New! View global litigation for patent families

US20060098932A1 - Optical connection closure having at least one connector port - Google Patents

Optical connection closure having at least one connector port Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060098932A1
US20060098932A1 US11300035 US30003505A US2006098932A1 US 20060098932 A1 US20060098932 A1 US 20060098932A1 US 11300035 US11300035 US 11300035 US 30003505 A US30003505 A US 30003505A US 2006098932 A1 US2006098932 A1 US 2006098932A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
closure
optical
cable
distribution
connection
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11300035
Inventor
Jennifer Battey
Guy Castonguay
Donnie Clapp
Terry Cox
Brett Menke
Jason Reagan
Chanh Vo
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Corning Optical Communications LLC
Original Assignee
Corning Optical Communications LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B6/00Light guides
    • G02B6/24Coupling light guides
    • G02B6/36Mechanical coupling means
    • G02B6/38Mechanical coupling means having fibre to fibre mating means
    • G02B6/3807Dismountable connectors, i.e. comprising plugs
    • G02B6/3897Connectors fixed to housings, casings, frames, circuit boards
    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B6/00Light guides
    • G02B6/44Mechanical structures for providing tensile strength and external protection for fibres, e.g. optical transmission cables
    • G02B6/4401Optical cables
    • G02B6/4439Auxiliary devices
    • G02B6/444Systems and boxes with surplus length
    • G02B6/4441[Boxes]
    • G02B6/4446Cableboxes
    • G02B6/445Cableboxes with lateral pivoting cover

