purposes of mitigating low priority class data starvation of the present invention, and QoS initiatives by using a single data buffer with management techniques to temporarily block or flow control data on a lower priority channel.
  • While the invention has been described with reference to the exemplary embodiments thereof, those skilled in the art will be able to make various modifications to the described embodiments of the invention without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (23)

1. A media access controller in a Universal. Serial Bus (USB) system, comprising:
a plurality of data queues having different priorities;
at least one escalation data queue;
a channel access interface; and
a queue manager to manage said plurality of data queues for service by said channel access interface;
wherein said queue manager places data from a lower priority one of said plurality of data queues into said at least one escalation data queue to alleviate a data starvation possibility to a lower priority one of said plurality of data queues.
2. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 1, wherein:
said media access controller is integrated into a Universal Serial Bus (USB) device.
3. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 2, wherein:
said USB device is a wireless device.
4. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 1, wherein said plurality of data queues comprises:
at least two data queues.
5. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 1, wherein said plurality of data queues comprises:
at least three data queues.
6. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 1, further comprising:
a register adapted to block a USB packet for a certain endpoint as a function of a frame structure waiting in an incoming data queue.
7. The media access controller in a Universal Serial Bus (USB) system according to claim 6, wherein:
said USB packet is blocked using a NAK/NYET mechanism.
8. A method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation, comprising:
grouping a plurality of groups of data into respective classes for queuing and transmission; and
as quality of service rules require, escalating data of a lower priority to a highest class;
wherein lower priority class traffic is allowed to be transmitted periodically on a communication medium during sustained periods of high(er) class priority traffic transmission.
9. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 8, wherein:
said transmission is over a USB device.
10. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 8, wherein:
said USB device is a wireless USB device.
11. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 8, further comprising:
arbitrating between a pending transfer in a transmit state and a pending transfer in a receive state.
12. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 11, wherein said arbitrating comprises:
rotating between said transmit state and said receive state.
13. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 8, further comprising:
maintaining a request history buffer; and
blocking a subsequent request that is lower priority then a highest priority captured in said history buffer;
wherein an endpoint is blocked temporarily.
14. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 8, further comprising:
blocking a USB packet for a certain endpoint as a function of a frame structure waiting in an incoming data queue.
15. The method for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 14, further comprising:
releasing said USB packet as soon as at least one of said plurality of queues empties to an acceptable level.
16. Apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation, comprising:
means for grouping a plurality of groups of data into respective classes for queuing and transmission; and
means for escalating data of a lower priority to a highest class as quality of service rules require;
wherein lower priority class traffic is allowed to be transmitted periodically on a communication medium during sustained periods of high(er) class priority traffic transmission.
17. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 16, wherein:
said transmission is over a USB device.
18. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 16, wherein:
said USB device is a wireless USB device.
19. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 16, further comprising:
means for arbitrating between a pending transfer in a transmit state and a pending transfer in a receive state.
20. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 19, wherein said arbitrating comprises:
means for rotating between said transmit state and said receive state.
21. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 16, further comprising:
means for maintaining a request history buffer; and
means for blocking a subsequent request that is lower priority then a highest priority captured in said history buffer;
wherein an endpoint is blocked temporarily.
22. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 16, further comprising:
means for blocking a USB packet for a certain endpoint as a function of a frame structure waiting in an incoming data queue.
23. The apparatus for flow controlling a lower priority traffic class on a different Universal Serial Bus (USB) endpoint to mitigate low priority class data starvation according to claim 22, further comprising:
means for releasing said USB packet as soon as at least one of said plurality of queues empties to an acceptable level.
US11/141,106 2005-06-01 2005-06-01 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems Abandoned US20060277330A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/141,106 US20060277330A1 (en) 2005-06-01 2005-06-01 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/141,106 US20060277330A1 (en) 2005-06-01 2005-06-01 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems
US12/483,611 US7987302B2 (en) 2005-06-01 2009-06-12 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/483,611 Continuation US7987302B2 (en) 2005-06-01 2009-06-12 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060277330A1 true US20060277330A1 (en) 2006-12-07

Family

ID=37495450

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/141,106 Abandoned US20060277330A1 (en) 2005-06-01 2005-06-01 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems
US12/483,611 Active 2025-07-26 US7987302B2 (en) 2005-06-01 2009-06-12 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/483,611 Active 2025-07-26 US7987302B2 (en) 2005-06-01 2009-06-12 Techniques for managing priority queues and escalation considerations in USB wireless communication systems

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20060277330A1 (en)

