US20060227513A1 - Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines - Google Patents

Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060227513A1
US20060227513A1 US11153788 US15378805A US2006227513A1 US 20060227513 A1 US20060227513 A1 US 20060227513A1 US 11153788 US11153788 US 11153788 US 15378805 A US15378805 A US 15378805A US 2006227513 A1 US2006227513 A1 US 2006227513A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
valve
including
method
device
apparatus
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11153788
Inventor
Terry Dishongh
Jason Cassezza
Kevin Rhodes
Bradford Needham
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Intel Corp
Original Assignee
Intel Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L23/00Details of semiconductor or other solid state devices
    • H01L23/34Arrangements for cooling, heating, ventilating or temperature compensation ; Temperature sensing arrangements
    • H01L23/46Arrangements for cooling, heating, ventilating or temperature compensation ; Temperature sensing arrangements involving the transfer of heat by flowing fluids
    • H01L23/473Arrangements for cooling, heating, ventilating or temperature compensation ; Temperature sensing arrangements involving the transfer of heat by flowing fluids by flowing liquids
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F19/00Preventing the formation of deposits or corrosion, e.g. by using filters or scrapers
    • F28F19/002Preventing the formation of deposits or corrosion, e.g. by using filters or scrapers by using inserts or attachments
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F27/00Control arrangements or safety devices specially adapted for heat-exchange or heat-transfer apparatus
    • F28F27/02Control arrangements or safety devices specially adapted for heat-exchange or heat-transfer apparatus for controlling the distribution of heat-exchange media between different channels
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F3/00Plate-like or laminated elements; Assemblies of plate-like or laminated elements
    • F28F3/12Elements constructed in the shape of a hollow panel, e.g. with channels
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/0001Technical content checked by a classifier
    • H01L2924/0002Not covered by any one of groups H01L24/00, H01L24/00 and H01L2224/00

