US20060121419A1 - Threat fire simulation system - Google Patents

Threat fire simulation system Download PDF

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US20060121419A1
US20060121419A1 US11286162 US28616205A US2006121419A1 US 20060121419 A1 US20060121419 A1 US 20060121419A1 US 11286162 US11286162 US 11286162 US 28616205 A US28616205 A US 28616205A US 2006121419 A1 US2006121419 A1 US 2006121419A1
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electrical
system
impulse element
electrical impulse
delivery
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US11286162
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Robert Ferris
Roger Malin
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VirTra Systems Inc
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VirTra Systems Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A33/00Adaptations for training; Gun simulators

Abstract

A threat fire simulation system (40) for simulating a projectile impacting a user (26) includes an electrical impulse element (44) configured for physical contact with the user (26). A controller (42) is in communication with the electrical impulse element (44). The controller (42) enables receipt of a signal (54) for activating electrical impulse element (44) to deliver a non-disabling electrical pulse (46) to the user (26). The electrical pulse (46) simulates an impact of the projectile on the user (26).

Description

    RELATED INVENTION
  • In addition, the present invention claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to: “Simulated Shot-Back Training Device,” U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/633,080, filed 3 Dec. 2004, which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the field simulation systems for use-of-force training. More specifically, the present invention relates to the simulation of a projectile, such as a bullet, impacting a trainee.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Due to current world events, there is an urgent need for highly effective law enforcement, security, and military training. Training involves practicing marksmanship skills with lethal and/or non-lethal weapons. Additionally, training involves the development of decision-making skills in situations that are stressful and potentially dangerous. Indeed, perhaps the greatest challenges faced by a trainee are when to use force and how much force to use. If an officer is unprepared to make rapid decisions under the various threats he or she faces, injury to the officer or citizens may result.
  • One training technique that has been in use for many years is the utilization of a simulation system to conduct training exercises. Simulation provides a cost effective means of teaching initial weapon handling skills and some decision-making skills, and provides training in real-life situations in which live-fire may be undesirable due to safety or other restrictions.
  • Simulation systems for such training have included devices to simulate the threat posed by an offender discharging a shot toward, and possibly impacting, a trainee. One such device is known as a shoot-back cannon. The shoot-back cannon discharges nylon balls at high velocity toward the trainee, with the nylon balls simulating bullets. Automatic targeting methods have been employed for directing the shoot-back cannot toward the trainee to reduce the instructor's burden of manually tracking and targeting the trainee. Training exercises typically involve teaching the trainee to seek cover.
  • One problem encountered with the shoot-back cannon is that due to the presence of high velocity nylon ball projectiles, the trainee must wear safety eye gear. The safety eye gear can have an adverse effect on the shooting accuracy of the trainee. Moreover, others in the area of the shoot-back cannon must also wear safety eye gear, generating both additional responsibility and liability for the training facility. Even with safety eye gear on, there is still the potential that the nylon ball projectile could injure the trainee or others, or damage equipment in the area. In addition, the nylon balls are a slipping hazard when on the floor because they can behave like ball-bearings under the foot of an individual.
  • In addition to problems associated with safety, the shoot-back cannon could misfire or miss the intended target. When this happens, the training opportunity is lost. More critically, however, the trainee may consciously or subconsciously marginalize real-world threats.
  • Typically the nylon balls are reused in the shoot-back cannon. Consequently, time intensive collection of the nylon balls is required. Finally, the shoot-back cannon is a mechanical device prone to break-down and wear-and-tear over time, necessitating costly repair and/or replacement.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, it is an advantage of the present invention that a system is provided for simulating a projectile impacting a user.
  • It is another advantage of the present invention that a system is provided in which a user can distinctly detect a simulated impact of a projectile.
  • Another advantage of the present invention is that a system is provided that is readily incorporated into a simulation system, is cost effectively manufactured, and calls for minimal adjustment by an instructor during a training exercise.
  • The above and other advantages of the present invention are carried out in one form by a system for simulating a projectile impacting a user. The system includes an electrical impulse element configured for physical contact with the user. A controller is in communication with the electrical impulse element for enabling receipt of a signal at the electrical impulse element. The signal activates the electrical impulse element to deliver a non-disabling electrical pulse to the user, the electrical pulse simulating an impact of the projectile.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A more complete understanding of the present invention may be derived by referring to the detailed description and claims when considered in connection with the Figures, wherein like reference numbers refer to similar items throughout the Figures, and:
  • FIG. 1 shows a block diagram of a simulation system in which the present invention may be implemented;
  • FIG. 2 shows an illustrative representation of a scene from a prerecorded video sequence, or scenario, that may be presented on a screen of the simulation system;
  • FIG. 3 shows a block diagram of a threat fire system for simulating a projectile impacting a user of the simulation system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of an electrical impulse element of the threat fire system of FIG. 3 mounted on a user worn belt;
  • FIG. 5 shows a partial rear perspective view of the electrical impulse element mounted on the user worn belt;
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of the electrical impulse element;
  • FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of the electrical impulse element of the threat fire system that attaches to the user via a clip in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 shows a screen shot image of a main window presented on a display of an instructor console;
  • FIG. 9 shows a screen shot image of a pop up window revealing a password entry pane;
  • FIG. 10 shows a partial screen shot image of the main window with the threat fire system prepared for operation; and
  • FIG. 11 shows a screen shot image of a drop down menu of that includes a list of default pain settings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention entails a system for simulating a threat fire condition that may be utilized within a simulation system for use-of-force training. The simulation system is utilized to display a scenario, with the scenario including an offender holding a weapon. The term “threat fire” utilized herein refers to a situation within the pre-recorded scenario in which the offender discharges his or her weapon toward the trainee, i.e., the offender is a “threat” to the trainee's perceived safety.
  • FIG. 1 shows a block diagram of a simulation system 20 in which the present invention may be implemented. Simulation system 20 includes a single screen 22, in front of which one or more participants, i.e., a trainee 26, may be positioned. A rear projection system 28 is associated with screen 22. Trainee 26 views screen 22 with video projected thereon via rear projection system 28, and must decide how to react to the subject matter presented within the video. Rear projection system 28 is operable, and the actions of trainee 26 may be monitored from, an instructor console 30 located a distance away from trainee 26.
  • The present invention is described in the context of its use with a single screen simulation system. It should be understood, however, that the specific simulation system is not a limitation of the present invention. Rather, the present invention may be readily implemented within a variety of existing and upcoming single screen and multiple screen simulation systems.
  • FIG. 2 shows an illustrative representation of a scene 32 from a prerecorded video sequence, or scenario 34, that may be presented on screen 22 of simulation system 20 (FIG. 1). Scene 32 shows an offender 36 poised with a weapon 38 in hand. Trainee 26 (FIG. 1) must make a determination as to whether a shot from weapon 38 is imminent, and whether to shoot first or seek cover. For purposes of the following description, offender 36 discharges weapon 38. Although an actual projectile, or bullet, cannot discharge from weapon 38 of the prerecorded video of scenario 34, the present invention enables trainee 26 to experience the sensation of an impact of the projectile, so as to reinforce good tactical decision making.
  • FIG. 3 shows a block diagram of a threat fire system 40 for simulating a projectile impacting trainee 26 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Threat fire system 40 includes a controller 42 operable from instructor console 30 and an electrical impulse element 44 worn by trainee 26 (FIG. 1). Electrical impulse element 44 is configured for physical contact with trainee 26 (FIG. 1), discussed below, and is configured to impart a non-disabling electrical pulse 46 to trainee 26. The term “non-disabling” utilized herein refers to a condition in which trainee 26 can feel pulse 46 as a sensation of mild or more severe pain. However, pulse 46 is not incapacitating, such as the pulse delivered by a conventional stun gun. Electrical pulse 46 simulates an impact of the simulated projectile fired from weapon 38 (FIG. 2) by offender 36 (FIG. 1). Thus, electrical pulse 46 serves as notification to trainee 26 that he or she has been “shot”.
  • In a preferred embodiment, instructor console 30 includes a first, or instructor, transceiver 48 in communication with controller 42. Instructor transceiver 48 is in communication with electrical impulse element 44 via a communication link 50. In a preferred embodiment, communication link 50 is a wireless link. However, a wired communication link may alternatively be employed. Controller 42 executes threat fire control code 52 which is operable by an instructor (not shown) via a data input 51, such as a keyboard, mouse, and the like, and is viewable by the instructor via a display 53. Threat fire control code 52 may be a stand-alone program or may be incorporated into primary control code (not shown) for controlling the general operation of simulation system 20 (FIG. 1). Through the execution of threat fire control code 52, controller 42 generates and conveys a signal, represented by a dashed arrow 54, to electrical impulse element 44. Signal 54 enables activation of electrical impulse element 44, discussed below, to deliver non-disabling electrical pulse 46 to trainee 26 via a pair of electrodes 55.
  • Electrical impulse element 44, worn by trainee 26 (FIG. 1) includes a second, or trainee, transceiver 56 for receiving signal 54 via wireless communication link 50. A master microcontroller 58 is in communication with transceiver 56. Master microcontroller 58 is further in communication with a slave microcontroller 60 via a link 62. In addition, master microcontroller 58 selectively communicates with an impulse generator 64 via a first power lead 66. Similarly, slave microcontroller 60 selectively communicates with impulse generator 64 via a second power lead 68. Master microcontroller 58, slave microcontroller 60, and impulse generator 64 are powered by a rechargeable battery 70.
  • Impulse generator 64 may be a conventional stunner circuit capable of producing a 20,000 to 150,000 volt pulse, or shock. The internal circuit of a conventional stunner circuit is typically based either on an oscillator, resonant circuit and step-up transformer or diode-capacity voltage multipliers to achieve a continuous, direct or alternating high-voltage discharge.
  • Such stunner weapons may be utilized in law enforcement environments for subduing a person by administering a high-voltage, but low-current electrical shock. An electrical shock of sufficient duration provided by the stunner weapon “confuses” the human nervous system, thus incapacitating an individual. The high voltage is needed to transfer the electrical charge to the individual's body, and the current is kept low so that the individual will not be severely injured.
  • In the training environment of simulation system 20, impulse generator 64 does not produce the incapacitating shock of a conventional stunner weapon. Rather, a high voltage electrical pulse 46 is produced for a very brief duration, discussed below. The high voltage of electrical pulse 46 is critical so that pulse 46 may be felt through the clothing of trainee 26. However, the short duration mitigates the potential for incapacitating trainee 26 (FIG. 1).
  • Safety interlocks are important for the safe training application of system 40. Such safety interlocks can include watchdog processors that monitor for any component failure. If the watchdog processors detect a failure or problem, impulse generator 64 cannot be activated.
  • Threat fire system 40 includes a duration timer 72 managed by master microcontroller 58 for monitoring a duration of activation of non-disabling electrical pulse 46, i.e., a delivery duration. Under normal operating conditions, delivery of pulse 46 is discontinued upon expiration of the delivery duration, as monitored at duration timer 72. Threat fire system 40 further includes a secondary exposure limit timer 74 managed by slave microcontroller 60. Exposure limit timer 74 ensures that the duration does not exceed a pre-programmed value, for example two and one half seconds. Should delivery of pulse 46 not be discontinued upon expiration of the delivery duration, as monitored at duration timer 72, delivery of pulse 46 will be discontinued when the duration reaches the pre-preprogrammed value, monitored at exposure limit timer 74. Thus, the dual timer capability of duration timer 72 and exposure limit timer 74 provides another safety interlock for limiting injury to trainee 26 (FIG. 1).
  • In addition, system 40 includes an interval timer 76 managed by master microcontroller 58. Interval timer 76 is utilized for controlling an interval between delivery of successive electrical pulses 46. Through the utilization of interval timer 76, electrical impulse element 44 will not reactivate for a set period after impulse generator 64 was last activated. Interval timer 76 may be set to, for example, fifteen seconds. Consequently, interval timer 76 provides yet another safety interlock for limiting injury to trainee 26.
  • In general operation, signal 54, in the form of a serial digital message, is sent from controller 42 over wireless communication link 50 via instructor transceiver 48. Ideally, the generation of signal 54 is coordinated with actions unfolding in scenario 34. For example, signal 54 may be automatically generated by controller 42 in response to an action in which offender 36 (FIG. 2) discharges weapon 38 (FIG. 2) when a period of time has elapsed and trainee 26 has not yet appropriately reacted to the situation. Alternatively, the instructor can “manually” activate electrical impulse element 44 from instructor console 30 (FIG. 3) via a program control window displayed on display 53 when offender 36 discharges weapon 38 and trainee 26 has not yet seeked cover.
  • Signal 54 is received at trainee transceiver 56, is decoded, and is forwarded to master microcontroller 58. Signal 54 includes an identifier specifying electrical impulse element 44, a “pain setting” in the form of a delivery duration for non-disabling electrical pulse 46, and a CHECKSUM.
  • Master microcontroller 58 performs a validity check of signal 54 using CHECKSUM to determine whether errors occurred in transmission of signal 54 over wireless link 52. Master microcontroller 58 further authenticates the identifier specifying electrical impulse element 44 and determines whether the transmitted delivery duration is a logical value. If signal 54 is invalid, master microcontroller 58 ignores signal 54 and nothing happens.
  • However, if signal 54 is valid, master microcontroller 58 returns an acknowledge signal to controller 42 via wireless communication link 50. Master microcontroller 58 then applies power to first power lead 66 and commands slave microcontroller 60 via link 62 to apply power to second power lead 68. In addition, master microcontroller 58 starts duration timer 72 and starts interval timer 76.
  • In response to commanding from master microcontroller 58, slave microcontroller 60 returns an acknowledge signal to master microcontroller 58 via link 62, applies power to second power lead 68, and starts secondary exposure limit timer 74.
  • Power applied to first and second power leads 66 and 68, respectively, enables activation of impulse generator 64 to produce and deliver non-disabling electrical impulse 46 at pair of electrodes 55. Master microcontroller 58 commands slave microcontroller 60 to remove power from second power lead 68 when duration timer 72 expires to discontinue delivery of non-disabling electrical pulse 46. If slave microcontroller 60 fails to receive appropriate commanding within the pre-programmed value monitored by exposure limit timer 74, slave microcontroller 60 removes power from second power lead 68 to impose a forced discontinuation of the delivery of electrical pulse 46.
  • Although threat fire system 40 is shown as having only one electrical impulse element 44, it should be understood that controller 42 can control a number of individual electrical impulse elements 44. These multiple electrical impulse elements 44 can be physically coupled at various locations on trainee 26. For example, one of elements 44 could be coupled to the primary shooting arm of trainee 26. As such, should element 44 become activated, trainee 26 may be compelled to utilize his or her non-dominant arm. Alternatively, these multiple electrical impulse elements 44 can be physically coupled to multiple trainees 26 concurrently training in simulation system 20 (FIG. 1).
  • Referring to FIGS. 4-6, FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of electrical impulse element 44 of threat fire system 40 (FIG. 3) mounted on a user worn belt 78. FIG. 5 shows a partial rear perspective view of the electrical impulse element 44 mounted on user worn belt 78, and FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of the electrical impulse element 44.
  • The elements of electrical impulse element 44 are contained in a housing 80, which is in turn coupled to belt 78. Belt 78 provides means for securing electrical impulse element 44 to trainee 26 (FIG. 1). Pair of electrodes 55 are imbedded in a user facing side 82 of belt 78 so that electrodes 55 can be placed in physical contact with trainee 26. Although electrodes 55 are in physical contact with trainee 26, electrodes 55 need not contact the trainee's skin. For example, electrodes 55 may include thin wires sewn into user facing side of belt 78 for ensuring that non-disabling electrical pulse 46 is felt by trainee 26 through the clothing of trainee 26.
  • Non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3) from electrodes 55 is capable of penetrating four or more layers of clothing (approximately one half inch of thickness), so that belt 78 can be conveniently placed on top of trainee clothing. Although belt 78 is shown with only one electrical impulse element 44 mounted thereon, belt 44 might include two elements 44 such that one is positioned in front of trainee 26 and one is positioned in the back.
  • Once belt 78 is secured with electrodes 55 in contact with trainee 26, electrical impulse element can be turned “on” via a pushbutton 84 located on an external surface of housing 80. In addition to pushbutton 84, housing 80 includes a charging port 86 for recharging battery 70 (FIG. 3) and a number of indicator lights 88. In an alternative embodiment, port 86 may be absent. In such a case, electrical impulse element 44 may be recharged via an inductive charge technique or may include non-rechargeable batteries. Indicator lights 88 include, for example, a “CHARGING” light that when blinking indicates that element 44 is charging and a “LOW BATTERY” light that when lit indicates that it's time to recharge element 44. Indicator lights can also include a “FAULT” light that when lit indicates a component failure within element 44, a “NO COMM” light that when lit indicates that there is no communication link between element 44 and controller 42 (FIG. 3), a “COMM” light that when lit that a communication link is present between element 44 and controller 42, and a “POWER” light that when lit indicates that power is currently on.
  • FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of electrical impulse element 44 of threat fire system 40 (FIG. 3) that attaches to trainee 26 (FIG. 1) via a clip 90 in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention. The elements of electrical impulse element 44 are contained in a housing 92, to which clip 90 is coupled. Clip 90 may be a conventional spring clip that provides means for securing electrical impulse element 44 to trainee 26 (FIG. 1). Pair of electrodes 55 may be imbedded in a user facing side 94 of clip 92 so that electrodes 55 can be placed in contact with trainee 26.
  • Multiple housings 92 may be secured to trainee 26 via clips 90 at various locations, such as in the front, back, and on each bicep. In this manner, the instructor could activate controller 42 to enable receipt of signal 50 (FIG. 3) at any of electrical impulse elements 44 contained in housings 92, thus simulating shots impacting at various locations on trainee 26.
  • FIG. 8 shows a screen shot image 96 of a main window 98 presented on display 51 (FIG. 3) of instructor console 30 (FIG. 3). Main window 98 is the primary opening view when a “threat fire control command” is selected on a main menu of the primary control code that controls the general operation of simulation system 20 (FIG. 1). Main window 98 includes a pain settings window 100 and a number of user fields, referred to as buttons, for determining the behavior of electrical impulse element 44 (FIG. 3).
  • Main window 98 opens with threat fire system 40 (FIG. 3) disarmed, as indicated by a current status indicator 102. Interactive buttons within main window can include an “arm” button 104 and a “disarm” button 106. To arm threat fire system 40, the instructor clicks on arm button 104. In response a pop up window of a password entry pane will be revealed.
  • FIG. 9 shows a screen shot image 108 of an exemplary pop up window 110 revealing a password entry pane 112. Per conventional procedures, the instructor is asked for an authorization password. After the instructor enters the authorization password and clicks “OK” in password entry pane 112, threat fire system 40 is armed.
  • FIG. 10 shows a partial screen shot image 114 of main window 98 with threat fire system 40 prepared for operation. Once armed, current status indicator 102 switches from “disarmed”, as in FIG. 8 to “armed” as in FIG. 10.
  • Referring back to FIG. 8, once threat fire system 40 is armed, controller 42 will connect via wireless communication link 50 (FIG. 3) to one or more available electrical impulse elements 44 (FIG. 3), and the individual controls for each of elements 44 will be enabled as appropriate.
  • In the exemplary illustration of FIG. 8, controller 42 can be enabled to communicate with up to twelve electrical impulse elements 44, that is two elements 44 (FRONT and BACK) for each of six trainees 26, labeled 1-6. FRONT indicates placement of one of electrical impulse elements 44 on the front of trainee 26, and BACK indicates placement of one of electrical impulse elements 44 on the back of trainee 26.
  • In this exemplary illustration, the connection of controller 42 with electrical impulse elements 44 is represented by outwardly radiating lines 116 about a FRONT button 118 and a BACK button 120 for each of two trainees 26, represented by the trainee identifiers “1” and “2” in main window 98. Although radiating lines 116 are shown herein, in an actual display, front button 118 and back button 120 may be normally colored red, and their color switches to green to indicate connection of controller 42 with particular impulse elements 44.
  • By utilizing pain settings window 100, the instructor can adjust pain settings for each of electrical impulse elements 44. The pain sensed by trainee 26 subjected to non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3) is affected by the delivery duration of pulse 46. A longer delivery duration results in a sensation of greater pain. Conversely, a shorter delivery duration of pulse 46 results in a sensation of less pain. In a group training exercise, the delivery duration could be extended to a greater length, such as, the exposure limit monitored by exposure limit timer 74 (FIG. 3). This lengthened duration, although non-disabling, may briefly put trainee 26 out of action, thereby simulating a situation in which trainee 26 is removed from combat.
  • Pain settings window 100 includes a duration select drop down menu 122, a duration readout field 124, and UP/DOWN buttons 126 to manually adjust the pain setting. In addition, pain settings window 100 includes a “SET” button 128 and an “AUTHORIZE” button 130 to enable the settings to change.
  • FIG. 11 shows a screen shot image 132 of drop down menu 122 that includes a list of default pain settings 134. A pain setting 134 selected from drop down menu 122 is the number of seconds, or fractions of a second, (i.e., a duration) that non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3) will be delivered.
  • With reference back to FIG. 8, in general operation, the instructor may initially click on authorize button 130 to enter an authorization code (not shown). The instructor may then either change the pain settings to one of a number of default settings using drop down menu 122 or may manually adjust the pain setting using UP/DOWN buttons 126. Once the pain settings are adjusted, the instructor may optionally click on set button 128 which disables adjustment of the pain settings. As such, the pain settings cannot be re-adjusted without first entering the authorization code, again providing another safety interlock for protecting trainee(s) 26 from injury.
  • To fire, or activate, any of electrical impulse elements 44, an instructor can simply click any of the active front and back buttons 118 and 120, indicated herein by outwardly radiating lines 116. This will fire a desired one of electrical impulse elements 44 at the desired one of pain settings 134 and at the desired location.
  • If more than one trainee 26 is utilizing simulation system 20 (FIG. 1) to train concurrently within scenario 34 (FIG. 2), multiple elements 44 can be activated concurrently using a link feature. For example, checking two or more of link check boxes 136 enables all of the selected elements to fire when one of the front or back buttons 118 and 120, respectively, are clicked. For example, if link check boxes 136 are checked for two trainees 26, represented by the trainee identifiers “1” and “2”, and front button 118 is clicked on trainee 26, represented by “2”, then both elements 44 associated with front button 118 for both trainees 26, represented by the trainee identifiers “1” and “2”, will activate. Thus, non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3) will be delivered to both trainees.
  • In the embodiment described above, controller 42 (FIG. 3) generates and transmits signal 54 over communication link 50 to electrical impulse element 44. Upon validation, signal 54 activates impulse generator 64 (FIG. 3) of electrical impulse element 44 to deliver non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3), pulse 46 simulating an impact of a projectile from weapon 38 (FIG. 2) discharged by offender 36 (FIG. 2) within scenario 34 (FIG. 2).
  • In an alternative embodiment, electrical impulse element 44 may interface via a wired or wireless communication link with standard laser-based training equipment, such as Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) and/or MILES 2000, currently used by the United States Armed Forces. A laser-based training system, such as MILES, provides tactical engagement simulation for direct fire force-on-force training using eye safe laser “bullets”. When the present invention is employed in combination with MILES gear, controller 42 (FIG. 3) may be employed to arm threat force system 40 (FIG. 3), thus enabling receipt of an activation signal at electrical impulse element 44. However, the activation signal is actually generated and transmitted from the MILES gear.
  • For example, when the MILES gear registers a lethal hit, the MILES gear could transmit an activation signal via a wired or wireless communication link to electrical impulse element 44. This activation signal could then trigger impulse generator 64 (FIG. 3) to deliver non-disabling electrical pulse 46 (FIG. 3). Sensation of pulse 46 can give a trainee a more realistic sense and negative feedback of being “virtually” killed in action during training. A non-lethal shot could be set to trigger a very short pulse 46, whereas a “kill” could trigger a more pronounced pulse 46.
  • When electrical impulse element 44 is utilized in cooperation with MILES gear, pain settings 134 (FIG. 11) would not be adjustable by the trainees in the field. In addition, if a soldier attempted to remove element 44, element 44 could be set in a mode to activate a “dead” setting of the MILES gear, to deter tampering. Another option may be to have element 44 equipped with a sensor that triggers when element 44 is removed from the soldier, thereby letting element 44 register an event of tampering. Conversely, such an element should include authorization capability for allowing an authorized individual to remove element 44 from the soldier.
  • In summary, the present invention teaches of a0 threat fire system for simulating a projectile impacting a user. The threat fire system delivers a non-disabling electrical pulse from an electrical impulse element coupled to a trainee so that the trainee can distinctly detect a simulated impact of a projectile. The non-disabling electrical pulse provides a more realistic sense and negative feedback of being “shot” in action during a simulation training exercise. Since the electrical impulse elements are coupled to the trainees, at no time does the instructor need to take aim, thereby greatly simplifying the instructor's burden during a training exercise. Moreover no actual projectiles or laser projectiles are utilized for threat fire simulation, thereby reducing the potential for injury to the trainee. More than one electrical impulse element can be coupled at various locations on a single trainee and/or trainees to maximize the impact of the training experience. Furthermore, the threat fire system is readily incorporated into a variety of single screen and multiple screen simulation system and its simplistic circuitry can be cost effectively manufactured.
  • Although the preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described in detail, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A system for simulating a projectile impacting a user, said system comprising:
    an electrical impulse element configured for physical contact with said user; and
    a controller in communication with said electrical impulse element for enabling receipt of a signal at said electrical impulse element, said signal activating said electrical impulse element to deliver a non-disabling electrical pulse to said user, said electrical pulse simulating an impact of said projectile.
  2. 2. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said controller is remotely located from said electrical impulse element, and is operable by an instructor.
  3. 3. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein:
    said electrical impulse element includes a receiver; and
    said controller includes a transmitter, and said signal is generated at and transmitted from said controller to said electrical impulse element via a wireless communication link between said receiver and said transmitter.
  4. 4. A system as claimed in claim 3 wherein said electrical impulse element further comprises:
    an impulse generator for generating said non-disabling electrical pulse; and
    a microcontroller interposed between said receiver and said impulse generator, said microcontroller performing a validity check of said signal prior to enabling activation of said impulse generator.
  5. 5. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said electrical impulse element is a first electrical impulse element, said signal is a first signal, and said system further comprises a second electrical impulse element in communication with said controller, said controller enabling receipt of a second signal at said second electrical impulse element, said second signal activating said second electrical impulse element to deliver a second non-disabling electrical pulse, said second electrical pulse simulating an impact of a second projectile.
  6. 6. A system as claimed in claim 5 further comprising means for linking an activation of said first and second electrical impulse elements to enable concurrent delivery of said first and second non-disabling electrical pulses.
  7. 7. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said electrical impulse element comprises:
    a housing containing an impulse generator for generating said non-disabling electrical pulse; and
    means, coupled to said housing, for securing said housing to said user.
  8. 8. A system as claimed in claim 7 further comprising a pair of electrodes imbedded in a user facing side of said securing means, said pair of electrodes being in electrical communication with said impulse generator for delivery of said non-disabling electrical pulse to said user.
  9. 9. A system as claimed in claim 7 wherein said securing means comprises a belt for encircling a portion of said user.
  10. 10. A system as claimed in claim 7 wherein said securing means comprises a clip coupled to an outer surface of said housing for attachment to said user.
  11. 11. A system as claimed in claim 1 further comprising means, in communication with said electrical impulse element, for adjusting a delivery duration of said non-disabling electrical pulse.
  12. 12. A system as claimed in claim 11 further comprising a duration timer in communication with said electrical impulse element for monitoring said delivery duration, said electrical impulse element discontinuing delivery of said electrical pulse upon expiration of said delivery duration.
  13. 13. A system as claimed in 12 further comprising a secondary timer in communication with said electrical impulse element for monitoring an exposure limit, said exposure limit being longer than said delivery duration such that when said electrical pulse remains activated following expiration of said delivery duration, said electrical impulse element imposes a forced discontinuation of said electrical pulse upon expiration of said exposure limit.
  14. 14. A system as claimed in claim 1 further comprising an interval timer, in communication with said electrical impulse element, for controlling an interval between delivery of said electrical pulse and delivery of a second electrical pulse.
  15. 15. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said system is utilized within a simulation system that includes a screen displaying a scenario, said scenario including an offender holding a weapon, and said system further comprises means for coordinating delivery of said non-disabling electrical pulse with an instance of said offender discharging said weapon.
  16. 16. A system for simulating a projectile impacting a user, said system comprising:
    an electrical impulse element configured for physical contact with said user;
    a controller in communication with said electrical impulse element for enabling receipt of a signal at said electrical impulse element, said signal activating said electrical impulse element to deliver a non-disabling electrical pulse to said user, said electrical pulse simulating an impact of said projectile;
    means, in communication with said electrical impulse element, for adjusting a delivery duration of said non-disabling electrical pulse; and
    an interval timer, in communication with said electrical impulse element, for controlling an interval between delivery of said electrical pulse and delivery of a second electrical pulse.
  17. 17. A system as claimed in claim 16 further comprising a duration timer in communication with said electrical impulse element for monitoring said delivery duration, said electrical impulse element discontinuing delivery of said electrical pulse upon expiration of said delivery duration.
  18. 18. A device for simulating a projectile impacting a user, said device comprising:
    a microcontroller for receiving a device activation signal;
    an impulse generator in communication with said microcontroller for generating a non-disabling electrical pulse in response to said device activation signal; and
    a pair of electrodes configured for physical contact with said user, said pair of electrodes being in electrical communication with said impulse generator for delivery of said non-disabling electrical pulse to said user, said electrical pulse simulating an impact of said projectile.
  19. 19. A device as claimed in claim 18 wherein said device further comprises a receiver in communication with said microcontroller for receiving said device activation signal via a wireless communication link.
  20. 20. A device as claimed in claim 18 wherein said device is utilized within a simulation system that includes a screen displaying a scenario, said scenario including an offender holding a weapon, and said system further comprises means for coordinating delivery of said non-disabling electrical pulse with an instance of said offender discharging said weapon.
US11286162 2004-12-03 2005-11-22 Threat fire simulation system Abandoned US20060121419A1 (en)

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US12643097 US8016594B2 (en) 2004-12-03 2009-12-21 Method of training utilizing a threat fire simulation system
US13230834 US8267691B1 (en) 2004-12-03 2011-09-12 Threat fire simulation and training system
US14931642 US20160059136A1 (en) 2004-12-03 2015-11-03 Simulated firearms entertainment system
US15452689 US20170176127A1 (en) 2004-12-03 2017-03-07 Simulated firearms entertainment system

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US20100227299A1 (en) 2010-09-09 application

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