Abstract

An optical connection closure has at least one connector port located within an external wall of the closure for receiving a connectorized optical fiber of a distribution cable on the inside of the closure and a pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cable on the outside of the closure. The closure includes a base, a cover affixed to the base and movable between a closed position and an opened position, and an end wall that defines at least a portion of at least one cable opening for receiving the distribution cable in a butt-type or a through-type closure configuration. The base and the cover define an interior cavity that optionally contains a splice tray for interconnecting the optical fiber of the distribution cable with a pigtail to create the connectorized optical fiber. The connector port may be located within an end wall, a bottom wall or a top wall of the closure.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to enclosures deployed in fiber optic communications networks, and more specifically, to an optical connection closure having at least one connector port located in an external wall of the closure operable for receiving a connectorized optical fiber on the inside of the closure and a pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cable on the outside of the closure.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0004]
    Optical fiber is increasingly being used for a variety of broadband applications including voice, video and data transmissions. As a result of the ever-increasing demand for broadband communications, fiber optic networks typically include a large number of mid-span access locations at which one or more optical fibers are branched from a distribution cable. These mid-span access locations provide a branch point from the distribution cable leading to an end user, commonly referred to as a subscriber, and thus, may be used to extend an “all optical” communications network closer to the subscriber. In this regard, fiber optic networks are being developed that deliver “fiber-to-the-curb” (FTTC), “fiber-to-the-business” (FTTB), “fiber-to-the-home” (FTTH), or “fiber-to-the-premises” (FTTP), referred to generically as “FTTx.” Based on the increase in the number of access points and the unique physical attributes of the optical fibers themselves, enclosures are needed for protecting, handling and maintaining optical fibers. Enclosures are also needed for readily connecting branched optical fibers of the distribution cable with respective optical fibers of drop cables to establish desired optical connections, while at the same time providing protection for the access point, the branched optical fibers and the optical connections from exposure to environmental conditions.
  • [0005]
    In one example of a fiber optic communications network, one or more drop cables are interconnected with a distribution cable at a mid-span access location within an aerial splice closure suspended from an aerial strand or from the distribution cable itself. Substantial expertise and experience are required to configure the optical connections within the closure in the field. In particular, it is often difficult to enter the closure and to identify an optical fiber of the distribution cable to be interconnected with an optical fiber of a particular drop cable. Once identified, the optical fibers of the drop cables are typically joined directly to the optical fibers of the distribution cable at the mid-span access location using conventional splicing techniques, such as fusion splicing. In other instances, the optical fibers of the drop cables and the optical fibers of the distribution cable are first spliced to a short length of optical fiber having an optical connector mounted upon the other end, referred to in the art as a “pigtail.” The pigtails are then routed to opposite sides of a connector adapter sleeve located within the closure to interconnect the drop cable with the distribution cable. In either case, the process of entering and configuring the closure is not only time consuming, but frequently must be accomplished by a highly skilled field technician at significant cost and under field working conditions that are less than ideal. Reconfiguring optical fiber connections in an aerial splice closure is especially difficult, particularly in instances where at least some of the optical fibers of the distribution cable extend uninterrupted through the closure, since the closure cannot be readily removed from the distribution cable. Further, once the optical connections are made, it is often labor intensive, and therefore costly, to reconfigure the existing optical connections or to add additional optical connections.
  • [0006]
    In order to reduce costs by permitting less experienced and less skilled technicians to perform mid-span access optical connections and reconfigurations in the field, communications service providers are increasingly pre-engineering new fiber optic networks and demanding factory-prepared interconnection solutions, commonly referred to as “plug-and-play” type systems. Pre-engineered networks, however, require that the location of certain of the branch points in the network be predetermined prior to the distribution cable being deployed. More particularly, pre-engineered solutions require precise location of the factory-prepared mid-span access locations where the preterminated, and sometimes pre-connectorized, optical fibers are made available for interconnection with optical fibers of drop cables extending from the subscriber premises. With regard to a factory-prepared interconnection solution, it would be desirable to produce an optical connection closure having one or more connector ports located in an external wall of the closure operable for receiving pre-connectorized optical fibers on the inside of the closure and pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables on the outside of the closure. It would also be desirable in an FTTP network to provide an optical connection closure that is operable to readily interconnect pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables with a feeder cable, distribution cable or branch cable of the network. It would also be desirable to provide an optical connection closure within an FTTP network that may be readily reconfigured after installation by a less experienced and less skilled field technician. It would further be desirable to be able to establish optical connections in a fiber optic communications network while eliminating the need for entering the closure and performing splices or adapter sleeve connections after the initial installation.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    To achieve the foregoing and other objects, and in accordance with the purpose of the present invention as embodied and broadly described herein, the present invention provides various embodiments of an optical connection closure having one or more connector ports located in an external wall of the closure for receiving connectorized optical fibers on the inside of the closure and pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables on the outside of the closure. An optical connection closure according to the present invention permits a less experienced and less skilled filed technician to establish desired optical connections in a fiber optic communications network and to reconfigure optical connections after initial installation of the closure at a branch point along the length of a feeder, distribution or branch cable of the network. An optical connection closure according to the present invention also permits optical connections to be established and reconfigured without the need for entering the closure and performing splices or adapter sleeve connections after the initial installation.
  • [0008]
    In an exemplary embodiment, the present invention provides an optical connection closure for use at a branch point in a fiber optic communications network including a distribution cable comprising a plurality of optical fibers and a mid-span access location provided along the length of the distribution cable. The closure comprises a base, a cover affixed to the base, opposed end walls affixed to the base, one or more distribution cable openings defined by the base and the opposed end walls for receiving the distribution cable extending therethrough, and one or more connector ports provided in the base, the cover or the opposed end walls. The distribution cable openings are operable for receiving the distribution cable between the opposed end walls, and the one or more connector ports are operable for receiving connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable on the inside of the closure and pre-connectorized drop cables on the outside of the closure. The closure may further comprise a shelf affixed within the base and movable between an opened position and a closed position in order to provide access to the distribution cable and the connectorized optical fibers, and at least one splice tray secured to the shelf for splicing at least one optical fiber of the distribution cable to a respective optical fiber terminating in a pigtail. The closure may be sealed or unsealed (breathable) depending upon the particular network deployment, such as an aerial, pedestal-mounted or below grade deployment.
  • [0009]
    In another exemplary embodiment, the present invention provides an optical connection closure for use at a branch point in a fiber optic communications network including a distribution cable comprising a plurality of optical fibers and a mid-span access location provided along the length of the distribution cable. The closure comprises a base, opposed end walls retained within the base and inserted around the distribution cable in order to receive the distribution cable between the opposed end walls, a cover removably secured to the base, and one or more connector ports located within an external wall of the cover. As with the embodiment previously described, the one or more connector ports are operable for receiving connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable on the inside of the closure and pre-connectorized drop cables on the outside of the closure.
  • [0010]
    In yet another exemplary embodiment, the present invention provides a fiber optic communications network including a distribution cable comprising a plurality of optical fibers, a mid-span access location provided along the length of the distribution cable, an optical connection closure positioned in the fiber optic network around the mid-span access location, the closure comprising one or more connector ports for receiving a connectorized optical fiber of the distribution cable on the inside of the closure and a pre-connectorized drop cable on the outside of the closure, at least one distribution cable opening for receiving the distribution cable extending through the closure, and opposed end walls positioned around the distribution cable and affixed to a base to retain the distribution cable between the opposed end walls of the closure.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    These and other features, aspects and advantages of the present invention are better understood when the following detailed description of the invention is read with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an aerial optical connection closure having a plurality of connector ports located within an external wall of the closure in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the closure of FIG. 1 including a distribution cable extending through the closure and a plurality or pre-connectorized drop cables connected to respective connector ports;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the closure of FIG. 2 with the cover in an opened position to show the internal compartment of the closure and the routing of a plurality of connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable to respective connector ports;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of an optical connection closure having a plurality of connector ports located within an end wall of the closure in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the closure of FIG. 4 with the cover in an opened position to show the internal compartment of the closure;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 6 a is a front perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an end cap for the closure of FIG. 5 having a plurality of connector ports and distribution cable openings located within the end cap;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 6 b is a rear perspective view of the end cap of FIG. 6 a;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a below grade optical connection closure having a plurality of connector ports located within a top wall of the closure in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the closure of FIG. 7 with the cover in an opened position to show the internal compartment of the closure;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an alternative below grade optical connection closure having a plurality of connector ports and distribution cable openings located within an end wall of the closure in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention; and
  • [0022]
    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the closure of FIG. 9 with the cover in an opened position to show the internal compartment of the closure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0023]
    The present invention will now be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings in which exemplary embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein. These exemplary embodiments are shown and described so that this disclosure will be both thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. Like reference numbers refer to like elements throughout the various drawings.
  • [0024]
    The present invention provides various embodiments of an optical connection closure having one or more connector ports located in an external wall of the closure for receiving connectorized optical fibers on the inside of the closure and pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables on the outside of the closure. Each connector port may include a connector adapter sleeve disposed within the connector port or may be configured to receive the mating optical connectors in any suitable manner now known or hereafter devised. Regardless, each connector port is the location at which an optical connection is made between a connectorized optical fiber of the distribution cable and a respective optical fiber of a pre-connectorized drop cable. In all embodiments envisioned herein, the connector ports are located within an external wall of the closure, such as an end wall of the closure housing, the bottom wall of the closure housing or the top wall of the closure housing. At least one cable opening is also located within at least one external wall of the housing for receiving, and passing therethrough, a distribution cable. In various closure designs, the distribution cable enters and exits the closure at opposing ends of the closure housing (e.g., a “taut-sheath” or “through” type closure). In alternative closure designs, the distribution cable enters and exits the closure at the same end of the closure housing (e.g., a “canister” or “butt” type closure). The location of the cable openings depends on the specific network deployment, such as an aerial, above-ground pedestal or below grade deployment.
  • [0025]
    In all embodiments envisioned herein, connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable are routed to the connector ports on the inside of the closure. In certain embodiments, the optical fibers accessed from the distribution cable may be spliced to optical fibers having optical connectors mounted on the other end (i.e., “pigtails”), which are then routed to the connector ports. Other optical fibers of the distribution cable may be stored separately from the accessed optical fibers such that they extend uninterrupted through the optical connection closure. Once the optical fibers are connectorized and routed to the connector ports, the closure may be closed and/or sealed. One or more pre-connectorized drop cables are then routed to the connector ports from the outside of the closure at any time subsequent to the initial installation of the closure without requiring access to the inside of the closure. The size of the closure may vary based upon the diameter of the distribution cable, the amount of optical fiber slack stored within the closure and the number of connector ports located in an external wall of the closure. In all embodiments, different distribution cable types may be accommodated, such as monotube, loose tube, central tube, ribbon and the like. In all embodiments, the optical connection closure may be adapted to accommodate a variety of connector types, such as but not limited to SC, LC, DC, FC, ST, SC/DC, MT-RJ, MTP and MPO ferrules.
  • [0026]
    In all embodiments, an optical connection closure, referred to herein as the “connection closure” or “closure,” according to the present invention comprises one or more cable openings for receiving and routing one or more distribution cables. One example of a distribution cable type that may be used in conjunction with present invention is an ALTOS® dielectric cable available from Corning Cable Systems LLC of Hickory, N.C. The ALTOS® dielectric cable is a lightweight fiber optic cable designed for both conduit (buried) and aerial (lashed) installations. In another example, the distribution cable is a Standard Single-Tube Ribbon (SST-Ribbon™) cable available from Corning Cable Systems LLC of Hickory, N.C. The SST-Ribbon™ cable contains readily identifiable twelve-fiber ribbons in a gel-filled tube. The distribution cable may be of a design that provides stable performance over a wide range of temperatures and is compatible with any telecommunications grade optical fiber. As used herein, the term “optical fiber” is intended to include all types of single mode and multi-mode light waveguides, including one or more bare optical fibers, loose-tube optical fibers, tight-buffered optical fibers, ribbonized optical fibers or any other expedient of a medium for transmitting light signals. In preferred embodiments, the distribution cable is flexible, easy to route and has no preferential bend. The pre-connectorized drop cables may be readily connected to and disconnected from the connector ports of the optical connection closure, thus eliminating the need for entering the closure and splicing the optical fibers of the drop cables to respective optical fibers of the distribution cable.
  • [0027]
    The distribution cable comprises one or more branch points at access locations provided along the length of the distribution cable. At each access location, one or more optical fibers are identified, severed and branched from the distribution cable, resulting in one or more preterminated optical fibers. In one embodiment, the preterminated optical fibers are direct connectorized (i.e., an optical connector is mounted directly on the end of the preterminated optical fiber). In an alternative embodiment, the preterminated optical fibers are first spliced to a shot length of optical fiber having an optical connector attached at the other end (i.e., a pigtail).
  • [0028]
    The access locations may be factory-prepared or prepared in the field by a highly skilled field technician. In a factory-prepared access location, a portion of the cable sheath of the distribution cable is removed in the factory to expose a predetermined length of an underlying tubular body, such as a buffer tube, containing a plurality of optical fibers. Pre-selected optical fibers are then accessed from the tubular body and preterminated from the distribution cable. The access location may then be protected with an installation enclosure, which may be removed after the distribution cable is deployed. In a field-prepared access location, a portion of the cable sheath of the distribution cable is removed in the field by a highly skilled to expose a predetermined length of an underlying tubular body, such as a buffer tube, containing a plurality of optical fibers. Pre-selected optical fibers are then preterminated and connectorized, as previously described. In both the factory-prepared and field-prepared access locations, the branch point, preterminated optical fibers and optical connectors are enclosed and protected using the optical connection closure of the present invention. In all embodiments, a pre-selected number of optical fibers of the distribution cable are preterminated for interconnection with one or more drop cables, while the remainder of the optical fibers may extend uninterrupted through the connection closure to another access location.
  • [0029]
    Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, an optical connection closure 20 constructed in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown. The connection closure 20 permits an optical fiber of one or more pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables 21 (FIG. 2) to be readily interconnected with a field terminated or factory preterminated and connectorized optical fiber 23 (FIG. 3) of a fiber optic distribution cable 25 (FIG. 2 and FIG. 3). As is well known and understood in the art, each pre-connectorized drop cable 21 comprises a flexible transport tube containing one or more optical fibers connected to an outside plant optical connection terminal, for example, a NID at a subscriber premises. The connection closure 20 provides a convenient branch point in an optical network for a field technician to initially install and subsequently reconfigure optical connections between a distribution cable and a drop cable in the network to provide communications service to a subscriber.
  • [0030]
    The connection closure 20 shown in FIGS. 1-3 is typically installed in an aerial location, however, the closure 20 may be installed below grade within a hand-hole or vault, or above ground within a larger enclosure, such as a cabinet, network terminal or pedestal. As shown, the connection closure 20 is secured in an aerial location and mounted to the distribution cable 25 by way of one or more cable openings 22 defined by external walls of the closure 20. Each cable opening 22 is adapted for receiving and routing a distribution cable 25 through the connection closure 20. The cable openings 22 are defined by two halves of an end wall 40 that are brought together and secured around the distribution cable 25. Each half of the end wall 40 defines approximately half of each cable opening 22. Offset fasteners 42, such as screws, may be used to secure the two halves of the end wall 40 together around the distribution cable 25. The fasteners 42 may also secure the end wall 40 to the base 26. The fasteners 42 may be accessed when the cover 28 is in an opened position. The base 26 and the end wall 40 may also comprise a water-blocking gel material that provides a sealing function between the distribution cable 25 and the respective cable opening 22 in a known manner.
  • [0031]
    Although the connection closure 20 shown herein is a “taut-sheath” or “through” type closure, it may have other configurations, such as a “canister” or “butt” type closure, without departing from the intended scope of the present invention. In the case of a through type closure, cable openings 22 may be utilized at opposed end walls of the connection closure 20, thus providing a lengthwise-extending passage through the closure 20. In the case of a butt type closure, two different cable openings 22 may be utilized at one end wall, thus providing cable entrance and exit openings in the same end wall. The cable openings 22 may be occupied with sealing members 24 and heat shrink material 27 operable for ensuring a water-tight seal between the distribution cable 25 outside the connection closure 20 and inside the closure 20. Unoccupied cable openings 22 may be fitted with a plug (not shown), cap or other sealing member s necessary until needed.
  • [0032]
    The connection closure 20 comprises a base 26 and a cover 28 each made of a lightweight, yet rigid material, such as aluminum, plastic or thermoplastic. Referring to FIG. 3, if necessary, the base 26 and cover 28 may be provided with lengthwise and/or widthwise stiffening ribs 32 to strengthen and prevent distortion of the base 26 and cover 28. The base 26 is generally box-shaped and defines an interior cavity for housing the express portion of distribution cable 25, connectorized optical fibers 23 and optical hardware, such as splice trays, couplers, adapters, optical fiber routing and slack storage guides and the like. The base 26 may have any of a variety of shapes that is suitable for housing optical communications hardware and for routing the express portion of distribution cable 25 and one or more connectorized optical fibers 23 of fiber optic distribution cable 25. The base 26 of the embodiments illustrated herein is generally elongated in the lengthwise dimension relative to the lateral dimension between a pair of opposed end walls 40. Preferably, the cover 28 is hingedly affixed to the base 26 and adapted to be opened and closed thereon. As shown, the cover 28 is generally rectangular and is hingedly affixed to the base 26 at one or more hinge locations 30. However, the cover 28 may be slidably attached to the base 26 to selectively expose the interior cavity of the base 26. Alternatively, the cover 28 may be removably attached to the base 26 to provide unobstructed access to the interior cavity. The base 26 and/or the cover 28 is preferably provided with clasps (not shown) or other conventional fasteners for securing the cover 28 to the base 26 in the closed configuration. A sealing gasket (not shown) may also be disposed between the base 26 and the cover 28 to provide a seal against environmental elements such as wind-driven rain.
  • [0033]
    The exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-3 comprises eight connector ports 34 for connecting between one and eight pre-connectorized drop cables 21 to connectorized optical fibers 23 of the distribution cable 25. Although eight connector ports 34 are shown in this particular embodiment, it is envisioned that the connection closure 20 may be designed to accommodate one or more connector ports 34. Thus, it is conceivable that the connection closure 20 may accommodate any number of pre-connectorized drop cables 21, for example, one, two, three, four, six, eight, twelve, etc. As used herein, the term “connector port” is intended to include an opening through an external wall of the connection closure 20 at which a connector of a connectorized optical fiber 23 of the distribution cable 25 is optically connected to a connector of a pre-connectorized drop cable 21. The connector port 34 may also include a factory-installed connector adapter sleeve (not shown) for aligning and maintaining the mating connectors in physical contact. In one embodiment, the connector adapter sleeve may be biased within the adapter to ensure physical contact between the opposed end faces of the connectors. Preferably, the connector ports 34 further provide an environmental seal at the interface between the connectorized optical fiber 23 of the distribution cable 25 and the pre-connectorized drop cable 21. Unused connector ports 34 may be covered and sealed with a removable cap or plug (not shown) until the connector port 34 is needed.
  • [0034]
    Referring specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2, eight connector ports 34 are shown disposed within a sidewall 36 of the base 26. The eight connector ports 34 are arranged into four pairs of two connector ports 34 each positioned on angled surfaces 38 defined by the base 26. The connector ports 34 are angled such that the pre-connectorized drop cables 21 may be directed towards one end of the connection closure 20, thus providing a low profile assembly and improved access to install, remove and reconfigure the optical connections. In addition, the pre-connectorized drop cables 21 are typically installed so as to provide a drip loop in a known manner to direct moisture away from the optical connections. In aerial applications, the connection closure 20 may be mounted upon the distribution cable 25 with the connector ports 34 directed towards the location where the other end of the drop cables 21 will be installed, for example, a subscriber premises. In addition to being angled, the angled surfaces 38 comprising the connector ports 34 are recessed from the sidewall 36 of the connection closure 20, thus protecting the connector ports 34 and the connectorized ends 39 of the drop cables 21 from direct impact in the even that the closure 20 is dropped or struck along the sidewall 36. In preferred embodiments, each angled surface 38 comprises one or two connector ports 34 to minimize the depth dimension of the connection closure 20. However, the size of the connection closure 20 may vary depending on the number and arrangement of the connector ports 34 required for a particular deployment.
  • [0035]
    Referring specifically to FIG. 3, a connection closure 20 constructed in accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention is illustrated with the cover 28 opened to show the interior of the closure 20 and its contents. The distribution cable 25 is shown entering the connection closure 20 through a cable opening 22 located within one end wall 40, and exiting the closure 20 via another cable opening 22 located within the opposed end wall 40. Inside the connection closure 20, the distribution cable 25 is secured to a cable bracket 44 positioned adjacent to the appropriate cable opening 22 located within each end wall 40. The cable bracket 44 defines a notch along its length for securing a conventional cable tie, strap or hose clamp 45 around the distribution cable 25 in a known manner. The cable bracket 44 also aids in retaining the connection closure 20 in place in a desired position along the length of the distribution cable 25. A plurality of mounting features 46 may be located on a wall of the connection closure 20 for attaching mounting brackets, for example, aerial hanging brackets, to the external surface of the closure 20. A plurality of hardware mounting features 48 are located on an interior wall of the connection closure 20 for fastening optical hardware, such as optical fiber storage trays, splice trays, coupler trays, routing guides, fiber organizers, etc., to the interior of the connection closure 20. A slack basket 50 may be fastened to the hardware mounting features 48 and operable for receiving and storing slack lengths of optical fibers and/or optical fiber buffer tubes. A strain relief bracket 52 may also be secured to the interior of the connection closure 20 using the hardware mounting features 48. Alternatively, the strain relief bracket 52 may be provided as part of a splice tray or other optical communications hardware. The strain relief bracket 52 provides strain relief for the optical fibers 23 exiting, for example, a splice tray (obscured). Splice trays are used when terminated or preterminated optical fibers are spliced in the field, such as when one or more optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 are accessed in the field to create a mid-span access location and spliced to interconnect the distribution cable with one or more drop cables 21. As shown, a plurality of optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 are spliced to optical fibers having an optical connector 29 mounted thereon (i.e., a pigtail) to produce a corresponding plurality of connectorized optical fibers 23.
  • [0036]
    The connectors 29 of the connectorized optical fibers 23 are routed within the interior cavity of the connection closure 20 and connected to the connector ports 34 on the inside of the closure 20. With the cover 28 opened as shown, the interior of the connection closure 20 is readily accessible to a field technician initially installing the connectorized optical fibers 23 into the respective connector port 34. The field technician may create and route additional connectorized optical fibers 23 to unused connector ports 34, or remove or rearrange optical connections between existing connectorized optical fibers 23 and the connector ports 34. Once the connection closure 20 is initially installed, the field technician may also add, remove or rearrange optical connections between optical fibers of the drop cables 21 and the respective connector ports 34 from the exterior of the connection closure 20 without the need for entering the closure 20. Since the connection closure 20 does not have to be entered to connect, disconnect or reconfigure drop cables 21, additional drop cables can be connected without disturbing the previously installed drop cables 21 or the contents of the connection closure 20, particularly the relatively delicate connectorized optical fibers 23 and the splice connections between the optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 and the connectorized optical fibers 23.
  • [0037]
    In applications in which optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 are spliced to pigtails in the field, a conventional splice organizer or splice tray (obscured) is mounted to a work shelf 54, preferably on the side of the shelf 54 facing the base 26. It will be readily apparent and well understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that inside the splice tray, each optical fiber of the distribution cable 25 is spliced to a pigtail (i.e., connectorized optical fiber 23) in any known manner, such as by fusion or mechanical splicing. The pigtail 23 exits the splice tray and is routed through the strain relief bracket 52 to a connector port 34 located within an external wall of the connection closure 20. The splice tray is adapted to receive any number of splices. The pigtails 23 may exit the splice tray at either end of the shelf 54, and the strain relief bracket 52 may be fastened to an interior wall of the base 26 at either end of the shelf 54. More than one splice organizer or splice tray may be provided to accommodate splicing the optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 to pigtails 23. In the case of more than one splice tray, the splice trays may be positioned in a stacked relationship on the shelf 54 and retained in a known manner, such as by a strap or by a nut secured on a threaded mounting post.
  • [0038]
    Preferably, the shelf 54 is hingedly affixed to an interior wall of the base 26 of the connection closure 20 at one or more hinge locations 56, thus allowing the shelf 54 to be rotated between an opened position for providing access to the splice tray and a closed position for storing the splice tray. The shelf 54 is movable relative to the base 26 to expose the splice tray to the field technician initially installing the connection closure 20 to performing the necessary splices in the field. Preferably, the distribution cable 25 is routed through the interior of the connection closure 20 beneath the shelf 54 so as to not interfere with the movement of the shelf 54 between the opened and closed positions. As shown, by locating the hinge points 56 adjacent the lower edge of the base 26, the shelf 54 is rotatable relative to the base 26 through an angle of at least about 90 degrees and as much as about 180 degrees between the opened position and the closed position, thus providing full and convenient access to the splice tray. As shown, the hinge locations 56 are located on the same side of the closure 20 as the hinge locations 30 that hingedly affix the cover 26 to the base 28. However, the hinge locations 56 may be located on the side of the closure 20 opposite the hinge locations 30. Alternatively, the shelf 54 may be slidably attached to the base 26 to selectively expose portions of the interior cavity of the base 26, or may be removably attached to the base 26 to provide unobstructed access to the interior cavity. In addition, the base 26 and/or the shelf 54 may be provided with conventional means for retaining the shelf 54 in the opened position such that the shelf 54 provides a stable work platform.
  • [0039]
    Regardless, sufficient space is provided in the interior cavity of the base 26 to route the optical fibers of the distribution cable 25, the connectorized optical fibers 23 and their respective connectors 29, as well as the express portion of the distribution cable 25 through the interior cavity. In applications in which the distribution cable 25 is accessed and the mid-span access location is factory-prepared, a splice tray may not be needed for connecting the connectorized optical fibers 23 to the respective optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 (e.g., a pre-connectorized fiber optic distribution cable). In this type of application, the shelf 54 and splice tray may be removed and instead a splice organizer may be secured to an interior wall of the connection closure 20 by way of the hardware mounting features 48 to support the factory-prepared splices between the optical fibers of the distribution cable 25 and the connectorized optical fibers 23. Furthermore, similar optical hardware may be provided for supporting the connectors 29 of any connectorized optical fibers 23 that are not routed to a connector port 34, such as a spare optical fiber 23.
  • [0040]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, a connection closure 20 constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown. As with the embodiment described above, the connection closure 20 illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 is typically mounted in an aerial location on a distribution cable via the cable openings 22 located in end walls 40 of base 26. The cable openings 22 located in the end walls 40 typically receive at least one fiber optic distribution cable (not shown) that extends through the connection closure 20. As shown, six connector ports 34 are located within an end wall 40 of the connection closure 20 for receiving up to six pre-connectorized drop cables (not shown). The distribution cable may enter and exit the connection closure 20 at the same end wall 40 or at opposed end walls 40, thus resulting in a butt-type or through-type enclosure, respectively. As previously mentioned, the connection closure 20 shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 is typically installed in an aerial location, however, the closure 20 may be installed below grade within a hand-hole or vault, or above ground within a larger enclosure, such as a cabinet, network terminal or pedestal.
  • [0041]
    The end wall 40 of the connection closure 20 has a pair of larger diameter circular cable openings 22 and a smaller diameter cable opening 22 formed therein. At least one distribution cable is received in any one of the three cable openings 22. Two-piece sealing members 24 engage the end wall 40 and the distribution cable such that the distribution cable is retained in a sealed manner through the end wall 40. If only one distribution cable is received through the end wall 40, the empty cable openings 22 may be fitted with a cap or plug (not shown) so that the connection closure 20 remains watertight. Referring specifically to FIGS. 6 a and 6 b, each cable opening 22 is formed in part by the end wall 40 and in part by an end portion of the base 26, with each part defining a semi-circular recess 58 for engaging approximately half of the distribution cable. To mount the connection closure 20 on a distribution cable, the field technician installs the closure 20 around the distribution cable and within the semi-circular recesses 58 defined by the base 26. The end wall 40 is then installed over the distribution cable and secured to the base 26 using the fasteners 42, such one or more threaded screws or bolts. As with the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3, the end wall 40 defines offset openings for receiving fasteners 42, which may be accessed when the cover 28 is in an opened position.
  • [0042]
    Preferably, the base 26, cover 28 and end wall 40 are each made of a lightweight, yet rigid material, such as aluminum, plastic or thermoplastic. Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, if necessary, the base 26 and cover 28 may be provided with lengthwise and/or widthwise stiffening ribs 32 to strengthen and prevent distortion of the base 26 and cover 28. The base 26 is generally box-shaped and defines an interior cavity for housing the express portion of the distribution cable, the connectorized optical fibers and optical hardware, such as splice trays, couplers, adapters, optical fiber routing and slack storage guides and the like. The base 26 may have any of a variety of shapes that is suitable for housing optical communications hardware and for routing the express portion of distribution cable and one or more connectorized optical fibers of the fiber optic distribution cable, as previously described. Preferably, the cover 28 is hingedly affixed to the base 26 and adapted to be opened and closed thereon. As shown, the cover 28 is generally rectangular and is hingedly affixed to the base 26 along the upper edge of one of the sidewalls at one or more hinge locations 30. However, the cover 28 may be slidably attached to the base 26 to selectively expose the interior cavity of the base 26. Alternatively, the cover 28 may be removably attached to the base 26 to provide unobstructed access to the interior cavity. The base 26 and/or the cover 28 is preferably provided with clasps (not shown) or other conventional fasteners for securing the cover 28 to the base 26 in the closed configuration. A sealing gasket (not shown) may also be disposed between the base 26 and the cover 28 to provide a seal against environmental elements such as wind-driven rain.
  • [0043]
    As shown, the end wall 40 comprises six connector ports 34 for connecting up to six pre-connectorized drop cables to connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable. Although six connector ports 34 are shown in this particular embodiment, it is envisioned that the connection closure 20 may be designed to accommodate one or more connector ports 34. Thus, it is conceivable that the connection closure 20 may accommodate any number of pre-connectorized drop cables 21, for example, one, two, three, four, six, eight, twelve, etc. Although not shown, identifying indicia may be placed adjacent to each connector port 34 for easy identification in the field. The connector port 34 may also include a factory-installed connector adapter sleeve (not shown) for aligning and maintaining the mating connectors in physical contact. In one embodiment, the connector adapter sleeve may be biased within the adapter to ensure physical contact between the opposed end faces of the connectors. Preferably, the connector ports 34 further provide an environmental seal at the interface between the connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable and the pre-connectorized drop cables. Unused connector ports 34 may be covered and sealed with a removable cap or plug 65 until the connector port 34 is needed.
  • [0044]
    As best shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 6 a, the six connector ports 34 are disposed within the end wall 40 in a staggered configuration. The connector ports 34 are recessed from the lengthwise edges of the base 26 and the cover 28 to protect the connectors ports 34, and any adapter and/or connector disposed therein from environmental factors and external forces, for example, if the connection closure 20 is inadvertently dropped during installation. The longitudinal axes of the connector ports 34 are directed parallel to the longitudinal axes of the distribution cable, thus providing a low profile assembly. The overall dimensions of the connection closure 20 may vary based on the number of connector ports 34 needed for as particular deployment and/or installation.
  • [0045]
    Referring specifically to FIG. 5, the connection closure 20 is illustrated with the cover 28 opened to show the interior of the closure 20 and its contents. Although not shown, the distribution cable may be secured to one or more cable brackets positioned adjacent to the appropriate cable opening 22 and secured by the base 26 or end wall 40. The cable bracket may define a notch along its length for securing a conventional cable tie, strap, hose clamp or other fastening mechanism around the distribution cable in a known manner. The cable bracket also aids in retaining the connection closure 20 in place in a desired position along the length of the distribution cable. A plurality of hardware mounting features 48 may be located on the interior of the connection closure 20 for fastening optical hardware, such as optical fiber storage trays, splice trays, coupler trays, routing guides, fiber organizers, etc., to the interior of the connection closure 20. A plurality of mounting features (not shown) may be located on the exterior of the connection closure 20 for attaching mounting brackets, for example, aerial hanging brackets or pedestal brackets, to the external surface of the connection closure 20. A slack basket (not shown) may be fastened to the hardware mounting features 48 and operable for receiving and storing slack lengths of optical fibers and/or optical fiber buffer tubes. A strain relief bracket (not shown) may also be secured to the interior of the connection closure 20 using the hardware mounting features 48. The strain relief bracket (which may also be part of a splice tray) provides strain relief for the optical fibers entering and exiting, for example, a splice tray (not shown). Splice trays are used when terminated or preterminated optical fibers are spliced in the field, such as when one or more optical fibers of the distribution cable are accessed in the field to create a mid-span access location and spliced to interconnect the distribution cable with one or more drop cables.
  • [0046]
    The connectors (not shown) of the connectorized optical fibers are routed within the interior cavity of the connection closure 20 and connected to the connector ports 34 on the inside of the closure 20. Although not shown, strain relief devices may be provided for any of the optical fibers within the interior of the base 26 to strain relieve the optical fibers adjacent the distribution cable or, for example, a splice tray. With the cover 28 opened as shown in FIG. 5, the interior of the connection closure 20 is readily accessible to a field technician initially installing the connectorized optical fibers into the respective connector port 34. The field technician may create and route additional connectorized optical fibers to unused connector ports 34, or remove or rearrange optical connections between existing connectorized optical fibers and the connector ports 34. Once the connection closure 20 is initially installed, the field technician may also add, remove or rearrange optical connections between optical fibers of the drop cables and the respective connector ports 34 from the exterior of the connection closure 20 without the need for entering the closure 20. Since the connection closure 20 does not have to be entered to connect, disconnect or reconfigure drop cables, additional drop cables can be connected without disturbing the previously installed drop cables or the contents of the connection closure 20, particularly the relatively delicate connectorized optical fibers and the splice connections between the optical fibers of the distribution cable and the connectorized optical fibers.
  • [0047]
    As previously described, a shelf 54 may be used to mount a conventional splice organizer or splice tray within the interior of the connection closure 20 to splice terminated or preterminated optical fibers of the distribution cable to pigtails. The splice organizer or splice tray may be mounted to either the top or bottom surface of the shelf 54. It will be readily apparent and well understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that each terminated or preterminated optical fiber may be spliced to a pigtail in any known manner, such as by fusion or mechanical splicing. The pigtail exits the splice organizer or splice tray and is routed to a connector port 34 located within an external wall of the connection closure 20. The splice organizer or splice tray may be configured to contain any number of splices. Preferably, the pigtails exit the splice organizer or splice tray at the side closest to the connector ports 34. More than one splice organizer or splice tray may be provided to accommodate splicing the optical fibers of the distribution cable to pigtails. In the case of more than one splice tray, the splice trays may be positioned in a stacked relationship on the shelf 54 and retained in a known manner, such as by a strap or by a nut secured on a threaded mounting post. Preferably, the shelf 54 is hingedly affixed to an interior wall of the base 26 of the connection closure 20 at one or more hinge locations, thus allowing the shelf 54 to be rotated between an opened position for providing access to the splice tray and a closed position for storing the splice tray.