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080219279A1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2008-09-11 Yen Hsiang Chew Scalable and configurable queue management for network packet traffic quality of service
US7451258B1 (en) * 2006-08-23 2008-11-11 Rockwell Collins, Inc. Rotating priority queue manager
US20090077274A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2009-03-19 Advanced Micro Devices Multi-Priority Communication in a Differential Serial Communication Link
US20090088869A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2009-04-02 Sysmex Corporation Sample processing apparatus and data processing apparatus
DE102007051372A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 Giesecke & Devrient Gmbh Data transfer of large amounts of data
US20090271537A1 (en) * 2008-04-23 2009-10-29 Daniel Labute Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US20100232370A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service traffic recognition and packet classification home mesh network
US20100232447A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service queue management in home mesh network
US20100232369A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Multi-channel single radio communication in home mesh network
US20100232354A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Node query in ad hoc home mesh network
US20100232371A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service service scheduling for home mesh network
US20100232400A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Virtualizing single radio for multiple wireless interfaces in home mesh network
US20100232396A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service architecture for home mesh network
US20110046796A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2011-02-24 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US20110149819A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Apparatus and method for synchronizing usb communication in usb-wireless lan system
US20120106565A1 (en) * 2010-11-03 2012-05-03 Broadcom Corporation Data bridge
US20140146766A1 (en) * 2011-05-25 2014-05-29 Nokia Corporation Method and apparatus for facilitating disaster communications
US20140189140A1 (en) * 2012-12-31 2014-07-03 Microsoft Corporation Program Based Caching In Live Media Distribution
US9055019B1 (en) 2007-11-21 2015-06-09 Marvell International Ltd. Method and apparatus for message multicasting
US9229792B1 (en) * 2007-11-21 2016-01-05 Marvell International Ltd. Method and apparatus for weighted message passing
US9445482B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2016-09-13 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb and method and system for use in configuring same
US20160267037A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-09-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Buffer management method and apparatus for universal serial bus communication in wireless environment
US20160285645A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-09-29 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Scheme for supporting wireless transmission taking into account qos of usb application data
US20170024344A1 (en) * 2015-07-22 2017-01-26 Microchip Technology Incorporated Method and System for USB 2.0 Bandwidth Reservation
US9641959B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-05-02 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household for industrial device including programmable controller and method device and system for use in configuring same
US10628240B2 (en) 2016-12-15 2020-04-21 Ab Initio Technology Llc Heterogeneous event queue

Families Citing this family (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7813271B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2010-10-12 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Aggregated link traffic protection
US8976796B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2015-03-10 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Bandwidth reuse in multiplexed data stream
US8494009B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2013-07-23 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Network clock synchronization timestamp
CN101578794B (en) * 2007-01-26 2012-12-12 华为技术有限公司 Multiplexed data stream circuit architecture
US7675945B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2010-03-09 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multi-component compatible data architecture
US8295310B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2012-10-23 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Inter-packet gap network clock synchronization
US8660152B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2014-02-25 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multi-frame network clock synchronization
US8588209B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2013-11-19 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multi-network compatible data architecture
US7986700B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2011-07-26 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multiplexed data stream circuit architecture
US8340101B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2012-12-25 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multiplexed data stream payload format
US7809027B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2010-10-05 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Network clock synchronization floating window and window delineation
US7961751B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2011-06-14 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Multiplexed data stream timeslot map
KR100872178B1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2008-12-09 한국전자통신연구원 Apparatus and method for managing forwarding service of WUSB based on priority
JP5152201B2 (en) * 2008-01-21 2013-02-27 富士通株式会社 Packet processing apparatus and packet processing program
US9367511B2 (en) * 2013-07-16 2016-06-14 Marvell World Trade Ltd. System method for managing USB data transfers by sorting a plurality of endpoints in scheduling queue in descending order based partially on endpoint frequency
US9524260B2 (en) 2014-06-18 2016-12-20 Qualcomm Incorporated Universal serial bus (USB) communication systems and methods
US9785606B2 (en) * 2014-12-22 2017-10-10 Intel Corporation Systems, methods, and devices for media agnostic USB packet scheduling

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6205150B1 (en) * 1998-05-28 2001-03-20 3Com Corporation Method of scheduling higher and lower priority data packets
US20020172205A1 (en) * 2001-05-07 2002-11-21 Tagore-Brage Jens P. System and a method for processing data packets or frames
US6601109B1 (en) * 1999-03-31 2003-07-29 International Business Machines Corporation USB-based networking and I/O hub
US20040092278A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2004-05-13 Wilhelmus Diepstraten Managing priority queues and escalation in wireless communication systems
US20050144353A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2005-06-30 Z-Com, Inc. Wireless virtual storage device
US20060039370A1 (en) * 2004-08-23 2006-02-23 Warren Rosen Low latency switch architecture for high-performance packet-switched networks
US7171505B2 (en) * 2002-05-02 2007-01-30 International Business Machines Corporation Universal network interface connection