Abstract

A therapeutic agent may be dispensed into a biological fluid on an as needed basis. A microelectromechanical system valve may dispense the therapeutic agent as needed. The valve may sense the extent of the need for the therapeutic agent and may controllably open to provide that therapeutic agent in response thereto.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/103,216, filed Apr. 11, 2005.
  • BACKGROUND
  • This invention relates generally to microelectromechanical systems used in biological applications.
  • Semiconductor fabricated machines of extremely small dimensions have potential medical applications. For example, microelectronic machines may be provided within external apparatus for the control of patient treatment. In addition, microelectronic mechanical systems may be sufficiently small that they may be implanted in situ to provide patient treatment.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a greatly enlarged, cross-sectional view in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged, cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view corresponding to FIG. 1 in use in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 4-4 in FIG. 1 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 5-5 in FIG. 1 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view corresponding to FIG. 1 at an early stage of manufacture in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view corresponding to FIG. 6 at a subsequent stage of manufacture in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 8 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view corresponding to FIG. 7 at a subsequent stage of manufacture in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to FIG. 1, an apparatus 10 may be implanted within a patient or may be external to the patient. Fluid, indicated as A, may flow in and through the device 10. For example, the flow of fluid A may be a flow of blood which is to be treated with appropriate therapeutic agents. The therapeutic agents, indicated as B, may flow from the passage 14 a under control of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) leaf valve 16. In other words, the valve 16 controls the flow of fluid B from the channel 14 a into the channel 14 b and thereby regulates the therapeutic treatment.
  • In one embodiment, the apparatus 10 may be made in two parts, including an upper part 12 b and a lower part 12 a. The two parts 12 may be permanently joined along the junction surface 12 c in one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, the part 12 b may have a passage 14 a formed therein to allow the passage of the fluid B while the part 12 a may have the passage 14 b formed in it. The parts 12 a and 12 b may be fabricated using semiconductor fabrication techniques in some embodiments of the present invention. The passages 14 b and 14 a may be formed by conventional lithographic techniques in one embodiment.
  • Controlling the communication between the passages 14 a and 14 b, a leaf valve 16 includes a first portion 16 a secured to the part 12 b and a second portion 16 b cantilevered over the passage 14 a in the part 12 a. Also formed on the surface 12 c and, particularly, in one embodiment, the outside surface of the part 12 b, are a plurality of roughenings or fluidic trips 18. At least some of the trips 18 may be located on the surface 12 c proximate to the passage 14 a.
  • The trips 18 function to create turbulent flow at the interface between the passages 14 a and 14 b. The turbulent fluidic flow assists in mixing the two fluids A and B. Thus, the flow of biological fluid to be treated, indicated at A, may be treated with the liquid, indicated at B, through a mixing action facilitated by the trips 18, especially when the valve 16 is opened.
  • The valve 16 may be formed of a flexible, multilayer structure. The lowest layer may include aluminum covered by copper 22. The layers 24 and 22 have different coefficients of thermal expansion in some embodiments and, therefore, may bend in controllable ways in response to heating. For example, the makeup of layers 22 and 24 may be similar to that used in switches for thermostat control.
  • Over the layer 22 may be situated a polymer layer 20 having formed therein with a coated inert particles such as glass beads 26. Some of the glass beads 26 extend out of the surface of the layer 20, as indicated at 26 a, and others are intermeshed within the polymer as indicated at 26 b. The glass beads 26 may function as carriers for biological agents. Structures other than glass beads may also be used.
  • The glass beads 26 may be coated with an appropriate functionalizing material which, in one embodiment, includes reactive components, such as free radicals, to react with passing molecules. For example, the glass beads 26 functionalized with a protein streptavidin may be coated with a layer including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In other words, the glass beads 26 a may be coated with an appropriate material having free reactive radicals to react with passing molecules. In one embodiment, this means that materials in the blood, passing through the passage 14 b, may react and adhere to the exposed glass beads 26 a. The glass beads 26 may be considered bioactive glass beads which are receptive to bio-agents, such as proteins, which attach to the free radicals on the glass beads 26 a i n one embodiment. “Bioactive” encompasses any material that may have an effect on any living tissue.
  • As one application, an in vitro delivery of medication may be made to blood passing through the apparatus 10, passage 14 a. A species within the passing blood may react with the bioactive glass beads 26 a that are exposed on the valve 16. The reactive constituents adhere to the glass beads 26 a and more, particularly, to a reactive coating on the beads 26 c.
  • Thus, in one embodiment, shown in FIG. 3, the reactive constituents in the blood collect on the surface of the valve 16 as indicated at C. The weight of these constituents pulls the valve 16 open by hingedly rotating the valve portion 16 b in a cantilevered fashion downwardly and away from the passage 14 a, still secured at portion 16 a, to the part 12 b. As shown in FIG. 3, as a result of the action of the fluidic trips 18, turbulent flow is generated, as indicated by the arrows D, facilitating the mixing of the fluid B in the passage 14 a with the fluid A in the passage 14 b.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, the passage 14 a, in one embodiment, may be a circular portion 14 e that includes a connecting portion 14 d which connects to a source of therapeutic agent. Proximate to the downstream edge of the passage 14 a may be the fluidic trips 18. In some embodiments, the fluidic trips 18 may cover the entire exposed surface 12 c of the portion 12 b.
  • Referring to FIG. 5, the part 12 a may include the passage 14 b formed therein. The passage 14 b may be a trench aligned with the circular portion 14 e of the passage 14 a.
  • Referring to FIGS. 6-8, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, the apparatus 10 may be fabricated in an inverted fashion beginning in FIG. 6. There, a substrate, forming the part 12 b, may have a passage 14 a formed therein. The passage 14 a may be filled with a material 30 which may be relatively easily removed, for example, by exposure to heat.
  • Over the material 30 and the part 12 b may be deposited a layer that will form the valve 16. The layer that will form the valve 16 is then patterned and etched to form the portion 16 a adhered to the part 12 b and the portion 16 b which, at this point, is still adhered to the material 30 that fills the passage 14 a.
  • In one embodiment, the trips 18 may be formed as incompletely removed portions of the layer that forms the valve 16. In such case, the trips 18, which may be surface roughenings, may extend across the upper exposed surface 12 c of the part 12 b at the stage shown in FIG. 7. In other embodiments, after etching and defining the valve 16, a coating (not shown) may be applied thereover which is sufficiently rough to form the trips 18. In still another embodiment, that coating may be partially removed by etching, leaving residue which acts as the trips 18.
  • Then, as shown in FIG. 8, the material 30 may be removed by conventional techniques including the application of heat and the removal by decomposition of the material 30. An example of such a material is a polymer such as polycarbonate and polynorbornene. This forms the open passage 14 a, better shown in FIG. 4. This removal also frees the free cantilevered end portion 16 b of the valve 16 to be movable into the passage 14 b. Then, the two parts 12 b and 12 a may be secured together using adhesive or other techniques. As a result, the passage 14 b can receive fluids, indicated as A, and mix into those fluids, the fluid B in the passage 14 a.
  • In some embodiments, the reaction between the treatment agent and the biological fluid may be controlled on an as needed basis. In other words, instead of simply flooding the body with extra treatment agents, such as drugs, that amount of therapeutic agent may be provided which is actually needed. As a result, the body is free from being exposed to excessive concentrations of the treatment agents in some embodiments. In addition, under-treatment may be reduced as well in some embodiments. Thus, in some embodiments, just the right amount of therapeutic agents may be provided.
  • While the present invention has been described with respect to a limited number of embodiments, those skilled in the art will appreciate numerous modifications and variations therefrom. It is intended that the appended claims cover all such modifications and variations as fall within the true spirit and scope of this present invention.

Claims (27)

  1. 1. A method comprising:
    providing a microelectromechanical system valve to sense the need to dispense a therapeutic agent.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 including forming a microelectromechanical system valve in the form of a leaf valve.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 including forming a depression in a first substrate and forming said valve over said depression.
  4. 4. The method of claim 3 including forming a trench through a second substrate and securing said first substrate and said second substrate together.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 including providing fluidic trips to form turbulent flow proximate to said valve to mix fluid controlled by said valve.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5 including forming said valve with a bioactive material.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6 including forming a bimetal valve.
  8. 8. The method of claim 6 including forming a polymer layer on said valve, said polymer layer including inert particles.
  9. 9. The method of claim 8 including functionalizing said inert particles.
  10. 10. The method of claim 9 including arranging said valve to be actuated in response to a chemical reaction with material on said inert particles.
  11. 11. A dispensing device comprising:
    a first flow passage;
    a second flow passage; and
    a microelectromechanical system valve to control the flow of fluid from one passage to the other, said system including fluidic trips to cause turbulent flow and mixing the fluids from said first and second flow passages.
  12. 12. The device of claim 11 wherein said valve is a leaf valve.
  13. 13. The device of claim 12 including a pair of substrates, said first flow passage formed in one substrate and said second flow passage formed in the other substrate and said valve formed between said substrates.
  14. 14. The device of claim 11 wherein said valve includes a bioactive material.
  15. 15. The device of claim 11 wherein said valve is a bimetal valve.
  16. 16. The device of claim 15 wherein said valve includes a bioactive material.
  17. 17. The device of claim 14 including a polymer layer and said bioactive material is embedded in said polymer layer.
  18. 18. The device of claim 17 including inert particles embedded in said polymer layer, said inert particles including a reactive material coated on said particles.
  19. 19. The device of claim 14 wherein said valve is operable in response to the extent of reactions with said bioactive material.
  20. 20. An apparatus comprising:
    a pair of passages;
    a valve to selectively control the extent of communication between said passages, said valve including a bioactive material, said valve operable in response to chemical reactions with said bioactive material.
  21. 21. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein said valve is a leaf valve.
  22. 22. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein said valve is a microelectromechanical system valve.
  23. 23. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein said valve includes a layer having a coating of bioactive material.
  24. 24. The apparatus of claim 23 wherein said layer includes inert particles having a bioactive coating thereon.
  25. 25. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein said inert particles are in the form of glass beads.
  26. 26. The apparatus of claim 25 including a polymer layer and wherein said glass beads are embedded in said polymer layer.
  27. 27. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein reactions with said bioactive material open said valve when sufficient accumulation occurs on said valve to pull said valve open.
US11153788 2005-04-11 2005-06-15 Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines Abandoned US20060227513A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11103216 US7652372B2 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-04-11 Microfluidic cooling of integrated circuits
US11153788 US20060227513A1 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-06-15 Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11153788 US20060227513A1 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-06-15 Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11103216 Continuation-In-Part US7652372B2 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-04-11 Microfluidic cooling of integrated circuits

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060227513A1 true true US20060227513A1 (en) 2006-10-12

Family

ID=37082939

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11103216 Active 2027-08-20 US7652372B2 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-04-11 Microfluidic cooling of integrated circuits
US11153788 Abandoned US20060227513A1 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-06-15 Controlling biological fluids in microelectromechanical machines

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11103216 Active 2027-08-20 US7652372B2 (en) 2005-04-11 2005-04-11 Microfluidic cooling of integrated circuits

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US7652372B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1869703A1 (en)
JP (1) JP4966962B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2006110903A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070113907A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2007-05-24 Reid Brennen Devices and methods using fluid-transporting features of differing dwell times
WO2010117874A3 (en) * 2009-04-05 2011-01-20 Microstaq, Inc. Method and structure for optimizing heat exchanger performance
CN101906378A (en) * 2010-07-05 2010-12-08 博奥生物有限公司;清华大学 Bubble micro valve and bubble micro valve-based micro-fluidic chip
DE102011100706A1 (en) * 2011-05-06 2012-11-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC (n. d. Gesetzen des Staates Delaware) Adjustable heat exchanger for a motor vehicle air conditioning
CN103087915B (en) * 2013-01-10 2015-04-22 中国科学院深圳先进技术研究院 Bubble eliminating device for high-throughput microfluidics cell chip and operation method thereof
JP5534067B1 (en) * 2013-03-06 2014-06-25 日本電気株式会社 Electronic components, and an electronic component cooling method
US9510478B2 (en) 2013-06-20 2016-11-29 Honeywell International Inc. Cooling device including etched lateral microchannels
FR3010830B1 (en) 2013-09-17 2016-12-23 Commissariat Energie Atomique Device for cooling an integrated circuit chip
CN103824826B (en) * 2014-02-21 2017-01-04 电子科技大学 A micro flow channel cooling method

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5316077A (en) * 1992-12-09 1994-05-31 Eaton Corporation Heat sink for electrical circuit components
US5441597A (en) * 1992-12-01 1995-08-15 Honeywell Inc. Microstructure gas valve control forming method
US5535818A (en) * 1992-10-12 1996-07-16 Fujitsu Limited Cooling system for electronic device
US20020068295A1 (en) * 2000-07-13 2002-06-06 Marc Madou Multimeric biopolymers as structural elements and sensors and actuators in microsystems
US6406260B1 (en) * 1999-10-22 2002-06-18 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. Heat transfer promotion structure for internally convectively cooled airfoils
US20030124627A1 (en) * 2001-11-29 2003-07-03 Burmer Glenna C. Diagnostic and therapeutic compositions and methods related to chemokine (C motif ) XC receptor 1 (CCXCR1), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)
US6590267B1 (en) * 2000-09-14 2003-07-08 Mcnc Microelectromechanical flexible membrane electrostatic valve device and related fabrication methods
US7544207B2 (en) * 2004-10-06 2009-06-09 Cook Incorporated Medical device with bioactive agent

Family Cites Families (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4022240A (en) * 1974-08-22 1977-05-10 The Perkin-Elmer Corporation Slide valve sealant system
US4989070A (en) * 1988-11-10 1991-01-29 Coriolis Corporation Modular heat sink structure
US6227809B1 (en) * 1995-03-09 2001-05-08 University Of Washington Method for making micropumps
US7015047B2 (en) * 2001-01-26 2006-03-21 Aviva Biosciences Corporation Microdevices having a preferential axis of magnetization and uses thereof
US6520477B2 (en) * 2001-02-01 2003-02-18 William Trimmer Micro pump
WO2003013008A3 (en) * 2001-08-01 2003-06-05 Voyant Technologies Inc Ocal exchange subscriber line conferencing method
US7025323B2 (en) * 2001-09-21 2006-04-11 The Regents Of The University Of California Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems
US6942018B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2005-09-13 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Electroosmotic microchannel cooling system
US6877528B2 (en) * 2002-04-17 2005-04-12 Cytonome, Inc. Microfluidic system including a bubble valve for regulating fluid flow through a microchannel
JP2003336949A (en) * 2002-05-17 2003-11-28 Yamatake Corp Refrigerant moving device and cooling device
US6679279B1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-20 Motorola, Inc. Fluidic valve having a bi-phase valve element
US7338637B2 (en) * 2003-01-31 2008-03-04 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Microfluidic device with thin-film electronic devices
JP2004289049A (en) 2003-03-25 2004-10-14 Seiko Instruments Inc Heat transport device and portable electronic equipment with the device
JP2004295718A (en) * 2003-03-28 2004-10-21 Hitachi Ltd Liquid cooling system for information processor

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5535818A (en) * 1992-10-12 1996-07-16 Fujitsu Limited Cooling system for electronic device
US5441597A (en) * 1992-12-01 1995-08-15 Honeywell Inc. Microstructure gas valve control forming method
US5316077A (en) * 1992-12-09 1994-05-31 Eaton Corporation Heat sink for electrical circuit components
US6406260B1 (en) * 1999-10-22 2002-06-18 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. Heat transfer promotion structure for internally convectively cooled airfoils
US20020068295A1 (en) * 2000-07-13 2002-06-06 Marc Madou Multimeric biopolymers as structural elements and sensors and actuators in microsystems
US6590267B1 (en) * 2000-09-14 2003-07-08 Mcnc Microelectromechanical flexible membrane electrostatic valve device and related fabrication methods
US20030124627A1 (en) * 2001-11-29 2003-07-03 Burmer Glenna C. Diagnostic and therapeutic compositions and methods related to chemokine (C motif ) XC receptor 1 (CCXCR1), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)
US7544207B2 (en) * 2004-10-06 2009-06-09 Cook Incorporated Medical device with bioactive agent

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US7652372B2 (en) 2010-01-26 grant
JP4966962B2 (en) 2012-07-04 grant
WO2006110903A1 (en) 2006-10-19 application
JP2008536337A (en) 2008-09-04 application
EP1869703A1 (en) 2007-12-26 application
US20060227512A1 (en) 2006-10-12 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Metz et al. Flexible polyimide probes with microelectrodes and embedded microfluidic channels for simultaneous drug delivery and multi-channel monitoring of bioelectric activity
US8025854B2 (en) Micro fluidic structures
US7097775B2 (en) Coated microfluidic delivery system
US7235098B2 (en) Medical devices having MEMs functionality and methods of making same
US8349276B2 (en) Apparatuses and methods for manipulating droplets on a printed circuit board
Vulto et al. Microfluidic channel fabrication in dry film resist for production and prototyping of hybrid chips
Wang et al. A microfluidics-based turning assay reveals complex growth cone responses to integrated gradients of substrate-bound ECM molecules and diffusible guidance cues
US20040129678A1 (en) Integrated apparatus and methods for treating liquids
Ma et al. A PZT insulin pump integrated with a silicon microneedle array for transdermal drug delivery
US7229538B2 (en) Microfluidic device with network micro channels
US7097809B2 (en) Combinatorial synthesis system
Ziegler et al. Fabrication of flexible neural probes with built-in microfluidic channels by thermal bonding of parylene
US20030180965A1 (en) Micro-fluidic device and method of manufacturing and using the same
Poulos et al. Electrowetting on dielectric-based microfluidics for integrated lipid bilayer formation and measurement
US20020188310A1 (en) Microfabricated surgical device
WO1999017749A1 (en) A micromachined valve for fluid applications
Matthews et al. Design and fabrication of a micromachined planar patch-clamp substrate with integrated microfluidics for single-cell measurements
Ziaie et al. Hard and soft micromachining for BioMEMS: review of techniques and examples of applications in microfluidics and drug delivery
US20040253123A1 (en) Integrated electrostatic peristaltic pump method and apparatus
JP2009109232A (en) Device having solid-liquid separation function, and its manufacturing method
US20070007240A1 (en) Wafer-level, polymer-based encapsulation for microstructure devices
Sinha et al. Nanoengineered device for drug delivery application
US7232109B2 (en) Electrostatic valves for microfluidic devices
JP2002085961A (en) Reactor and production method thereof
US20040028566A1 (en) Microfluidic device for the controlled movement of fluid

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: INTEL CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DISHONGH, TERRY J.;CASSEZZA, JASON T.;RHODES, KEVIN S.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:016699/0518

Effective date: 20050603