  • [0048]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, a connection closure 20 constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown. FIG. 7 shows the cover 28 in a closed position, while FIG. 8 shows the cover 28 in an opened position. The embodiment of the connection closure 20 shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 is typically installed in a below grade location, for example, within a hand-hole or vault. However, the connection closure 20 may also be installed in an aerial location, for example on a telephone pole, or in an above ground location within a larger enclosure, such as an above ground cabinet, network terminal or pedestal. For below grade deployments, the connection closure 20 is mounted on a buried distribution cable (not shown) by way of one or more cable openings 22 located within at least one external wall of the connection closure 20. As previously described, the base 26 and the end wall 40 may each define semi-circular recesses 58 that are configured to receive at least one distribution cable through the exterior wall of the connection closure 20. As shown, the end wall 40 is inserted into grooves defined by the base 26 and secured in place around the distribution cable. Fasteners (not shown), such as threaded screws or bolts, may be used to secure the end wall 40 to the base 26. Preferably, the fasteners may only be accessed when the cover 28 is in an opened position. The base 26 and the end wall 40 may also be provided with a water-blocking gel material that provides a sealing function.
  • [0049]
    The connection closure 20 shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 may be a butt-type or a through-type enclosure, depending on the routing of the distribution cable(s). In the case of a through-type enclosure, cable openings 22 may be utilized at opposed end walls of the connection closure 20, thus providing a lengthwise-extending passage through the closure 20. In the case of a butt-type enclosure, two cable openings 22 may be utilized at one end wall 40, thus providing cable entrance and exit openings in the same end wall 40. The cable openings 22 may be provided with sealing members (not shown) operable for forming a seal between the distribution cable and the connection closure 20. Unoccupied cable openings 22 may be fitted with a plug, cap or other sealing member (not shown) until needed.
  • [0050]
    The connection closure 20 comprises a base 26 and a cover 28 each made of a lightweight, yet rigid material, such as aluminum, plastic or thermoplastic. The base 26 and cover 28 may be provided with lengthwise and/or widthwise stiffening ribs 32 on either the interior or exterior, or both, of the closure 20 to strengthen and prevent distortion of the base 26 and cover 28. The base 26 is generally box-shaped and defines an interior cavity for housing the express portion of the distribution cable, the connectorized optical fibers and optical hardware, such as splice trays, couplers, adapters, optical fiber routing and slack storage guides and the like. The base 26 may have any of a variety of shapes that is suitable for housing optical communications hardware and for routing the express portion of distribution cable and one or more connectorized optical fibers of the fiber optic distribution cable, as previously described. Preferably, the cover 28 is hingedly affixed to the base 26 and adapted to be opened and closed thereon. As shown, the cover 28 is generally rectangular and is hingedly affixed to the base 26 along the upper edge of one of the sidewalls at one or more hinge locations and secured to the base 26 at openings 68 that receive threaded screws or bolts, or other known fasteners to secure the cover 28 in the closed position. However, the cover 28 may be slidably attached to the base 26 to selectively expose the interior cavity of the base 26. Alternatively, the cover 28 may be removably attached to the base 26 to provide unobstructed access to the interior cavity. A sealing gasket (not shown) may also be disposed between the base 26 and the cover 28 to provide a seal against environmental elements such as wind-driven rain. The connection closure 20 may further comprise a pressure valve 64 operable for pressurizing the interior cavity of the closure 20. While breathable closures may be used in both aerial, buried and above ground deployments, below grade deployments oftentimes require a sealed and pressurized closure 20.
  • [0051]
    The exemplary embodiment of the closure 20 illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 comprises twelve connector ports 34 for receiving up to twelve connectorized optical fibers on the inside of the closure 20 and up to twelve pre-connectorized drop cables on the outside of the closure 20. Although the twelve connector ports 34 are shown arranged in four rows of three, it is envisioned that the connection closure 20 may be designed to accommodate any desired number of connector ports 34, for example, one, two, three, four, six, eight, twelve, etc. Thus, it is conceivable that the closure 20 may accommodate any desired number of pre-connectorized drop cables. Furthermore, the dimensions and overall size of the connection closure 20 will vary depending on the number of connector ports 34 utilized. Although not shown, identifying indicia may be placed adjacent to each connector port 34 for easy identification in the field. The connector port 34 may also include a factory-installed connector adapter sleeve (not shown) for aligning and maintaining the mating connectors in physical contact. In one embodiment, the connector adapter sleeve may be biased within the adapter to ensure physical contact between the opposed end faces of the connectors. Preferably, the connector ports 34 further provide an environmental seal at the interface between the connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable and the pre-connectorized drop cables. Unused connector ports 34 may be covered and sealed with a removable cap or plug 65 until the connector port 34 is needed. The twelve connector ports 34 are shown located within the top surface of the cover 28 on angled surfaces 38. The angled surfaces 38 provide a preferred routing direction of the pre-connectorized drop cables. The angled surfaces 38 are recessed from and surrounded on two sides by a protruding portion of the molded cover 28 operable for providing protection to the connector ports 34 during deployment and installation. In below grade deployments, the connection closure 20 may be mounted upon the distribution cable with the connector ports 34 angled in the direction in which the drop cables will be routed.
  • [0052]
    Referring specifically to FIG. 8, the connection closure 20 is illustrated with the cover 28 opened to show the interior of the closure 20 and its contents. Although not shown, the distribution cable enters the connection closure 20 through a cable opening 22 located within one end wall 40 and exits the closure 20 through a cable opening 22 located within the opposed end wall 40. The distribution cable may be secured to one or more cable brackets positioned adjacent to the appropriate cable opening 22 and secured by the base 26 or end wall 40. The cable bracket may define a notch along its length for securing a conventional cable tie, strap, hose clamp or other fastening mechanism around the distribution cable in a known manner. The cable bracket also aids in retaining the connection closure 20 in place in a desired position along the length of the distribution cable. A plurality of hardware mounting features 48 may be located on the interior of the connection closure 20 for fastening optical hardware, such as optical fiber storage trays, splice trays, coupler trays, routing guides, fiber organizers, etc., to the interior of the connection closure 20. A slack basket (not shown) may be fastened to the hardware mounting features 48 and operable for receiving and storing slack lengths of optical fibers and/or optical fiber buffer tubes. A strain relief bracket 52 may also be secured to the interior of the connection closure 20 using the hardware mounting features 48. The strain relief bracket 52 (which may also be a part of the splice tray) provides strain relief for the optical fibers entering and exiting, for example, a splice tray 66. Splice trays are used when terminated or preterminated optical fibers are spliced in the field, such as when one or more optical fibers of the distribution cable are accessed in the field to create a mid-span access location and spliced to interconnect the distribution cable with one or more drop cables.
  • [0053]
    The connectors (not shown) of the connectorized optical fibers are routed within the interior cavity of the connection closure 20 and connected to the connector ports 34 on the inside of the closure 20. Although not shown, strain relief devices may be provided for any of the optical fibers within the interior of the base 26 to strain relieve the optical fibers adjacent the distribution cable. With the cover 28 opened as shown in FIG. 8, the interior of the connection closure 20 is readily accessible to a field technician initially installing the connectorized optical fibers into the respective connector ports 34. The field technician may create and route additional connectorized optical fibers to unused connector ports 34, or remove or rearrange optical connections between existing connectorized optical fibers and the connector ports 34. Once the connection closure 20 is initially installed, the field technician may also add, remove or rearrange optical connections between optical fibers of the drop cables and the respective connector ports 34 from the exterior of the connection closure 20 without the need for entering the closure 20. Since the connection closure 20 does not have to be entered to connect, disconnect or reconfigure drop cables, additional drop cables can be connected without disturbing the previously installed drop cables or the contents of the connection closure 20, particularly the relatively delicate connectorized optical fibers and the splice connections between the optical fibers of the distribution cable and the connectorized optical fibers.
  • [0054]
    As previously described, a shelf 54 may be used to mount a conventional splice organizer or splice tray 66 within the interior of the connection closure 20 to splice terminated or preterminated optical fibers of the distribution cable to pigtails. The splice tray 66 may be mounted to either the top or bottom surface of the shelf 54, or as shown, within a slot provided on the shelf 54. It will be readily apparent and well understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that each terminated or preterminated optical fiber may be spliced to a pigtail in any known manner, such as by fusion or mechanical splicing. The pigtail exits the splice tray 66 and is routed to a connector port 34 located within an external wall of the connection closure 20. The splice tray 66 may be configured to contain any number of splices, or a plurality of splice trays 66 may be utilized. Preferably, the pigtails exit the splice tray 66 at the side closest to the connector port 34 to which the connectorized optical fiber is routed and are strain relieved to the appropriate strain relief bracket 52. In the case of more than one splice tray 66, the splice trays may be positioned in a stacked relationship on the shelf 54 and retained in a known manner, such as by a strap or by a nut secured on a threaded mounting post. As shown, the shelf 54 is secured by conventional fasteners to an interior wall of the base 26 of the connection closure 20 at one or more locations, thus allowing the shelf 54 to be removed for providing access to the splice tray 66 and replaced for storing the splice tray 66.
  • [0055]
    Regardless, sufficient space is provided in the interior cavity of the base 26 to route the optical fibers of the distribution cable, the connectorized optical fibers and their respective connectors, as well as the express portion of the distribution cable through the interior cavity. In applications in which the distribution cable is accessed and the mid-span access location is factory-prepared, a splice tray 66 may not be needed for connecting the connectorized optical fibers to the respective optical fibers of the distribution cable (e.g., a pre-connectorized fiber optic distribution cable). In this type of application, the shelf 54 and splice tray 66 may be removed and instead a splice organizer may be secured to an interior wall of the connection closure 20 by way of the hardware mounting features 48 to support the factory-prepared splices between the optical fibers of the distribution cable and the connectorized optical fibers. Furthermore, similar optical hardware may be provided for supporting the connectors of any connectorized optical fibers that are not routed to a connector port 34.
  • [0056]
    Referring now to FIGS. 9 and 10, a connection closure 20 constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown. FIG. 9 shows the cover 28 in a closed position, while FIG. 10 shows the cover 28 in an opened position. The embodiment of the connection closure 20 shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 is typically installed in a below grade location, for example, within a hand-hole or vault. However, the connection closure 20 may also be installed in an aerial location, for example on a telephone pole, or in an above ground location within a larger enclosure, such as an above ground cabinet, network terminal or pedestal. For below grade deployments, the connection closure 20 is mounted on a buried distribution cable (not shown) by way of one or more cable openings 22 located within at least one external wall of the connection closure 20. As previously described, the base 26 and the end wall 40 (removed from the base 26 in FIG. 9) define the cable openings 22 for receiving at least one distribution cable through the exterior wall of the connection closure 20. As shown, the end wall 40 is inserted into grooves defined by the base 26 and secured in place around the distribution cable. Fasteners (not shown), such as threaded screws or bolts, may be used to secure the end wall 40 to the base 26. Preferably, the fasteners may only be accessed when the cover 28 is in an opened position. The base 26 and the end wall 40 may also be provided with a water-blocking gel material that provides a sealing function.
  • [0057]
    The connection closure 20 comprises a base 26 and a cover 28 each made of a lightweight, yet rigid material, such as aluminum, plastic or thermoplastic. The base 26 and cover 28 may be provided with lengthwise and/or widthwise stiffening ribs 32 on either the interior or exterior of the closure 20, or both to strengthen and prevent distortion of the base 26 and cover 28. The base 26 and the cover 28 together are generally “lunch pale” shaped and define an interior cavity. The cover 28 may have any shape that is suitable for housing a plurality of connector ports 34 located within an external wall of the closure 20. As shown, the cover 28 is generally arcuate and dome-shaped and is hingedly affixed to the base 26 along the upper edge of one of the sidewalls at one or more hinge locations and secured to the base 26 at openings 68 that receive threaded screws or bolts, or other known fasteners to secure the cover 28 in the closed position. A sealing gasket (not shown) may also be disposed between the base 26 and the cover 28 to provide a seal against environmental elements such as wind-driven rain. The connection closure 20 may further comprise a pressure valve (not shown) located within an external wall operable for pressurizing the closure 20, as previously described.
  • [0058]
    The exemplary embodiment of the closure 20 illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10 comprises eight connector ports 34 for receiving up to eight connectorized optical fibers on the inside of the closure 20 and up to eight pre-connectorized drop cables on the outside of the closure 20. Although the eight connector ports 34 are shown arranged in an arcuate pattern, it is envisioned that the connection closure 20 may be designed to accommodate any desired number of connector ports 34, for example, one, two, three, four, six, eight, etc., on one or both ends of the closure 20. Thus, it is conceivable that the closure 20 may accommodate any desired number of pre-connectorized drop cables. Furthermore, the dimensions and overall size of the connection closure 20 will vary depending on the number of connector ports 34 utilized. Although not shown, identifying indicia may be placed adjacent to each connector port 34 for easy identification in the field. The connector port 34 may also include a factory-installed connector adapter sleeve (not shown) for aligning and maintaining the mating connectors in physical contact. In one embodiment, the connector adapter sleeve may be biased within the adapter to ensure physical contact between the opposed end faces of the connectors. Preferably, the connector ports 34 further provide an environmental seal at the interface between the connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable and the pre-connectorized drop cables. Unused connector ports 34 may be covered and sealed with a removable cap or plug 65 until the connector port 34 is needed. The eight connector ports 34 are shown located within one end of the cover 28 and generally parallel to the direction of the distribution cable. In below grade deployments, the connection closure 20 may be mounted upon the distribution cable with the connector ports 34 oriented in the direction in which the drop cables will be routed.
  • [0059]
    Referring specifically to FIG. 10, the connection closure 20 is illustrated with the cover 28 opened to show the interior of the closure 20 and its contents. Although not shown, the distribution cable enters the connection closure 20 through a cable opening 22 located within one end wall 40 and exits the closure 20 through a cable opening 22 located within the opposed end wall 40. The distribution cable may be secured to one or more cable brackets positioned adjacent to the appropriate cable opening 22 and secured by the base 26 or end wall 40. The cable bracket may define a notch along its length for securing a conventional cable tie, strap, hose clamp or other fastening mechanism around the distribution cable in a known manner. The cable bracket also aids in retaining the connection closure 20 in place in a desired position along the length of the distribution cable. A plurality of hardware mounting features 48 may be located on the interior of the connection closure 20 for fastening optical hardware, such as optical fiber storage trays, splice trays, coupler trays, routing guides, fiber organizers, etc., to the interior of the connection closure 20. A slack basket (not shown) may be fastened to the hardware mounting features 48 and operable for receiving and storing slack lengths of optical fibers and/or optical fiber buffer tubes. A strain relief bracket 52 may also be secured to the interior of the connection closure 20 using the hardware mounting features 48. The strain relief bracket 52 (which may also be a part of the splice tray) provides strain relief for the optical fibers entering and exiting, for example, a splice tray 66. Splice trays are used when terminated or preterminated optical fibers are spliced in the field, such as when one or more optical fibers of the distribution cable are accessed in the field to create a mid-span access location and spliced to interconnect the distribution cable with one or more drop cables.
  • [0060]
    The connectors (not shown) of the connectorized optical fibers are routed within the interior cavity of the connection closure 20 and connected to the connector ports 34 on the inside of the closure 20. Although not shown, strain relief devices may be provided for any of the optical fibers within the interior of the base 26 to strain relieve the optical fibers adjacent the distribution cable. With the cover 28 opened as shown in FIG. 10, the interior of the connection closure 20 is readily accessible to a field technician initially installing the connectorized optical fibers into the respective connector ports 34. The field technician may create and route additional connectorized optical fibers to unused connector ports 34, or remove or rearrange optical connections between existing connectorized optical fibers and the connector ports 34. Once the connection closure 20 is initially installed, the field technician may also add, remove or rearrange optical connections between optical fibers of the drop cables and the respective connector ports 34 from the exterior of the connection closure 20 without the need for entering the closure 20. Since the connection closure 20 does not have to be entered to connect, disconnect or reconfigure drop cables, additional drop cables can be connected without disturbing the previously installed drop cables or the contents of the connection closure 20, particularly the relatively delicate connectorized optical fibers and the splice connections between the optical fibers of the distribution cable and the connectorized optical fibers.
  • [0061]
    As previously described, a shelf 54 may be used to mount a conventional splice organizer or splice tray 66 within the interior of the connection closure 20 to splice terminated or preterminated optical fibers of the distribution cable to pigtails. The splice tray 66 may be mounted to either the top or bottom surface of the shelf 54, or as shown, within a slot provided on the shelf 54. It will be readily apparent and well understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that each terminated or preterminated optical fiber may be spliced to a pigtail in any known manner, such as by fusion or mechanical splicing. The pigtail exits the splice tray 66 and is routed to a connector port 34 located within an external wall of the connection closure 20. The splice tray 66 may be configured to contain any number of splices, or a plurality of splice trays 66 may be utilized. Preferably, the pigtails exit the splice tray 66 at the side closest to the connector ports 34 and are strain relieved to the appropriate strain relief bracket 52. In the case of more than one splice tray 66, the splice trays may be positioned in a stacked relationship on the shelf 54 and retained in a known manner, such as by a strap or by a nut secured on a threaded mounting post. As shown, the shelf 54 is secured by conventional fasteners to an interior wall of the base 26 of the connection closure 20 at one or more locations, thus allowing the shelf 54 to be removed for providing access to the splice tray 66 and replaced for storing the splice tray 66.
  • [0062]
    The exemplary embodiments of a connection closure according to the present invention shown and described herein provide a number of significant advantages over previously known aerial and below grade splice closures. For purposes of example only, and not by way of limitation, a connection closure constructed in accordance with the invention provides a field technician with the ability to readily connect, disconnect and reconfigure pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables to “quick connect” connector ports located within an external wall of the closure. In addition, connectorized optical fibers of the distribution cable are routed to the connector ports on the inside of the closure during installation, thus eliminating the need for a field technician to enter the closure to make subsequent optical connections of the pre-connectorized drop cables to the terminated or preterminated optical fibers of the distribution cable. Thus, the connection closure of the present invention eliminates the need for performing fusion and mechanical splices in the field once the optical fibers of the distribution cable are connectorized. It should be noted that a connection closure constructed in accordance with the invention permits numerous configurations of aerial, buried and above ground closures for receiving pre-connectorized fiber optic drop cables to be interconnected with a distribution cable.
  • [0063]
    The foregoing is a description of various embodiments of the invention that are given here by way of example only. Although an optical connection closure having at least one connector port located within an external wall of the closure has been described with reference to preferred embodiments and examples thereof, other embodiments and examples may perform similar functions and/or achieve similar results. All such equivalent embodiments and examples are within the spirit and scope of the present invention and are intended to be covered by the appended claims.

Claims (4)

  1. 1-29. (canceled)
  2. 30. An optical fiber connection closure for use at a branch point in a fiber optic communications network including a distribution cable comprising a plurality of optical fibers and a mid-span access location provided along the length of the distribution cable, the closure comprising;
    a base;
    a cover affixed to the base such that the base and the cover define an interior cavity, the cover movable relative to the base between a closed position and an opened position for providing access to the interior cavity;
    an end wall cooperating with the base and comprising at least a portion of at least one cable opening for receiving the distribution cable within the interior cavity defined by the base and the cover;
    a plurality of connector ports located within the cover and having an inside adapted for receiving certain of the optical fibers of the distribution cable having connectors mounted upon the ends thereof from within the interior cavity and having an outside adapted for receiving a respective pre-connectorized drop cable.
  3. 31. The closure according to claim 30, wherein the distribution cable is received within the cable opening in a lengthwise direction and the connector ports are oriented such that the pre-connectorized drop cables extend away from the closure in a direction generally parallel to the distribution cable.
  4. 32. The closure according to claim 30, further comprising a connector adapter sleeve disposed within the at least one connector port and biased for aligning and maintaining the connectorized optical fiber and the pre-connectorized drop cable in physical contact.
US11300035 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port Abandoned US20060098932A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10774266 US7013074B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2004-02-06 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US11300035 US20060098932A1 (en) 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11300035 US20060098932A1 (en) 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US12008488 US7869681B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2008-01-11 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port for optically connecting a drop cable to a distribution cable

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060098932A1 true true US20060098932A1 (en) 2006-05-11

Family

ID=34826944

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10774266 Active US7013074B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2004-02-06 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US11300024 Abandoned US20060093304A1 (en) 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US11300035 Abandoned US20060098932A1 (en) 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US12008488 Active US7869681B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2008-01-11 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port for optically connecting a drop cable to a distribution cable

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10774266 Active US7013074B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2004-02-06 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port
US11300024 Abandoned US20060093304A1 (en) 2004-02-06 2005-12-14 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12008488 Active US7869681B2 (en) 2004-02-06 2008-01-11 Optical connection closure having at least one connector port for optically connecting a drop cable to a distribution cable

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (4) US7013074B2 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050213921A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2005-09-29 Mertesdorf Daniel R Fiber access terminal
US20080232743A1 (en) * 2007-03-23 2008-09-25 Erik Gronvall Drop terminal with anchor block for retaining a stub cable
US20090046985A1 (en) * 2007-08-16 2009-02-19 Erik Gronvall Fiber Optic Enclosure Internal Cable Management
US20090123115A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-05-14 Erik Gronvall Drop Terminal Releasable Engagement Mechanism
US20090220204A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Gil Ruiz Splice revolver, splice module and method of organizing fiber strands in the splice module
US20100209065A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 Gil Ruiz Optical fiber management shelf including door with push-push fastener
US7844158B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2010-11-30 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mini drop terminal
US20160334579A1 (en) * 2014-04-25 2016-11-17 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Optical fiber splice housings

Families Citing this family (131)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6160946A (en) 1998-07-27 2000-12-12 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Outside plant fiber distribution apparatus and method
US7239789B2 (en) 2003-10-06 2007-07-03 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber splice case
US7120347B2 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-10-10 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US6926449B1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2005-08-09 Corning Cable Systems Llc Connector port for network interface device
US7130519B2 (en) * 2004-05-11 2006-10-31 Preformed Line Products Company Convertible fiber closure platform
US7680388B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2010-03-16 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Methods for configuring and testing fiber drop terminals
US7489849B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2009-02-10 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber drop terminal
CA2531263C (en) * 2004-12-22 2015-11-03 Tyco Electronics Corporation Optical fiber termination apparatus, entry sealing members and methods for using the same
US7274850B2 (en) * 2005-02-25 2007-09-25 Charles Industries, Ltd. Fiber optic splice enclosure
US7359613B2 (en) * 2005-05-27 2008-04-15 Tyco Electronics Corporation Optical fiber termination apparatus for taut sheath splicing and method for using the same
US7356237B2 (en) * 2005-07-25 2008-04-08 Tyco Electronics Corporation Optical fiber cable termination apparatus
US7393148B2 (en) * 2005-12-06 2008-07-01 Tyco Electronics Corporation Optical fiber splicing closures and methods
US7885504B2 (en) * 2005-12-16 2011-02-08 Fci Americas Technology, Inc. Dual-optical fiber coupler enclosure
US7418183B2 (en) * 2006-02-08 2008-08-26 Charles Industries, Ltd. Fiber optic splice enclosure
US7756372B2 (en) 2006-02-22 2010-07-13 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber optic cable systems and kits and methods for terminating the same
US7477824B2 (en) 2006-04-05 2009-01-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Universal bracket for mounting a drop terminal
JP4388540B2 (en) * 2006-11-14 2009-12-24 カナレ電気株式会社 Tadashi Mitsunari unit
US20080111977A1 (en) * 2006-11-14 2008-05-15 Asml Holding N.V. Compensation techniques for fluid and magnetic bearings
US7583885B2 (en) * 2006-11-28 2009-09-01 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber distribution enclosure
US7493002B2 (en) 2007-01-19 2009-02-17 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic adapter cassette and panel
US7668432B2 (en) * 2007-01-31 2010-02-23 Tyco Electronics Corporation Multi-drop closure systems and methods for fiber optic cabling
US7558458B2 (en) * 2007-03-08 2009-07-07 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Universal bracket for mounting a drop terminal
US7535716B2 (en) * 2007-05-23 2009-05-19 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Apparatus for enclosing electronic components used in telecommunication systems
US8380874B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2013-02-19 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8001261B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2011-08-16 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8699678B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2014-04-15 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8782274B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2014-07-15 Voxer Ip Llc Method and system for progressively transmitting a voice message from sender to recipients across a distributed services communication network
US8145780B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2012-03-27 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8090867B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2012-01-03 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US20090103529A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Rebelvox, Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8825772B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2014-09-02 Voxer Ip Llc System and method for operating a server for real-time communication of time-based media
US9178916B2 (en) 2007-06-28 2015-11-03 Voxer Ip Llc Real-time messaging method and apparatus
US8699383B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2014-04-15 Voxer Ip Llc Method and apparatus for real-time synchronization of voice communications
US8099512B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2012-01-17 Voxer Ip Llc Method and system for real-time synchronization across a distributed services communication network
US8321582B2 (en) 2008-02-08 2012-11-27 Voxer Ip Llc Communication application for conducting conversations including multiple media types in either a real-time mode or a time-shifted mode
US9054912B2 (en) 2008-02-08 2015-06-09 Voxer Ip Llc Communication application for conducting conversations including multiple media types in either a real-time mode or a time-shifted mode
US8542804B2 (en) 2008-02-08 2013-09-24 Voxer Ip Llc Voice and text mail application for communication devices
US7751362B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-07-06 Rebelvox Llc Graceful degradation for voice communication services over wired and wireless networks
US8682336B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2014-03-25 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8180029B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2012-05-15 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US7751361B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2010-07-06 Rebelvox Llc Graceful degradation for voice communication services over wired and wireless networks
US8111713B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2012-02-07 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8391312B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2013-03-05 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8321581B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2012-11-27 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8559319B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2013-10-15 Voxer Ip Llc Method and system for real-time synchronization across a distributed services communication network
US8250181B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2012-08-21 Voxer Ip Llc Method and apparatus for near real-time synchronization of voice communications
US8706907B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2014-04-22 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
EP2191315B1 (en) 2007-09-06 2015-01-07 Prysmian S.p.A. Modular system and methods for connecting an external communication network to a user network of a building
US7740409B2 (en) * 2007-09-19 2010-06-22 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US20090277226A1 (en) * 2007-10-16 2009-11-12 Santangelo Salvatore R Modular melter
US8855276B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2014-10-07 Voxer Ip Llc Telecommunication and multimedia management method and apparatus
US8325662B2 (en) * 2008-09-17 2012-12-04 Voxer Ip Llc Apparatus and method for enabling communication when network connectivity is reduced or lost during a conversation and for resuming the conversation when connectivity improves
US7751675B2 (en) * 2007-12-11 2010-07-06 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Wall box adapted to be mounted at a mid-span access location of a telecommunications cable
US8111966B2 (en) * 2008-01-09 2012-02-07 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Wall box adapted to be mounted at a mid-span access location of a telecommunications cable
US20090202212A1 (en) * 2008-02-12 2009-08-13 Cox Terry D Cable slack storage rack
US7970249B2 (en) * 2008-02-15 2011-06-28 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic splice enclosure
US8401583B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2013-03-19 Voxer Ip Llc Time-shifting for push to talk voice communication systems
DE102008056036B4 (en) * 2008-06-09 2010-12-30 Adc Gmbh Panel to accommodate a connection box for optical fiber cables
US8718434B2 (en) * 2008-07-01 2014-05-06 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Cable enclosure with sealed cable entry port
EP2508928B1 (en) * 2008-09-23 2015-08-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Enclosure for telecommunications cables, with removable organizer
US8270950B2 (en) * 2008-12-05 2012-09-18 Voxer Ip Llc Mobile communication device, method, and system for reducing exposure to radio frequency energy during transmissions by transmitting media in/out while the mobile communication device is safe distance away from user
US8428418B2 (en) * 2008-12-09 2013-04-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic adapter plate and cassette
CN102365572A (en) * 2009-01-28 2012-02-29 Adc电信公司 Fiber optic enclosure
US8849927B2 (en) * 2009-01-30 2014-09-30 Voxer Ip Llc Method for implementing real-time voice messaging on a server node
US20100198922A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Rebelvox Llc Methods for using the addressing, protocols and the infrastructure of email to support near real-time communication
US8645477B2 (en) * 2009-01-30 2014-02-04 Voxer Ip Llc Progressive messaging apparatus and method capable of supporting near real-time communication
US8688789B2 (en) * 2009-01-30 2014-04-01 Voxer Ip Llc Progressive messaging apparatus and method capable of supporting near real-time communication
US20110293277A1 (en) * 2009-02-11 2011-12-01 Daniel Aurel Bradea Reconfigurable multi-zoned fiber optic network architecture having fiber optic devices
EP2221932B1 (en) 2009-02-24 2011-11-16 CCS Technology Inc. Holding device for a cable or an assembly for use with a cable
EP2404393A4 (en) 2009-03-05 2014-12-10 Adc Telecommunications Inc Methods, systems and devices for integrating wireless technology into a fiber optic network
EP2411853A1 (en) * 2009-03-27 2012-02-01 3M Innovative Properties Company Low profile fiber drop point of entry system and method of installing
US20100278499A1 (en) * 2009-04-30 2010-11-04 Mures Marcel G Fiber Optic Panels Configured to Retain Fiber Optic Components in a Depth Space of a Chassis
US8699838B2 (en) 2009-05-14 2014-04-15 Ccs Technology, Inc. Fiber optic furcation module
US9075216B2 (en) 2009-05-21 2015-07-07 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic housings configured to accommodate fiber optic modules/cassettes and fiber optic panels, and related components and methods
US8712206B2 (en) 2009-06-19 2014-04-29 Corning Cable Systems Llc High-density fiber optic modules and module housings and related equipment
JP2012530944A (en) 2009-06-19 2012-12-06 コーニング ケーブル システムズ リミテッド ライアビリティ カンパニー Optical fiber device and related equipment and methods high density and high bandwidth
US20110013875A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic enclosure with adapter bulkhead positioned beneath pivotal splice tray
US8533611B2 (en) * 2009-08-10 2013-09-10 Voxer Ip Llc Browser enabled communication device for conducting conversations in either a real-time mode, a time-shifted mode, and with the ability to seamlessly shift the conversation between the two modes
US20110097052A1 (en) * 2009-10-21 2011-04-28 Solheid James J Fiber Access Terminal Mounted at a Mid-Span Access Location of a Telecommunications Cable
US8625950B2 (en) 2009-12-18 2014-01-07 Corning Cable Systems Llc Rotary locking apparatus for fiber optic equipment trays and related methods
US8992099B2 (en) 2010-02-04 2015-03-31 Corning Cable Systems Llc Optical interface cards, assemblies, and related methods, suited for installation and use in antenna system equipment
US8138418B2 (en) * 2010-02-10 2012-03-20 Cordelia Lighting, Inc. Electrical junction box
US8913866B2 (en) 2010-03-26 2014-12-16 Corning Cable Systems Llc Movable adapter panel
US8837940B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2014-09-16 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Methods and systems for distributing fiber optic telecommunication services to local areas and for supporting distributed antenna systems
US9078287B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2015-07-07 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber to the antenna
CA2796221C (en) 2010-04-16 2018-02-13 Ccs Technology, Inc. Sealing and strain relief device for data cables
CN102221735B (en) * 2010-04-16 2013-07-17 泰科电子(上海)有限公司 Cable connector box
US9519118B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2016-12-13 Corning Optical Communications LLC Removable fiber management sections for fiber optic housings, and related components and methods
US8660397B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2014-02-25 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-layer module
US8385711B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2013-02-26 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-configurable splice holder
US9075217B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-07-07 Corning Cable Systems Llc Apparatuses and related components and methods for expanding capacity of fiber optic housings
US8879881B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2014-11-04 Corning Cable Systems Llc Rotatable routing guide and assembly
US8870469B2 (en) 2010-05-12 2014-10-28 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic connector and method of applying same to a fiber optic cable
US8718436B2 (en) 2010-08-30 2014-05-06 Corning Cable Systems Llc Methods, apparatuses for providing secure fiber optic connections
US9279951B2 (en) 2010-10-27 2016-03-08 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic module for limited space applications having a partially sealed module sub-assembly
US8755663B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2014-06-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Impact resistant fiber optic enclosures and related methods
US9116324B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2015-08-25 Corning Cable Systems Llc Stacked fiber optic modules and fiber optic equipment configured to support stacked fiber optic modules
US8662760B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2014-03-04 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic connector employing optical fiber guide member
CA2819235C (en) 2010-11-30 2018-01-16 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber device holder and strain relief device
EP2671109A2 (en) 2011-02-02 2013-12-11 Corning Cable Systems LLC Dense fiber optic connector assemblies and related connectors and cables suitable for establishing optical connections for optical backplanes in equipment racks
US8861919B2 (en) * 2011-02-16 2014-10-14 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber optic closure
KR101253889B1 (en) * 2011-03-10 2013-04-16 이건테크놀로지 주식회사 Terminal box for optical cable
US8774585B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2014-07-08 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Strain-relief bracket for fiber optic closure
US9008485B2 (en) 2011-05-09 2015-04-14 Corning Cable Systems Llc Attachment mechanisms employed to attach a rear housing section to a fiber optic housing, and related assemblies and methods
US8989547B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-03-24 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic equipment assemblies employing non-U-width-sized housings and related methods
US8686289B2 (en) 2011-07-14 2014-04-01 Channell Commercial Corporation Sealing mechanism and method for drop cable splice enclosures
US8953924B2 (en) 2011-09-02 2015-02-10 Corning Cable Systems Llc Removable strain relief brackets for securing fiber optic cables and/or optical fibers to fiber optic equipment, and related assemblies and methods
US9106981B2 (en) 2011-10-03 2015-08-11 Tyco Electronics Uk Ltd Aggregation enclosure for elevated, outdoor locations
US9069151B2 (en) 2011-10-26 2015-06-30 Corning Cable Systems Llc Composite cable breakout assembly
US9038832B2 (en) 2011-11-30 2015-05-26 Corning Cable Systems Llc Adapter panel support assembly
RU2644444C2 (en) * 2012-04-03 2018-02-12 Тайко Электроникс Райхем Бвба Body and organizer for telecommunications
US8873926B2 (en) 2012-04-26 2014-10-28 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic enclosures employing clamping assemblies for strain relief of cables, and related assemblies and methods
US9250409B2 (en) 2012-07-02 2016-02-02 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber-optic-module trays and drawers for fiber-optic equipment
US9042702B2 (en) 2012-09-18 2015-05-26 Corning Cable Systems Llc Platforms and systems for fiber optic cable attachment
EP2725397B1 (en) 2012-10-26 2015-07-29 CCS Technology, Inc. Fiber optic management unit and fiber optic distribution device
EP2738584A1 (en) * 2012-12-03 2014-06-04 CCS Technology, Inc. Fiber optic distribution device
CN203069847U (en) * 2012-12-26 2013-07-17 长飞光纤光缆有限公司 Capacity-expandable type horizontal optical cable connector box
US20140219621A1 (en) * 2013-02-06 2014-08-07 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic multiport
US20150268434A1 (en) * 2013-02-06 2015-09-24 Corning Optical Communications LLC Fiber optic multiport
US8998504B2 (en) * 2013-02-21 2015-04-07 Avago Technologies General Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. User-configurable optical fiber link
US8985862B2 (en) 2013-02-28 2015-03-24 Corning Cable Systems Llc High-density multi-fiber adapter housings
EP3004954A4 (en) * 2013-06-07 2017-05-10 Commscope Technologies Llc Telecommunications connection device
US9696511B2 (en) 2013-08-24 2017-07-04 CommScope Connectivity Belgium BVBA Sealing structures for optical cable closure
US20170176701A1 (en) * 2014-04-03 2017-06-22 CommScope Connectivity Belgium BVBA Splitter module and enclosure for use therein
WO2015188305A1 (en) * 2014-06-09 2015-12-17 深圳日海通讯技术股份有限公司 Optical splitter used outdoors
CA2954776A1 (en) * 2014-07-10 2016-01-14 Corning Optical Communications LLC Optical fiber distribution hub with fiber routing structures
USD768585S1 (en) * 2014-12-15 2016-10-11 General Electric Company Electronics enclosure
US9742176B2 (en) 2015-03-16 2017-08-22 Commscope Technologies Llc Enclosure for cable distribution assembly
WO2017046190A3 (en) 2015-09-14 2017-04-27 CommScope Connectivity Belgium BVBA Terminal enclosure with modular aspects and modules for interfacing with the terminal enclosure
JP2017076859A (en) * 2015-10-14 2017-04-20 キヤノン株式会社 Imaging device
US9575279B1 (en) * 2016-04-14 2017-02-21 Furukawa Industrial S.A. Produtos Elétricos Optic termination box

Citations (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US674908A (en) * 1900-11-07 1901-05-28 Herman C Dreisvogt Cornice-brake machine.
US4884863A (en) * 1989-03-06 1989-12-05 Siecor Corporation Optical fiber splicing enclosure for installation in pedestals
US5004315A (en) * 1983-10-20 1991-04-02 Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Optical cable and optical cable line
US5029958A (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-07-09 Scientific-Atlanta, Inc. Optical fiber enclosure for optoelectronic converter
US5042901A (en) * 1990-07-31 1991-08-27 Siecor Corporation Preconnectorized optical splice closure
US5133039A (en) * 1990-10-29 1992-07-21 At&T Bell Laboratories Aerial fiber optic cable case
US5133038A (en) * 1980-04-17 1992-07-21 Reliance Comm/Tec. Corporation Fiber optic splice case
US5247135A (en) * 1992-02-07 1993-09-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Aerial terminal
US5440665A (en) * 1993-04-16 1995-08-08 Raychem Corporation Fiber optic cable system including main and drop cables and associated fabrication method
US5525756A (en) * 1994-02-28 1996-06-11 Raychem Corporation Rodent-proof aerial splice closure
US5644671A (en) * 1995-06-23 1997-07-01 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber spice case with cross connect feature
US5754643A (en) * 1995-10-02 1998-05-19 Lucent Technologies Inc. Weatherable outside electronic device enclosure
US5778122A (en) * 1996-12-24 1998-07-07 Siecor Corporation Fiber optic cable assembly for interconnecting optical fibers within a receptacle mounted within the wall of an enclosure
US5892870A (en) * 1995-11-16 1999-04-06 Fiber Connections Inc. Fibre optic cable connector
US6066801A (en) * 1997-03-05 2000-05-23 Uro Denshi Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Cable television/telephone tap
US6096973A (en) * 1997-07-11 2000-08-01 Lucent Technologies Inc. Aerial terminal for paired-conductor and coaxial-cable drop wires
US6152767A (en) * 1996-01-24 2000-11-28 N.V. Raychem S.A. Cable closure
US6359228B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2002-03-19 Corning Cable Systems Llc Splice closure
US6427035B1 (en) * 1999-08-12 2002-07-30 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Method and apparatus for deploying fiber optic cable to subscriber
US6521835B1 (en) * 1999-06-14 2003-02-18 K. & M. Realty Trust Cable raceway for bridges and like structures with channel members having multiple degrees of freedom
US6579014B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-06-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic receptacle
US6621975B2 (en) * 2001-11-30 2003-09-16 Corning Cable Systems Llc Distribution terminal for network access point
US6646200B1 (en) * 2002-07-29 2003-11-11 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Apparatus, systems, and methods for adjusting the position of a hanging aerial terminal
US6648520B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-11-18 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic plug
US6661961B1 (en) * 2000-11-01 2003-12-09 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber low profile network interface device
US6777617B2 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-08-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Telecommunications terminal
US20060093278A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Elkins Robert B Ii Pre-connectorized fiber optic distribution cable having overmolded access location
US20060093303A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Randy Reagan Fiber drop terminal
US20060147172A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Luther James P Overmolded multi-port optical connection terminal having means for accommodating excess fiber length
US7075012B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Terminal box
US7075013B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Aerial telecommunications terminal and system
US7078625B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-18 3M Innovative Properties Company Universal aerial hanger
US7094972B2 (en) * 2004-07-13 2006-08-22 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Insulating cover for electrical connectors

Family Cites Families (118)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3879575A (en) * 1974-02-21 1975-04-22 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Encapsulating compound and closure
US4085286A (en) * 1974-09-27 1978-04-18 Raychem Corporation Heat-recoverable sealing article with self-contained heating means and method of sealing a splice therewith
US4152539A (en) * 1977-10-21 1979-05-01 Northern Telecom Limited Telecommunication cable splices
US4270020A (en) * 1979-11-21 1981-05-26 Gf Business Equipment, Inc. Partition wiring system
US4322573A (en) * 1980-03-11 1982-03-30 Northern Telecom Limited Encapsulation of telecommunications cable splices
US4666537A (en) * 1980-04-24 1987-05-19 Thomas & Betts Corporation Method of sealing and repairing electrical cables
US4732628A (en) * 1980-04-24 1988-03-22 Thomas & Betts Corporation Method of sealing and repairing electrical cables
JPS58105114A (en) 1981-12-17 1983-06-22 Hitachi Cable Ltd Optical fiber cable line with branch
FR2524986B1 (en) * 1982-04-08 1984-05-25 Cables De Lyon Geoffroy Delore
FR2531544B1 (en) * 1982-08-04 1985-01-25 Cit Alcatel optical cable headend
US4592721A (en) * 1982-09-23 1986-06-03 Northern Telecom Limited Apparatus for sealably encapsulating articles
FR2538918B1 (en) * 1983-01-05 1985-03-22 Telecommunications Sa
US4512628A (en) * 1983-05-31 1985-04-23 Gte Products Corporation Splice casing assembly
US4913512A (en) * 1983-12-19 1990-04-03 Gte Products Corporation Fiber optic in-line splice case assembly
JPS60169815A (en) 1984-02-13 1985-09-03 Dainichi Nippon Cables Ltd Connection end part of cable with optical fiber
JPS60169813A (en) 1984-02-15 1985-09-03 Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd Optical branching terminal
US4589939A (en) * 1984-02-17 1986-05-20 Raychem Corporation Insulating multiple-conductor cables using coated insert means
US5602954A (en) * 1984-04-11 1997-02-11 Raychem Sv Electrofit fiber optics butt splice
JPH023962B2 (en) 1984-07-17 1990-01-25 Fujitsu Ltd
US4581480A (en) * 1984-09-07 1986-04-08 Northern Telecom Limited Cable splice closure and strain relief
US4570032A (en) * 1984-09-07 1986-02-11 Northern Telecom Limited Sealing closure for a cable splice
US4648919A (en) * 1984-09-18 1987-03-10 Raychem Corp. Protection of cable splice
US4670069A (en) * 1984-09-18 1987-06-02 Raychem Corp. Protection of cable splice
US4591330A (en) * 1984-11-05 1986-05-27 Northern Telecom Limited Moulding equipment
JPS61190305A (en) 1985-02-20 1986-08-25 Fujitsu Ltd Housing structure for underwater branching device
JPH046137B2 (en) 1985-03-27 1992-02-04 Hitachi Ltd
CA1232954A (en) * 1985-06-19 1988-02-16 Leonard J. Charlebois Forming of cable splice closures
CA1247826A (en) * 1985-06-28 1989-01-03 Leonard J. Charlebois Manufacture of sealing closures for a telecommunications cable splice
CA1236958A (en) * 1985-06-28 1988-05-24 Leonard J. Charlebois Manufacture of sealing closures for a telecommunications cable splice
US4648606A (en) * 1985-07-08 1987-03-10 Northern Telecom Limited Seals
JPS6259906A (en) 1985-09-10 1987-03-16 Nec Corp Optical submarine branching device
US4736071A (en) * 1986-03-17 1988-04-05 American Telephone And Telegraph Company, At&T Bell Laboratories Encapsulation system with pressurization means
US4652072A (en) * 1986-04-28 1987-03-24 Wire Tech Incorporated Cable-connector assembly
US4747020A (en) * 1986-05-16 1988-05-24 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Wire distribution apparatus
JPH0213429B2 (en) * 1986-07-10 1990-04-04 Yazaki Corp
JPS63136007A (en) 1986-11-28 1988-06-08 Furukawa Electric Co Ltd:The Optical branch and connection box
JPS63180915A (en) 1987-01-22 1988-07-26 Furukawa Electric Co Ltd:The Terminal part for optical cable
JPS63287916A (en) 1987-05-21 1988-11-25 Chubu Electric Power Co Inc Terminal part of composite cable
JPS63310317A (en) 1987-06-11 1988-12-19 Showa Electric Wire & Cable Co Ltd Junction structural-unit for submaring cable
JPH01138828A (en) 1987-08-12 1989-05-31 Hitachi Cable Ltd Method and system set for temporary restoration of multi-core optical cable
US4805979A (en) * 1987-09-04 1989-02-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Fiber optic cable splice closure
US4820007A (en) * 1988-02-12 1989-04-11 American Telephone And Telegraph Company At&T Bell Laboratories Cable closure and methods of assembling
US4898448A (en) * 1988-05-02 1990-02-06 Gte Products Corporation Fiber distribution panel
US4900123A (en) * 1988-08-29 1990-02-13 Gte Products Corporation 1550 nm fiber distribution panel
US4927227A (en) * 1988-10-31 1990-05-22 At&T Bell Laboratories Optical fiber cable closure
US4911662A (en) * 1988-12-20 1990-03-27 Northern Telecom Limited Distribution frame for telecommunications cable
JPH0353466A (en) * 1989-07-19 1991-03-07 Three Bond Co Ltd Coating member for joint member
US5122069A (en) * 1989-07-28 1992-06-16 Amp Incorporated Access flooring module
US4995688A (en) * 1989-07-31 1991-02-26 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Optical fiber distribution frame
US4986762A (en) * 1989-08-15 1991-01-22 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Termination module for use in an array of modules
US4982083A (en) * 1990-01-03 1991-01-01 Amp Incorporated Optical simulator with loop-back attenuator and filter
US5115105A (en) * 1990-02-21 1992-05-19 Amphenol Corporation Overbraided in-line data bus loom
JP2532065Y2 (en) * 1990-05-21 1997-04-09 ミネソタ・マイニング・アンド・マニュファクチュアリング・カンパニー Optical fiber distribution center
US5194692A (en) * 1990-09-27 1993-03-16 Amphenol Corporation Uncased data bus coupler
US5127082A (en) * 1991-03-22 1992-06-30 The Siemon Company Fiber optic patch panel
US5097529A (en) * 1991-03-22 1992-03-17 At&T Bell Laboratories Space-saving optical fiber cable closure
US5125060A (en) * 1991-04-05 1992-06-23 Alcatel Na Cable Systems, Inc. Fiber optic cable having spliceless fiber branch and method of making
US5210812A (en) * 1991-04-05 1993-05-11 Alcatel Na Cable Systems, Inc. Optical fiber cable having spliced fiber branch and method of making the same
US5121458A (en) * 1991-04-05 1992-06-09 Alcatel Na Cable Systems, Inc. Preterminated fiber optic cable
US5185844A (en) * 1991-07-29 1993-02-09 At&T Bell Laboratories Closure for optical fiber connective arrangements and method of providing same
FR2686729B1 (en) * 1992-01-29 1994-03-18 Filotex Link armored multi-leg.
US5214735A (en) * 1992-04-06 1993-05-25 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic connector retainer
US5212761A (en) * 1992-04-27 1993-05-18 At&T Bell Laboratories Fiber optic module
JP2827076B2 (en) * 1992-09-21 1998-11-18 日東電工株式会社 Waterproofing method of the wire branch connection portion and a cover for use in the method
US5432302A (en) * 1992-11-19 1995-07-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Hydrostatic sealing sleeve for spliced wire connections
WO1994024598A1 (en) * 1993-04-16 1994-10-27 Raychem Corporation Bonding assembly for fiber optic cable and associated method
DE9316172U1 (en) * 1993-10-22 1993-12-09 Kabelmetal Electro Gmbh Sleeve for holding branch-off or connection points of optical or electrical cables
US5490229A (en) * 1993-12-08 1996-02-06 At&T Ipm Corp. Slidably mounted optical fiber distribution tray
US5394502A (en) * 1993-12-21 1995-02-28 United Technologies Corporation Fiber optic cable harness break-out fitting
DE69416330D1 (en) * 1994-01-21 1999-03-11 Adc Telecommunications Inc Fiber distribution frame with high packing density
US5381501A (en) * 1994-01-27 1995-01-10 General Motors Corporation Fiber optic bundle connector including a hollow cone and a terminal block
US5425121A (en) * 1994-02-02 1995-06-13 Siecor Corporation Cable assembly for use with opto-electronic equipment enclosures
US5495549A (en) * 1994-02-18 1996-02-27 Keptel, Inc. Optical fiber splice closure
US5402515A (en) * 1994-03-01 1995-03-28 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Fiber distribution frame system, cabinets, trays and fiber optic connector couplings
US5416874A (en) * 1994-07-01 1995-05-16 Siecor Corporation Optical receiver stub fitting
US5898813A (en) * 1994-08-04 1999-04-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Optical short-circuit plug
FR2728080B1 (en) * 1994-12-08 1997-01-10 Alcatel Cable Interface A splicing box of fiber optic cables
CA2215410A1 (en) * 1995-03-31 1996-10-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Closure with cable strain relief
US5631993A (en) * 1995-04-20 1997-05-20 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber splice case
US5509099A (en) * 1995-04-26 1996-04-16 Antec Corp. Optical fiber closure with sealed cable entry ports
US5732180A (en) * 1995-06-09 1998-03-24 Multilink, Inc. Method and apparatus for sealing fiber optic entryways to a sealed enclosure
US5757997A (en) * 1995-12-22 1998-05-26 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Optical fiber connector using fiber spring force alignment groove
US5758003A (en) * 1996-03-15 1998-05-26 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. High density fiber management
US5861575A (en) * 1996-03-19 1999-01-19 Broussard; Blaine L. Device and method for a fluid stop splice for a submersible cable
EP0801317B1 (en) * 1996-04-12 2002-06-26 Telephone Cables Limited Management of optical fibre
JPH09304631A (en) * 1996-05-14 1997-11-28 Fujikura Ltd Closure for cable connection
US6376774B1 (en) * 1996-08-22 2002-04-23 Littelfuse Inc. Housing for cable assembly
US5734776A (en) * 1996-08-28 1998-03-31 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Outside plant cross-connect apparatus
US5708753A (en) * 1996-09-24 1998-01-13 Lucent Technologies Inc. Method of recovering from a fiber-cable cut using random splicing reconnection
US5745633A (en) * 1996-12-24 1998-04-28 Siecor Corporation Fiber optic cable assembly for securing a fiber optic cable within an input port of a splice closure
DE59813727D1 (en) * 1997-02-14 2006-11-02 Nexans Deutschland Ind Ag & Co Telecommunication cable assembly to the junction of a plurality of stranded elements with optical fibers containing
US6061492A (en) * 1997-04-09 2000-05-09 Siecor Corporation Apparatus and method for interconnecting fiber cables
US5903698A (en) * 1997-04-11 1999-05-11 Wiltron Company Fiber optic connection assembly
US5907653A (en) * 1997-05-01 1999-05-25 Lucent Technologies Inc. Racetrack grommet for optical fiber cable splice closure
US5894540A (en) * 1997-05-22 1999-04-13 Lucent Technologies Inc. Optical Fiber take-up assembly
US6061870A (en) * 1998-01-07 2000-05-16 The Burton Corporation Bushing system
US6215930B1 (en) * 1998-05-11 2001-04-10 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Management Corporation Remote-splitter fiber optic cable
US6014490A (en) * 1998-06-05 2000-01-11 Siecor Operation, Llc Optical fiber interconnection closure having a fiber management frame
US6215939B1 (en) * 1998-07-02 2001-04-10 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber splice case with integral cable clamp, buffer cable storage area and metered air valve
US6208796B1 (en) * 1998-07-21 2001-03-27 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic module
US6343950B1 (en) * 1999-02-23 2002-02-05 Mark E. Eginton Connector arrays
US6535682B1 (en) * 1999-03-01 2003-03-18 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Optical fiber distribution frame with connector modules
US6236795B1 (en) * 1999-06-07 2001-05-22 E. Walter Rodgers High-density fiber optic cable distribution frame
US6385381B1 (en) * 1999-09-21 2002-05-07 Lucent Technologies Inc. Fiber optic interconnection combination closure
US6526210B1 (en) * 2000-06-27 2003-02-25 Cisco Technology, Inc. Optical connector retainer panel and system
US6539160B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-03-25 Corning Cable Systems Llc Optical fiber splicing and connecting assembly with coupler cassette
US6542688B1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-04-01 Corning Cable Systems Llc Optical fiber splicing and connecting assembly
US6560394B1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2003-05-06 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber management frame for closure
US6798967B2 (en) * 2001-04-12 2004-09-28 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber management frame for securely retaining optical fiber connection trays
US6565260B2 (en) * 2001-10-19 2003-05-20 Axe, Inc. High-connector density interface plate
US6678457B2 (en) * 2001-12-01 2004-01-13 Unicom Technologies, Co., Ltd Optical splitter module
US6778752B2 (en) * 2002-05-31 2004-08-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Below grade closure for local convergence point
US6766094B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-07-20 Corning Cable Systems Llc Aerial closure for local convergence point
US6721484B1 (en) * 2002-09-27 2004-04-13 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic network interface device
US6856748B1 (en) * 2003-09-30 2005-02-15 Corning Cable Systems Llc Interconnection enclosure having a connector port and preterminated optical connector
US7239789B2 (en) 2003-10-06 2007-07-03 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber splice case
US7120347B2 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-10-10 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US7327943B2 (en) * 2005-06-22 2008-02-05 Corning Cable Systems Llc Installation closure having fiber management apparatus

Patent Citations (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US674908A (en) * 1900-11-07 1901-05-28 Herman C Dreisvogt Cornice-brake machine.
US5133038A (en) * 1980-04-17 1992-07-21 Reliance Comm/Tec. Corporation Fiber optic splice case
US5004315A (en) * 1983-10-20 1991-04-02 Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Optical cable and optical cable line
US4884863A (en) * 1989-03-06 1989-12-05 Siecor Corporation Optical fiber splicing enclosure for installation in pedestals
US5029958A (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-07-09 Scientific-Atlanta, Inc. Optical fiber enclosure for optoelectronic converter
US5042901A (en) * 1990-07-31 1991-08-27 Siecor Corporation Preconnectorized optical splice closure
US5133039A (en) * 1990-10-29 1992-07-21 At&T Bell Laboratories Aerial fiber optic cable case
US5247135A (en) * 1992-02-07 1993-09-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Aerial terminal
US5440665A (en) * 1993-04-16 1995-08-08 Raychem Corporation Fiber optic cable system including main and drop cables and associated fabrication method
US5525756A (en) * 1994-02-28 1996-06-11 Raychem Corporation Rodent-proof aerial splice closure
US5825964A (en) * 1995-06-23 1998-10-20 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber splice case with cross connect feature
US5644671A (en) * 1995-06-23 1997-07-01 Preformed Line Products Company Optical fiber spice case with cross connect feature
US5754643A (en) * 1995-10-02 1998-05-19 Lucent Technologies Inc. Weatherable outside electronic device enclosure
US5892870A (en) * 1995-11-16 1999-04-06 Fiber Connections Inc. Fibre optic cable connector
US6152767A (en) * 1996-01-24 2000-11-28 N.V. Raychem S.A. Cable closure
US5778122A (en) * 1996-12-24 1998-07-07 Siecor Corporation Fiber optic cable assembly for interconnecting optical fibers within a receptacle mounted within the wall of an enclosure
US6066801A (en) * 1997-03-05 2000-05-23 Uro Denshi Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Cable television/telephone tap
US6096973A (en) * 1997-07-11 2000-08-01 Lucent Technologies Inc. Aerial terminal for paired-conductor and coaxial-cable drop wires
US6521835B1 (en) * 1999-06-14 2003-02-18 K. & M. Realty Trust Cable raceway for bridges and like structures with channel members having multiple degrees of freedom
US6427035B1 (en) * 1999-08-12 2002-07-30 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Method and apparatus for deploying fiber optic cable to subscriber
US6359228B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2002-03-19 Corning Cable Systems Llc Splice closure
US6661961B1 (en) * 2000-11-01 2003-12-09 Tyco Electronics Corporation Fiber low profile network interface device
US6579014B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-06-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic receptacle
US6648520B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-11-18 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic plug
US6621975B2 (en) * 2001-11-30 2003-09-16 Corning Cable Systems Llc Distribution terminal for network access point
US6646200B1 (en) * 2002-07-29 2003-11-11 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Apparatus, systems, and methods for adjusting the position of a hanging aerial terminal
US6777617B2 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-08-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Telecommunications terminal
US7094972B2 (en) * 2004-07-13 2006-08-22 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Insulating cover for electrical connectors
US20060093303A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Randy Reagan Fiber drop terminal
US20060093278A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Elkins Robert B Ii Pre-connectorized fiber optic distribution cable having overmolded access location
US20060147172A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Luther James P Overmolded multi-port optical connection terminal having means for accommodating excess fiber length
US7075012B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Terminal box
US7075013B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Aerial telecommunications terminal and system
US7078625B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2006-07-18 3M Innovative Properties Company Universal aerial hanger

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090297112A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2009-12-03 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20070140642A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2007-06-21 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US7292763B2 (en) * 2004-03-08 2007-11-06 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20080131068A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2008-06-05 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber Access Terminal
US7397997B2 (en) * 2004-03-08 2008-07-08 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20080226252A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2008-09-18 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber Access Terminal
US8363999B2 (en) 2004-03-08 2013-01-29 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20080260345A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2008-10-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20080260344A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2008-10-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
USRE43762E1 (en) 2004-03-08 2012-10-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US7941027B2 (en) 2004-03-08 2011-05-10 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber access terminal
US20050213921A1 (en) * 2004-03-08 2005-09-29 Mertesdorf Daniel R Fiber access terminal
US20080232743A1 (en) * 2007-03-23 2008-09-25 Erik Gronvall Drop terminal with anchor block for retaining a stub cable
US20090046985A1 (en) * 2007-08-16 2009-02-19 Erik Gronvall Fiber Optic Enclosure Internal Cable Management
US20090123115A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-05-14 Erik Gronvall Drop Terminal Releasable Engagement Mechanism
US8213761B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2012-07-03 Adc Telecommunications Mini drop terminal
US7903923B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2011-03-08 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Drop terminal releasable engagement mechanism
US20110067452A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2011-03-24 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mini drop terminal
US7844158B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2010-11-30 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mini drop terminal
US20090220204A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Gil Ruiz Splice revolver, splice module and method of organizing fiber strands in the splice module
US7756378B2 (en) 2008-02-28 2010-07-13 Commscope, Inc. Of North Carolina Splice revolver, splice module and method of organizing fiber strands in the splice module
US20100209065A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 Gil Ruiz Optical fiber management shelf including door with push-push fastener
US8554042B2 (en) * 2009-02-18 2013-10-08 Commscope, Inc. Optical fiber management shelf including door with push-push fastener
US20160334579A1 (en) * 2014-04-25 2016-11-17 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Optical fiber splice housings

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20050175307A1 (en) 2005-08-11 application
US7013074B2 (en) 2006-03-14 grant
US7869681B2 (en) 2011-01-11 grant
US20060093304A1 (en) 2006-05-04 application
US20080112681A1 (en) 2008-05-15 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7244066B2 (en) Fiber optic receptacle and plug assembly including alignment sleeve insert
US5247603A (en) Fiber optic connection system with exchangeable cross-connect and interconnect cards
US5097529A (en) Space-saving optical fiber cable closure
US6061492A (en) Apparatus and method for interconnecting fiber cables
US5734776A (en) Outside plant cross-connect apparatus
US7457503B2 (en) Telecommunications connection cabinet
US7526172B2 (en) Splitter modules for fiber distribution hubs
US6631237B2 (en) Termination and splice panel
US6539160B2 (en) Optical fiber splicing and connecting assembly with coupler cassette
US20050254757A1 (en) Connector port for network interface device
US20070165995A1 (en) Fiber distribution hub with modular termination blocks
US20090257726A1 (en) Fiber management panel
US6792191B1 (en) Local convergence cabinet
US7330629B2 (en) Fiber optic universal bracket apparatus and methods
US7512304B2 (en) Drop terminal with anchor block for retaining a stub cable
US6721484B1 (en) Fiber optic network interface device
US7751674B2 (en) Modular optical fiber cassettes and fiber management methods
US7137742B2 (en) Fiber optic receptacle and plug assemblies with alignment and keying features
US7734138B2 (en) Fiber optic connector holders
US6926449B1 (en) Connector port for network interface device
US20060056782A1 (en) Flexible optical closure and other flexible optical assemblies
US8059932B2 (en) Modular optical fiber cassette
US7415181B2 (en) Fiber optic cables and assemblies for fiber to the subscriber applications
US6711339B2 (en) Fiber management module with cable storage
US7190874B1 (en) Fiber demarcation box with cable management

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CORNING CABLE SYSTEMS LLC, NORTH CAROLINA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BATTEY, JENNIFER A.;CASTONGUAY, GUY;CLAPP JR., DONNIE R.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:017370/0574;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040202 TO 20040203