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7035948B1 (en) * 2001-03-19 2006-04-25 Transdimension, Inc. System and method for USB controllers
US7562362B1 (en) * 2003-06-18 2009-07-14 Apple Inc. User control of task priority
US7579809B2 (en) * 2005-08-04 2009-08-25 Staccato Communications, Inc. Rechargeable wireless adapters

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6205150B1 (en) * 1998-05-28 2001-03-20 3Com Corporation Method of scheduling higher and lower priority data packets
US6601109B1 (en) * 1999-03-31 2003-07-29 International Business Machines Corporation USB-based networking and I/O hub
US20020172205A1 (en) * 2001-05-07 2002-11-21 Tagore-Brage Jens P. System and a method for processing data packets or frames
US7171505B2 (en) * 2002-05-02 2007-01-30 International Business Machines Corporation Universal network interface connection
US20040092278A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2004-05-13 Wilhelmus Diepstraten Managing priority queues and escalation in wireless communication systems
US20050144353A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2005-06-30 Z-Com, Inc. Wireless virtual storage device
US20060039370A1 (en) * 2004-08-23 2006-02-23 Warren Rosen Low latency switch architecture for high-performance packet-switched networks

Cited By (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7451258B1 (en) * 2006-08-23 2008-11-11 Rockwell Collins, Inc. Rotating priority queue manager
US9078802B2 (en) 2007-02-26 2015-07-14 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US8150552B2 (en) * 2007-02-26 2012-04-03 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US20110046796A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2011-02-24 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US7710989B2 (en) * 2007-03-06 2010-05-04 Intel Corporation Scalable and configurable queue management for network packet traffic quality of service
US20080219279A1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2008-09-11 Yen Hsiang Chew Scalable and configurable queue management for network packet traffic quality of service
US20090077274A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2009-03-19 Advanced Micro Devices Multi-Priority Communication in a Differential Serial Communication Link
WO2009036563A3 (en) * 2007-09-19 2009-05-07 Ati Technologies Ulc Multi-priority communication in a differential serial communication link
US8131382B2 (en) * 2007-09-27 2012-03-06 Sysmex Corporation Sample processing apparatus and data processing apparatus
US20090088869A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2009-04-02 Sysmex Corporation Sample processing apparatus and data processing apparatus
DE102007051372A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 Giesecke & Devrient Gmbh Data transfer of large amounts of data
US9229792B1 (en) * 2007-11-21 2016-01-05 Marvell International Ltd. Method and apparatus for weighted message passing
US9055019B1 (en) 2007-11-21 2015-06-09 Marvell International Ltd. Method and apparatus for message multicasting
US8060660B2 (en) 2008-04-23 2011-11-15 Autodesk, Inc Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US20090271531A1 (en) * 2008-04-23 2009-10-29 Daniel Labute Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US20090271537A1 (en) * 2008-04-23 2009-10-29 Daniel Labute Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US7802033B2 (en) * 2008-04-23 2010-09-21 Autodesk, Inc. Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US7783797B2 (en) * 2008-04-23 2010-08-24 Autodesk, Inc. Adaptive bandwidth distribution system for high-performance input/output devices with variable throughput
US20100232354A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Node query in ad hoc home mesh network
US8861445B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2014-10-14 Sony Cororation Multi-channel single radio communication in home mesh network
US7974297B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2011-07-05 Sony Corporation Quality of service queue management in home mesh network
US20100232447A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service queue management in home mesh network
US20100232370A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service traffic recognition and packet classification home mesh network
US20100232369A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Multi-channel single radio communication in home mesh network
US20100232396A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service architecture for home mesh network
US20100232400A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Virtualizing single radio for multiple wireless interfaces in home mesh network
US8194593B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2012-06-05 Sony Corporation Quality of service architecture for home mesh network
US8223786B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2012-07-17 Sony Corporation Quality of service scheduling for home mesh network
US20100232371A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Sony Corporation Quality of service service scheduling for home mesh network
US8780762B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2014-07-15 Sony Corporation Node query in ad hoc home mesh network
US8761174B2 (en) 2009-03-11 2014-06-24 Sony Corporation Quality of service traffic recognition and packet classification home mesh network
US20110149819A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Apparatus and method for synchronizing usb communication in usb-wireless lan system
US9143384B2 (en) * 2010-11-03 2015-09-22 Broadcom Corporation Vehicular network with concurrent packet transmission
US8750319B2 (en) * 2010-11-03 2014-06-10 Broadcom Corporation Data bridge
US20120106565A1 (en) * 2010-11-03 2012-05-03 Broadcom Corporation Data bridge
US20120106550A1 (en) * 2010-11-03 2012-05-03 Broadcom Corporation Vehicular network with concurrent packet transmission
US20140146766A1 (en) * 2011-05-25 2014-05-29 Nokia Corporation Method and apparatus for facilitating disaster communications
US20140189140A1 (en) * 2012-12-31 2014-07-03 Microsoft Corporation Program Based Caching In Live Media Distribution
US9276978B2 (en) * 2012-12-31 2016-03-01 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Program based caching in live media distribution
US10382223B2 (en) * 2013-10-31 2019-08-13 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Scheme for supporting wireless transmission taking into account QoS of USB application data
US10078607B2 (en) * 2013-10-31 2018-09-18 Sasmung Electronics Co., Ltd Buffer management method and apparatus for universal serial bus communication in wireless environment
US20160267037A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-09-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Buffer management method and apparatus for universal serial bus communication in wireless environment
US20160285645A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-09-29 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Scheme for supporting wireless transmission taking into account qos of usb application data
US9641959B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-05-02 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household for industrial device including programmable controller and method device and system for use in configuring same
US10433135B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2019-10-01 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household or industrial device including programmable controller and method, device and system for use in configuring same
US9445482B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2016-09-13 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb and method and system for use in configuring same
US10085330B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2018-09-25 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb, intelligent lighting device and method and system for use in configuring same
US10582595B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2020-03-03 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb, intelligent lighting device and method and system for use in configuring same
US9713235B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-07-18 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb, intelligent lighting device and method and system for use in configuring same
US20170024344A1 (en) * 2015-07-22 2017-01-26 Microchip Technology Incorporated Method and System for USB 2.0 Bandwidth Reservation
US10628240B2 (en) 2016-12-15 2020-04-21 Ab Initio Technology Llc Heterogeneous event queue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US7987302B2 (en) 2011-07-26
US20090254685A1 (en) 2009-10-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9871739B2 (en) Service interface for QOS-driven HPNA networks
US9800513B2 (en) Mapped FIFO buffering
US8917740B2 (en) Channel service manager
US8929363B1 (en) Apparatus and method for allocating buffers of a memory including tracking a number of buffers used to store a received frame
US8065462B2 (en) Data communication interface and communication devices incorporating same
US7058074B2 (en) Unified channel access for supporting quality of service (QoS) in a local area network
US5959997A (en) Hybrid access system with AGC control of upstream channel transmit power
US7903550B2 (en) Bandwidth reservation for data flows in interconnection networks
Tan et al. Time-based Fairness Improves Performance in Multi-Rate WLANs.
US6888831B1 (en) Distributed resource reservation system for establishing a path through a multi-dimensional computer network to support isochronous data
US6526451B2 (en) Method and network device for creating circular queue structures in shared memory
CN100459560C (en) Method and appts. for providing communications bandwidth to users having committed data rate based on priority assignment
US9007902B1 (en) Method and apparatus for preventing head of line blocking in an Ethernet system
KR101021566B1 (en) Mechanism for providing quality of service in a network utilizing priority and reserved bandwidth protocols
US7249206B2 (en) Dynamic memory allocation between inbound and outbound buffers in a protocol handler
ES2637665T3 (en) Effective circuits in packet switching networks
US6715002B2 (en) Watermark for additional data burst into buffer memory
US6438135B1 (en) Dynamic weighted round robin queuing
US7606154B1 (en) Fair bandwidth allocation based on configurable service classes
US8040801B2 (en) Service interface for QoS-driven HPNA networks
US7039061B2 (en) Methods and apparatus for retaining packet order in systems utilizing multiple transmit queues
JP5313310B2 (en) Memory management for high-speed media access control
US5960001A (en) Apparatus and method for guaranteeing isochronous data flow on a CSMA/CD network
US7239636B2 (en) Multiple virtual channels for use in network devices
US6021132A (en) Shared memory management in a switched network element

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: AGERE SYSTEMS INC., PENNSYLVANIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DIEPSTRATEN, WILHELMUS;GEURTSEN, AART JAN;STRAUSS, STEVEN E.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:016639/0600;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050422 TO 20050601

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION