US20060088984A1 - Laser ablation method - Google Patents

Laser ablation method Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060088984A1
US20060088984A1 US10/972,108 US97210804A US2006088984A1 US 20060088984 A1 US20060088984 A1 US 20060088984A1 US 97210804 A US97210804 A US 97210804A US 2006088984 A1 US2006088984 A1 US 2006088984A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
laser
pulse
laser pulses
less
method
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/972,108
Inventor
Eric Li
Christopher Rumer
Alexander Streltsov
Mark Blocker
Sergei Voronov
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Intel Corp
Original Assignee
Intel Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Intel Corp filed Critical Intel Corp
Priority to US10/972,108 priority Critical patent/US20060088984A1/en
Assigned to INTEL CORPORATION reassignment INTEL CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BLOCKER, MARK A., LI, ERIC J., RUMER, CHRISTOPHER L., STRELTSOV, ALEXANDER M., VORONOV, SERGEI L.
Publication of US20060088984A1 publication Critical patent/US20060088984A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L21/00Processes or apparatus adapted for the manufacture or treatment of semiconductor or solid state devices or of parts thereof
    • H01L21/70Manufacture or treatment of devices consisting of a plurality of solid state components formed in or on a common substrate or of parts thereof; Manufacture of integrated circuit devices or of parts thereof
    • H01L21/77Manufacture or treatment of devices consisting of a plurality of solid state components or integrated circuits formed in, or on, a common substrate
    • H01L21/78Manufacture or treatment of devices consisting of a plurality of solid state components or integrated circuits formed in, or on, a common substrate with subsequent division of the substrate into plural individual devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/02Positioning or observing the workpiece, e.g. with respect to the point of impact; Aligning, aiming or focusing the laser beam
    • B23K26/06Shaping the laser beam, e.g. by masks or multi-focusing
    • B23K26/062Shaping the laser beam, e.g. by masks or multi-focusing by direct control of the laser beam
    • B23K26/0622Shaping the laser beam, e.g. by masks or multi-focusing by direct control of the laser beam by shaping pulses
    • B23K26/0624Shaping the laser beam, e.g. by masks or multi-focusing by direct control of the laser beam by shaping pulses using ultrashort pulses, i.e. pulses of 1ns or less
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/36Removing material
    • B23K26/38Removing material by boring or cutting
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K2101/00Articles made by soldering, welding or cutting
    • B23K2101/36Electric or electronic devices
    • B23K2101/40Semiconductor devices

Abstract

A combination of specific laser pulse durations and repetition rates are incorporated into a semiconductor wafer laser scribing/dicing process. The disclosed combination can reduce factors that contribute to thermal effects, explosive melting and evaporation, and laser/plasma interactions, thereby reducing problems with microcracks, delamination, and particles that can affect semiconductor die yields and reliability.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to laser micromachining and more specifically to the laser micromachining of semiconductor substrates.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The heat generated during the scribing/dicing of semiconductor wafers can be a concern when using conventional (nanosecond) lasers. Heating can cause problems with microcracking, delamination, and particles, all of which can impact semiconductor die yields and reliability. Heat is generated when optical power from the laser pulse is coupled to the lattice degrees of freedom of the material being lased. When this occurs, high energy electrons (excited by photons from the laser) transfer energy to phonons through electron-phonon interactions. This typically occurs within a matter of tens of picoseconds. As a result, the material heats, melts, and then upon reaching its photo ablation threshold, evaporates.
  • Due to the thermal nature of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, the heat produced is not necessarily confined to the area of the laser's focus spot. It can be transferred to other substrate regions via thermal conduction. The heat impacted region is referred to as the heat affected zone. To the extent that heat does not dissipate from the heat affected zone fast enough and optical power continues to be added by the laser pulses, the size of the heat affected zone and thermal effects from heat build-up can increase.
  • Laser scribing/dicing through multiple layers can compound thermal effects problems. For example, when scribing semiconductor wafers, a stack of multiple metal and dielectric layers must be removed. Since the ablation threshold of metals and wide-bandgap dielectrics such as silicon dioxide is higher than that of other materials (such as for example low-k dielectrics), the fluence (laser energy density) must be increased to accommodate removal of these high ablation threshold materials so that the entire stack can be ablated during a single scribe pass of the laser. As fluence increases so too does the thermal energy delivered to the focus spot and the area of the heat affected zone.
  • In addition, because of differences in the optical absorption, heat conduction, and thermal properties of individual layers in the stack, some layers will melt and evaporate faster than others, and some layers will expand and contract differently. To the extent that melting and evaporation occurs in an underlying layer, a subsurface boiling phenomenon can occur that rips off upper layers during evaporation. Also, if the stack is heated and coefficients of thermal expansion of layers in the stack do not match, tensile and compressive film stresses can be produced. In either case, microcracking, delamination, and particles can result.
  • The interaction between the laser pulse and the plasma plume can also create problems during laser scribing/dicing. Optical energy absorbed by the plasma during the laser pulse can reduce the amount of energy delivered to the surface and heat the plume. The heat can cause the plume to expand, whereupon recoiling, mechanical and thermal stresses can be generated. Secondary heating from the expanding plume can also contribute to thermal effects in the heat affected zone. In addition, boiling material caught up in the plasma plume's recoil can recondense and form droplets that contaminate the semiconductor substrate. Also, the reduction in laser energy caused by the laser/plasma interaction results in decreased scribing/dicing efficiency. This problem can be remedied by increasing the fluence. However, increasing fluence compounds problems with thermal effects.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a portion of a laser pulse train that shows the timing relationship between first and second laser pulses in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a top-down view of die formed on a semiconductor substrate;
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 are expanded views of the die shown in FIG. 2 that illustrate alternative techniques for scribing wafers using embodiments of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using a conventional nanosecond laser;
  • FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using an ultrafast laser, wherein the time between laser pulses is less than the plasma lifetime; and
  • FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using an embodiment of the present invention.
  • It will be appreciated that for simplicity and clarity of illustration, elements in the drawings have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements may be exaggerated relative to other elements for clarity. Further, where considered appropriate, reference numerals have been repeated among the drawings to indicate corresponding or analogous elements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In the following detailed description, a method for laser scribing/dicing semiconductor substrates is disclosed. Reference is made to the accompanying drawings within which are shown, by way of illustration, specific embodiments by which the present invention may be practiced. In other instances, well known features may be omitted or simplified in order not to obscure embodiments of the present invention. It is to be understood that other embodiments may exist and that other structural changes may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention.
  • In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, specific laser pulse durations and repetition rates are incorporated into a laser scribing/dicing process. The disclosed processes can reduce/eliminate factors that contribute to thermal effects, explosive melting and evaporation, and laser/plasma interactions, thereby reducing microcracking, delamination, and particles that can affect semiconductor die yields and reliability.
  • Although embodiments of the present invention are discussed in reference to the scribing of semiconductor wafers, one of ordinary skill appreciates that the methods disclosed herein are not limited to such applications and that other types of workpieces can be micromachined using embodiments that fall within the scope and spirit of the present invention.
  • In one embodiment, semiconductor wafer scribe lines (street regions) are scribed/diced by projecting a train of laser pulses onto the wafer. In one embodiment, the duration of each of the laser pulses is less than approximately 100 picoseconds. In one embodiment, the time interval between laser pulses is greater than or equal to the lifetime of the plasma plume produced by the first laser pulse (plasma lifetime is typically on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds depending upon the irradiation conditions, the materials ablated, and the ambient environment). Studies reporting plasma plume lifetimes have been reported by K. H. Song, et al., “Mechanisms of absorption in pulsed excimer laser-induced plasma,” Applied Physics A (Materials Science Processing), vol.65, no.4-5, October 1997. p. 477-85; and R. Stoian et al., “Surface charging and impulsive ion ejection during ultrashort pulsed laser ablation,” Physical Review Letters, vol.88, no.9, Mar. 4, 2002. p. 097603/1-4.
  • In one embodiment, the time interval between laser pulses in the pulse train is be greater than the time it takes for the work piece to substantially dissipate the heat generated by the laser pulse away from the heat affected zone (heat dissipation time). Generally speaking, the heat dissipation time is believed to be on the order of a microsecond. More specifically, since dielectrics conduct heat slower than metals, their heat diffusivity is believed to more strongly impact heat dissipation times. Therefore, assuming that the heat diffusivity for dielectric materials in the film stack approximates that of silicon (i.e. k=0.8 cm2/s) and that the radius of the laser's irradiated area is approximately 5 microns (um), then the heat dissipation time, as given by the equation t=(4r2)/k, can be calculated to be approximately one microsecond (i.e. t˜1 us).
  • In an exemplary embodiment, where the plasma lifetime and heat dissipation times are less than approximately one microsecond, the time period between the first pulse and the second pulse should be greater than approximately one microsecond. In other words, under circumstances where (1) the lifetime of the plasma produced by a laser pulse, and (2) the time it takes to substantially dissipate heat produced by the laser pulse away from the heat affected zone is less than approximately one microsecond, thermal damage can be reduced (as compared to prior art methods) by adjusting the repetition rate of the laser pulses to be equal to or less than approximately one megahertz. One of ordinary skill appreciates that the plasma lifetime, the heat dissipation time or both should be considered when determining the optimal timing between laser pulses. Therefore, to the extent that either of these is greater than or less than the one microsecond, then the time between laser pulses can correspondingly be greater than or less than one microsecond.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates the intensity, duration, and repetition rate of laser pulses in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Shown in FIG. 1 are two laser pulses 102 and 104 that are representative of the timing relationship of a series of pulses (pulse train) used to ablate a workpiece, such as a semiconductor wafer. As shown in FIG. 1, a first laser pulse 102 is followed by a second laser pulse 104. In one embodiment, the laser source is a neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG)laser that projects coherent radiation having a wavelength in the near infrared (IR) wavelength regime (i.e., wavelength is between 800 nanometers (nm) and two microns (um)).
  • In a preferred embodiment, the laser pulse intensity 116 is greater than the photo-ablation threshold 110 of each material in the stack being lased, the laser's wavelength is one micron or longer, and the pulse duration is less than the electron-phonon interaction time scale. A pulse intensity 116 that is greater than the ablation threshold of each material in the film stack is preferred to insure that all wafer street material will be removed. Wavelengths of one micron or longer are preferred because at these wavelengths the ablation threshold is less sensitive to the absorption spectrum of the material being lased and material removal can occur in the non-linear absorption and non-thermal ablation regimes. Pulse durations that are less than the electron-phonon interaction time scale are preferred because this can reduce energy transferred into the lattice.
  • In one embodiment, the pulse duration 108, is less than approximately 100 picoseconds. Preferably the pulse duration 108 is less than approximately 10 picoseconds. And more preferably, the pulse duration is less than approximately one picosecond (1000 femtoseconds). Decreasing the laser pulse duration to a time period that is substantially less than the time it takes for the energy to transfer to the atom's lattice system inhibits the direct coupling of the laser's radiation to the sample's lattice phonons. This significantly reduces the generation of heat. At these pulse durations, ablation is not accomplished by the melting/evaporation that results from the laser's energy being transferred to the atom's lattice system. Instead, the atoms are ionized directly by single or multi-photon absorption before energy transfer from the electronic system to the lattice system can occur. This results in ultrafast bond scission and effective material removal via sublimation. Little or no thermal and mechanical stress is generated and damage, cracking, and delamination in areas surrounding the lased area are significantly reduced.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the interval 106 between laser pulses 102 and 104 is greater than the lifetime of the plasma 112 generated by the laser pulse 102. By increasing the interval between the laser pulses 102 and 104 in the train until after the plasma has substantially decayed, interaction problems between the plasma and the second laser pulse is reduced/eliminated. Therefore, no increase must be made to the optical energy delivered to the material's surface to compensate for the reduction in delivered optical power that can result from the interaction. As a result, scribing efficiency is increased. Also, because the laser pulsing is timed so as not to be concurrent with the existence of the plasma, plasma heating caused by the laser is reduced/eliminated.
  • In addition, as also shown in FIG. 1, the interval 106 between pulses 102 and 104 is greater than the heat dissipation time 114. Typically this time is believed to be less than approximately 1 microsecond. By staging laser pulses to occur after heat generated from the prior pulse has dissipated, problems with heat build-up can be reduced.
  • FIGS. 2-4 describe generally, methods for scribing semiconductor wafers using a laser system that incorporates one or more embodiments of the present invention. Turning now to FIG. 2, a top-down view of semiconductor wafer 200 that includes semiconductor die 202 is shown. The semiconductor die 202 can include circuitry that forms an integrated circuit device, such as a microprocessor, a chipset device, a memory device, or the like. At the intersection of street regions 204 and 206 are dice 202A, 202B, 202C, and 202D. Expanded views of the dice 202A, 202B, 202C, and 202D are shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. FIGS. 3 and 4 will be used to describe the scribing of wafers using a laser that incorporates one or more embodiments of the present invention.
  • Turning now to FIG. 3, a first method for laser scribing is shown, wherein laser kerfs 302A, 302B, and 304A, 304B are formed toward edges of street region 206 and 204, respectively. The laser kerfs are formed by removing street region material using a laser ablation process that incorporates one or more embodiments of the present invention. The street region can include dielectric materials such as low-k dielectrics, silicon nitrides, silicon carbides, silicon dioxide, or the like; conductive materials that include copper, aluminum, refractory metals, or the like; and semiconductor materials, such as crystalline silicon, polysilicon, amorphous silicon, or the like. A train of pulses from the laser is focused onto the street region, whereby material in the streets is removed and the laser kerf regions are formed. The laser kerf regions stop in or on the underlying silicon substrate. Next a wafer dicing saw is used to cut saw kerfs 306 and 308 through the center of the streets 206 and 204, as shown in FIG. 3. The saw removes dielectric, conductive, semiconductive, and substrate material and thereby singulates the wafer. In this embodiment, the laser kerf functions as a crack arrestor, thereby preventing the propagation of cracks that are formed by the saw from extending into the integrated circuit.
  • An alternative scribing method is disclosed in FIG. 4, whereby laser kerfs 402 and 404 are formed in the center of street regions 204 and 206 respectively. In this embodiment, the laser kerfs are formed to be wider than the wafer dicing saw blade and they extend through the layers of street region material (i.e. dielectric, conductive, and semiconductive material) down to the substrate. Following the laser scribe to form the kerfs 402 and 404, the saw is used to cut through the substrate exposed by the laser and thereby singulate the wafer. Here, since the saw contacts only the substrate (i.e. it does not contact any layers of street region material) no thermal or mechanical stresses are generated in the films formed over the semiconductor substrate. This technique may be advantageous in that the saw blade does not have to remove the dielectric and metal material in the street region. This reduces blade loading and can extend the life and reliability of the blade and the overall cost of the sawing process.
  • By using embodiments of the present invention, the complex interactions among the electronic system, the lattice, heat-diffusion, and the plasma can be decoupled or eliminated. Reducing the pulse duration into the picosecond or femtosecond time regimes reduces/eliminates energy transfer from the electrons system to the phonon system. This reduces heating, and consequently melting and surface/subsurface boiling, all of which can contribute to particles, cracking, and delamination. Separating the time between laser pulses to permit adequate diffusion of heat that is generated by a laser pulse reduces the build-up of the heat and the size of the heat affected zone. Separating the laser pulses by at least the time it takes for the plasma plume to decay prevents plasma interference with the laser's operation. Thus, laser fluence adjustments that may have been necessary to compensate for this interference are minimized or eliminated. Also, now there is no secondary heating which results from interactions between the laser pulse and the plasma due to their occurrence in different time domains. In addition, the laser scribing/dicing processes disclosed herein produce debris that is smaller than that generated by conventional nanosecond thermal ablation methods. Here, materials are processed via a relatively cold ablation “atomization” process. The atoms are ionized directly by breaking atomic bonds to remove material, thereby producing of mono-atomic clusters of the removed material. This is in contrast to the localized intense heating, melting, and boiling of material associated with longer pulse width (i.e., nanosecond) lasers. In addition, since less heat is generated, the debris is formed at a cooler temperature than with conventional processes. These particles have less tendency to stick to surrounding areas after they are formed, and they can be easily removed using air instead of with wet processing, which correspondingly reduces costs and increases throughput.
  • Benefits of using laser scribing processes that practice embodiments of the present invention can better be understood by comparing their effects with laser scribing processes that do not. FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using a conventional nanosecond laser. The physical effects of heating and melting are readily observed. Portions of the street region have been removed by the laser. However, a significant amount of unevaporated material and debris still remains. The irregular nature of the remaining melted and recondensed material is evidence of the physical and thermal nature of the nanosecond laser process.
  • FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using an ultrafast (i.e., picosecond) laser, wherein the time between laser pulses is less than the plasma lifetime and the heat dissipation time. As can be seen in this micrograph, the physical effects of this laser process are less than the case of the nanosecond laser in FIG. 5. However, the secondary heating effects (i.e. heat produced by the combination of the interaction between the incoming laser pulse and the plasma plume and/or not allowing heat generated by the laser pulse to dissipate) has generated significant melting of the street region material. This material has redeposited itself along sidewalls and surface regions of the adjacent semiconductor dice.
  • FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional micrograph of a wafer street region that has been scribed using an embodiment of the present invention, wherein the time between laser pulses is greater than the plasma lifetime and the heat dissipation time (i.e., one microsecond). As can be observed in the micrograph of FIG. 7, both the physical and thermal effects have been significantly reduced as compared to the cross-section micrographs shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. Here, because the interactions between the lattice, heat-diffusion, and the plasma have largely been decoupled, the physical effects due to heating, melting, and surface/subsurface boiling have been reduced, and the thermal effects due to secondary heating have also been reduced. There is minimal evidence of damage and unremoved material in the street region and there is minimal build-up of melted lased material on the sidewalls of the wafer dice. Also, the debris that is present in the street region and on the surface of the dice is not typical of the debris produced by the melting and recondensation observed in FIGS. 5 and 6. Consequently, it is much more easily removed.
  • The various implementations described above have been presented by way of example only and not limitation. Having thus described in detail embodiments of the present invention, it is understood that the invention defined by the appended claims is not to be limited by particular details set forth in the above description, as many apparent variations thereof are possible without departing from the spirit or scope thereof.

Claims (29)

1. A method for laser micromachining a workpiece comprising:
projecting a laser-pulse train onto the workpiece; and
ablating portions of the workpiece, wherein a time interval between laser pulses in the laser-pulse train is greater than a heat dissipation time of workpiece regions heated by individual laser pulses.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the time interval between the laser pulses is greater than a lifetime of a plasma produced at the surface of the workpiece by individual laser pulses.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the laser pulses have pulse durations that are less than 100 picoseconds.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the laser pulses have pulse durations that are less than 1000 femtoseconds.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein a repetition rate of the laser-pulse train is less than approximately one megahertz.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the time interval between laser pulses is greater than one microsecond.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein potions of the workpiece is further characterized as semiconductor wafer street regions.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein ablating portions of the workpiece scribes street regions.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein ablating portions of the workpiece dices street regions.
10. A method for forming a semiconductor device comprising:
removing portions of a semiconductor substrate using a series of laser pulses, wherein:
a duration of each of the laser pulses is less than an electron-phonon interaction time; and
a time between a first laser pulse and a second laser pulse in the series of laser pulses is greater than a heat dissipation time of the first laser pulse.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein the time between the first laser pulse and a second laser pulse is greater than a lifetime of a plasma created by the first laser pulse.
12. The method of claim 10, wherein the first and second laser pulses each have a pulse duration that is less than 1000 femtoseconds.
13. The method of claim 10, wherein the first and second laser pulses each have a pulse duration that is less than 10 picoseconds.
14. The method of claim 10, wherein the first and second laser pulses each have a pulse duration that is less than 100 picoseconds.
15. The method of claim 10, wherein a repetition rate of the series of laser pulses is less than approximately one megahertz.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein removing portions of the semiconductor substrate scribes the semiconductor substrate.
17. The method of claim 15, wherein removing portions of the semiconductor substrate dices the semiconductor substrate.
18. A semiconductor dice having regions that have been removed by a series of laser pulses, wherein a duration of each of the laser pulses is less than approximately 100 picosecond and a time between a first laser pulse and a second laser pulse in the series of laser pulses is greater than a heat dissipation time of the first laser pulse.
19. The semiconductor dice of claim 18, wherein the time between the first laser pulse and a second laser pulse in the series of laser pulses is greater than a lifetime of a plasma created by the first laser pulse.
20. The semiconductor dice of claim 18, wherein the first laser pulse and the second laser pulse each have a pulse duration that is less than 1000 femtoseconds.
21. The semiconductor dice of claim 18, wherein a repetition rate of the series of laser pulses is less than approximately one megahertz.
22. The semiconductor dice of claim 18, wherein the regions removed by the series of laser pulses are further characterized as street regions of a semiconductor substrate.
23. A semiconductor device that has been singulated from a semiconductor wafer by projecting a laser-pulse train onto the semiconductor wafer, wherein a time interval between laser pulses in the laser-pulse train is greater than a heat dissipation time of regions in the semiconductor wafer that are heated by individual laser pulses.
24. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein the time interval between the laser pulses is greater than a lifetime of a plasma produced at the surface of the semiconductor wafer by individual laser pulses.
25. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein each of the laser pulses have a duration that is less than 100 picoseconds.
26. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein the each of the laser pulses have a duration that is less than 1000 femtoseconds.
27. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein a repetition rate of the laser-pulse train is less than approximately one megahertz.
28. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein the time interval between laser pulses is greater than one microsecond.
29. The semiconductor device of claim 23, wherein projecting a laser-pulse train onto the semiconductor wafer scribes street regions of the semiconductor wafer.
US10/972,108 2004-10-21 2004-10-21 Laser ablation method Abandoned US20060088984A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/972,108 US20060088984A1 (en) 2004-10-21 2004-10-21 Laser ablation method

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/972,108 US20060088984A1 (en) 2004-10-21 2004-10-21 Laser ablation method

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060088984A1 true US20060088984A1 (en) 2006-04-27

Family

ID=36206700

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/972,108 Abandoned US20060088984A1 (en) 2004-10-21 2004-10-21 Laser ablation method

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20060088984A1 (en)

Cited By (90)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060121680A1 (en) * 2004-12-03 2006-06-08 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Semiconductor device and manufacturing method thereof
US20060249816A1 (en) * 2005-05-05 2006-11-09 Intel Corporation Dual pulsed beam laser micromachining method
US20070272555A1 (en) * 2006-05-24 2007-11-29 Baird Brian W Laser processing of workpieces containing low-k dielectric material
US20070272666A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2007-11-29 O'brien James N Infrared laser wafer scribing using short pulses
US20080156780A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-07-03 Sergei Voronov Substrate markings
US20080311345A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2008-12-18 Picodeon Ltd Oy Coating With Carbon Nitride and Carbon Nitride Coated Product
US20090061210A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2009-03-05 Picodeon Ltd Oy Coating on a fiber substrate and a coated fiber product
WO2009133174A1 (en) 2008-04-30 2009-11-05 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Dicing a semiconductor wafer
US20100197116A1 (en) * 2008-03-21 2010-08-05 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing methods and systems
US20100289186A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2010-11-18 International Business Machines Corporation Enhanced quality of laser ablation by controlling laser repetition rate
US20110127648A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2011-06-02 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Heat Spreader Structures in Scribe Lines
US20110259861A1 (en) * 2009-11-09 2011-10-27 Nlight Photonics Corporation Fiber laser systems for cold ablation
US20120012170A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2012-01-19 Institutt For Energiteknikk Processed silicon wafer, silicon chip, and method and apparatus for production thereof
US20120121382A1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2012-05-17 Raymond Ruiwen Xu Laser maintenance tool
USRE43605E1 (en) 2000-09-20 2012-08-28 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Laser segmented cutting, multi-step cutting, or both
JP2012195472A (en) * 2011-03-17 2012-10-11 Disco Abrasive Syst Ltd Laser processing method of nonlinear crystal substrate
US20120322238A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Wei-Sheng Lei Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using water-soluble die attach film
US20120322235A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Wei-Sheng Lei Wafer dicing using hybrid galvanic laser scribing process with plasma etch
US20120322239A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Saravjeet Singh Hybrid laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using substrate carrier
EP2577750A2 (en) * 2010-05-27 2013-04-10 Solexel, Inc. Laser processing for high-efficiency thin crystalline silicon solar cell fabrication
US8582927B1 (en) * 2008-11-12 2013-11-12 Eospace, Inc. High-efficiency optical modulators and implementation techniques
US20140017882A1 (en) * 2012-07-13 2014-01-16 Wei-Sheng Lei Method of coating water soluble mask for laser scribing and plasma etch
US8643147B2 (en) 2007-11-01 2014-02-04 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Seal ring structure with improved cracking protection and reduced problems
US8703581B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2014-04-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Water soluble mask for substrate dicing by laser and plasma etch
US8759197B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2014-06-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-step and asymmetrically shaped laser beam scribing
US20140179084A1 (en) * 2012-12-20 2014-06-26 Wei-Sheng Lei Wafer dicing from wafer backside
US20140245608A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2014-09-04 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method and apparatus for laser-beam processing and method for manufacturing ink jet head
US20140263207A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Jian Liu Method and Apparatus for Welding Dissimilar Material with a High Energy High Power Ultrafast Laser
US8853056B2 (en) 2010-06-22 2014-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using femtosecond-based laser and plasma etch
US8940619B2 (en) 2012-07-13 2015-01-27 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of diced wafer transportation
US8946057B2 (en) 2012-04-24 2015-02-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using UV-curable adhesive film
US8975163B1 (en) 2014-04-10 2015-03-10 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser-dominated laser scribing and plasma etch hybrid wafer dicing
US8980727B1 (en) 2014-05-07 2015-03-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Substrate patterning using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etching processing schemes
JP2015057289A (en) * 2013-08-09 2015-03-26 国立大学法人大阪大学 Laser processing apparatus, laser processing method, and method of manufacturing processed product
US8999816B1 (en) 2014-04-18 2015-04-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Pre-patterned dry laminate mask for wafer dicing processes
US9018079B1 (en) 2014-01-29 2015-04-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with intermediate reactive post mask-opening clean
US9029242B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-05-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Damage isolation by shaped beam delivery in laser scribing process
US9034771B1 (en) 2014-05-23 2015-05-19 Applied Materials, Inc. Cooling pedestal for dicing tape thermal management during plasma dicing
US9041198B2 (en) 2013-10-22 2015-05-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Maskless hybrid laser scribing and plasma etching wafer dicing process
US9048309B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2015-06-02 Applied Materials, Inc. Uniform masking for wafer dicing using laser and plasma etch
US9054176B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-06-09 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-step and asymmetrically shaped laser beam scribing
US9076860B1 (en) 2014-04-04 2015-07-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Residue removal from singulated die sidewall
US9093518B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-07-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Singulation of wafers having wafer-level underfill
US9105710B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2015-08-11 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing method for improving die packaging quality
US9112050B1 (en) 2014-05-13 2015-08-18 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing tape thermal management by wafer frame support ring cooling during plasma dicing
US9117868B1 (en) 2014-08-12 2015-08-25 Applied Materials, Inc. Bipolar electrostatic chuck for dicing tape thermal management during plasma dicing
US9130056B1 (en) 2014-10-03 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Bi-layer wafer-level underfill mask for wafer dicing and approaches for performing wafer dicing
US9129904B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using pulse train laser with multiple-pulse bursts and plasma etch
US9130057B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid dicing process using a blade and laser
US9142459B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-09-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with mask application by vacuum lamination
US9159621B1 (en) 2014-04-29 2015-10-13 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing tape protection for wafer dicing using laser scribe process
US9159624B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2015-10-13 Applied Materials, Inc. Vacuum lamination of polymeric dry films for wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach
US9165832B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-10-20 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of die singulation using laser ablation and induction of internal defects with a laser
US9165812B2 (en) 2014-01-31 2015-10-20 Applied Materials, Inc. Cooled tape frame lift and low contact shadow ring for plasma heat isolation
US9177861B1 (en) 2014-09-19 2015-11-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using laser scribing process based on an elliptical laser beam profile or a spatio-temporal controlled laser beam profile
US9196498B1 (en) 2014-08-12 2015-11-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Stationary actively-cooled shadow ring for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US9196536B1 (en) 2014-09-25 2015-11-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a phase modulated laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9224650B2 (en) 2013-09-19 2015-12-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing from wafer backside and front side
US9236305B2 (en) 2013-01-25 2016-01-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing with etch chamber shield ring for film frame wafer applications
US9236510B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2016-01-12 Solexel, Inc. Patterning of silicon oxide layers using pulsed laser ablation
US9245803B1 (en) 2014-10-17 2016-01-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a bessel beam shaper laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9252057B2 (en) 2012-10-17 2016-02-02 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing with partial pre-curing of UV release dicing tape for film frame wafer application
US9269604B2 (en) 2014-04-29 2016-02-23 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer edge warp suppression for thin wafer supported by tape frame
US9275902B2 (en) 2014-03-26 2016-03-01 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing processes for thin wafers with bumps on wafer backside
US9281244B1 (en) 2014-09-18 2016-03-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using an adaptive optics-controlled laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9293304B2 (en) 2013-12-17 2016-03-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Plasma thermal shield for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US9299614B2 (en) 2013-12-10 2016-03-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and carrier for dicing a wafer
US9299611B2 (en) 2014-01-29 2016-03-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with mask plasma treatment for improved mask etch resistance
US9312177B2 (en) 2013-12-06 2016-04-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Screen print mask for laser scribe and plasma etch wafer dicing process
US9321126B2 (en) 2004-03-31 2016-04-26 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing apparatus and methods
US9330977B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2016-05-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a galvo scanner and linear stage hybrid motion laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9343366B2 (en) 2014-04-16 2016-05-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing wafers having solder bumps on wafer backside
US9349648B2 (en) 2014-07-22 2016-05-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a rectangular shaped two-dimensional top hat laser beam profile or a linear shaped one-dimensional top hat laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9355907B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2016-05-31 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a line shaped laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9419165B2 (en) 2006-10-09 2016-08-16 Solexel, Inc. Laser processing for high-efficiency thin crystalline silicon solar cell fabrication
US9455362B2 (en) 2007-10-06 2016-09-27 Solexel, Inc. Laser irradiation aluminum doping for monocrystalline silicon substrates
US9460966B2 (en) 2013-10-10 2016-10-04 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and apparatus for dicing wafers having thick passivation polymer layer
US9478455B1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-10-25 Applied Materials, Inc. Thermal pyrolytic graphite shadow ring assembly for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US9508886B2 (en) 2007-10-06 2016-11-29 Solexel, Inc. Method for making a crystalline silicon solar cell substrate utilizing flat top laser beam
US9583375B2 (en) 2014-04-14 2017-02-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Water soluble mask formation by dry film lamination
US9583651B2 (en) 2011-12-26 2017-02-28 Solexel, Inc. Systems and methods for enhanced light trapping in solar cells
US9601375B2 (en) 2015-04-27 2017-03-21 Applied Materials, Inc. UV-cure pre-treatment of carrier film for wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach
US9620379B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-04-11 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-layer mask including non-photodefinable laser energy absorbing layer for substrate dicing by laser and plasma etch
US9721839B2 (en) 2015-06-12 2017-08-01 Applied Materials, Inc. Etch-resistant water soluble mask for hybrid wafer dicing using laser scribing and plasma etch
US9768014B2 (en) 2014-01-31 2017-09-19 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer coating
US9793132B1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-10-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Etch mask for hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch wafer singulation process
US9852997B2 (en) 2016-03-25 2017-12-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a rotating beam laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9972575B2 (en) 2016-03-03 2018-05-15 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a split beam laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US20180185964A1 (en) * 2015-11-09 2018-07-05 Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Method of producing semiconductor chip, and mask-integrated surface protective tape used therein
US10363629B2 (en) 2017-06-01 2019-07-30 Applied Materials, Inc. Mitigation of particle contamination for wafer dicing processes

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4525842A (en) * 1984-02-24 1985-06-25 Myers John D Laser device and method
US4943700A (en) * 1985-12-06 1990-07-24 Austral Asian Lasers Pty. Ltd. Laser sawmill
US6552301B2 (en) * 2000-01-25 2003-04-22 Peter R. Herman Burst-ultrafast laser machining method
US20030226831A1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2003-12-11 Martin Strassl Laser processing apparatus for plasma-induced ablation
US20050274702A1 (en) * 2004-06-15 2005-12-15 Laserfacturing Inc. Method and apparatus for dicing of thin and ultra thin semiconductor wafer using ultrafast pulse laser
US6998567B2 (en) * 2003-01-31 2006-02-14 Trimedyne, Inc. Generation and application of efficient solid-state laser pulse trains
US20060039419A1 (en) * 2004-08-16 2006-02-23 Tan Deshi Method and apparatus for laser trimming of resistors using ultrafast laser pulse from ultrafast laser oscillator operating in picosecond and femtosecond pulse widths

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4525842A (en) * 1984-02-24 1985-06-25 Myers John D Laser device and method
US4943700A (en) * 1985-12-06 1990-07-24 Austral Asian Lasers Pty. Ltd. Laser sawmill
US6552301B2 (en) * 2000-01-25 2003-04-22 Peter R. Herman Burst-ultrafast laser machining method
US20030226831A1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2003-12-11 Martin Strassl Laser processing apparatus for plasma-induced ablation
US6998567B2 (en) * 2003-01-31 2006-02-14 Trimedyne, Inc. Generation and application of efficient solid-state laser pulse trains
US20050274702A1 (en) * 2004-06-15 2005-12-15 Laserfacturing Inc. Method and apparatus for dicing of thin and ultra thin semiconductor wafer using ultrafast pulse laser
US20060039419A1 (en) * 2004-08-16 2006-02-23 Tan Deshi Method and apparatus for laser trimming of resistors using ultrafast laser pulse from ultrafast laser oscillator operating in picosecond and femtosecond pulse widths

Cited By (122)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE43605E1 (en) 2000-09-20 2012-08-28 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Laser segmented cutting, multi-step cutting, or both
US9321126B2 (en) 2004-03-31 2016-04-26 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing apparatus and methods
US9236510B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2016-01-12 Solexel, Inc. Patterning of silicon oxide layers using pulsed laser ablation
US20060121680A1 (en) * 2004-12-03 2006-06-08 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Semiconductor device and manufacturing method thereof
US7521326B2 (en) * 2004-12-03 2009-04-21 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Semiconductor device and manufacturing method thereof
US20060249816A1 (en) * 2005-05-05 2006-11-09 Intel Corporation Dual pulsed beam laser micromachining method
US7611966B2 (en) * 2005-05-05 2009-11-03 Intel Corporation Dual pulsed beam laser micromachining method
US20080311345A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2008-12-18 Picodeon Ltd Oy Coating With Carbon Nitride and Carbon Nitride Coated Product
US20090061210A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2009-03-05 Picodeon Ltd Oy Coating on a fiber substrate and a coated fiber product
US20090166812A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2009-07-02 Picodeon Ltd Oy Semiconductor and an arrangement and a method for producing a semiconductor
US8741749B2 (en) * 2006-02-23 2014-06-03 Picodeon Ltd Oy Semiconductor and an arrangement and a method for producing a semiconductor
EP2030224A1 (en) * 2006-05-24 2009-03-04 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Laser processing of workpieces containing low-k dielectric material
EP2030224A4 (en) * 2006-05-24 2011-10-19 Electro Scient Ind Inc Laser processing of workpieces containing low-k dielectric material
US20070272555A1 (en) * 2006-05-24 2007-11-29 Baird Brian W Laser processing of workpieces containing low-k dielectric material
US8198566B2 (en) 2006-05-24 2012-06-12 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Laser processing of workpieces containing low-k dielectric material
US20070272666A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2007-11-29 O'brien James N Infrared laser wafer scribing using short pulses
US9419165B2 (en) 2006-10-09 2016-08-16 Solexel, Inc. Laser processing for high-efficiency thin crystalline silicon solar cell fabrication
US20080156780A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-07-03 Sergei Voronov Substrate markings
US9430685B2 (en) 2006-12-29 2016-08-30 Intel Corporation Substrate markings
US8344286B2 (en) * 2007-01-18 2013-01-01 International Business Machines Corporation Enhanced quality of laser ablation by controlling laser repetition rate
US20100289186A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2010-11-18 International Business Machines Corporation Enhanced quality of laser ablation by controlling laser repetition rate
US9455362B2 (en) 2007-10-06 2016-09-27 Solexel, Inc. Laser irradiation aluminum doping for monocrystalline silicon substrates
US9508886B2 (en) 2007-10-06 2016-11-29 Solexel, Inc. Method for making a crystalline silicon solar cell substrate utilizing flat top laser beam
US8643147B2 (en) 2007-11-01 2014-02-04 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Seal ring structure with improved cracking protection and reduced problems
US8785813B2 (en) 2008-03-21 2014-07-22 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing methods and systems
US8158493B2 (en) 2008-03-21 2012-04-17 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing methods and systems
US20100197116A1 (en) * 2008-03-21 2010-08-05 Imra America, Inc. Laser-based material processing methods and systems
WO2009133174A1 (en) 2008-04-30 2009-11-05 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Dicing a semiconductor wafer
US8551792B2 (en) 2008-04-30 2013-10-08 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Dicing a semiconductor wafer
US8582927B1 (en) * 2008-11-12 2013-11-12 Eospace, Inc. High-efficiency optical modulators and implementation techniques
US8860208B2 (en) * 2008-11-14 2014-10-14 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Heat spreader structures in scribe lines
US20110127648A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2011-06-02 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Heat Spreader Structures in Scribe Lines
US9044829B2 (en) * 2009-11-09 2015-06-02 Nlight Photonics Corporation Fiber laser systems for cold ablation
US20110259861A1 (en) * 2009-11-09 2011-10-27 Nlight Photonics Corporation Fiber laser systems for cold ablation
EP2577750A4 (en) * 2010-05-27 2014-04-09 Solexel Inc Laser processing for high-efficiency thin crystalline silicon solar cell fabrication
EP2577750A2 (en) * 2010-05-27 2013-04-10 Solexel, Inc. Laser processing for high-efficiency thin crystalline silicon solar cell fabrication
US9245802B2 (en) 2010-06-22 2016-01-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using femtosecond-based laser and plasma etch
US10163713B2 (en) 2010-06-22 2018-12-25 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using femtosecond-based laser and plasma etch
US8853056B2 (en) 2010-06-22 2014-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using femtosecond-based laser and plasma etch
US20120012170A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2012-01-19 Institutt For Energiteknikk Processed silicon wafer, silicon chip, and method and apparatus for production thereof
US8927897B2 (en) * 2010-11-17 2015-01-06 Rolls-Royce Corporation Laser maintenance tool
US20120121382A1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2012-05-17 Raymond Ruiwen Xu Laser maintenance tool
JP2012195472A (en) * 2011-03-17 2012-10-11 Disco Abrasive Syst Ltd Laser processing method of nonlinear crystal substrate
US20120322238A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Wei-Sheng Lei Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using water-soluble die attach film
US20120322239A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Saravjeet Singh Hybrid laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using substrate carrier
US9263308B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2016-02-16 Applied Materials, Inc. Water soluble mask for substrate dicing by laser and plasma etch
US20120322235A1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2012-12-20 Wei-Sheng Lei Wafer dicing using hybrid galvanic laser scribing process with plasma etch
US9029242B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-05-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Damage isolation by shaped beam delivery in laser scribing process
US9218992B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-12-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using substrate carrier
US8759197B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2014-06-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-step and asymmetrically shaped laser beam scribing
US8507363B2 (en) * 2011-06-15 2013-08-13 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using water-soluble die attach film
US10112259B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2018-10-30 Applied Materials, Inc. Damage isolation by shaped beam delivery in laser scribing process
US9129904B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using pulse train laser with multiple-pulse bursts and plasma etch
US8703581B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2014-04-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Water soluble mask for substrate dicing by laser and plasma etch
US9054176B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-06-09 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-step and asymmetrically shaped laser beam scribing
US9224625B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2015-12-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using water-soluble die attach film
US8912077B2 (en) * 2011-06-15 2014-12-16 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using substrate carrier
US20140245608A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2014-09-04 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method and apparatus for laser-beam processing and method for manufacturing ink jet head
US9583651B2 (en) 2011-12-26 2017-02-28 Solexel, Inc. Systems and methods for enhanced light trapping in solar cells
US8946057B2 (en) 2012-04-24 2015-02-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing using UV-curable adhesive film
US9048309B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2015-06-02 Applied Materials, Inc. Uniform masking for wafer dicing using laser and plasma etch
US9177864B2 (en) * 2012-07-13 2015-11-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of coating water soluble mask for laser scribing and plasma etch
US20140377937A1 (en) * 2012-07-13 2014-12-25 Wei-Sheng Lei Method of coating water soluble mask for laser scribing and plasma etch
US8940619B2 (en) 2012-07-13 2015-01-27 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of diced wafer transportation
US8859397B2 (en) * 2012-07-13 2014-10-14 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of coating water soluble mask for laser scribing and plasma etch
US20140017882A1 (en) * 2012-07-13 2014-01-16 Wei-Sheng Lei Method of coating water soluble mask for laser scribing and plasma etch
US9252057B2 (en) 2012-10-17 2016-02-02 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser and plasma etch wafer dicing with partial pre-curing of UV release dicing tape for film frame wafer application
US8975162B2 (en) * 2012-12-20 2015-03-10 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing from wafer backside
US20140179084A1 (en) * 2012-12-20 2014-06-26 Wei-Sheng Lei Wafer dicing from wafer backside
US9236305B2 (en) 2013-01-25 2016-01-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing with etch chamber shield ring for film frame wafer applications
US9620379B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-04-11 Applied Materials, Inc. Multi-layer mask including non-photodefinable laser energy absorbing layer for substrate dicing by laser and plasma etch
US20140263207A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Jian Liu Method and Apparatus for Welding Dissimilar Material with a High Energy High Power Ultrafast Laser
US9878399B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2018-01-30 Jian Liu Method and apparatus for welding dissimilar material with a high energy high power ultrafast laser
JP2015057289A (en) * 2013-08-09 2015-03-26 国立大学法人大阪大学 Laser processing apparatus, laser processing method, and method of manufacturing processed product
US9105710B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2015-08-11 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing method for improving die packaging quality
US9224650B2 (en) 2013-09-19 2015-12-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing from wafer backside and front side
US9460966B2 (en) 2013-10-10 2016-10-04 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and apparatus for dicing wafers having thick passivation polymer layer
US9209084B2 (en) 2013-10-22 2015-12-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Maskless hybrid laser scribing and plasma etching wafer dicing process
US9041198B2 (en) 2013-10-22 2015-05-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Maskless hybrid laser scribing and plasma etching wafer dicing process
US9312177B2 (en) 2013-12-06 2016-04-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Screen print mask for laser scribe and plasma etch wafer dicing process
US9299614B2 (en) 2013-12-10 2016-03-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and carrier for dicing a wafer
US9293304B2 (en) 2013-12-17 2016-03-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Plasma thermal shield for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US9299611B2 (en) 2014-01-29 2016-03-29 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with mask plasma treatment for improved mask etch resistance
US9018079B1 (en) 2014-01-29 2015-04-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with intermediate reactive post mask-opening clean
US9236284B2 (en) 2014-01-31 2016-01-12 Applied Materials, Inc. Cooled tape frame lift and low contact shadow ring for plasma heat isolation
US9768014B2 (en) 2014-01-31 2017-09-19 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer coating
US9165812B2 (en) 2014-01-31 2015-10-20 Applied Materials, Inc. Cooled tape frame lift and low contact shadow ring for plasma heat isolation
US9275902B2 (en) 2014-03-26 2016-03-01 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing processes for thin wafers with bumps on wafer backside
US9076860B1 (en) 2014-04-04 2015-07-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Residue removal from singulated die sidewall
US8975163B1 (en) 2014-04-10 2015-03-10 Applied Materials, Inc. Laser-dominated laser scribing and plasma etch hybrid wafer dicing
US9583375B2 (en) 2014-04-14 2017-02-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Water soluble mask formation by dry film lamination
US9343366B2 (en) 2014-04-16 2016-05-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing wafers having solder bumps on wafer backside
US8999816B1 (en) 2014-04-18 2015-04-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Pre-patterned dry laminate mask for wafer dicing processes
US9159621B1 (en) 2014-04-29 2015-10-13 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing tape protection for wafer dicing using laser scribe process
US9269604B2 (en) 2014-04-29 2016-02-23 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer edge warp suppression for thin wafer supported by tape frame
US8980727B1 (en) 2014-05-07 2015-03-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Substrate patterning using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etching processing schemes
US9112050B1 (en) 2014-05-13 2015-08-18 Applied Materials, Inc. Dicing tape thermal management by wafer frame support ring cooling during plasma dicing
US9034771B1 (en) 2014-05-23 2015-05-19 Applied Materials, Inc. Cooling pedestal for dicing tape thermal management during plasma dicing
US9093518B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-07-28 Applied Materials, Inc. Singulation of wafers having wafer-level underfill
US9165832B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-10-20 Applied Materials, Inc. Method of die singulation using laser ablation and induction of internal defects with a laser
US9142459B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-09-22 Applied Materials, Inc. Wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach with mask application by vacuum lamination
US9130057B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid dicing process using a blade and laser
US9349648B2 (en) 2014-07-22 2016-05-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a rectangular shaped two-dimensional top hat laser beam profile or a linear shaped one-dimensional top hat laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9196498B1 (en) 2014-08-12 2015-11-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Stationary actively-cooled shadow ring for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US9117868B1 (en) 2014-08-12 2015-08-25 Applied Materials, Inc. Bipolar electrostatic chuck for dicing tape thermal management during plasma dicing
US9281244B1 (en) 2014-09-18 2016-03-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using an adaptive optics-controlled laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9177861B1 (en) 2014-09-19 2015-11-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using laser scribing process based on an elliptical laser beam profile or a spatio-temporal controlled laser beam profile
US9196536B1 (en) 2014-09-25 2015-11-24 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a phase modulated laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9130056B1 (en) 2014-10-03 2015-09-08 Applied Materials, Inc. Bi-layer wafer-level underfill mask for wafer dicing and approaches for performing wafer dicing
US9245803B1 (en) 2014-10-17 2016-01-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a bessel beam shaper laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9159624B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2015-10-13 Applied Materials, Inc. Vacuum lamination of polymeric dry films for wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach
US9355907B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2016-05-31 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a line shaped laser beam profile laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9330977B1 (en) 2015-01-05 2016-05-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a galvo scanner and linear stage hybrid motion laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9601375B2 (en) 2015-04-27 2017-03-21 Applied Materials, Inc. UV-cure pre-treatment of carrier film for wafer dicing using hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch approach
US9721839B2 (en) 2015-06-12 2017-08-01 Applied Materials, Inc. Etch-resistant water soluble mask for hybrid wafer dicing using laser scribing and plasma etch
US9478455B1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-10-25 Applied Materials, Inc. Thermal pyrolytic graphite shadow ring assembly for heat dissipation in plasma chamber
US20180185964A1 (en) * 2015-11-09 2018-07-05 Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Method of producing semiconductor chip, and mask-integrated surface protective tape used therein
US10307866B2 (en) * 2015-11-09 2019-06-04 Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Method of producing semiconductor chip, and mask-integrated surface protective tape used therein
US9972575B2 (en) 2016-03-03 2018-05-15 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a split beam laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9852997B2 (en) 2016-03-25 2017-12-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Hybrid wafer dicing approach using a rotating beam laser scribing process and plasma etch process
US9793132B1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-10-17 Applied Materials, Inc. Etch mask for hybrid laser scribing and plasma etch wafer singulation process
US10363629B2 (en) 2017-06-01 2019-07-30 Applied Materials, Inc. Mitigation of particle contamination for wafer dicing processes

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Kautek et al. Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of metallic, semiconducting, ceramic, and biological materials
US7804043B2 (en) Method and apparatus for dicing of thin and ultra thin semiconductor wafer using ultrafast pulse laser
JP4788712B2 (en) Pulsed laser treatment with controlled thermal and physical modification.
US7528342B2 (en) Method and apparatus for via drilling and selective material removal using an ultrafast pulse laser
JP5826027B2 (en) Laser-based material processing method and system
JP4200177B2 (en) Laser processing method and semiconductor device
CN101681822B (en) Working method for cutting
US8685838B2 (en) Laser beam machining method
US8268704B2 (en) Method for dicing substrate
EP2216128B1 (en) Method of cutting object to be processed
JP5449665B2 (en) Laser processing method
JP4907965B2 (en) Laser processing method
JP4749799B2 (en) Laser processing method
EP1748474B1 (en) Laser processing method
EP1742252B1 (en) Laser processing method
US20100311313A1 (en) Working object grinding method
JP4954653B2 (en) Laser processing method
EP1906438B1 (en) Method for cutting workpiece
JP5342772B2 (en) Processing object cutting method
EP1875983B1 (en) Laser processing method and chip
US8969752B2 (en) Laser processing method
US7134943B2 (en) Wafer processing method
TWI476085B (en) Processing object cutting method
EP1956640A1 (en) Laser processing method
EP1742253B1 (en) Laser processing method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: INTEL CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LI, ERIC J.;RUMER, CHRISTOPHER L.;STRELTSOV, ALEXANDER M.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015927/0792;SIGNING DATES FROM 20041013 TO 20041020

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION