New! View global litigation for patent families

US20060194170A1 - Dental implant system - Google Patents

Dental implant system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060194170A1
US20060194170A1 US11406782 US40678206A US2006194170A1 US 20060194170 A1 US20060194170 A1 US 20060194170A1 US 11406782 US11406782 US 11406782 US 40678206 A US40678206 A US 40678206A US 2006194170 A1 US2006194170 A1 US 2006194170A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
implant
portion
dental
surface
fig
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11406782
Inventor
Peter Wohrle
Duaine Griffith
Original Assignee
Wohrle Peter S
Griffith Duaine E
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0018Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools characterised by the shape
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • A61C8/0066Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers with positioning means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/0077Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars with shape following the gingival surface or the bone surface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • A61C8/0054Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers having a cylindrical implant connecting part
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • A61C8/006Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers with polygonal positional means, e.g. hexagonal or octagonal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • A61C8/0069Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers tapered or conical connection
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/008Healing caps or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0089Implanting tools or instruments

Abstract

A dental implant assembly for supporting a dental prosthesis. The assembly comprises a dental implant and an abutment. The dental implant comprises a body portion, a collar portion and a central bore. The body portion is located at a distal end of the dental implant and is configured to lie at least substantially below a crest of a patient's jawbone. The collar portion is located at a proximal end of the dental implant and forms an abutment mating surface which defines an outer edge that has a generally scalloped shape. The central bore extends through the collar portion and into the implant body portion. The central bore includes a threaded portion and a post portion. The abutment comprises a post configured to fit within the post portion of the central bore and an implant mating surface that is configured to mate with the abutment mating surface of the dental implant.

Description

    PRIORITY INFORMATION
  • [0001]
    This application is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/341,531, filed Jan. 13, 2003, which claims the priority benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) of Provisional Application 60/347,723 filed Jan. 11, 2002, the entire contents of these applications are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates generally to dental implants and, more particularly, to an improved dental implant system.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0005]
    Implant dentistry involves the restoration of one or more teeth in a patient's mouth using artificial components. Such artificial components typically include a dental implant and a prosthetic tooth and/or a final abutment that is secured to the dental implant. Generally, the process for restoring a tooth is carried out in three stages.
  • [0006]
    Stage I involves implanting the dental implant into the alveolar bone (i.e., jawbone) of a patient. The oral surgeon first accesses the alveolar bone through the patient's gum tissue and removes any remains of the tooth to be replaced. Next, the specific site in the alveolar bone where the implant will be anchored is widened by drilling and/or reaming to accommodate the width of the dental implant to be implanted. Then, the dental implant is inserted into the hole, typically by screwing, although other techniques are known for introducing the implant in the jawbone.
  • [0007]
    After the implant is initially installed in the bone, a temporary healing cap is secured over the exposed proximal end in order to seal an internal bore of the implant. The patient's gums are then sutured over the implant to allow the implant site to heal and to allow desired osseointegration to occur. Complete osseointegration typically takes anywhere from four to ten months.
  • [0008]
    During stage II, the surgeon reaccesses the implant fixture by making an incision through the patient's gum tissues. The healing cap is then removed, exposing the proximal end of the implant. Typically, an impression coping in attached to the implant and a mold or impression is then taken of the patient's mouth to accurately record the position and orientation of the implant within the mouth. This is used to create a plaster model or analogue of the mouth and/or the implant site and provides the information needed to fabricate the prosthetic replacement tooth and any required intermediate prosthetic components. Stage II is typically completed by attaching to the implant a temporary healing abutment or other transmucosal component to control the healing and growth of the patient's gum tissue around the implant site. In a modified procedure, an abutment or other transmucosal component is either integrally formed with the implant or attached to the implant during stage I. In such a procedure, stages I and II are effectively combined in to a single stage.
  • [0009]
    Stage III involves fabricating and placement of a cosmetic tooth prosthesis to the implant fixture. The plaster analogue provides laboratory technicians with a model of the patient's mouth, including the orientation of the implant fixture and/or abutment relative to the surrounding teeth. Based on this model, the technician constructs a final restoration. The final step in the restorative process is replacing the temporary healing abutment with the final abutment and attaching a final prosethesis to the final abutment.
  • [0010]
    The dental implant is typically fabricated from pure titanium or a titanium alloy. The dental implant typically includes a body portion and a collar. The body portion is configured to extend into and osteointegrate with the alveolar bone. The top surface of the collar typically lies flush with the crest of the jawbone bone. The final abutment typically lies on the top surface and extends through the soft tissue, which lies above the alveolar bone. As mentioned above, the abutment supports the final prostheses. Typically, the coronal or crown portion of the collar and the portions of the final abutment that extend through the soft tissue have a machined or polished surfaces. This arrangement is believed in the art to prevent the accumulation of plaque and calculus and facilitates cleaning.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    One aspect of the present invention includes the recognition that the body's natural defense mechanisms tend to provide approximately a 2-3 millimeter zone of soft tissue between the abutment-implant interface (i.e., microgap) and the alveolar crest. This zone is referred to as the “biological width” and is present around natural teeth as well as dental implants. The biological width typically extends 360 degrees around the implant and lies coronal to the alveolar crest and apical to the prosthetic crown margin (approximately 2.5-3 millimeters). The biological width consists of approximately 1 millimeter gingival sulcus, 1 millimeter epithelial attachment and 1 millimeter connective tissue attachment. In prior art implants, the abutment-implant interface typically lies flush with the alveolar crest. As such, the bone tissue is reabsorbed and the alveolar crest retreats until the proper biological width can be reestablished. This bone loss is undesirable both aesthetically and structurally.
  • [0012]
    Another aspect of the invention is the recognition that in the prior art typically provides for a flat interface (i.e., microgap) between the abutment and the collar of the implant. However, due to the irregular configuration of the alveolar crest, a flat interface makes it difficult to conform to a proper biological width in all 360 degrees around the implant. A proper biological width that does not extend for all 360 degrees around the implant can produce undesirable bone loss.
  • [0013]
    Therefore, one embodiment of the present invention comprises a dental implant assembly for supporting a dental prosthesis. The assembly comprises a dental implant having a body portion located at a distal end of the dental implant. The body portion is configured to lie at least substantially below a crest of a patient's jawbone. A collar portion is located at a proximal end of the dental implant. The collar portion forms a top surface, which defines an outer edge that has at least one peak and valley to match the contours of a patient's soft tissue. A central bore extends through the collar portion and into the implant body portion. The central bore includes a threaded portion and a post portion. The assembly also includes an abutment comprising a post configured to fit within the post portion of implant. A final restoration is configured to fit over the upper portion of the abutment and has an implant mating surface that is configured to mate with the mating surface of the dental implant.
  • [0014]
    Another embodiment of the present invention comprises a dental implant assembly for supporting a dental prosthesis. The assembly comprises a dental implant having body portion located at a distal end of the dental implant. The body portion is configured to lie at least substantially below a crest of a patient's jawbone. A collar portion is located at a proximal end of the dental implant. The collar portion forms a mating surface which defines an outer edge that has a generally scalloped shape. A central bore extends through the collar portion and into the implant body portion. The central bore includes a threaded portion and a post portion. A healing abutment comprises a post configured to fit within the post portion of the central bore and including an upper portion and implant mating surface that is configured to mate with the mating surface of the dental implant.
  • [0015]
    Another embodiment of the present invention is dental implant assembly for supporting a dental prosthesis. The assembly comprises a dental implant and an insertion tool. The dental implant comprises a body portion located at a distal end of the dental implant. The body portion is configured to lie at least substantially below a crest of a patient's jawbone. The collar portion is located at a proximal end of the dental implant. The collar portion forming an abutment mating surface which defines an outer edge that has at least one peak and one valley. A central bore extends through the collar portion and into the implant body portion. The central bore includes a threaded portion and a post portion. The insertion tool comprises a post configured to fit within the post portion of the central bore and at least one depth marker for indicating the position of the outer edge. The assembly also comprises complementary mating surfaces between the post of the insertion tool and the post portion of the central tool. The complementary mating surfaces are configured to prevent relative rotation between the dental implant and the insertion tool.
  • [0016]
    For purposes of summarizing the invention and the advantages achieved over the prior art, certain objects and advantages of the invention have been described herein above. Of course, it is to be understood that not necessarily all such objects or advantages may be achieved in accordance with any particular embodiment of the invention. Thus, for example, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may be embodied or carried out in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other objects or advantages as may be taught or suggested herein.
  • [0017]
    All of these embodiments are intended to be within the scope of the invention herein disclosed. These and other embodiments of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments having reference to the attached figures, the invention not being limited to any particular preferred embodiment(s) disclosed.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0018]
    These and other features of this invention will now be described with reference to the drawings of a preferred embodiment which is intended to illustrate and not to limit the invention. The drawings contain the following figures:
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1A is a front view of a dental implant;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1B is a side view of the dental implant of FIG. 1A shown without threads;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 1C is a top view of the dental implant of FIG. 1A;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 1D is a cross-sectional view of the dental implant of FIG. 1A taken along line 1D-1D;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2A is a front view of an abutment configured to mate with the implant of FIG. 1A;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 2B is a top view of the abutment of FIG. 2A;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 2C is a bottom view of the abutment of FIG. 2A;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 2D is a cross-sectional view of the abutment of FIG. 2A taken along line 2D-2D;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 3A is a side view of a coupling bolt;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 3B is a top view of the coupling bolt of FIG. 3A;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 4A is a front view of a final restoration configured to mate with the implant of FIG. 1A;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4B is a side view of the final restoration of FIG. 4B;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 5A is a front view of a healing cap;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 5B is a top view of the healing cap of FIG. 5A;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 5C is a side view of the healing cap of FIG. 5A;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 5D is a cross-sectional view of the healing cap of FIG. 5A taken at line 5D-5D;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 6A is a side view of an insertion tool; and
  • [0036]
    FIG. 6B is a front view of the insertion tool of FIG. 6A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0037]
    FIGS. 1A-D illustrate an embodiment of a dental implant 10. In this embodiment, the implant 10 comprises an implant body 12, which preferably includes a lower portion 14 and a collar 16. The lower portion 14 is preferably tapered and includes threads 18 that match preformed threads made along the inner surface of a bore in the patient's jawbone (not shown). However, it should be appreciated that the lower portion 14 can be configured so as to be self-tapping or unthreaded. It should also bee appreciated that although the illustrated lower portion 14 is tapered or conical it may also be substantially cylindrical.
  • [0038]
    As best seen in FIG. 1A, the lower portion 14 preferably has a bone apposition surface 20, which is configured to promote osseointegration. In one embodiment, the bone apposition surface 20 increases the surface area of the lower portion 12. For example, the bone apposition surface 20 can be formed by roughening the lower portion 12 in several different manners, such as, for example, acid-etching, grit blasting, and/or machining. Alternatively, the bone apposition surface 20 can be formed by coating the lower surface with a substance that increases the surface area of the lower portion 12. Calcium phosphate ceramics, such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), are particularly suitable materials.
  • [0039]
    The collar 16 preferably lies above (i.e., proximal) the lower portion 12 and in the illustrated embodiment is preferably integrally formed with or permanently affixed to the lower portion 12 at a collar/implant interface 22 (see FIG. 1B). The collar 16 is defined in part by a side wall 24. In the illustrated embodiment, the side wall 24 is tapered with respect to the longitudinal axis of the implant 10 at an angle of approximately 30 degrees. However, in modified embodiments, the side wall 24 can be cylindrical or substantially cylindrical. The illustrated collar 16 also has a substantially circular cross-section (see FIG. 1C). However, in modified embodiments, the collar 16 may have a non-round cross-section.
  • [0040]
    As best seen in FIGS. 1A-C, the collar 16 includes a top surface 26. As will be described in more detail below, the top surface 26 may support a final restoration. In the illustrated embodiment, an outer edge 28 of the top surface 26 has a curved or scalloped shape with at least one and more preferably two peaks 30 and valleys 32 that follow or at least closely approximate the shape of the naturally occurring contours of a patient's soft-tissue morphology.
  • [0041]
    In one embodiment, the outer edge 28 is configured so as to be positioned at approximately the same height as the top surfaces of the naturally occurring soft-tissue morphology. In such embodiments, the peaks 30 of the outer edge 28 lie approximately 2-5 millimeters above the collar/body interface 22 while the valleys 32 lie approximately 1-5 millimeters below the peaks 30. In one preferred arrangement, the peak 30 lies approximately 4 millimeters above the collar body interface 25 and the valleys 32 lie approximately 2 millimeters below the peak. Although not illustrated it should be appreciated that in modified embodiments the peaks and valleys may have different heights. That is, the two peaks may have different heights as compared to each other. In a similar manner, the two valleys may have different heights as compared to each other.
  • [0042]
    As best seen in FIG. 1B, in the illustrated embodiment, the top surface 26 is beveled with respect to a line that is perpendicular longitudinal axis of the implant 10. In one preferred embodiment, the top surface 26 beveled at an angle of 30 degrees. In modified embodiments, the top surface 26 may be perpendicular to the longitudinal axis (i.e., flat).
  • [0043]
    With reference to FIG. 1A, a top edge 34 of the bone tissue apposition surface 20 preferably extends above the collar/implant interface 22 and onto the collar 16. As with the outer edge 28, the top edge 34 preferably has a curved or scalloped shape with at least one and more preferably two peaks 36 and valleys 38 that follow or at least closely approximate the shape of the naturally occurring contours of a patient's bone-tissue morphology. In the illustrated embodiment, the peaks 36 and valleys 38 of the top edge 34 are aligned with the peaks 30 and valleys 32 of the outer edge 34.
  • [0044]
    In the illustrated arrangement, the valleys 38 of the top edge 34 lie slightly above or at the collar/implant interface the peak 30. The peaks 36 may lie approximately 1-5 millimeters above the valleys. In one embodiment, the peaks 36 lie approximately 2 millimeters above the valleys 38. As with the outer edge 28, it should be appreciated that in modified embodiments the peaks 36 and valleys 38 may have different heights. That is, the two peaks 36 may have different heights as compared to each other. In a similar manner, the two valleys 38 may have different heights as compared to each other.
  • [0045]
    The surface 35 of the collar 16 above the top edge may be polished to reduce accumulation of plaque and calculus. In a modified embodiment, the surface 35 may be treated to promote soft-tissue attachment. Such treatments may include roughening and the application of coatings that increase surface area.
  • [0046]
    With reference to FIG. 1D, the implant 10 preferably includes a central bore 40. In the illustrated embodiment, the central bore 40 includes a threaded section 42 for receiving a threaded portion of a bolt or screw (described below) and post-receiving section 44, which preferably includes a tapered portion 46 adjacent the threaded section 42. The post-receiving 44 section may include anti-rotational features, such as, for example, flat sides, grooves, and or indentations. In the illustrated arrangement, the anti-rotational feature comprises a pair of flat sides 48 (see FIG. 1C), which are positioned in an enlarged diameter portion 50 of the post-receiving section 44.
  • [0047]
    FIGS. 2A-D illustrate an abutment 52, which is configured to mate with the implant 10 described above. In the illustrated arrangement, the abutment 52 includes a lower portion 54 (see FIG. 2A) that is configured to fit within the post-receiving section 44 of the implant 10. As mentioned above, the post-receiving section 44 may include anti-rotational features. If the post-receiving section 46 includes such anti-rotational features, the lower portion 54 preferably includes corresponding structures so as to prevent the abutment 52 from rotating with respect to the implant body 10. Accordingly, the lower portion 54 of the illustrated embodiment includes a pair of flat sides 56 (FIG. 2C) on an enlarged diameter section 58 of the lower portion 54 (FIG. 2A).
  • [0048]
    As best seen in FIG. 2D, the abutment 52 preferably includes a central through bore 60, which includes a shoulder 62. The central bore 60 and shoulder 62 are configured to receive a bolt, which is illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 3B.
  • [0049]
    Turning now to FIGS. 3A and 3B, the coupling screw 100 is sized and dimensioned to extend through the bore 60 and to couple the abutment 52 to the implant 10. The coupling screw 100 has an externally threaded lower region 102. The threaded lower region 102 is sized and dimensioned to engage the threads of the threaded chamber 42 of the implant 10. The coupling screw 102 also advantageously includes a hexagonal recess 104 located within a head 106 of the screw 100. The hexagonal recess 104 allows for the insertion of a hexagonally shaped tool such as a conventional Allen® wrench, which can be used to apply rotational force to the coupling screw 100.
  • [0050]
    With reference back to FIG. 2A, the abutment has an upper portion 64, which, when the lower portion 54 is in the implant 10, is configured to lie above the top surface 26 of the implant 10. The upper portion 64 may be shaped in various ways for supporting various dental components such as, for example, a final restorations and/or other dental components. In the illustrated embodiment, the upper portion 64 has a generally cylindrical shape with a slight taper.
  • [0051]
    FIGS. 4A-B illustrates a final restoration 66, which can be used with the implant 10 and abutment 52 described above. The final restoration 66 includes an inner surface (not shown), which is configured to fit over the upper portion 64 of the abutment 52. The final restoration 66 preferably also includes a lower surface 68, which is configured to mate with the top surface 26 of the implant 10. Preferably, the lower surface 68 is configured such that the final restoration 66 is secured on top of the abutment 52, the side wall 24 of the implant and an outer surface 70 of the final restoration 66 form a smooth transition. That is, the dimensions and contours of the outer edge 28 of the top surface 26 preferably closely match the dimensions and contours of an outer edge 72 of the lower surface 68 of the final restoration 66.
  • [0052]
    The embodiments described above have several advantages. For example, the illustrated implant 10 has a bone apposition surface 20 that follows the naturally occurring contours of the a patient's bone-tissue morphology. This arrangement reduces alveolar bone loss. In a similar manner, the interface between the final restoration 66 and the dental implant 10 follows the naturally occurring contours of the patient's soft-tissue morphology. This arrangement encourages uniform tissue growth above the bone tissue and minimizes the amount of the dental implant 10 that extends above the soft-tissue. In contrast, in prior art implants, substantial portions of the dental implant extend above the soft-tissue, which can create undesirable “shadows” in the gum-tissue. In addition, the interaction between top surface 26 of the implant contacts the lower surface 68 of the final restoration 66, provides an additional anti-rotational structure between the final restoration 66 and the implant 10.
  • [0053]
    FIGS. 5A-D illustrate a healing cap 74, which is also configured to mate with the implant 10 described above. The healing cap 74 may be used to cover the dental implant 10 during a healing period, such as, for example, after stage one and/or two surgery.
  • [0054]
    The healing cap 74 includes a post 76 that is configured to fit within the post receiving section 44 of the dental implant 10. The healing cap 74 preferably includes a central bore 78 with a shoulder 80. The central bore 78 and shoulder 80 are configured to receive a bolt such as the bolt 100 described above. The bolt 100 can extend into the threaded section 42 to secure the healing cap 74 to the dental implant 10.
  • [0055]
    The healing cap 80 preferably includes a lower surface 82 (see FIG. 5D), which is configured to mate with the top surface 26 of the implant 10. As with the restoration, the top and lower surfaces 26, 82, are preferably configured such that, when the healing cap 80 is secured to the implant 10 a smooth transition is formed between the outer surfaces of the implant 10 and the healing cap 74. An upper surface 75 of the healing cap 74 may have a variety of shapes. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, the upper surface 75 of the healing cap 74 is configured to shape the patient's gums during stage two surgery. In modified embodiment, the upper surface 54 of the healing cap 74 can be configured to facilitate suturing the patient's gums over the implant 10 to allow the implant site to heal and to allow desired osseointegration after, for example, stage one surgery.
  • [0056]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the post 76 includes a releasable retention feature 90, which is configured to releaseably engage the central bore 40 of the dental implant 10. The post 76 may include a variety of releasable retention features, such as, for example, prongs or compressible material, for creating a releasable retention force between the dental implant 10 and the healing abutment. In the illustrated embodiment, the releasable retention feature 90 comprises a resilient O-ring 90 (shown in cross-section in FIG. 5A) positioned within an annular ridge and recess 91. The O-ring 90 is configured to engage the inner surfaces of the central bore in a friction or interference fit. In this manner, the dental practitioner may temporarily attached the healing cap 74 to the implant 10. The practitioner can then use both hands to manipulate the bolt 100 and a driving instrument to secure the healing cap 74 to the implant 10.
  • [0057]
    FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate an insertion tool 110 that may be used to insert the dental implants described above into a patient's jawbone. The insertion tool 110 includes a post 110 that is configured to fit within the post receiving chamber 44 of the implant. As mentioned above, the post receiving chamber 44 can include anti-rotational features 48. If the post receiving chamber 44 includes such anti-rotational features 48, the post 112 preferably includes corresponding structures so as to prevent the insertion tool 110 from rotating with respect to the implant body 10. In the illustrated embodiment, the post 112 includes two flat sides 114, which corresponds to two flat sides 48 in the post receiving chamber 44 so as to prevent relative rotation between the insertion tool 110 and the dental implant 10.
  • [0058]
    The insertion tool 110 includes a torque receiving member 114. The torque receiving member 114 is configured to transmit torque from a torque tool (e.g., a wrench) to the insertion tool. In this manner, the torque generated by the tool can be transmitted to the implant 10 through the insertion tool 110. In the illustrated embodiment, the torque receiving member 114 has a hexagonal cross-section. It should be appreciated that the torque receiving member 114 can be formed into a wide variety of other suitable shapes that may be used with efficacy, giving due consideration to the goals of providing anti-rotation between the torque tool and the insertion tool. For example, the torque receiving member 114 may comprise one or more radially inwardly or outwardly extending splines or recesses, flats, polygonal configurations and other anti-rotation complementary surface structures.
  • [0059]
    The illustrated insertion tool 110 also includes a handpiece receiving portion 116 is sized and dimensioned to fit within a commercial handpiece drill. Typically, the handpiece receiving portion 116 will include a D-shaped key 118 as depicted in FIGS. 6A and 6B. Accordingly, the handpiece receiving portion 116 can be irrotatably locked within the handpiece so that torque can be transmitted from the handpiece to the insertion tool 110. Although a D-shaped key is used in the preferred embodiment, it should be understood that the key may be in the form other shapes as long as that, when in engaged with the handpiece, the key prevents the insertion tool 110 from rotating with respect to the handpiece and from falling out of the handpiece
  • [0060]
    The insertion tool 110 includes a plurality of depth markers 120. In the illustrated embodiment, the depth markers 120 comprise annular grooves. In other embodiments, the depth markers 120 may be formed in a variety of other ways, such as, for example, laser etching, paint, protrusions, etc. The depth markers 120 may be used to guide the dental practitioner when inserting a dental implant into the patient's jawbone. For example, the depth makers 120 are preferably uniformly spaced and arranged so as to indicate the distance from the top of the implant to the top of the gum tissue. In this manner, the thickness of the gum tissue can be determined without requiring incisions to be made around the adjoining/adjacent tissue so as to raise a tissue flap for depth reference. Instead, a probe may be used along the insertion tool 120 to determine the position of the alveolar crest. In such an arrangement, the thickness of the gum tissue may be determined by reference to the depth markers 120 and the implant 10 can be appropriately positioned with respect to the alveolar crest and the top of the gum tissue.
  • [0061]
    As with the abutment 74, the post 112 of the insertion tool 110 preferably includes a releasable retention feature 122, which is configured to releaseably engage the central bore 40 of the dental implant 10. The post 112 may include a variety of releasable retention features, such as, for example, prongs or compressible material, for creating a releasable retention force between the dental implant 10 and the insertion tool 110. In the illustrated embodiment, the releasable retention feature 122 comprises a resilient O-ring 122 (shown in cross-section in FIGS. 6A and 6B) positioned within an annular ridge and recess 124. The O-ring 122 is configured to engage the inner surfaces of the central bore in a friction or interference fit. In this manner, the dental practitioner may temporarily attached the insertion tool 120 to the implant 10 so as to remove the implant from a package or container.
  • [0062]
    Although this invention has been disclosed in the context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the invention and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. In addition, while a number of variations of the invention have been shown and described in detail, other modifications, which are within the scope of this invention, will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art based upon this disclosure. It is also contemplated that various combination or subcombinations of the specific features and aspects of the embodiments may be made and still fall within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, it should be understood that various features and aspects of the disclosed embodiments can be combine with or substituted for one another in order to form varying modes of the disclosed invention. Thus, it is intended that the scope of the present invention herein disclosed should not be limited by the particular disclosed embodiments described above, but should be determined only by a fair reading of the claims that follow.

Claims (3)

  1. 1. A dental implant assembly for supporting a dental prosthesis, the assembly comprising:
    a dental implant comprising a body portion located at a distal end of the dental implant, the body portion configured to lie at least substantially below a crest of a patient's jawbone, a collar portion located at a proximal end of the dental implant, the collar portion forming an abutment mating surface which defines an outer edge having at least one peak and one valley; a central bore that extends through the collar portion and into the implant body portion, the central bore including a threaded portion and a post portion,
    an insertion tool comprising a post configured to fit within the post portion of the central bore and at least one depth marker for indicating the position of the outer edge; and
    complementary mating surfaces between the post of the insertion tool and the post portion of the central tool, the complementary mating surfaces being configured to prevent relative rotation between the dental implant and the insertion tool.
  2. 2. The dental implant assembly as in claim 1, wherein the post includes a retention member for realeasably securing the insertion tool to the implant.
  3. 3. The assembly as in claim 2, wherein the retention member comprises an O-ring positioned on the post.
US11406782 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system Abandoned US20060194170A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US34772302 true 2002-01-11 2002-01-11
US10341531 US20040033470A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2003-01-13 Dental implant system
US11406782 US20060194170A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11406782 US20060194170A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060194170A1 true true US20060194170A1 (en) 2006-08-31

Family

ID=23364967

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10341531 Abandoned US20040033470A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2003-01-13 Dental implant system
US11406782 Abandoned US20060194170A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system
US11406626 Active 2023-08-31 US7780447B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10341531 Abandoned US20040033470A1 (en) 2002-01-11 2003-01-13 Dental implant system

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11406626 Active 2023-08-31 US7780447B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-04-19 Dental implant system

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (3) US20040033470A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1467674B1 (en)
JP (1) JP4280638B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2473087C (en)
DE (1) DE60327164D1 (en)
ES (1) ES2325954T3 (en)
WO (1) WO2003059189A1 (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050014108A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2005-01-20 Wohrle Peter S. Dental implant system
US20050214714A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2005-09-29 Wohrle Peter S Dental implant system
US20090239195A1 (en) * 2008-03-18 2009-09-24 Peter Wohrle Asymmetrical dental implant
USRE42391E1 (en) 1998-12-01 2011-05-24 Woehrle Peter S Bioroot endosseous implant
US20130065198A1 (en) * 2011-09-14 2013-03-14 Marcus Abboud Jaw implant
US9168110B2 (en) 2012-05-29 2015-10-27 Biomet 3I, Llc Dental implant system having enhanced soft-tissue growth features
US20160008103A1 (en) * 2014-07-10 2016-01-14 Metal Industries Research & Development Centre Dental Prosthesis and a Dental Implant Including Same

Families Citing this family (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2532860T3 (en) 2001-12-21 2015-04-01 Nobel Biocare Services Ag Implant with an outer surface having a corrugated configuration, underlying
CA2473087C (en) 2002-01-11 2011-05-31 Nobel Biocare Ab Dental implant system
DE602004021720D1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2009-08-06 Nobel Biocare Ab implant
EP1579819B2 (en) * 2004-03-25 2013-06-26 Straumann Holding AG Improved intraosteal dental implant
US7108510B2 (en) * 2004-06-25 2006-09-19 Niznick Gerald A Endosseous dental implant
EP1629791A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-01 Denta Vision GmbH Dental implant system, implanting method and superstructure for the implant system
US7758344B2 (en) * 2005-11-18 2010-07-20 Form And Function Dental Services, P.C. Asymmetrical dental implant and method of insertion
EP1894541B1 (en) * 2006-08-29 2013-03-20 Straumann Holding AG Abutment for a dental implant
US20110014587A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. System and methods of preserving an oral socket
EP2335639B1 (en) * 2009-12-15 2014-04-16 AIDI Biomedical International Dental implant fixture mount-abutment
ES2377607B1 (en) * 2012-02-15 2013-02-13 Phibo Dental Solutions, S.L. customizable dental pillar for soft tissue modeling
WO2014113851A1 (en) * 2013-01-28 2014-07-31 Villa Hernandes Marcelo Skeleton for dental prostheses

Citations (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2112007A (en) * 1937-01-16 1938-03-22 Pinkney B Adams Anchoring means for false teeth
US3849887A (en) * 1970-06-01 1974-11-26 Vitredent Corp Dental implant
US4416629A (en) * 1982-07-06 1983-11-22 Mozsary Peter G Osseointerfaced implanted artificial tooth
US4468200A (en) * 1982-11-12 1984-08-28 Feldmuhle Aktiengesellschaft Helical mandibular implant
US4624673A (en) * 1982-01-21 1986-11-25 United States Medical Corporation Device system for dental prosthesis fixation to bone
US4713003A (en) * 1985-05-17 1987-12-15 University Of Toronto Innovations Foundation Fixture for attaching prosthesis to bone
US4960381A (en) * 1987-01-08 1990-10-02 Core-Vent Corporation Screw-type dental implant anchor
US5004422A (en) * 1989-11-09 1991-04-02 Propper Robert H Oral endosteal implants and a process for preparing and implanting them
US5035619A (en) * 1989-10-20 1991-07-30 Fereidoun Daftary Anatomical restoration dental implant system with improved healing cap and abutment
US5246370A (en) * 1992-11-27 1993-09-21 Coatoam Gary W Dental implant method
US5282747A (en) * 1991-07-08 1994-02-01 Nordin Harald E Superstructure for an artificial tooth
US5282746A (en) * 1992-11-04 1994-02-01 Grady C. Sellers Method of installing a dental prosthesis
US5310343A (en) * 1992-10-14 1994-05-10 Jiro Hasegawa Endo-osseous implant
US5417568A (en) * 1994-02-25 1995-05-23 Giglio; Graziano D. Gingival contoured abutment
US5417569A (en) * 1990-04-20 1995-05-23 Perisse; Jean Multi-element dental implant
US5431567A (en) * 1993-05-17 1995-07-11 Daftary; Fereidoun Anatomical restoration dental implant system with interlockable various shaped healing cap assembly and matching abutment member
US5584693A (en) * 1994-02-07 1996-12-17 Katsunari Nishihara Artificial dental root
US5636989A (en) * 1993-09-29 1997-06-10 Somborac; Milan Dental implant
US5674069A (en) * 1995-01-13 1997-10-07 Osorio; Julian Customized dental abutment
US5759034A (en) * 1996-11-29 1998-06-02 Daftary; Fereidoun Anatomical restoration dental implant system for posterior and anterior teeth
US5779480A (en) * 1996-05-21 1998-07-14 Degussa Aktiengesellschaft Prosthetic abutment for dental implants
US5931675A (en) * 1996-07-12 1999-08-03 Callan; Donald P. Dental prosthesis
US5989029A (en) * 1997-07-08 1999-11-23 Atlantis Components, Inc. Customized dental abutments and methods of preparing or selecting the same
US5989027A (en) * 1995-12-08 1999-11-23 Sulzer Calcitek Inc. Dental implant having multiple textured surfaces
US6024567A (en) * 1996-07-12 2000-02-15 Callan; Donald P. Dental prosthesis
US6162054A (en) * 1998-01-28 2000-12-19 Takacs; Gyula Subgingival jaw implant
US6164969A (en) * 1997-03-21 2000-12-26 Dinkelacker; Wolfgang Dental implant
US6174167B1 (en) * 1998-12-01 2001-01-16 Woehrle Peter S. Bioroot endosseous implant
US6217333B1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2001-04-17 Carlo Ercoli Dental implant for promoting reduced interpoximal resorption
US6217331B1 (en) * 1997-10-03 2001-04-17 Implant Innovations, Inc. Single-stage implant system
US6227858B1 (en) * 1997-02-25 2001-05-08 Nobel Biocare Ab Bone anchoring element
US6280195B1 (en) * 1999-06-11 2001-08-28 Astra Aktiebolag Method of treating a partially or totally edentulous patient
US6312260B1 (en) * 1998-08-12 2001-11-06 Nobel Biocare Ab One-step threaded implant
US6350126B1 (en) * 2000-09-01 2002-02-26 Ricardo Levisman Bone implant
US6464500B1 (en) * 2001-05-22 2002-10-15 Don Dragoljub Popovic Dental implant and abutment system
US20030031982A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2003-02-13 Abarno Juan Carlos Split implant for dental reconstruction
US20030031981A1 (en) * 2000-10-21 2003-02-13 Robert Holt Prosthetic implant
US6527554B2 (en) * 2001-06-04 2003-03-04 Nobel Biocare Ab Natural implant system
US20030068599A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 Balfour Alan R. Esthetic profile endosseous root-formed dental implant
US6619958B2 (en) * 1997-04-09 2003-09-16 Implant Innovations, Inc. Implant delivery system
US6626911B1 (en) * 1998-11-11 2003-09-30 Nobel Biocare Ab Threaded implant, and arrangement and method for such an implant
US6652765B1 (en) * 1994-11-30 2003-11-25 Implant Innovations, Inc. Implant surface preparation

Family Cites Families (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3527554A (en) * 1968-08-29 1970-09-08 Fritz Peterson Feed supports for mink cages
GB1291470A (en) 1968-12-09 1972-10-04 Aga Ab A device for mounting a prosthesis on skeletal tissue
US4051598A (en) 1974-04-23 1977-10-04 Meer Sneer Dental implants
DE2628485A1 (en) 1975-07-17 1977-01-20 Straumann Inst Ag jaw implant
US4812120A (en) 1987-11-02 1989-03-14 Flanagan Dennis F Implantable percutaneous device
US4856994A (en) * 1988-01-25 1989-08-15 Implant Innovations, Inc. Periodontal restoration components
FR2634369A1 (en) 1988-07-20 1990-01-26 Malek Pierre Dental implant
EP0390129B1 (en) 1989-03-29 1994-06-08 Sugio Otani Dental implant
US5125839A (en) 1990-09-28 1992-06-30 Abraham Ingber Dental implant system
US5458488A (en) 1991-12-30 1995-10-17 Wellesley Research Associates, Inc. Dental implant and post construction
WO1993013815A1 (en) 1992-01-13 1993-07-22 Lucocer Aktiebolag An implant
DE4235801C2 (en) 1992-10-23 1997-03-06 Friatec Keramik Kunststoff Dental implant
CA2147970C (en) 1992-10-28 2004-08-03 Stig Gustav Vilhelm Hansson Fixture in a dental implant system
US5876454A (en) 1993-05-10 1999-03-02 Universite De Montreal Modified implant with bioactive conjugates on its surface for improved integration
US5316477A (en) 1993-05-25 1994-05-31 Calderon Luis O Universal implant abutment
DE4339060A1 (en) 1993-11-16 1995-05-18 Borsig Babcock Ag Gear compressor for the compression of oxygen
US5873721A (en) 1993-12-23 1999-02-23 Adt Advanced Dental Technologies, Ltd. Implant abutment systems, devices, and techniques
US5527182A (en) 1993-12-23 1996-06-18 Adt Advanced Dental Technologies, Ltd. Implant abutment systems, devices, and techniques
US5622500A (en) * 1994-02-24 1997-04-22 Core-Vent Corporation Insertion tool/healing collar/abutment
US5667384A (en) 1994-06-03 1997-09-16 Institut Straumann Ag Device for forming a dental prosthesis and method of manufacturing such a device
US5571017A (en) 1994-10-05 1996-11-05 Core-Vent Corporation Selective surface, externally-threaded endosseous dental implant
DE19509762A1 (en) 1995-03-17 1996-09-26 Imz Fertigung Vertrieb Intra-osseous single tooth implant with spacer sleeve
DE59600579D1 (en) 1995-03-20 1998-10-22 Straumann Inst Ag Connection arrangement of a dental implant with a conical secondary part
US5695334A (en) 1995-12-08 1997-12-09 Blacklock; Gordon D. Bendable and castable post and core
US6142782A (en) * 1996-01-05 2000-11-07 Lazarof; Sargon Implant assembly and process for preparing a prosthetic device
DE69636845D1 (en) 1996-04-04 2007-02-22 Julian Osorio Patient-specific dental support
JPH1033562A (en) 1996-07-25 1998-02-10 Injietsukusu:Kk Artificial dental root
WO1998042273A1 (en) 1997-03-21 1998-10-01 Wolfgang Dinkelacker Tooth implant
US5989028A (en) 1997-05-15 1999-11-23 Core-Vent Corporation Non-submergible, one-part, root-form endosseous dental implants
US6012923A (en) 1998-07-30 2000-01-11 Sulzer Calcitek Inc. Two-piece dental abutment with removable cuff
US6287115B1 (en) 1998-11-17 2001-09-11 L. Paul Lustig Dental implant and tool and method for effecting a dental restoration using the same
EP1013236B1 (en) 1998-12-11 2000-11-08 Dinkelacker, Wolfgang, Dr. med. dent. Dental implant and manufacturing method
US6413089B1 (en) 1999-02-10 2002-07-02 Arthur Ashman Immediate post-extraction implant
US6273720B1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2001-08-14 Robert Spalten Dental implant system
ES2325054T3 (en) * 2000-01-04 2009-08-25 Straumann Holding Ag enossal dental implant.
US6854972B1 (en) 2000-01-11 2005-02-15 Nicholas Elian Dental implants and dental implant/prosthetic tooth systems
US6285754B1 (en) * 2000-04-06 2001-09-04 2Wire, Inc. Odd-order low-pass pots device microfilter
US6431867B1 (en) * 2000-04-18 2002-08-13 Glenn Gittelson Dental implant system
WO2003000909A3 (en) 2001-06-21 2009-06-18 Mark Burk Methods for the manufacture of pure single enantiomer compounds and for selecting enantioselective enzymes
US6537069B1 (en) * 2001-10-01 2003-03-25 Earl Wayne Simmons, Jr. Method and apparatus for dental implants
CA2473087C (en) 2002-01-11 2011-05-31 Nobel Biocare Ab Dental implant system
US6939135B2 (en) 2002-06-03 2005-09-06 Schubert L. Sapian Growth factor releasing biofunctional dental implant
US7708559B2 (en) 2003-05-16 2010-05-04 Nobel Biocare Services Ag Dental implant system
US20050214714A1 (en) 2003-05-16 2005-09-29 Wohrle Peter S Dental implant system

Patent Citations (45)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2112007A (en) * 1937-01-16 1938-03-22 Pinkney B Adams Anchoring means for false teeth
US3849887A (en) * 1970-06-01 1974-11-26 Vitredent Corp Dental implant
US4624673A (en) * 1982-01-21 1986-11-25 United States Medical Corporation Device system for dental prosthesis fixation to bone
US4416629A (en) * 1982-07-06 1983-11-22 Mozsary Peter G Osseointerfaced implanted artificial tooth
US4468200A (en) * 1982-11-12 1984-08-28 Feldmuhle Aktiengesellschaft Helical mandibular implant
US4713003A (en) * 1985-05-17 1987-12-15 University Of Toronto Innovations Foundation Fixture for attaching prosthesis to bone
US4960381A (en) * 1987-01-08 1990-10-02 Core-Vent Corporation Screw-type dental implant anchor
US4960381B1 (en) * 1987-01-08 1998-04-14 Core Vent Corp Screw-type dental implant anchor
US5035619A (en) * 1989-10-20 1991-07-30 Fereidoun Daftary Anatomical restoration dental implant system with improved healing cap and abutment
US5004422A (en) * 1989-11-09 1991-04-02 Propper Robert H Oral endosteal implants and a process for preparing and implanting them
US5417569A (en) * 1990-04-20 1995-05-23 Perisse; Jean Multi-element dental implant
US5282747A (en) * 1991-07-08 1994-02-01 Nordin Harald E Superstructure for an artificial tooth
US5310343A (en) * 1992-10-14 1994-05-10 Jiro Hasegawa Endo-osseous implant
US5282746A (en) * 1992-11-04 1994-02-01 Grady C. Sellers Method of installing a dental prosthesis
US5246370A (en) * 1992-11-27 1993-09-21 Coatoam Gary W Dental implant method
US5431567A (en) * 1993-05-17 1995-07-11 Daftary; Fereidoun Anatomical restoration dental implant system with interlockable various shaped healing cap assembly and matching abutment member
US5636989A (en) * 1993-09-29 1997-06-10 Somborac; Milan Dental implant
US5584693A (en) * 1994-02-07 1996-12-17 Katsunari Nishihara Artificial dental root
US5417568A (en) * 1994-02-25 1995-05-23 Giglio; Graziano D. Gingival contoured abutment
US6652765B1 (en) * 1994-11-30 2003-11-25 Implant Innovations, Inc. Implant surface preparation
US5674069A (en) * 1995-01-13 1997-10-07 Osorio; Julian Customized dental abutment
US5989027A (en) * 1995-12-08 1999-11-23 Sulzer Calcitek Inc. Dental implant having multiple textured surfaces
US5779480A (en) * 1996-05-21 1998-07-14 Degussa Aktiengesellschaft Prosthetic abutment for dental implants
US6024567A (en) * 1996-07-12 2000-02-15 Callan; Donald P. Dental prosthesis
US5931675A (en) * 1996-07-12 1999-08-03 Callan; Donald P. Dental prosthesis
US5759034A (en) * 1996-11-29 1998-06-02 Daftary; Fereidoun Anatomical restoration dental implant system for posterior and anterior teeth
US6227858B1 (en) * 1997-02-25 2001-05-08 Nobel Biocare Ab Bone anchoring element
US6164969A (en) * 1997-03-21 2000-12-26 Dinkelacker; Wolfgang Dental implant
US6619958B2 (en) * 1997-04-09 2003-09-16 Implant Innovations, Inc. Implant delivery system
US6231342B1 (en) * 1997-07-08 2001-05-15 Atlantis Components, Inc. Customized dental abutments and methods of preparing or selecting the same
US5989029A (en) * 1997-07-08 1999-11-23 Atlantis Components, Inc. Customized dental abutments and methods of preparing or selecting the same
US6217331B1 (en) * 1997-10-03 2001-04-17 Implant Innovations, Inc. Single-stage implant system
US6162054A (en) * 1998-01-28 2000-12-19 Takacs; Gyula Subgingival jaw implant
US6312260B1 (en) * 1998-08-12 2001-11-06 Nobel Biocare Ab One-step threaded implant
US6626911B1 (en) * 1998-11-11 2003-09-30 Nobel Biocare Ab Threaded implant, and arrangement and method for such an implant
US6174167B1 (en) * 1998-12-01 2001-01-16 Woehrle Peter S. Bioroot endosseous implant
US6283754B1 (en) * 1998-12-01 2001-09-04 Woehrle Peter S. Bioroot endosseous implant
US6280195B1 (en) * 1999-06-11 2001-08-28 Astra Aktiebolag Method of treating a partially or totally edentulous patient
US6217333B1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2001-04-17 Carlo Ercoli Dental implant for promoting reduced interpoximal resorption
US6350126B1 (en) * 2000-09-01 2002-02-26 Ricardo Levisman Bone implant
US20030031981A1 (en) * 2000-10-21 2003-02-13 Robert Holt Prosthetic implant
US6464500B1 (en) * 2001-05-22 2002-10-15 Don Dragoljub Popovic Dental implant and abutment system
US6527554B2 (en) * 2001-06-04 2003-03-04 Nobel Biocare Ab Natural implant system
US20030031982A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2003-02-13 Abarno Juan Carlos Split implant for dental reconstruction
US20030068599A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 Balfour Alan R. Esthetic profile endosseous root-formed dental implant

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE42391E1 (en) 1998-12-01 2011-05-24 Woehrle Peter S Bioroot endosseous implant
US20050014108A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2005-01-20 Wohrle Peter S. Dental implant system
US20050214714A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2005-09-29 Wohrle Peter S Dental implant system
US7708559B2 (en) 2003-05-16 2010-05-04 Nobel Biocare Services Ag Dental implant system
US20090239195A1 (en) * 2008-03-18 2009-09-24 Peter Wohrle Asymmetrical dental implant
US8066511B2 (en) * 2008-03-18 2011-11-29 Woehrle Peter Asymmetrical dental implant
US20130065198A1 (en) * 2011-09-14 2013-03-14 Marcus Abboud Jaw implant
US9039417B2 (en) * 2011-09-14 2015-05-26 Marcus Abboud Jaw implant
US9168110B2 (en) 2012-05-29 2015-10-27 Biomet 3I, Llc Dental implant system having enhanced soft-tissue growth features
US20160008103A1 (en) * 2014-07-10 2016-01-14 Metal Industries Research & Development Centre Dental Prosthesis and a Dental Implant Including Same
US9504540B2 (en) * 2014-07-10 2016-11-29 Metal Industries Research & Development Centre Dental implant with positioning marker and index portions

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2473087A1 (en) 2003-07-24 application
EP1467674A1 (en) 2004-10-20 application
CA2473087C (en) 2011-05-31 grant
DE60327164D1 (en) 2009-05-28 grant
US20040033470A1 (en) 2004-02-19 application
JP4280638B2 (en) 2009-06-17 grant
JP2005514981A (en) 2005-05-26 application
EP1467674B1 (en) 2009-04-15 grant
US7780447B2 (en) 2010-08-24 grant
US20060188846A1 (en) 2006-08-24 application
ES2325954T3 (en) 2009-09-25 grant
WO2003059189A1 (en) 2003-07-24 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5989027A (en) Dental implant having multiple textured surfaces
US4416629A (en) Osseointerfaced implanted artificial tooth
US6716030B1 (en) Universal O-ball mini-implant, universal keeper cap and method of use
US5564921A (en) Method of forming an abutment post
US6217331B1 (en) Single-stage implant system
US4187609A (en) Submerged functional implant and method
US6220860B1 (en) Dental implant
US5702346A (en) Dental implant fixture for anchorage in cortcal bone
US5297963A (en) Anatomical restoration dental implant system with interlockable elliptical healing cap assembly and matching abutment member
US5695336A (en) Dental implant fixture for anchorage in cortical bone
US4547157A (en) Submergible post-type dental implant system and method of using same
US6769913B2 (en) Impression cap
US4960381A (en) Screw-type dental implant anchor
US5362235A (en) Anatomical restoration dental implant system with interlockable angled abutment assembly
US5636989A (en) Dental implant
US5246370A (en) Dental implant method
US4253833A (en) Submerged functional implant and method
US5927979A (en) Abutment-mount system for dental implants
US5591029A (en) Dental implant system
US6273720B1 (en) Dental implant system
US6045361A (en) Ball-topped screw for facilitating the making of an impression of a dental implant and method of using the same
US5209659A (en) Method for installing a dental implant
US4687443A (en) Submergible post-type dental implant system and method of using same
US20080261176A1 (en) Dental implant and dental component connection
US5785525A (en) Dental implant system