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Recreational Disc Locator Device

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Publication number
US20060199682A1
US20060199682A1 US11307039 US30703906A US2006199682A1 US 20060199682 A1 US20060199682 A1 US 20060199682A1 US 11307039 US11307039 US 11307039 US 30703906 A US30703906 A US 30703906A US 2006199682 A1 US2006199682 A1 US 2006199682A1
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US
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Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
signal
disc
locator
means
device
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11307039
Inventor
Adam Holms
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Holms Adam M
Original Assignee
Holms Adam M
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0021Tracking a path or terminating locations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B67/00Sporting games or accessories therefor, not provided for in groups A63B1/00 - A63B65/00
    • A63B67/06Ring or disc tossing games, e.g. quoits; Throwing or tossing games, e.g. using balls; Games for manually rolling balls, e.g. marbles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/18Throwing or slinging toys, e.g. flying disc toys
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0021Tracking a path or terminating locations
    • A63B2024/0053Tracking a path or terminating locations for locating an object, e.g. a lost ball
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B71/0619Displays, user interfaces and indicating devices, specially adapted for sport equipment, e.g. display mounted on treadmills
    • A63B71/0622Visual, audio or audio-visual systems for entertaining, instructing or motivating the user
    • A63B2071/0625Emitting sound, noise or music
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B43/00Balls with special arrangements

Abstract

A locator device for a recreational throwing disc such as golf disc or Frisbee is disclosed. The locator device can be of a visual, aural or electromagnetic nature depending on such factors as the expense, size and weight limitations required by each.

Description

  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a locator device for a recreational throwing disc such as a golf disc or Frisbee.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The act of throwing discs has been with us in one form or another since the beginning of time. Early man realized the advantages of using flying objects to hunt from a distance in order to avoid injury from an often formidable prey. The appearance of items like the boomerang indicates that early man understood the benefits of a flat spinning weapon. Such an object would travel further than a round object. Moreover, the spinning motion could be exploited by shaping and sharpening the edge to enhance its lethality upon impact.
  • [0003]
    Since that time, games involving throwing discs have evolved from man's instinctual competitive drive. However, as with any game in which the game pieces are thrown, hit, or otherwise removed from the immediate proximity of the player, the discs often get lost. Consequently, the need has arisen for a device that effectively locates the lost disc without interfering with its aero dynamical properties.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0004]
    A locator system for a golf disc or Frisbee is disclosed. The system comprises transmitting means operable for transmitting a locator signal, wherein the transmitting means is physically located on the golf disc or Frisbee, and receiving means operable for receiving the locator signal from the transmitting means. In a second embodiment the system further comprises signal transmission means operable for transmitting a prompting signal to the golf disc or Frisbee, signal receiving means for operable receiving a prompting signal from the signal transmission means, and signal initiation means operable for initiating the locator signal in response to the prompting signal. Both the signal receiving means and the signal initiation means are physically located on the golf disc or Frisbee.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0005]
    The terms, “disc”, “throwing disc”, “golf disc” and “Frisbee”, as used interchangeably herein, are intended to denote a flat circular disc that is thrown for recreational purposes.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • [0006]
    FIG. 1 illustrates the operation of disc locator in passive mode.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the operation of disc locator in active mode.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of a disc as seen from the top.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of a disc as seen from the bottom.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 5 shows a plan view of a disc as seen from the top.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 6 shows a plan view of a disc as seen from the bottom.
  • [0012]
    Identification of Numbers used in the drawings
  • [0013]
    10—disc, throwing disc, golf disc, or Frisbee
  • [0014]
    11—locator signal
  • [0015]
    12—receiver operable for receiving locator signal
  • [0016]
    13—barrier between locator signal and receiver
  • [0017]
    20—transmitter operable for prompting a signal from locator device
  • [0018]
    21—prompting signal
  • [0019]
    30—top surface of disc
  • [0020]
    40—bottom surface of disc
  • [0021]
    41—rim of disc, candidate location for locator device or for prompting signal receiver
  • [0022]
    42—center of disc, also a candidate location for locator device or for prompting signal receiver
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0023]
    Consider an individual playing disc golf on a standard course. The disc (10) is thrown as part of the game. At times, it will land in an area that is visually obscured from the player as indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2. The barrier (13) responsible for the obscurity may be vegetation, walls, or any other semi-opaque objects situated on the line of sight between the disc (10) and the player. If the disc (10) is equipped with a device location system capable of communicating to the player, then it can be easily found.
  • [0024]
    The location system can be either passive as shown in FIG. 1 or active as shown in FIG. 2. The locator device is a common component of both. It is affixed or otherwise incorporated into the disc (10), and is configured to emit a signal (11) capable of being detected by a receiver (12). There are only two essential characteristics of the receiver (12); it must be sensitive to the signal (11) emitted by the locator device and it must be communicable with the player or other person searching for the lost disc (10).
  • [0025]
    The signal (11)/receiver (12) pair could be as simple as a beeper emitting an audio signal (11). Here, the person's ear, or the person's dog's ear, is the receiver (12). Another embodiment could comprise a visual signal (11) such as a blinking light. Here, the person's eye is the receiver (12). A more sophisticated embodiment might involve the emission of an electromagnetic signal (11) subsequently detected by a receiver (12) capable of sensing the signal. Such a system is available from Electronic Identification Systems, www.trovan.com.
  • [0026]
    A passive system is illustrated in FIG. 1. In passive mode, the locator device emits the locator signal (11) without any prompting. In contrast to this, the location process for an active system as illustrated in FIG. 2, is initiated by a prompting signal (21) emitted by a transmitter (20). The locator device senses the prompting signal (21) and begins emitting its own signal in response. The prompting signal (21) may be electromagnetic in nature while the locator device may emit an electromagnetic, visual or audio signal (11). The only requirement is that the prompting signal (21) must be sensible to the locator device and result in the onset of signal (11) emission. Weight and power requirements for each type of transmit-receive link will serve to dictate the optimum choice for a given system.
  • [0027]
    In the event that an electromagnetic signal is employed as either the prompting signal (21) or the locator signal (11), one must consider the capabilities and limitations of its frequency content. A low frequency system, for example, emits a divergent signal and has relatively low power requirements. On the other hand, a high frequency system is more apt to penetrate dense barriers such as heavy vegetation. The tradeoff is that power requirements are often significant, thereby dictating heavier and clumsier apparatus. Moreover, high frequency systems are characterized by narrow angular ranges; the locator device and the receiver (12) must be mutually faced. Components for an electromagnetic signal for either system are available from RF-ID.com.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 3 shows the top surface (30) of a standard disc (10). FIG. 4 illustrates the bottom surface (40) including an optional rimmed edge (41). A candidate spot for the location device is the center of the disc (42) as shown in FIG. 4. Other embodiments of the location device include a ring butted up against the rim (41) also shown in the figure. The basic geometrical requirement of the locator device is that it not interfere with the aero dynamical characteristics of the disc. Because the disk spins about its geometrical center, the configuration of device is constrained to one of azimuthal symmetry. Moreover, it must be light so that the added weight does not significantly interfere with the disc's unadulterated flight characteristics. The locator device could be incorporated into the disc (10) at the time of manufacture.
  • [0029]
    The above arguments focusing on the location device parallel those for a device sensible to a prompting signal (21) of an active system. One embodiment would be that the location device is configured in the rim (41) while the sensing device for the prompting signal (21) resides at the center (42) of the disc. Another embodiment might have the two configurations reversed while a third would have them both incorporated into the disc at the time of manufacture. Yet another embodiment would have the locator device for the locator signal (11) coincident with the sensing device for the prompting signal (21).
  • [0030]
    While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For instance, the emitting signal (11) can be actuated by the user before the disc is thrown rather than being prompted after the fact or being in a continuous state of emission. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.

Claims (10)

1. A locator system for a golf disc or Frisbee comprising:
Transmitting means operable for transmitting a locator signal, wherein said transmitting means is physically located on said golf disc or Frisbee, and
Receiving means operable for receiving said locator signal from said transmitting means.
2. A locator system as in claim 1 wherein said transmitting means comprises a beeper and wherein said receiving means comprises a mammalian ear.
3. A locator system as in claim 1 wherein said transmitting means comprises a blinking light and wherein said receiving means comprises a mammalian eye.
4. A locator system as in claim 1 wherein said transmitting means comprises an electromagnetic emitter, wherein said electromagnetic emitter is operable for generating an output signal, and wherein said receiving means comprises a receiver operable for sensing said output signal of said electromagnetic emitter.
5. A locator system as in claim 1 wherein said golf disc or Frisbee has a center and wherein said transmitting means is located at said center.
6. A locator system as in claim 1 wherein said golf disc or Frisbee has a rim and wherein said transmitting means is located at said rim.
7. A locator system as in claim 1 further comprising:
Signal transmission means operable for transmitting a prompting signal to said golf disc or Frisbee,
Signal receiving means for operable receiving a prompting signal from said signal transmission means,
Signal initiation means operable for initiating said locator signal in response to said prompting signal wherein both said signal receiving means and said signal initiation means are physically located on said golf disc or Frisbee.
8. A locator system as in claim 7 wherein said prompting signal is electromagnetic and wherein said locator signal is a beeper.
9. A locator system as in claim 7 wherein said prompting signal is electromagnetic and wherein said locator signal is a blinking light.
10. A locator system as in claim 7 wherein said prompting signal is electromagnetic and wherein said locator signal is electromagnetic.
US11307039 2005-02-09 2006-01-19 Recreational Disc Locator Device Abandoned US20060199682A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US59374005 true 2005-02-09 2005-02-09
US11307039 US20060199682A1 (en) 2005-02-09 2006-01-19 Recreational Disc Locator Device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11307039 US20060199682A1 (en) 2005-02-09 2006-01-19 Recreational Disc Locator Device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060199682A1 true true US20060199682A1 (en) 2006-09-07

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US11307039 Abandoned US20060199682A1 (en) 2005-02-09 2006-01-19 Recreational Disc Locator Device

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7677620B1 (en) 2008-02-07 2010-03-16 Tasey Matt A Disc retrieving apparatus
US20110053716A1 (en) * 2009-09-02 2011-03-03 Lewis Neal R Golf disc
US20150319562A1 (en) * 2014-05-02 2015-11-05 Christopher Leon Martin Disc golf disc location system

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4086723A (en) * 1976-09-29 1978-05-02 Strawick Raymond L Chemi-luminescent flying saucer toy
US5141229A (en) * 1990-09-10 1992-08-25 Sure Trak, Inc. Acceleration and deceleration electrical switch
US5468000A (en) * 1995-04-13 1995-11-21 Bennett; Tommy L. Remotely activated location identifying arrow attachment
US6113504A (en) * 1998-07-10 2000-09-05 Oblon, Spivak, Mcclelland, Maier & Neustadt, P.C. Golf ball locator
US6390642B1 (en) * 2000-02-16 2002-05-21 Robert Wayne Simonton Tracer light for archer's arrow

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4086723A (en) * 1976-09-29 1978-05-02 Strawick Raymond L Chemi-luminescent flying saucer toy
US5141229A (en) * 1990-09-10 1992-08-25 Sure Trak, Inc. Acceleration and deceleration electrical switch
US5468000A (en) * 1995-04-13 1995-11-21 Bennett; Tommy L. Remotely activated location identifying arrow attachment
US6113504A (en) * 1998-07-10 2000-09-05 Oblon, Spivak, Mcclelland, Maier & Neustadt, P.C. Golf ball locator
US6390642B1 (en) * 2000-02-16 2002-05-21 Robert Wayne Simonton Tracer light for archer's arrow

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7677620B1 (en) 2008-02-07 2010-03-16 Tasey Matt A Disc retrieving apparatus
US20110053716A1 (en) * 2009-09-02 2011-03-03 Lewis Neal R Golf disc
US20150319562A1 (en) * 2014-05-02 2015-11-05 Christopher Leon Martin Disc golf disc location system
US9579552B2 (en) * 2014-05-02 2017-02-28 Christopher Leon Martin Disc golf disc location system

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