US20060270412A1 - System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment - Google Patents

System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060270412A1
US20060270412A1 US11/137,003 US13700305A US2006270412A1 US 20060270412 A1 US20060270412 A1 US 20060270412A1 US 13700305 A US13700305 A US 13700305A US 2006270412 A1 US2006270412 A1 US 2006270412A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
wireless
wireless device
communication mode
signal
predetermined
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/137,003
Inventor
Bruce Willins
Benjamin Bekritsky
Huayan Wang
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Symbol Technologies LLC
Original Assignee
Symbol Technologies LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Symbol Technologies LLC filed Critical Symbol Technologies LLC
Priority to US11/137,003 priority Critical patent/US20060270412A1/en
Assigned to SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. reassignment SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: WANG, HUAYAN AMY, BERITSKY, BENJAMIN, WILLINS, BRUCE A.
Assigned to SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. reassignment SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. IN RESPONSE TO DOCUMENT ID NO.; 103190561 CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT ASSIGNOR'S NAME REEL/FRAME NO. 016730/0971 Assignors: WANG, HUAYAN AMY, BERITSKY, BENJAMIN, WILLINS, BRUCE A.
Assigned to SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. reassignment SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT TO THE 3RD ASSIGNOR'S NAME, PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL 017986 FRAME 0871. Assignors: WANG, HUAYAN AMY, BEKRITSKY, BENJAMIN, WILLINS, BRUCE A.
Publication of US20060270412A1 publication Critical patent/US20060270412A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/08Access point devices
    • H04W88/10Access point devices adapted for operation in multiple networks, e.g. multi-mode access points
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W48/00Access restriction; Network selection; Access point selection
    • H04W48/16Discovering, processing access restriction or access information
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
    • Y02D70/14Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks
    • Y02D70/142Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks in Wireless Local Area Networks [WLAN]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
    • Y02D70/16Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in other wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/166Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in other wireless communication networks in Radio Frequency Identification [RF-ID] transceivers

Abstract

Described is a system and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment. The system may include a first wireless device having a first wireless transceiver; a second wireless device having a second wireless transceiver; and an envelope detection arrangement (“EDA”) coupled to the second device. The second wireless device has a first communication mode and a second communication mode, The second wireless transceiver conducts wireless communications with the first wireless transceiver using a predetermined wireless communication protocol (e.g., IEEE 802.11/16) only when the second wireless device is in the first communication mode. The second wireless transceiver is in a low-power state when in the second communication mode. The EDA screens radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence; the signal is generated according to the same predetermined wireless communication protocol. When the EDA receives the signal, the arrangement causes the second wireless device to switch into the first communication mode.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • Wireless local area networks (“WLANs”) are frequently utilized in locations where one or more mobile units (“Mus”) (e.g., PDAs, scanners, laptops, cell phones, etc.) require access to the WLAN, a central server and/or a database. For example, in a retail or a warehouse environment, a plurality of MUs may be used at any one time to perform routine functions, such as retrieving data from inventory items (e.g., scanning barcodes, interrogating RFID tags). These MUs are connected to the WLAN via an access point (“AP”) in order to transmit the data to the central server, the database or other MUs. In the retail environment, the data may represent, for example, a number of items presently on a shelf, a location of an item within a store, etc.
  • These environments (e.g., retail, warehouse) may have highly dynamic radio frequency (“RF”) characteristics due to certain contingencies, such as floor plan changes and the addition, removal or movement of goods therein. RF surveys performed prior to and during the WLAN installation cannot cover all of these contingencies, and maintain a cost- and capacity-efficient WLAN architecture. That is, these contingencies may cause interruptions and interference in the wireless connections between the MUs and the APs resulting in coverage gaps in the WLAN. As a result, WLAN operators are forced to perform routine maintenance, including identifying and fixing the coverage gaps, which may represent significant time and cost to a proprietor of the WLAN (e.g., owner of retail outlet).
  • To maintain reliability of the WLAN, the operators typically oversubscribe through proliferation of APs within the WLAN. However, each additional AP represents significant costs in terms of installation, maintenance, etc. Furthermore, the coverage gaps may be temporally-based, and, thus, not require full deployment (e.g., cabling, line/battery powering, etc.) of an additional AP. Thus, there is a need for a system which will maintain reliability and resiliency of the WLAN at a lower cost than the over-proliferation of APs therein.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to is a system and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment. The system may include a first wireless device having a first wireless transceiver; a second wireless device having a second wireless transceiver; and an envelope detection arrangement (“EDA”) coupled to the second device. The second wireless device has a first communication mode and a second communication mode, The second wireless transceiver conducts wireless communications with the first wireless transceiver using a predetermined wireless communication protocol (e.g., IEEE 802.11/16) only when the second wireless device is in the first communication mode. The second wireless transceiver is in a low-power state when in the second communication mode. The EDA screens radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence; the signal is generated according to the same predetermined wireless communication protocol. When the EDA receives the signal, the arrangement causes the second wireless device to switch into the first communication mode.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows an exemplary embodiment of a system according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 shows an exemplary embodiment of a method for connecting a device to a network according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 shows an exemplary embodiment of a method utilized by a device requiring connection to a network according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 shows an exemplary embodiment of a predetermined signal according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 shows an exemplary embodiment of a modified access point according to the present invention; and
  • FIG. 6 shows an exemplary embodiment of a receiver coupled to a computing device according to the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present invention may be further understood with reference to the following description and the appended drawings, wherein like elements are referred to with the same reference numerals. The exemplary embodiment of the present invention describes a system for providing reliability and resiliency to a wireless communication network. As will be described further below, the present invention may enable a connection to the wireless network for wireless devices outside of an RF range thereof.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, a system 100 according to the present invention may include a wireless communication network (e.g., a wireless local area network (“WLAN”) 105) deployed within a space 108. The space 108 may be an enclosed environment (e.g., a retail location, a warehouse, a library, etc.), an open environment (e.g., a park) or a combination thereof. Although the system 100 will be described with reference to the WLAN 105, those of skill in the art will understand that the present invention may be utilized in any wireless communication network (e.g., WWAN, etc.) and/or by any device connected (wired or wirelessly) thereto.
  • The WLAN 105 may include a variety of wireless communication devices operating therein and connected thereto. For example, the WLAN 105 may include an access point (“AP”) 110 at a predetermined position within the space 108. That is, the position of the AP 110 may be determined as a result of, for example, a radio frequency (“RF”) survey conducted by an operator or a proprietor of the WLAN 105. The RF survey may have taken into account factors, such as a size of the space 108, wireless communication devices operable therein, applications of such devices, etc., and the positioning and/or configuration of the AP 110 may have been a function of the factors. As understood by those of skill in the art, the AP 110 may be one of a plurality of APs positioned within the WLAN 105, the space 108 and/or the system 100. Thus, any number of APs may be utilized in connection with the present invention.
  • The AP 110 may have a connection, wired (e.g., ethernet cable) or wireless, to a server 112. The server 112 may be further connected to a database 114, which may be integral with the server 112 or act as a stand-alone storage element. The server 112 may utilize a representation of the space 108 and/or the WLAN 105 and the position of the APs (including the AP 110) to determine an RF environment created thereby.
  • The AP 110 has a coverage area 115 in which it may conduct wireless communications with the wireless computing devices therein. The coverage area 115 may represent a predetermined range over which the AP 110 can send and receive RF signals. Although the coverage area 115 is depicted as uniform (e.g., fixed radius around the AP 110), those of skill in the art will understand that the coverage area 115 may be manipulated by, for example, beam steering or switching via a smart antenna at the AP 110. Although, FIG. 1 depicts that the AP 110 may communicate with any wireless device within the coverage area 115, those of skill in the art will understand that one or more coverage holes 117 may exist therein. The coverage hole 117 may be a region of any size in which wireless signals from the AP 110 cannot reach. The coverage hole 117 may be caused by, for example, obstructions in a signal path which prevent the signal from reaching the wireless device within the coverage hole 117. Those of skill in the art will further understand that the existence of the coverage hole 117 may be a function of time. That is, the coverage hole 117 may be eliminated (e.g., restored connectivity to the AP 110) upon one or more conditions (e.g., changing a physical environment around the AP 110).
  • As shown in FIG. 1, a mobile computing unit (“MU”) 120 is further included in the system 100. As understood by those of skill in the art, the MU 120 may be any computing unit with wireless communication capability (e.g., PDA, laptop, cell phone, handheld computer, network interface card, RFID tag, scanner, etc.). Without being in the coverage area 115 of the AP 110 (or any AP in the WLAN 105) or being within the coverage hole 117, the MU 120 is disconnected from the WLAN 105 and cannot communicate with any other MUs or APs connected thereto.
  • The disconnection may be a result of movement of the MU 120 within the space 108. For example, the MU 120 may be a scanner which is used for an inventory function (e.g., scanning barcodes) within a warehouse. After each scan or a predetermined number of scans, the MU 120 may transmit inventory data (e.g., product ID, location, etc.) to the server 112 via the AP 110. However, when the MU 120 is outside of the coverage area 115 of the AP 110, the transmission of the inventory data fails. Thus, a user of the MU 120 may attempt to reestablish connection to the WLAN 105 and complete the transmission by repositioning the MU 120 (and himself) within the warehouse. Alternatively, after the failed transmission, the MU 120 may store the inventory data and transmit it when a connection to the WLAN 105 has been reestablished (e.g., back inside the coverage area 115, out of the coverage hole 117, the coverage hole 117 has been eliminated). When the user is repositioning, the inventory function is suspended and no new inventory data is being collected. When the MU 120 transmits an increased amount of stored inventory data, it may use an increased portion of a bandwidth allocated to the WLAN 105. In both instances, the operator and/or the proprietor of the WLAN 105 is taking on significant costs as a result of the scanner being disconnected from the WLAN 105. Those of skill in the art will understand that the disconnection may be a result of factors other than position, such as, for example, decreased power of the AP 110 and/or the MU 120, barriers/obstructions between the MU 120 and the AP 110 which may create the coverage hole 117, etc.
  • Disconnections caused by movement, power and/or barriers/obstructions may be temporary. That is, as noted above, repositioning the MU 120 and/or time may resolve the disconnection. However, time taken to reposition and/or wait for restored connectivity may result in a loss in productivity. Thus, the present invention provides both temporary and permanent solutions for temporary and permanent disconnections suffered by MUs within the WLAN 105. In addition, these solutions may be low-cost in that significant hardware/software modifications and/or upgrades to the WLAN 105 and the devices therein/connected thereto may not be required.
  • According to the present invention, the system 100 further includes a modified AP (“MAP”) 125 positioned within the WLAN 105. Preferably, the MAP 125 is positioned within the coverage area 115 of the AP 110 allowing for wireless communication therebetween. The MAP 125 may be positioned during initial deployment of the WLAN 105 and/or as a result of, for example, coverage gap detection. Those of skill in the art will understand that any number of MAPs may be positioned within the WLAN 105. As will be described below, deployment and utilization of the MAPs may extend the RF environment and provide reliability and resiliency thereto. For example, the MAPs may allow the APs to communicate with MUs within coverage holes and/or outside of their respective coverage areas.
  • An exemplary embodiment of an architecture of the MAP 125 is shown in FIG. 5. The MAP 125 may include components similar to a conventional AP (e.g., AP 110). For example, the MAP 125 may include a processor 505, a memory arrangement 510 and one or more transceivers 515 interconnected in any known manner (e.g., via a bus). Each transceiver 515 may include an antenna element 520 attached thereto. When powered, the transceiver 515 is capable of conducting wireless communications within the WLAN 105. As will be explained further below, the MAP 125, when powered, provides for wireless communications on the same channel as the AP 110, thereby limiting co-channel and/or adjacent channel interference. Further included on the MAP 125 may be a LAN port (e.g., RJ 45), one or more light-emitting diodes (e.g., power, LAN connection, active, etc.) and a reset and/or power button/switch. According to the present invention, the MAP 125, the AP 110, the MU 120 and any other wireless computing device connected to the WLAN 105 may be capable of conducting wireless communications according to one or more predefined communication protocols (e.g., IEEE 802.11x).
  • The MAP 125 may further include a power arrangement 525. According to the present invention, the power arrangement 525 may be a battery 530 housed within a battery compartment 535 in the MAP 125. The battery compartment 535 may include a security feature (e.g., a lock) which would allow only authorized personnel to change/charge the battery 530. The MAP 125 may monitor a charge level of the battery 530 and transmit a signal to the server 112 (or broadcast a signal) when the level reaches a predetermined threshold, indicating that the battery 530 must be either replaced and/or recharged. In another embodiment, the battery 530 is attached to a recharger (not shown) which may be, for example, a solar cell. Thus, the battery 530 may recharge itself on a continuous basis. In a further embodiment, the power arrangement 525 is a line voltage.
  • According to the present invention, the MAP 125 may further include a receiver 540 (e.g., an AM demodulator). In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the receiver 540 may include an amplifier and be housed within the MAP 125 and be connected to the other components of the MAP 125 (e.g., processor 505, memory 510, transceiver 515, antenna element 520) so that the receiver 540 may draw power from either the power arrangement 525 of the MAP 125 or a further power arrangement (e.g., a battery) used only by the receiver 540. The receiver 540 preferably includes one or more modifications which allow for operation at a reduced power (i.e., a low power mode in which a reduced amount of power is drawn from the battery 530). The modifications which provide for operation at reduced power may include, for example, decreased sensitivity, single channel operation, alternative demodulation schemes and/or low duty cycle operation. According to the present invention, the receiver 540 listens and/or screens for-a predetermined signal 400 (e.g., a sequence of 802.11 transmissions, a predetermined signal strength (e.g., an RSSI)) which includes an envelope, an exemplary embodiment of which is shown in FIG. 4 and is described further below. The receiver 540 does not modify, decode and/or demodulate the predetermined signal 400. Thus, the present invention is directed to recognition of the envelope of the predetermined signal rather than any data contained therein. Those of skill in the art will understand that the receiver 540 may listen to an area broader than the further coverage area 130.
  • In an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the MAP 125 is not connected (e.g., wired) to the WLAN 105 via, for example, network infrastructure cabling (e.g., ethernet cabling). Thus, with no cable connecting the WLAN 105 and the LAN port on the MAP 125, the MAP 125 may not directly initiate wireless communications and/or communicate with the server 112. Thus, the MAP 125 remains in an idle state until the predetermined signal 400 is transmitted/broadcast over a radio channel and received, as further described below.
  • The MAP 125 switches between a first communication mode (“FCM”) and a second communication mode (“SCM”) upon receipt of the predetermined signal 400 by the receiver 540. Thus, the MAP 125 utilizes a dual-mode of operation including the FCM and the SCM. In the FCM (e.g., a dormant state), the MAP 125 is powered off, conserving the battery 530. Thus, in the FCM, only the receiver 540 (and an amplifier connected thereto) are powered. Those of skill in the art will understand that, when in the FCM, the MAP 125 is completely powered off. The FCM is not a sleep/power-conserve state. While in the FCM, the receiver 540 listens only for the predetermined signal 400. In the SCM (e.g., active mode), the MAP 125 is capable of actively conducting wireless communications.
  • When the predetermined signal 400 is received, the receiver 540 switches the MAP 125 from the FCM to the SCM. That is, the receiver 540 sends a signal to the processor 505 indicating that the MAP 125 should switch to the SCM. Once the MAP 125 has switched to the SCM, it acts as a bridge by, for example, receiving a signal (e.g., an 802.11 transmission) from the AP 110 and transmitting it to the MU 120, or vice-versa. Thus, the AP 110 may effectively extend the coverage area 115 to include a further coverage area 130 of the MAP 125. No hardware, software or power modifications need be made to the AP 110 which may communicate with the MU 120 (or any wireless device within the coverage area 130) via the MAP 125. Those of skill in the art will understand that the further coverage area 130 may have similar characteristics (e.g., size, space, dimension, etc.) to that of the coverage area 115.
  • As shown in FIG. 6, in a further exemplary embodiment, the receiver 540 may be manufactured as a stand-alone component for attachment to a wireless computing device 600. In this embodiment, the receiver 540 may have its own power arrangement (e.g., a battery, line voltage) or may derive power from a power arrangement (e.g., battery, line voltage) of the device 600. The device 600 may be, for example, an AP, a PC, a laptop, a cell phone, a PDA, a network interface card, a handheld computer, a scanner, an RFID tag, etc. In this manner, the device 600 may have a port (e.g., serial, USB, etc.) which receives a cable/contact on the receiver 540. Also, in this or any other embodiment, the receiver 540 may include an antenna element 605 which may facilitate reception of the predetermined signal 400.
  • The receiver 540 may have several further embodiments. In a preferred exemplary embodiment, the receiver 540 is a low-power receiver (e.g., a non-802.11 radio) designed solely to respond to the predetermined signal 400. In another exemplary embodiment, the receiver 540 is a conventional receiver (e.g., a conventional 802.11 receiver). In yet a further embodiment, the receiver 540 is a modified receiver (e.g., reduced-power 802.11 receiver) which may be the conventional receiver with one or more modifications (e.g., decreased receivers sensitivity, single channel receiver operation, alternative demodulation schemes based on the predetermined signal 400, low duty cycle receiver operation, etc.). The one or more modifications preferably reduces battery power consumed by the modified receiver, thereby increasing a lifetime of the battery thereof or of the MAP 125.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, in operation, the MU 120 may be located (temporarily or permanently) outside of the coverage area 115 or in the coverage hole 117, and, as a result, be disconnected from the WLAN 105. The MU 120 may be able to detect this disconnection. For example, the MU 120 may determine the disconnection as a predetermined number of missed beacons from the AP 110, an upper layer protocol timeout (e.g., TCP timeout) and/or one or more failed communication transactions (e.g., did not receive acknowledgment from AP 110). Preferably, the MU 120 detects the disconnection immediately or soon after its exit from the coverage area 115.
  • Upon detection of the disconnection, the MU 120 may attempt to reconnect to the AP 110 or any other AP connected to the WLAN 105. If this attempted reconnection fails, the MU 120 transmits the predetermined signal 400. As understood by those of skill in the art, the transmission of the predetermined signal 400 may not be transmitted to a particular wireless computing device, but may simply be a broadcast by the MU 120 over a radio channel. Further, transmission of the predetermined signal 400 may be user-controlled if, for example, the MU 120 detects the disconnection but the user desires to work offline (i.e., disconnected from the WLAN 105). An exemplary embodiment of the predetermined signal 400 is shown in FIG. 4. In this embodiment, the predetermined signal 400 may be generated by any wireless communication device utilizing the communication protocol (e.g., IEEE 802.11x). In this embodiment, the predetermined signal 400 is a pulse-width-modulation sequence generated from one or more individual, sequential packet transmissions with a pre-defined spacing therebetween.
  • The predetermined signal 400 may include a first packet 405 having a first predetermined pulse width 410 (e.g., T1). A second packet 415 having a second predetermined pulse width 420 (e.g., T3) may be separated from the first packet 405 by a first pre-defined space 425 (e.g., T2). A third packet 430 having a third predetermined pulse width 435 (e.g., T5) may be separated from the second packet 415 by a second pre-defined space 440 (e.g., T4). As shown in FIG. 4, the predetermined pulse widths 410 and 435 may be the same and have a shorter duration than the second predetermined pulse width 420. As understood by those of skill in the art, various embodiments of the predetermined signal 400 may be used in conjunction with the present invention. For example, one or more packets with uniform or varying pulse-widths, with or without uniform or varying spaces therebetween may be used. The representative example depicted in FIG. 4 is shown only to illustrate that the predetermined signal 400 may have a predefined structure(s) or characteristic(s) which is recognized by the receiver 540 as the device (e.g., the MAP 125) connected thereto should switch to the SCM.
  • Referring back to FIG. 1, when the MU 120 detects the disconnection from the WLAN 105, it transmits/broadcasts the predetermined signal 400 in an attempt to reestablish the connection. The predetermined signal 400 is received by the receiver 540 which is connected to the MAP 125. In one exemplary embodiment, the receiver 540 only responds to a transmission of the predetermined signal 400. That is, the receiver 540 does not respond to any signals (e.g., 802.11 transmissions, non-802.11 transmissions, etc.) other than the predetermined signal 400. Thus, the receiver 540 may consume very little power from its power source or that of the MAP 125.
  • As described above, the predetermined signal 400 may have a format including one or more packets of uniform or varying pulse-width. These packets may or may not contain any data. Thus, the receiver 400 may not attempt to decode the packets (e.g., demodulate the predetermined signal 400), but based on the predefined structure(s) (e.g., resolved on/off timing 445), determines that the transmission is the predetermined signal 400. This determination may be accomplished using, for example, a pulse code modulation (“PCM”) technique which may provide robust receiver sensitivity. In this manner, the predetermined signal 400 is operably similar to an SOS communication. For example, the MU 120 represents that it is “lost” (e.g., disconnected from the WLAN 105), and broadcasts the predetermined signal 400 (e.g., SOS) hoping that any in the FCM connected to the WLAN 105 hears it and (re)establishes the connection thereto. Thus, the MU 120 is utilizing the predetermined signal 400 in an “emergency” scenario (e.g., disconnected from the WLAN 105).
  • Upon receipt of the predetermined signal 400, the receiver 540 indicates to the MAP 125 that it should switch from the FCM to the SCM. In the SCM, the MAP 125 may relay transmissions (e.g., 802.11 packets) from the MU 130 to the AP 110, and vice-versa. For example, once the MAP 125 enters the second mode, it may transmit a beacon from the AP 110 to the MU 120. When the MU 120 receives the beacon, it will know that it has been (re)connected to the WLAN 105. The MAP 125 may remain in the SCM until a predetermined condition occurs. For example, the predetermined condition may be when no MUs are associated with the MAP 125. As will be understood by those of skill in the art, when the MAP 125 is in the SCM, the receiver 540 may cease listening for the predetermined signal 400. That is, the receiver 540 may not require power while the MAP 125 is in the SCM. Thus, when the MAP 125 is in the FCM, the receiver 540 is powered and the MAP 125 is not, and when the MAP 125 is in the SCM, the MAP 125 is powered and the receiver 540 may not be powered.
  • In a further embodiment of the present invention, after the MAP 125 switches from the FCM to the SCM, it transmits a notification signal to the server 112 via the AP 110. The notification signal may alert the server 112 that the MAP 125 has been activated (e.g., switched to the SCM) indicating a coverage gap within the WLAN 105. As understood by those of skill in the art, the notification signal may include data such as, for example, an identification and a location of the MAP 125 and a time of receipt of the predetermined signal 400. The data may further include an identification of the device from which it was transmitted (e.g., the MU 120). The data may be utilized by the server 112 and/or operator/proprietor of the WLAN 105 to determine coverage gaps and intermittent outage trends therein.
  • Upon receipt of the notification signal, the server 112 may instruct the MAP 125 to remain in the SCM thereby providing the connection to the WLAN 105 for the MU 120. In a further embodiment, the server 112 indicates to the operator/proprietor of the WLAN 105 that the MAP 125 is activated and will be so for a predetermined amount of time. In that time, the operator/proprietor may replace the MAP 125 with a conventional AP (e.g., with a wired or wireless connection to the WLAN 105). Alternatively, the server 112 may instruct one or more APs (e.g., AP 110) within a predetermined distance around the MAP 125 to increase power expanding a coverage thereof (e.g., coverage area 115). Those of skill in the art will understand that any of the above responses to the notification signal may temporarily or permanently establish a connection to the WLAN 105.
  • An exemplary embodiment of a method 200 according to the present invention is shown in FIG. 2. The method 200 may be implemented in hardware or software, and executed by the processor 505 in the MAP 125 and/or the receiver 540. In step 202, the MAP 125 is in the FCM. Thus, the receiver 540 is listening/screening wireless communications within the range thereof for the predetermined signal 400.
  • In step 205, the receiver 540 receives the predetermined signal 400. As described above, the predetermined signal 400 may be transmitted by the MU 120 in response to the disconnection from the WLAN 105 (e.g., exiting the coverage area 105, powering up outside the coverage area 105, in the coverage hole 117). In one exemplary embodiment, after receiving the predetermined signal 400, the receiver 540 switches to a power-off state. Thus, the receiver 540 and the MAP 125 are mutually exclusive, in that when one is powered, the other is not.
  • In further embodiments of the present invention, the predetermined signal 400 may be transmitted from other sources as a result of other conditions in the WLAN 105. For example, in one exemplary embodiment, the AP (e.g., AP 110, a further AP, a dumb access port) may transmit the predetermined signal 400 as a result of a predetermined event, such as, for example, an increased amount of communications which exceeds a capacity of the AP, if the AP detects a malfunction (e.g., wired connection ceases working), or if the AP requests assistance from the further AP (or any other wireless device) for a diagnostic of itself. The above examples of the predetermined event for transmission of the predetermined signal 400 are illustrative thereof, and those of skill in the art will understand that various other examples may be contemplated which remain within the scope of the present invention.
  • In step 210, the MAP 125 switches from the FCM to the SCM. As noted above, the MAP 125 may remain in the SCM until no MUs are associated therewith. While in the SCM, the MAP 125 is configured to relay transmissions between devices in the WLAN 105, particularly devices within the further coverage area 130 (e.g., MU 120 to AP 110, and vice-versa).
  • In step 215, the MAP 125 establishes the connection to the WLAN 105. In one embodiment, as described above, the MAP 125 may transmit the beacon received from the AP 110 to the MU 120, connecting the MU 120 to the WLAN 105. In a further embodiment, the MAP 125 transmits the notification signal to the server 112 via the AP 110. The notification signal, as stated above, may indicate that the coverage gap exists where the MU 120 is located. In yet a further embodiment, the predetermined signal 400 may have contained data. In this embodiment, the MAP 125 transmits the predetermined signal 400 to the AP 110, and, then, transmits beacons to the MU 110. In the cases where the AP 110, the further AP or the dumb access port transmitted the predetermined signal 400, the MAP 125, after switching to the SCM, may further operate as a conventional AP.
  • A further exemplary embodiment of a method 300 according to the present invention is shown in FIG. 3. The method 300 may be implemented in hardware or software, and executed by a processor in any device which requires the MAP 125 (or any device connected to the receiver 540) to switch to the SCM (e.g., due to disconnection from the WLAN 105, surge in traffic, malfunction, aided diagnostic, etc.). Although the method 300 will be described with reference to the MU 120, those of skill in the art would understand that the method 300 may be executed by any wireless device (e.g., AP, MU, etc.) with transmission capability.
  • In step 305, the MU 120 detects the disconnection from the WLAN 105 based on one or more predetermined criteria. For example, the criteria may be one or more missed beacons from the AP 110, one or more upper layer protocol timeouts (e.g., TCP timeouts), one or more failed transmissions, etc.
  • In step 310, the MU 120 determines whether the predetermined signal 400 has been previously broadcast on or transmitted over the radio channel. In this manner, the MU 120 may use an energy detection mechanism (e.g., one of a plurality of conventional clear channel assessment (“CCA”) modes) to detect energy in the channel. The MU 120 may detect the energy in the channel for a predetermined duration which is preferably long enough to determine if the predetermined signal 400 has been transmitted over or broadcast on the channel, or if the receiver 540 has received the predetermined signal 540. The use of the energy detection mechanism may prevent corruption of the predetermined signal 400 previously transmitted on the channel by preventing multiple MUs disconnected from the WLAN 105 from transmitting their own predetermined signal 400. As understood by those skilled in the art, detecting the in-channel energy may be optional for the MU 120. That is, once the MU 120 detects the disconnection, it may automatically transmit/broadcast the predetermined signal 400 without detecting the in-channel energy.
  • In step 315, the predetermined signal 400 has not been transmitted/broadcast on the channel, and, thus, the MU 120 transmits/broadcasts the predetermined signal 400. In one exemplary embodiment, the receiver 540 hears the predetermined signal 400, and the MAP 125 switches from the FCM to the SCM, which has been described above. In a further exemplary embodiment, it is possible that the MU 120 connects to the WLAN 105 via the AP 110 or the further AP. In this manner, the MU 120 may be moving within the space, lose the connection at a first position, and reestablish the connection at a second position. For example, the MU 120 may move to an area of the warehouse which is outside of the coverage area 115, thereby temporarily disconnecting from the WLAN 105 (e.g., in the coverage gap). However, the MU 120 may be in the coverage gap only temporarily and reconnect to the WLAN 105 via the further AP (e.g., conventional AP) within a short time. Thus, upon reconnecting to the WLAN 105 via the further AP, the MU 120 and/or the further AP may transmit a message to the server 112 indicating that the MU 120 has been reconnected and that the MAP 125 may remain in or switch back to the FCM. Therefore, the server 112 may distinguish between the coverage gaps in the WLAN 105 and/or adjust operation of the WLAN 105 accordingly (i.e., no chance of reconnection, low chance of reconnection, transient). For example, the coverage gap with ‘no chance of reconnection’ or ‘low chance of reconnection’ may warrant deployment of a conventional AP (wired or wireless) therein or may require that the MAP 125 remain in the SCM. Whereas, the ‘transient’ coverage gap may simply warrant a power adjustment (e.g., to manipulate a coverage area) of the AP in the WLAN 105.
  • In step 320, either the predetermined signal 400 has been previously transmitted/broadcast on the channel (step 310) or the MU 120 has transmitted/broadcast the predetermined signal 400 thereon (step 315). Thus, the MU 120 may receive the beacon from the AP 110 via the MAP 125, reestablishing the connection to the WLAN 105 (step 325). According to the present invention, the user of the MU 120 and/or the server 112 may be notified of the disconnection from and/or the connection to the WLAN 105. For example, while in the coverage area 115, the MU 120 may include a display/message which indicates that the MU 120 is connected to the WLAN 105. Furthermore, the server 112 may have knowledge of those devices (APs, MAPs, MUs, etc.) which are connected to the WLAN 105. Upon exiting from the coverage area 115 (or powering on in the coverage gap), the display/message may indicate a disconnection from the WLAN 105. As understood by those of skill in the art, the server 112 may recognize when a device previously connected to the WLAN 105 loses the connection (e.g., in the coverage gap, malfunction, etc.), but may not recognize the disconnection if the device (e.g., the MU 120) is powered on in the coverage gap.
  • After the MU 120 is connected to the WLAN 105, it may communicate with any devices connected thereto. For example, the MU 120 may transmit the inventory data to the AP 110 via the MAP 125. With a connection to the AP 110, the MU 120 may further communicate with the server 112 and further MUs connected to the WLAN 105. As described above, once the MAP 125 is in the SCM, it may simply retransmit received signals between wireless devices (e.g., MU 120 to AP 110, and vice-versa).
  • In a further exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the AP 110 may transmit the predetermined signal 400 to the receiver 540 attached to the MAP 125. In this manner, the AP 110 may attempt to expand the coverage area 115 to devices not previously therein. Those of skill in the art would understand that this embodiment may be useful for many applications, such as, for example asset tag (e.g., RFID tag) wakeup. That is, the AP 110 may interrogate the asset tag via the MAP 125. This embodiment may be initiated by the server 112, any AP or any MU.
  • It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made in the present invention, without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Thus, it is intended that the present invention cover the modifications and variations of this invention provided they come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.

Claims (22)

1. A system, comprising:
a first wireless device including a first wireless transceiver;
a second wireless device including a second wireless transceiver, the second wireless device having a first communication mode and a second communication mode, the second wireless transceiver conducting wireless communications with the first wireless transceiver using a predetermined wireless communication protocol only when the second wireless device is in the first communication mode, the second wireless transceiver being in a low-power state when in the second communication mode; and
an envelope detection arrangement coupled to the second device, the arrangement screening radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence, the signal being generated according to the predetermined wireless communication protocol,
wherein, when the arrangement receives the signal, the arrangement causes the second wireless device to switch into the first communication mode.
2. The system according to claim 1, wherein the arrangement includes at least one of a signal strength indicator and an AM demodulator.
3. The system according to claim 1, wherein the signal has at least one temporal characteristic.
4. The system according to claim 1, wherein the predetermined wireless communication protocol is an IEEE 802.11 protocol.
5. The system according to claim 3, wherein the temporal characteristic includes at least one of an 802.11 packet and a time interval.
6. The system according to claim 1, wherein the first wireless device generates and transmits the signal only when the first wireless device failed to connect to a third wireless device which communicates with the first wireless device according to the predetermined wireless communication protocol.
7. The system according to claim 6, wherein, when the second wireless device is in the first communication mode, the second wireless device is a wireless bridge between the first wireless device and the third wireless device.
8. The system according to claim 7, wherein, once the first wireless device directly connects to the third wireless device, the second wireless device switches from the first communication mode to the second communication mode.
9. The system according to claim 1, wherein the second wireless device is a battery-powered device.
10. The system according to claim 9, wherein, when a power level of the battery reaches a predetermined value, the second wireless device transmits a corresponding further signal to one of the first wireless device and a third wireless device.
11. A method, comprising:
screening, by an envelope detection arrangement, radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence, the signal being generated according to a predetermined wireless communication protocol, the arrangement coupled to a first wireless device including a first wireless transceiver, the first wireless device having a first communication mode and a second communication mode, the first wireless transceiver conducting wireless communications with a second wireless transceiver of a second wireless device using the predetermined wireless communication protocol only when the first wireless device is in the first communication mode, the first wireless transceiver being in a low-power state when in the second communication mode; and
when the arrangement receives the signal, switching the first wireless device into the first communication mode.
12. The method according to claim 11, wherein the arrangement includes at least one of a signal strength indicator and an AM demodulator.
13. The method according to claim 11, wherein the signal has at least one temporal characteristic.
14. The method according to claim 11, wherein the predetermined wireless communication protocol is an IEEE 802.11 protocol.
15. The method according to claim 13, wherein the temporal characteristic includes at least one of an 802.11 packet and a time interval.
16. The method according to claim 11, further comprising:
generating, by the second wireless device, the signal only when the second wireless device failed to connect to a third wireless device which communicates with the second wireless device according to the predetermined wireless communication protocol; and
transmitting, by the second wireless device, the signal.
17. The method according to claim 16, further comprising:
when the first wireless device is in the first communication mode, acting as a wireless bridge between the second wireless device and the third wireless device.
18. The method according to claim 17, further comprising:
when the second wireless device directly connects to the third wireless device, switching the first wireless device from the first communication mode to the second communication mode.
19. The method according to claim 11, wherein the first wireless device is a battery-powered device.
20. The method according to claim 19, further comprising:
when a power level of the battery reaches a predetermined value, transmitting, by the first wireless device, a corresponding further signal to one of the second wireless device and a third wireless device.
21. A system, comprising:
a mobile computing unit;
a first access point conducting wireless communications with the mobile computing unit according to a predetermined wireless communication protocol;
a second access point having a first communication mode and a second communication mode, the second access point conducting wireless communications using the predetermined wireless communication protocol only in the first communication mode, the second access point being in a low-power state in the second communication mode; and
an envelope detection arrangement coupled to the second access point, the arrangement screening radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence, the signal being generated by the mobile computing unit and according to the predetermined wireless communication protocol,
wherein, when the arrangement receives the signal, the arrangement causes the second access point to switch into the first communication mode in order to act as a wireless bridge between the mobile computing unit and the first wireless access point.
22. A wireless device, comprising:
a transceiver conducting wireless communications according to a predetermined wireless protocol;
a battery supplying power to the wireless device; and
an envelope detection arrangement screening radio frequency signals for a signal having a predetermined envelope sequence, the signal generated according to the predetermined wireless protocol,
wherein, the device has a first communication mode and a second communication mode, the device conducting the wireless communications only when in the first communication mode, the device being in a low-power battery state in the second communication mode, and
wherein, when the arrangement receives the signal, the arrangement causes the device to switch into the first communication mode.
US11/137,003 2005-05-25 2005-05-25 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment Abandoned US20060270412A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/137,003 US20060270412A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2005-05-25 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/137,003 US20060270412A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2005-05-25 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment
CN 200680026658 CN101228740A (en) 2005-05-25 2006-04-11 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment
EP06740829A EP1884068A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2006-04-11 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment
PCT/US2006/013357 WO2006127154A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2006-04-11 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment
CA002609370A CA2609370A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2006-04-11 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060270412A1 true US20060270412A1 (en) 2006-11-30

Family

ID=36698873

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/137,003 Abandoned US20060270412A1 (en) 2005-05-25 2005-05-25 System and method for resilient coverage in a wireless environment

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US20060270412A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1884068A1 (en)
CN (1) CN101228740A (en)
CA (1) CA2609370A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006127154A1 (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070025287A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Goren David P Method and system for determining existence of a predetermined wireless network coverage condition in a wireless network
US20070026818A1 (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-01 Willins Bruce A Signal detection arrangement
US20070124367A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-05-31 Guoxin Fan Integrated Mobile Diagnostics and Electronic Customer Care Test Script with Browser
US20080132249A1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2008-06-05 Palm, Inc. Local caching of map data based on carrier coverage data
US20100057904A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-04 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Device managing apparatus, device managing method, and computer-readable recording medium for the device managing method
US20100080134A1 (en) * 2007-01-31 2010-04-01 Nanoradio Ab Background scanning method for wlan client devices
US20120040703A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2012-02-16 Kunihiro Kawase Broadcasting method, access control apparatus and radio apparatus
US20140029450A1 (en) * 2012-07-27 2014-01-30 Clark Alan Vitek Adaptive Antenna Pattern Management for Wireless Local Area Networks
US20140187272A1 (en) * 2012-12-27 2014-07-03 Jaroslaw J. Sydir Cellular network scanning control based on ambient identifiable wireless signal sources
WO2017078954A1 (en) * 2015-11-02 2017-05-11 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. System and method for mapping wireless network coverage
US20170163815A1 (en) * 2010-10-12 2017-06-08 United Services Automobile Association (Usaa) Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for transferring or recovering a communication between a number of participants

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8867667B2 (en) * 2011-04-04 2014-10-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems and methods for monitoring a wireless network

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3990011A (en) * 1975-09-10 1976-11-02 Rockwell International Corporation Method and apparatus for determining AM modulation factor
US5924022A (en) * 1995-09-15 1999-07-13 Pcs Microcell International RF repeater for TDMA mobile telephone systems
US5937332A (en) * 1997-03-21 1999-08-10 Ericsson, Inc. Satellite telecommunications repeaters and retransmission methods
US6272120B1 (en) * 1997-01-28 2001-08-07 Cisco Technology, Inc. Multi-radio bridge
US20010041551A1 (en) * 1993-07-15 2001-11-15 Micron Communications, Inc. Wake up device for a communications system
US20020068618A1 (en) * 2000-07-24 2002-06-06 Shoobridge Richard Allen Wireless access point software system
US20030013474A1 (en) * 1999-07-06 2003-01-16 Hiep Pham Implementation of power control in a wireless overlay network
US20040023680A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-05 Hulvey Robert W. Dual-mode clock for improved power management in a wireless device
US6735417B2 (en) * 2002-08-15 2004-05-11 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for relaying information in an AD-HOC network
US20050047361A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-03-03 Max Fudim Method and apparatus of secure roaming

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR100958926B1 (en) 2003-07-23 2010-05-19 주식회사 케이티 wireless internet access repeater and method thereof

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3990011A (en) * 1975-09-10 1976-11-02 Rockwell International Corporation Method and apparatus for determining AM modulation factor
US20010041551A1 (en) * 1993-07-15 2001-11-15 Micron Communications, Inc. Wake up device for a communications system
US5924022A (en) * 1995-09-15 1999-07-13 Pcs Microcell International RF repeater for TDMA mobile telephone systems
US6272120B1 (en) * 1997-01-28 2001-08-07 Cisco Technology, Inc. Multi-radio bridge
US5937332A (en) * 1997-03-21 1999-08-10 Ericsson, Inc. Satellite telecommunications repeaters and retransmission methods
US20030013474A1 (en) * 1999-07-06 2003-01-16 Hiep Pham Implementation of power control in a wireless overlay network
US20020068618A1 (en) * 2000-07-24 2002-06-06 Shoobridge Richard Allen Wireless access point software system
US20040023680A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-05 Hulvey Robert W. Dual-mode clock for improved power management in a wireless device
US6735417B2 (en) * 2002-08-15 2004-05-11 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for relaying information in an AD-HOC network
US20050047361A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-03-03 Max Fudim Method and apparatus of secure roaming

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070025287A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Goren David P Method and system for determining existence of a predetermined wireless network coverage condition in a wireless network
US7437127B2 (en) * 2005-07-28 2008-10-14 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Method and system for determining existence of a predetermined wireless network coverage condition in a wireless network
US20070026818A1 (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-01 Willins Bruce A Signal detection arrangement
US20070124367A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-05-31 Guoxin Fan Integrated Mobile Diagnostics and Electronic Customer Care Test Script with Browser
US20080132249A1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2008-06-05 Palm, Inc. Local caching of map data based on carrier coverage data
WO2008070400A3 (en) * 2006-12-05 2008-08-07 Palm Inc Local caching of map data based on carrier coverage data
US9125140B2 (en) * 2007-01-31 2015-09-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Background scanning method for WLAN client devices
US20100080134A1 (en) * 2007-01-31 2010-04-01 Nanoradio Ab Background scanning method for wlan client devices
KR101473503B1 (en) 2007-01-31 2014-12-16 삼성전자주식회사 Background scanning method for wlan client devices
US8943192B2 (en) * 2008-09-04 2015-01-27 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Device managing apparatus, device managing method, and computer-readable recording medium for the device managing method
US20100057904A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-04 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Device managing apparatus, device managing method, and computer-readable recording medium for the device managing method
US20120040703A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2012-02-16 Kunihiro Kawase Broadcasting method, access control apparatus and radio apparatus
US10015320B2 (en) * 2010-10-12 2018-07-03 United Services Automobile Association (Usaa) Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for transferring or recovering a communication between a number of participants
US20170163815A1 (en) * 2010-10-12 2017-06-08 United Services Automobile Association (Usaa) Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for transferring or recovering a communication between a number of participants
US9456357B2 (en) * 2012-07-27 2016-09-27 Aruba Networks, Inc. Adaptive antenna pattern management for wireless local area networks
US20140029450A1 (en) * 2012-07-27 2014-01-30 Clark Alan Vitek Adaptive Antenna Pattern Management for Wireless Local Area Networks
US9526083B2 (en) * 2012-12-27 2016-12-20 Intel Corporation Cellular network scanning control based on ambient identifiable wireless signal sources
US20140187272A1 (en) * 2012-12-27 2014-07-03 Jaroslaw J. Sydir Cellular network scanning control based on ambient identifiable wireless signal sources
US9888390B2 (en) 2015-11-02 2018-02-06 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. System and method for mapping wireless network coverage
WO2017078954A1 (en) * 2015-11-02 2017-05-11 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. System and method for mapping wireless network coverage
GB2560118A (en) * 2015-11-02 2018-08-29 Walmart Apollo Llc System and method for mapping wireless network coverage
US10264470B2 (en) 2015-11-02 2019-04-16 Walmart Apollo, Llc System and method for mapping wireless network coverage

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2006127154A1 (en) 2006-11-30
CA2609370A1 (en) 2006-11-30
EP1884068A1 (en) 2008-02-06
CN101228740A (en) 2008-07-23

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8102798B2 (en) Method and apparatus for managing scanning in wireless computing devices to reduce power consumption
US6907229B2 (en) Enhancing wireless LAN capacity using transmission power control
TWI551167B (en) For wireless transmission of a beacon report transmit receive unit and method of use
US7489661B2 (en) Dynamic transmit power configuration system for wireless network environments
US6563427B2 (en) Proximity monitoring communication system
EP1889407B1 (en) Beacon transmission for wireless networks
KR100754301B1 (en) Access point initiated forced roaming based upon bandwidth
US7359362B2 (en) Control of a multi-sectored antenna system to improve channel efficiency
US7346358B2 (en) Logical boundaries in communications networks
Kellogg et al. Wi-Fi backscatter: Internet connectivity for RF-powered devices
CN104812101B (en) Wireless telecom equipment, wireless communication system, wireless communications method and program
US7095748B2 (en) Bridging apparatus for interconnecting a wireless PAN and a wireless LAN
US8310978B2 (en) Wireless communication system, wireless communication device and wireless communication method, and computer program
EP3110229B1 (en) Encoded information reading terminal with wireless path selection capability
US7881273B2 (en) Wireless communication system, wireless communication apparatus, wireless communication method, and computer program
US7843807B2 (en) Fault reporting tag for mesh access points
US20060258395A1 (en) Integrated circuit for optimizing access point channel selection
EP2517505B1 (en) Method and system for discoverability of power saving p2p devices
US20040038707A1 (en) Power management method and apparatus of wireless local area network module in computer system
US8774041B2 (en) Proximity-based wireless handshaking for connection establishment
JP3796200B2 (en) Wireless communication system and switching method
US20070123263A1 (en) Distributed multi-beam wireless system
US7215976B2 (en) RFID device, system and method of operation including a hybrid backscatter-based RFID tag protocol compatible with RFID, bluetooth and/or IEEE 802.11x infrastructure
US8320288B2 (en) Communication system, communication apparatus and communication method, and computer program
CA2452744C (en) Mobile communication terminal, server, communication system, communication control method, and communication control program

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WILLINS, BRUCE A.;WANG, HUAYAN AMY;BERITSKY, BENJAMIN;REEL/FRAME:016730/0971;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050615 TO 20050617

AS Assignment

Owner name: SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., NEW YORK

Free format text: IN RESPONSE TO DOCUMENT ID NO.; 103190561 CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT ASSIGNOR'S NAME REEL/FRAME NO.;ASSIGNORS:WILLINS, BRUCE A.;WANG, HUAYAN AMY;BERITSKY, BENJAMIN;REEL/FRAME:017986/0871;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050615 TO 20050617

AS Assignment

Owner name: SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., NEW YORK

Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT TO THE 3RD ASSIGNOR'S NAME, PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL 017986 FRAME 0871;ASSIGNORS:WILLINS, BRUCE A.;WANG, HUAYAN AMY;BEKRITSKY, BENJAMIN;REEL/FRAME:018412/0884;SIGNING DATES FROM 20060615 TO 20060617

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION