US20060226310A1 - Method of supporting tools and supplies upon a sloped surface - Google Patents

Method of supporting tools and supplies upon a sloped surface Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060226310A1
US20060226310A1 US11/435,960 US43596006A US2006226310A1 US 20060226310 A1 US20060226310 A1 US 20060226310A1 US 43596006 A US43596006 A US 43596006A US 2006226310 A1 US2006226310 A1 US 2006226310A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
base
shelf
support
caddy
hinge
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Abandoned
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US11/435,960
Inventor
Peter Hall
John Lampe
Original Assignee
Hall Peter V
Lampe John K
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US55695104P priority Critical
Priority to US9121105A priority
Application filed by Hall Peter V, Lampe John K filed Critical Hall Peter V
Priority to US11/435,960 priority patent/US20060226310A1/en
Publication of US20060226310A1 publication Critical patent/US20060226310A1/en
Assigned to HALL, PETER V. reassignment HALL, PETER V. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: LAMPE, JOHN K.
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44DPAINTING OR ARTISTIC DRAWING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; PRESERVING PAINTINGS; SURFACE TREATMENT TO OBTAIN SPECIAL ARTISTIC SURFACE EFFECTS OR FINISHES
    • B44D3/00Accessories or implements for use in connection with painting or artistic drawing, not otherwise provided for; Methods or devices for colour determination, selection, or synthesis, e.g. use of colour tables
    • B44D3/12Paint cans; Brush holders; Containers for storing residual paint
    • B44D3/14Holders for paint cans
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D15/00Apparatus or tools for roof working
    • E04D15/02Apparatus or tools for roof working for roof coverings comprising tiles, shingles, or like roofing elements

Abstract

The invention is a method of supporting tools and supplies atop a sloped roof. The method includes (a) obtaining a caddy with a base and a shelf pivotally connected to one another, (b) placing the base of the caddy into supportive contact with a sloped roof, (c) pivoting the shelf of the caddy relative to the base about a laterally extending axis until the shelf is substantially horizontal, (d) supporting the shelf at the substantially horizontal position with a support member, and (e) placing a plurality of individual tools or supplies upon the substantially horizontal shelf.

Description

  • This is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/091,211, filed Mar. 28, 2005, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/556,951 filed Mar. 29, 2004.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to caddies configured and arranged for use atop a pitched roof.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The prior art contains a number of examples of devices used for storage or support on sloped surfaces such as a pitched roof.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,533,227 to Rom teaches an apparatus for holding a paint bucket on an inclined surface. The device includes a sleeve which can be clamped around the bucket, a circular support for contacting the sloped surface, and an adjustment mechanism for adjusting the angle of the support.
  • U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,913,782 and 5,249,397 to Monaco et al. describe a knockdown platform. The platform has adjustable legs for creating a level surface when the platform is positioned on an inclined surface. The platform, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,913,782, also could have a tray with a variety of indentations for containment of objects.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,558,306 to Binford et al. reveals an inclined surface support. The support consists of vertical and horizontal surfaces secured at right angles to one another. A mechanism secured by bolts permits the adjustment of the height of the horizontal surface in relation to the vertical surface. A paint bucket could be inserted in an opening in the horizontal surface.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,962,906 to Fatool et al. describes a paint can holder for supporting a paint can on a sloped surface. The device consists of two u-shaped members attached at a pivot point to each other near the ends of the u-shaped members. The angle of the u-shaped members could be adjusted. Spiked protrusions could hold the device on a sloped surface such as a roof.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 1,423,726 to Mohr et al. teaches a cylindrical paint bucket holder with legs two of which are adjustable. Adjustment screws could hold the adjustable legs in the desired position.
  • These devices, however, have certain shortcomings. The purpose of the present invention is to overcome the shortcomings in the prior art.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention is a method of supporting tools and supplies atop a sloped roof. The method includes an initial step of obtaining a caddy with (i) a shelf having a laterally extending proximal edge and a distal edge, (ii) a base having a laterally extending proximal edge and a distal edge, (iii) a hinge pivotable about a laterally extending axis connecting the shelf and the base proximate the proximal edge of the shelf and proximate the proximal edge of the base, and (iv) a support member for supporting the shelf at a selected and adjustable acute angle relative to the base. After obtaining the caddy the method includes the steps of (a) placing the base into supportive contact with a sloped roof, (b) pivoting the shelf relative to the base about the laterally extending axis until the shelf is substantially horizontal, (c) supporting the shelf at the substantially horizontal position with the support member, and (d) placing a plurality of individual tools or supplies upon the substantially horizontal shelf.
  • OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES
  • This invention encompasses embodiments with one or more of the following objects or advantages. Some of the advantages and objects of this invention are set forth below.
  • An adjustable caddy to create a level surface for storage on sloped surfaces such as a pitched roof.
  • An adjustable caddy that is safe and convenient for the user to use, economical to manufacture, and convenient for shipping and storage.
  • An adjustable caddy that could provide a level shelf for storage of various items including paint buckets and tools on sloped surfaces such as pitched roofs.
  • An adjustable caddy that could have a gripping surface for contacting the surface of the roof or other sloped surface in order to prevent slippage of the device off the sloped surface.
  • An adjustable caddy with a gripping surface that would not damage the sloped surface such as shingles or other roofing material on a pitched roof.
  • An adjustable caddy that could have an adjustment mechanism that could allow the shelf to be made level on surfaces with different slopes.
  • An adjustable caddy that could have an adjustment indicator showing the slope for which the various adjustments could be used.
  • An adjustable caddy that could be made to collapse to a compact state when not in use.
  • An adjustable caddy that could be made from a unitary piece of material to create any shelf surfaces, support elements, and hinges or other features used in creation of the caddy.
  • An adjustable caddy comprising a base for resting on a sloped surface and a shelf which on its proximate end is connected to the base by a hinge, and which on its distal end can be fixed by an adjustment mechanism at different angles in relation to the base and the sloped surface.
  • Devices contemplated by this invention could be suitable for many purposes. The devices contemplated by this invention eliminate most of the disadvantages identified in the prior art.
  • The above summary of the present invention is not intended to describe each illustrated embodiment, object, advantage, or use of the present invention. The figures and the detailed description that follow more particularly exemplify these embodiments.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the invention supporting a paint can upon a pitched roof.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of the invention shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the invention shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged perspective view of a front corner of the shelf portion of the invention shown in FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of the invention shown in FIG. 4 prior to erection.
  • FIG. 7 is a top view of the invention shown in FIG. 4 folded into a storage position.
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 9 is a top view of the invention shown in FIG. 8 prior to erection.
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a fourth embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 11 is a top exploded view of the invention shown in FIG. 10 prior to erection.
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a fifth embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a sixth embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION INCLUDING A BEST MODE
  • Nomenclature
    • 101 Caddy (1st embodiment)
    • 102 Shelf
    • 103 Base
    • 104 First Support Member
    • 105 Second Support Member
    • 106 Paint Bucket
    • 107 Bottom Surface of Base
    • 108 Hinge
    • 109 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 110 Holes
    • 111 Spring Activated Pin
    • 112 Handle on Pin
    • 113 Inward Direction
    • 114 Roof
    • 201 Caddy (2nd embodiment)
    • 202 Shelf
    • 203 Base
    • 204 First Support Member
    • 205 Second Support Member
    • 207 Bottom Surface of Base
    • 208 a First Hinge
    • 208 b Second Hinge
    • 208 c Third Hinge
    • 209 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 210 Holes
    • 213 Inward Direction
    • 215 a First Axis
    • 215 b Second Axis
    • 215 c Third Axis
    • 216 a First Tab
    • 216 b Second Tab
    • 301 Caddy (3rd embodiment)
    • 302 Shelf
    • 303 Base
    • 304 Support Member
    • 308 a First Hinge
    • 308 b Second Hinge
    • 309 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 310 Slots
    • 316 Tab
    • 401 Caddy (4th embodiment)
    • 402 Shelf
    • 403 Base
    • 404 Support Member
    • 408 a First Hinge
    • 408 b Second Hinge
    • 409 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 410 Slots
    • 416 Tab
    • 501 Caddy (5th embodiment)
    • 502 Tray
    • 502 b Bottom of Tray
    • 502 w Sidewalls of Tray
    • 503 Base
    • 503 s Sides of Base
    • 504 First Support Leg
    • 505 Second Support Leg
    • 508 Hinge
    • 509 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 510 Holes
    • 601 Caddy (6th embodiment)
    • 602 Tray
    • 602 b Bottom of Tray
    • 602 w Sidewalls of Tray
    • 603 Base
    • 603 u Upper Surface of Base
    • 604 First Support Leg
    • 605 Second Support Leg
    • 608 Hinge
    • 609 Adjustment Mechanism
    • 610 Holes
      Construction and Use
    First Embodiment
  • FIGS. 1-3 show one embodiment of an adjustable caddy 101. The adjustable caddy 101 could consist generally of a shelf 102, a base 103, and two support members 104 and 105.
  • The shelf 102 could provide a surface on which objects could rest. FIG. 1 shows a paint bucket 106 on the shelf 102. The bottom surface 107 of the base 103 could contact the sloped surface such as that of a pitched roof 114. The shelf 102 and the base 103 could be disposed in an angled relationship to one another. The support members 104 and 105 could attach to the base 103. The shelf 102 could be held in the angled relationship by the support members 104 and 105, a hinge 108, and an adjustment mechanism 109 as shown in FIG. 1.
  • The adjustment mechanism 109 could consist of a series of holes 110 in the support members 104 and 105, and a spring-activated pin 111 attached to the shelf 102. By squeezing the U-shaped handle 112 on the pin 111, the ends (unnumbered) of the pin 111 can be pulled inward 113 such that the ends of the pin 111 no longer reach the holes 110 in the support members 104 and 105 and the shelf 102 may be repositioned relative to the base 103. By releasing the handle 112, the ends of the pin 111 will expand outward and may be reintroduction into a pair of aligned holes 110 in each of the support members 104 and 105.
  • The base 103 could have a gripping material (unnumbered) on its bottom surface 107 as shown in FIG. 3. This gripping material on the bottom surface 107 could prevent the adjustable caddy 101 from sliding down sloped surfaces such as a roof 114.
  • The adjustable caddy 101 could be made of different materials or combinations of materials, including metals, plastics, foams, cellulose-based materials, ceramics, non-natural fiber-based materials, etc. Generally, the structure of the adjustable caddy 101 should preferably be sufficiently stiff to prevent sagging or unintentional collapse.
  • The gripping material on the bottom surface 107 of the base 103 could also be made of different materials. A foam or rubber material may be suitable for most applications. However, other materials that could create a non-slip surface such as sand or sand-like materials could also be suitable. Alternatively, a gripping surface could be created on the base 103 by, for example, roughening the surface, molding treads, or otherwise creating a surface that would not slide easily on a sloped surface.
  • Second Embodiment
  • FIGS. 4-7 show another embodiment of an adjustable caddy 201. The shelf 202, the base 203 and the support members 204 and 205 could be formed from a unitary piece of material. A first hinge 208 a could connect the shelf 202 and the base 203. Second and third hinges 208 b and 208 c could connect the support members 204 and 205, and the base 203. The hinges 208 a, 208 b and 208 c could be created by creasing the material either in a molding process or in a secondary folding operation. Thus, the shelf 202 and the base 203 could move in relation to one another along the first axis 215 a created by the first hinge 208 a. The first and second support members 204 and 205 could move in relation to the base 203 along second and third axes 215 b and 215 c created by the second and third hinges 208 b and 208 c.
  • The shelf 202, the base 203, and the support members 204 and 205 could be positioned for use as shown in FIG. 4. The bottom surface 207 of the base 203 could contact the sloped surface such as that of a pitched roof (not shown). Tabs 216 a and 216 b formed in the shelf 202 could fit into holes 210 in the support members 204 and 205 to form an adjustment mechanism 209. As shown in FIG. 5, the tabs 216 a and 216 b could be hooked to catch the first and second support members 204 and 205 and thereby permit gravity to hold the shelf 202 and the base 203 in the desired position.
  • The rigidity of the hinges 208 a, 208 b and 208 c could be selected based upon the intended application. For example, it may be desirable to have the first hinge 208 a between the shelf 202 and the base 203 to move freely. However, it may be desirable to have the second and third hinges 208 b and 208 c move less freely in such a way as to cause the support members 204 and 205 to be biased in an inward direction 213. This inwardly directed force may be desirable to hold tabs 216 a and 216 b in the holes 210 and prevent unintended collapse of the caddy 201.
  • The caddy 201 could be folded into the storage position shown in FIG. 7. In this folded position the caddy 201 would be more compact. This compactness could be advantageous for packaging for retail, for shipping, and for storage by the user.
  • An advantage of a caddy 201 according to the second embodiment could be economy of manufacture. The device could be made by die-cutting or molding a piece of plastic. The hinges 208 a, 208 b and 208 c could be formed by a secondary folding operation or in a molding process.
  • Third Embodiment
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 show yet another embodiment of an adjustable caddy 301 with a forward positioned adjustment mechanism 309.
  • A first hinge 308 a could connect the shelf 302 and the base 303. The second hinge 308 b could connect the support member 304 and the base 303. The hinges 308 a and 308 b could be created by creasing the material either in a molding process or in a secondary folding operation. Thus, the shelf 302 and the base 303 could move in relation to one another along a first axis (unnumbered) created by the first hinge 308 a. The support member 304 could move in relation to the base 303 along a second axes (unnumbered) created by the second hinge 308 b.
  • Similar to the adjustable caddy 201 of the second embodiment, the caddy 301 shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 could be made of a unitary piece of material. A possible advantage of the caddy 301 shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 is that even less material might be necessary to create the caddy 301 because the support member 304 folds up from the base 303.
  • The shelf 302 could have a tab 316. The adjustment mechanism 309 could consist of a tab 316 for insertion into one of several slots 310 on the support member 304 to support the shelf 302 at the desired angle. The tab 316 could be hooked to prevent the unintended collapse of the shelf 302.
  • Fourth Embodiment
  • FIGS. 10 and 11 show still another embodiment of an adjustable caddy 401 with a forward positioned adjustment mechanism 409. The caddy 401 shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 has a first hinge 408 a between the shelf 402 and the base 403 and a second hinge 408 b between the shelf 402 and the support member 404. A tab 416 positioned on the support member 404 could be inserted into slots 410 in the base 403.
  • The shelf 402, the base 403 and the support member 404 could be connected by a flexible tape to form the hinges 408 a and 408 b. The tape could have adhesive to fasten securely. The tape could be sufficiently flexible to allow the hinges 408 a and 408 b to flex to the desired extent.
  • An advantage of the adjustable caddy 401 shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 could be ease and economy of manufacture. The caddy 401 could easily be manufactured from die-cut material.
  • Fifth Embodiment
  • FIG. 12 shows another embodiment of an adjustable caddy 501. The caddy 501 includes a tray 502 with a bottom 502 b and sidewalls 502 w for forming a compartment (unnumbered). The back edge (unnumbered) of the tray 502 is attached to a base 503 by a hinge 508. The tray 502 and base 503 could be formed from a unitary piece of material with a live hinge 508 formed along the interface of these components. First and second legs 504 and 505 are pivotally attached to the sides (unnumbered) of the tray 502. A series of longitudinally spaced holes 510 are provided along both sides 503 s of the base 503. The free ends (unnumbered) of the legs 504 and 505 are configured and arranged for insertion into laterally aligned holes 510 in the base 503 to form an adjustment mechanism 509 for supporting the tray 502 at a desired angle relative to the base 503.
  • Sixth Embodiment
  • FIG. 13 shows another embodiment of an adjustable caddy 601 with a tray 602 having a bottom 602 b and sidewalls 602 w. The back edge (unnumbered) of the tray 602 is attached to a base 603 by a hinge 608. The caddy 601 of the sixth embodiment is similar to the caddy 501 of the fifth embodiment except that the series of longitudinally spaced holes 610 are provided in the upper surface 603 u of the base 603 proximate each side (unnumbered) of the base 603. The free ends (unnumbered) of the legs 604 and 605 are configured and arranged for insertion into laterally aligned holes 610 in the base 603 to form an adjustment mechanism 609 for supporting the tray 602 at a desired angle relative to the base 603.
  • Modifications
  • The invention described in this specification encompasses numerous modifications including caddies of different sizes, shapes, and materials, and caddies configured and arranged in different ways than discussed above.
  • Many factors may influence the size and shape of the caddy and its features. For some applications it may be desirable to have a caddy of different sizes and shapes than described above. Such changes would be within the scope of the invention.
  • The caddies 101, 201, 301, 401, 501 and 601 discussed above could be made of many different materials. For example, the caddy could be made of various materials including plastic, metal, cellulose based materials, glass or ceramic, non-natural fiber or combinations of these materials. The caddy could be created using many techniques such as molding, forming, or cutting. Such changes would be within the scope of the invention.
  • Finally, the various aspects of the caddy described above could be combined in different ways than described above. Such changes would be within the scope of the invention.
  • The present invention should not be considered limited to the particular examples described above, but rather should be understood to cover all aspects of the invention as fairly set out in the claims arising from this application. For example, while suitable sizes, materials, packaging and the like have been disclosed in the above discussion, it should be appreciated that these are provided by way of example and not of limitation as a number of other sizes, materials, fasteners, and so forth may be used without departing from the invention. Various modifications as well as numerous structures to which the present invention may be applicable will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art to which the present invention is directed upon review of the present specifications. The claims which arise from this application are intended to cover such modifications and structures.

Claims (19)

1. A method of supporting tools and supplies atop a sloped roof, comprising:
(i) obtaining a caddy, comprising:
(a) a shelf having a laterally extending proximal edge and a distal edge,
(b) a base having a laterally extending proximal edge and a distal edge,
(c) a hinge pivotable about a laterally extending axis connecting the shelf and the base proximate the proximal edge of the shelf and proximate the proximal edge of the base, and
(d) a support member for supporting the shelf at a selected and adjustable acute angle relative to the base,
(ii) placing the base into supportive contact with a sloped roof,
(iii) pivoting the shelf relative to the base about the laterally extending axis until the shelf is substantially horizontal,
(iv) supporting the shelf at the substantially horizontal position with the support member, and
(v) placing a plurality of individual tools or supplies upon the substantially horizontal shelf.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the caddy further comprises a releasable fastening mechanism for locking the angled position of the shelf relative to the base as between at least two different acute angles.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the shelf may be supported at a plurality of different acute angles relative to the base and the caddy further comprising indicia indicating the value of the acute angle at each of the positions at which the shelf may be supported.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein the base has a bottom surface and at least a portion of the bottom surface of the base is textured to provide an increased coefficient of static friction relative to a roof surface.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein the base is constructed from a material, the base has a bottom surface, and at least a portion of the bottom surface of the base is coated with a material having an increased coefficient of static friction relative to the material from which the base is constructed.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein the support member includes at least two laterally spaced separate and distinct components.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein the support member is hingedly connected to the base for pivoting about a second laterally extending axis.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein the support member is hingedly connected to the base for pivoting about a longitudinally extending axis.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein the shelf, base and support member are pivotable relative to one another for pivoting as between a flat storage position with the shelf superimposed upon the base, and an erected use position with the shelf supported at an acute angle relative to the base.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein the hinge is a live-hinge.
11. The method of claim 7 wherein the support member is hingedly connected to the base by a live-hinge.
12. The method of claim 8 wherein the support member is hingedly connected to the base by a live-hinge.
13. The method of claim 10 wherein the shelf, base and support member are constructed from a single unitary piece of material.
14. The method of claim 11 wherein the shelf, base and support member are constructed from a single unitary piece of material.
15. The method of claim 12 wherein the shelf, base and support member are constructed from a single unitary piece of material.
16. The method of claim 1 wherein the shelf includes at least one well for storage of items.
17. The method of claim 1 wherein the shelf is a tray.
18. The method of claim 1 wherein the tools or supplies placed upon the substantially horizontal shelf includes an open-top container of a liquid.
19. The method of claim 18 wherein the liquid is paint.
US11/435,960 2004-03-29 2006-05-17 Method of supporting tools and supplies upon a sloped surface Abandoned US20060226310A1 (en)

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US9121105A true 2005-03-28 2005-03-28
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US20090050761A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2009-02-26 Gunsaullus Scott E All terrain material and tool tray
US20090260383A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Dan Knight Air conditioner condenser platform
US20100127002A1 (en) * 2008-11-21 2010-05-27 Ronald Bel Container Assembly For Use On Planar Surfaces Of Varying Slopes
US20110089295A1 (en) * 2009-10-16 2011-04-21 Wickwire Tracy A Adjustable Paint Bucket Stand
US7984821B1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2011-07-26 Malmberg Brant P Bucket assembly for angled surfaces
US20130000526A1 (en) * 2010-03-12 2013-01-03 Mathieson Thomas R Material wrapper and work platform
US8939415B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2015-01-27 James Dillinger Rooftop device and rooftop device assemblies
US9079453B1 (en) * 2008-09-18 2015-07-14 Grant Cox Container holder having rotatable circular joint
US9145687B1 (en) * 2012-10-31 2015-09-29 Russell N Bancroft Convertible support pad apparatus
US9587408B1 (en) * 2013-03-13 2017-03-07 Troy Ray Brannon Roof workman's utility box
US20180313152A1 (en) * 2017-04-27 2018-11-01 Peter Koeman, IV Wedge Ladder Leveler

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090050761A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2009-02-26 Gunsaullus Scott E All terrain material and tool tray
US7887016B2 (en) * 2007-08-23 2011-02-15 Gunsaullus Scott E All terrain material and tool tray
US7984821B1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2011-07-26 Malmberg Brant P Bucket assembly for angled surfaces
US7950620B2 (en) * 2008-04-18 2011-05-31 Dan Knight Air conditioner condenser platform
US20090260383A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Dan Knight Air conditioner condenser platform
US9079453B1 (en) * 2008-09-18 2015-07-14 Grant Cox Container holder having rotatable circular joint
US7874451B2 (en) 2008-11-21 2011-01-25 Ronald Bel Container assembly for use on planar surfaces of varying slopes
US20100127002A1 (en) * 2008-11-21 2010-05-27 Ronald Bel Container Assembly For Use On Planar Surfaces Of Varying Slopes
US20110089295A1 (en) * 2009-10-16 2011-04-21 Wickwire Tracy A Adjustable Paint Bucket Stand
US8256731B2 (en) * 2009-10-16 2012-09-04 Wickwire Tracy A Adjustable paint bucket stand
US20130000526A1 (en) * 2010-03-12 2013-01-03 Mathieson Thomas R Material wrapper and work platform
US8939415B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2015-01-27 James Dillinger Rooftop device and rooftop device assemblies
US9145687B1 (en) * 2012-10-31 2015-09-29 Russell N Bancroft Convertible support pad apparatus
US9587408B1 (en) * 2013-03-13 2017-03-07 Troy Ray Brannon Roof workman's utility box
US20180313152A1 (en) * 2017-04-27 2018-11-01 Peter Koeman, IV Wedge Ladder Leveler
US10662707B2 (en) * 2017-04-27 2020-05-26 Peter Koeman, IV Wedge ladder leveler

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