US20060082064A1 - Card game - Google Patents

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US20060082064A1
US20060082064A1 US11/005,241 US524104A US2006082064A1 US 20060082064 A1 US20060082064 A1 US 20060082064A1 US 524104 A US524104 A US 524104A US 2006082064 A1 US2006082064 A1 US 2006082064A1
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Prior art keywords
card
player
cards
dealer
wager
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US11/005,241
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Russell Caterinicchio
William Peace
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Caterinicchio Russell P
Peace William C
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Application filed by Caterinicchio Russell P, Peace William C filed Critical Caterinicchio Russell P
Priority to US11/005,241 priority patent/US20060082064A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3293Card games, e.g. poker, canasta, black jack
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F2001/005Poker

Abstract

The card game provides for a series of three basic progressive wagers by players on three levels. After wagers are placed, a single dealer card is dealt face up and three cards are dealt face up to each player. The object of the game is for at least one player card to be of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card. If the player does not achieve this, that player's hand ends with no further cards dealt to that player. However, if the player has at least one of the first three cards meeting the above requirement, the player wins the first progressive wager and receives two additional cards. The same rules apply to the fourth and fifth cards. Additional payouts may be provided for multiple cards meeting the rule and for various combinations of poker hands formed when all five player cards are dealt.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/619,206, filed on Oct. 15, 2004.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to wagering games. More particularly, the present invention comprises various embodiments of a card game in which players place progressive wagers on a series of cards. The object is to have at least one card in the first tier, which matches the suit and is higher in rank than the single dealer card. Additional wagers involve cards above the first tier, poker card combinations, etc.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Wagering games using various playing card formats have been known for centuries. Many of these games have been incorporated into commercial gambling houses and casinos, where they are enjoyed by players from virtually all walks of life. These various wagering card games range from those having relatively simple rules (e.g., baccarat) to more complex games, such as certain forms of poker and other games that are seldom played at the casino level (e.g., bridge, cribbage, etc.).
  • Nearly all such games are based upon the principle of comparing a series of cards dealt randomly to the player(s) to a series of cards dealt randomly to the dealer or house, or to those cards of other players. Most such games involve a comparison of various card combinations held by the players or the house (e.g., poker), or a comparison of the count or rank of the cards held by the players and dealer or house (e.g., baccarat, blackjack, etc.). The present inventors are aware of one game in which the dealer draws only a single card, but players do not receive cards in this game. Rather, they place wagers relating to the suit and rank of the card, before the card is shown. The various types of card games noted above tend to be relatively complex, requiring an inordinate amount of time to learn to play well, or have relatively simple rules which result in a boring game after a relatively short time. Thus, a card game solving the aforementioned problems is desired.
  • The card game provides a three-level progressive wager opportunity for players in a relatively uncomplicated game. Players place their wagers before the cards are dealt, with a single card being dealt face up to the dealer and an initial series of three cards being dealt face up to each player. The object of the game is for the player(s) to have at least one of their three cards be of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card. If this does not occur, the player is out of that hand and no further cards are dealt to that losing player.
  • However, if the player does have at least one (or more) of the initial three cards which are of the same suit and higher in rank than the single dealer card, the player receives two additional cards. The same basic rule applies to the new fourth and fifth cards dealt, as well. The player may also increase his/her second and third progressive wagers on these additional cards before these cards are dealt, if he/she wishes. Additional wagers may be placed upon other potential outcomes, including multiple winning cards and five-card poker hand combinations. Payouts are progressively higher formless likely outcomes, e.g., multiple winning cards in a player hand and/or certain less frequent poker combinations.
  • These and other features of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a wagering table configured for the card game of the present invention, showing its general features.
  • FIG. 2 is a top plan view of two exemplary player positions for the card game of the present invention, showing a right side winning hand and a “push” or tie for the left player hand.
  • FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a two tier winning hand on the right side.
  • FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a two tier winning hand on the right side and a first tier winning hand on the left side.
  • FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a first tier winning hand of three cards on the left side and a single card first tier winning hand on the right side.
  • FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a three card first tier and a third tier winning hand on the left side.
  • FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a five card winning hand on the left side.
  • FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a single card winning hand on the right side in which the single winning card also comprises the high card of a poker hand.
  • FIG. 9 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions, showing a pair for the winning poker hand on the right side.
  • FIG. 10 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which each player has a poker hand pair, with kings high in the left hand.
  • FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a three of a kind winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 12 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a straight for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 13 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a flush for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 14 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a full house for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 15 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has four of a kind for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 16 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has five of a kind for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 17 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a straight flush for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 18 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has a royal flush for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 19 is a top plan view of a pair of player positions in which the left side player has blackjack for the winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 20 is a perspective view of an exemplary electronic video machine for the play of the present game.
  • FIG. 21 is a flow chart illustrating the general steps in the method of play of the present game.
  • Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention comprises various embodiments of a card game in which a variable number of player cards are compared with a single dealer card. The game is played using at least one deck (and preferably multiple decks) of conventional playing cards comprising four suits of thirteen cards each, ranging from a low card of a two through a high card of an ace. A player win occurs when at least one of the player's initial three cards: (a) is of the same suit as the single dealer card, and (b) is of a higher rank than the single dealer card. Additional levels provide the opportunity for additional wins by the player, if that player wins the initial three card hand by having at least one card that meets the requirement. Other embodiments provide for the play of poker-like hands with two additional cards, and/or wagering on the various card combinations of the present game. The present game may be played as a private game, either with or without wagers involved, or as a casino type game where wagering is a part of the game.
  • FIG. 1 of the drawings illustrates an exemplary table layout for the play of the present card game as a casino game. In FIG. 1, the table 10 includes playing positions 12 a through 12 g for seven players, but it will be seen that more or fewer player positions may be provided as desired. Each player position 12 a through 12 g includes a series of five card positions in the form of an inverted T when viewed from the orientation of each of the players. The first three card positions 14 through 18 form the crossbar of the T and are called the “reverse phalanx.” The fourth and fifth card positions 20 and 22 form the stem of the T and are oriented toward the dealer position 24. Each player has a series of three progressive wagering positions 26 through 30, with a similar series of three progressive payoff positions 32 through 36 directly opposite the player wagering positions 26 through 30. The dealer also controls a house supply of chips 38 and has a single dealer card position 40.
  • FIGS. 2 through 7 illustrate two exemplary player positions 12 a and 12 b. It will be understood that additional positions may be included on the table, as in the exemplary seven-position table of FIG. 1. Only two positions 12 a and 12 b are illustrated in FIGS. 2 through 7 and FIGS. 8 through 19, for simplicity and clarity in the drawing Figs. Each position 12 a and 12 b includes the five card positions 14 through 22 and the three player progressive wager positions 26 through 30 and corresponding dealer payout positions 32 through 36, along with the single dealer card position 40.
  • The game is begun when players place three progressive wagers on their three progressive wager positions 26 through 30, as shown in FIG. 2 and described generally in the first step 100 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. Wagers may be placed in differing amounts according to the level of the progressive wager, i.e., whether it is the first, second, or third wager. Each progressive wager is increased by two over the preceding wager. As an example, a first chip or other wagering unit having a value of five (e.g., dollars, etc.) is placed on the first progressive wagering position 26 for each player, with the second position 28 having three such chips thereon and the third position 30 having five such chips thereon. These chip amounts and quantities are exemplary, and may be adjusted according to the house rules and/or desires of the players.
  • Once the wagers have been placed, the dealer deals a single card face up on the dealer card position 40 and a series of three cards face up to each player on the respective first through third positions 14 through 18 forming the crossbar or “reverse phalanx” of the card pattern for each player, generally as described in the second step 102 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. The remaining fourth and fifth player card positions 20 and 22 remain open at this point in the game.
  • At this point in the game, the first three cards dealt to each player are compared to the single dealer card, generally as indicated in the third step 104 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. In order for a player to win his/her initial wager, i.e., the wager placed upon the first bettor position 26, one of the three cards on one of the three crossbar or “reverse phalanx” positions 12 through 18 must be of (a) the same suit as the single dealer card, and (b) a higher rank than the single dealer card. In the example shown in FIG. 2, the single dealer card is the four of diamonds. This provides players with relatively good odds, as there are only two cards in each suit that rank below the four. The odds of a player drawing at least one of three cards which is of (a) the same suit as the dealer card and (b) a higher rank than the dealer card are relatively high, with ten cards remaining in a standard fifty two card deck which are of the same suit and of a higher rank than the four of diamonds.
  • It will be seen in the exemplary hands of FIG. 2, that the first player position 12 a has only managed to draw one card in the diamond suit to match the dealer card suit on the second card position 16, and that single card also matches the rank of the dealer card, i.e., the four of diamonds. This is entirely possible when multiple decks are used in the play of the present game. This condition constitutes a “push” or tie, with rules requiring the first wager on the first position 28 to be returned to the player, but permitting the player to continue play by receiving fourth and fifth cards as shown for the position 12 a of FIG. 2.
  • In the case of the second player position 12 b in FIG. 2, it will be seen that that player has drawn a ten of diamonds on the first card position 14, thus winning over the four of diamonds dealer card. The player need only have a single winning card of the initial three cards of the “reverse phalanx” positions 14 through 18, in order to win his/her first progressive wager on the first wagering position 26. When this occurs, the house matches the first progressive wager of the player with an identical amount, as shown by the matching amount on the initial house payout position 32 and described generally by the fourth step 106 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. Other amounts may be provided as desired, in accordance with casino and/or gaming commission rules.
  • When a player has a “push” or win, i.e., at least one of his/her first three cards which ties or beats the dealer card, then that player receives two additional cards in the “stem” positions 20 and 22 of the inverted T pattern, generally as shown for the initial three card “push” hand of the player position 12 a and the initial three card winning hand of the player position 12 b in FIG. 2. In the examples of FIG. 2, neither of the fourth and fifth cards in either of the positions 12 a or 12 b are of the same suit, i.e., diamonds, as the single four of diamonds dealer card. Accordingly, the players would lose their second and third progressive bets placed upon their respective betting positions 28 and 30.
  • FIG. 3 of the drawings illustrates another exemplary card combination that may occur in the play of the present card game. In FIG. 3, it will be seen that for the player position 12 a, although all of the first three cards of the positions 14 through 18 are of the same suit as the single dealer card, i.e., spades, none of that player's first three cards are of higher rank than the jack of spades dealt to the dealer position 40. While the odds of at least one of the first three player cards matching the suit of the dealer card are constant, the higher the rank of the card dealt to the single dealer position 40, the less likely it will be that any of the first three cards dealt to each player will at least match or exceed the rank of the single dealer card in order for the player to continue to the next level of play. Thus, the first player 12 a in FIG. 3 has lost, since the player is not allowed to receive fourth and fifth cards for the hand when losing during the initial three card play. This step is indicated by the fifth step 108 of the flow chart of FIG. 21.
  • However, a review of the right side hand 12 b of FIG. 3 shows that the first card position 14 contains the queen of spades, which qualifies as a winning card in that it is of the same suit and of a higher rank than the jack of spades dealer card in FIG. 3. This entitles the player at the second player position 12 b to receive fourth and fifth cards to form the stem of the T card pattern to form a five card hand, as indicated by the fourth step 106 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. When a player receives fourth and fifth cards after winning or tying with one of the first three cards, the fourth and fifth cards are compared sequentially to the dealer card in the same manner as the first three base cards of the positions 14 through 18. In the case of the second position 12 b of FIG. 3, the fourth card is the queen of spades, which beats the jack of spades dealer card. This enables the player to win his second progressive bet, as indicated by the matching quantity of chips placed on the second progressive dealer bet position 34 for the second player position 12 b in FIG. 3. This fourth card comparison and win is indicated by the eighth through tenth steps 114 through 118 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. (The sixth and seventh steps 110 and 112 are possibilities occurring in the first three cards, and are discussed further below.) In the case of a “push” or tie between the fourth card and dealer card, the second progressive wager is returned to the player, just as in the case of a “push” in the first three cards, as discussed further above. The player still continues on to the fifth and final card.
  • Further review of the fifth card position 22 of the second player position 12 b of FIG. 3 shows that this position contains the nine of diamonds. As this card is not of the same suit and higher rank than the jack of spades dealer card, the player at position 12 b loses his/her wager for the fifth card, as indicated by the loss of wager chips on the third progressive wager position 30 for the player of position 12 b in FIG. 3. This is also indicated generally by the eleventh through thirteenth steps 120 through 124 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. A “push” between the final fifth card and dealer card results in the player's third progressive wager being returned to the player, just as in the cases of “push” situations in the first two levels of play, as may occur when multiple decks are used.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates yet another possible outcome in the present game. In FIG. 4, the dealer card position 40 contains the four of diamonds. The first player position 12 a has a single winning card, i.e., the seven of diamonds, qualifying by being of the same suit and of a higher rank than the dealer card. Accordingly, fourth and fifth cards have been dealt to the player at position 12 a. However, these fourth and fifth cards, i.e., the four of hearts and three of spades, are of different suits than the dealer's four of diamonds, and hence player wagers placed upon the second and third progressive wager positions, are lost.
  • The player at the second position 12 b has also been dealt a winning card in the “reverse phalanx” row of card positions 14 through 18, i.e., the jack of diamonds in the first position 14. This entitles the player at position 12 b to receive fourth and fifth cards, as described further above. The fourth card of position 12 b in FIG. 4, i.e., the five of hearts, is a loser, with the second progressive bet placed by the player on position 28 going to the house or casino. While the rank of the fourth card, i.e., five, is higher than the four of the dealer card, it is not of the same suit as the dealer card and hence cannot win. However, the player still has a chance to win with his/her fifth card. In the case of the fifth card on card position 22 for the second player 12 b in FIG. 4, this card is a winner, as it is of the same suit (diamonds) as the single dealer card and is of a higher rank (seven, v. four for the dealer card). Thus, the player at position 12 b in FIG. 4, would win his/her third progressive bet, as indicated by the stack of chips on the player third progressive position 30 and matching stack of chips on the dealer third progressive position 36. This winning third progressive wager scenario is indicated by the fourteenth step 126 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. Once the resolution of the third progressive wager has been achieved by comparing the fifth player card with the dealer card, the hand ends as indicated by the fifteenth step 128 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. A new hand comprising three cards to each player and a single dealer card may be dealt at this time.
  • It will be noted that it is possible for more than one of the initial three player cards beat the single dealer card, and this is even more likely when the randomly selected dealer card is relatively low. Such a scenario is illustrated in FIG. 5 for the first player position 12 a, and described generally in the sixth step 110 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. In this situation, the dealer has been dealt a seven of diamonds, and the player at position 12 a has been dealt the eight, jack, and king of diamonds in the first three card positions 14 through 18. Each of these cards is a winner when compared to the dealer's seven of diamonds, and accordingly, a bonus payout may be provided to the player who achieves such a hand, generally as indicated by the “Player Wins According To Entire Wager” seventh step 112 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. This means that the payout will be equal to the entire wager placed by the player on all three progressive wager positions 26 through 30, even though this wager only involves the first level of play of the hand. After winning such a wager for all three initial cards beating the single dealer card, the player still has the chance to collect further winnings according to his/her fourth and fifth cards. In any event, the player must have all three of his/her initial cards beat the dealer card in order to win more than the first progressive wager. A second of the three cards winning, with one of the cards being a loser, entitles the player only to his/her initial progressive wager. However, other payout amounts, odds, and procedures may be adapted to the present game, if so desired.
  • A player may have three winning cards in the “reverse phalanx” group of three card positions 14 through 18, and also have the fourth and/or fifth cards as winners as well. FIG. 6 shows such a four card winning hand for the first player position 12 a. In the position 12 a of FIG. 6, the player has been dealt three winning cards along the base row positions 14 through 18, i.e., the eight, ten, and king of spades, all of which beat the dealer's five of spades according to the rules of the present game. Accordingly, the player has won the bonus wager equivalent to all three of the progressive wagers initially placed by the player. In addition, the player is dealt a fourth and a fifth card, due to winning with at least one card of the initial three cards dealt to the player. Those fourth and fifth cards are compared to the single dealer card as described further above, with the player winning his/her second and/or third progressive wager, depending upon whether the fourth or fifth card wins. In addition, the player wins a ten-to-one wager amount when any four of his/her five cards beat the dealer's card. Again, the specific payout odds and/or amounts may be adjusted according to the needs of the casino and/or gaming commission regulations, as required.
  • FIG. 7 provides an illustration of yet another possible hand in the present game, in which a player may receive five of five cards that beat the dealer's single card. Such a hand is illustrated in the first player position 12 a of FIG. 7. In FIG. 7 the player has been dealt the king, queen, and ace of hearts for the first three cards, all of which beat the six of hearts of the dealer's card. In addition, the player's fourth and fifth cards comprise the ten and eight of hearts, respectively, giving the player a total of five out of five cards which beat the single dealer card. Such an occurrence is a relatively rare event, with the payout provided accordingly. An exemplary payout may be at two hundred to one, with alternative odds and payouts being provided in accordance with the rules of the house and/or gaming commission as appropriate.
  • FIGS. 2 through 7 have illustrated various winning and losing card combinations according to the basic rules of the present game. However, it will be recognized that when a player wins with at least one of the three base cards to receive fourth and fifth cards, the resulting five cards may be considered as a five-card poker hand, if so desired. FIGS. 8 through 19 illustrate a series of poker hands that may occur during the play of the present game as described above. Players may place wagers upon the likelihood of such poker hands occurring during the regular play of the present game as described above, if so desired, in accordance with the sixteenth step 130 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. When players place such poker wagers, they are betting upon at least two sequential occurrences. First, as a poker hand requires five cards, they are wagering that at least one of their base cards will be a winner to allow them to draw a fourth and a fifth card. Secondly, they are wagering that their five-card hand will have a higher poker ranking than any other five-card hand that occurs during that round of play. Players may place poker wagers against one another in addition to the wagers against the house in accordance with the rules and procedures described above for the play of the present game. Alternatively, the house may accept poker wagers, with the house retaining some percentage as required and/or permitted.
  • In FIG. 8, the first player position 12 a has no cards in the first three card baseline of positions 14 through 18 which beat the dealer's five of spades, as all of the position 12 a cards are of different suits than the dealer card. However, player position 12 b of FIG. 7 includes three spades in the three card baseline, entitling that player to a bonus and fourth and fifth cards, as described further above. It will be noted that the five cards of the player position 12 b do not comprise any winning multiple card poker combination, e.g., a pair, three of a kind, five card flush, etc. If the hand were being considered as a poker hand, it would have a value only according to the highest card contained in the hand, i.e., the queen of spades. This card would result in a winning poker hand for the player position 12 b in comparison to the player position 12 a, even though the position 12 a contains an ace. This is because the first player position cannot have a fourth and fifth card to form a poker hand, as the hand did not have any winning cards in the first three cards. Accordingly, assuming that the players have placed poker wagers in accordance with the sixteenth and seventeenth steps 130 and 132 of the flow chart of FIG. 21, the player of position 12 b would win the poker hand wager over the player of position 12 a. This is true even though the winning poker hand contains only a high card forming the winning hand, due to the inability of the player of position 12 a to gain fourth and fifth cards to form a poker hand due to the lack of a winning card in the first three cards. Such a winning poker hand and winning wager are indicated generally by the eighteenth and nineteenth steps 134 and 136 of the flow chart of FIG. 21. The lack of placement of poker wagers and winning of a poker wager (which by definition results in all other poker hands losing during that round of play) ends the poker play for that hand, generally as indicated by the twentieth step 138 of the flow chart of FIG. 21.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a winning poker hand comprising a pair of queens. In FIG. 9, the second player position displays the queen of hearts on the first card position 14 and the queen of spades on the second card position 16. As the second player position contains one card which beats the dealer card, i.e., the player's queen of spades beats the dealer's five of spades, the second player position 12 b wins the initial or base line wager and receives two additional cards, i.e., the six and seven of hearts on the card positions 20 and 22. These two additional cards do not add to the value of the hand, but the five-card total does provide sufficient cards to form a poker hand with the two queens dealt in the initial three cards forming a pair.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates another poker hand combination on the left side or first player position 12 a. It will be noted that both positions 12 a and 12 b have a winning card in the “reverse phalanx” row, i.e., the king of spades on the first card position 14 of the first player position 12 a, and the seven of spades on the third card position 19 of the second player position. While the fourth and fifth cards of the second player position do not match the suit of the dealer card (the five of spades) and thus cannot win the second and third progressive wagers, the fifth card (the four of hearts) is of the same rank as the second card (the four of spades), forming a pair. A review of the first player position 12 a, however, shows that this hand contains a pair of kings on first row positions 14 and 18, and moreover contains a pair of sixes on the first row center position 16 and the fifth card position 22. The pair of kings of positions 14 and 18 of the first player position would be sufficient to beat the pair of fours of positions 16 and 22 of the second player position. However, the addition of the pair of sixes in the first player position hand increases the value of that hand even further. It will be noted that while the six of spades on the fifth card position 22 of the first player position 12 a beats the dealer card, this is not required to form a poker pair in accordance with the rules of play of the present game. The six of spades on the fifth card position 22 could have been the six of clubs, hearts, or another six of diamonds where multiple decks are used. The key here is that one of the first three cards, i.e., the king of spades on the first card position 14, beats the dealer card in order to draw fourth and fifth cards for the hand to form a five-card poker hand. The fact that the fifth card happens to be of the same suit as the dealer card allows the player to win his/her third progressive wager in the regular play of the present game, and also happens to form the second pair of the two pair poker hand of the first player position 12 a in FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates a poker hand having three of a kind in the first player position 12 a. As in the example of FIG. 10, both hands have one winning card in the “reverse phalanx” row comprising card positions 14 through 18. The fourth and fifth cards drawn for the second player position are of different suits than the dealer card, however, and do not provide a win for either of the second or third progressive bets nor do they add any value in the form of a poker hand. However, the hand of the first player position contains a pair of eights in the first three cards, with the first card being the eight of spades which beats the dealer's five of spades and allows the addition of fourth and fifth cards to the hand. The fifth card is another eight of spades (possible where multiple decks are used), which not only provides a winning third progressive wager for the player, but also forms the third card of a three of a kind poker hand.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates yet another winning poker hand combination, in which the first player position 12 contains a straight comprising the eight through the queen of various suits. The card of the first position 14 in the first player position 12 a is the nine of spades, which beats the dealer's five of spades and enables the hand to receive fourth and fifth cards on the positions 20 and 22 to form a five card poker hand. The initial three cards comprising the nine, jack, and ten provide the potential for a straight, which could be continued with the addition of a seven and/or eight and/or king and/or queen. As the hand turns out, the fourth and fifth cards comprise a queen, extending the straight from the jack dealt in the initial three cards, and an eight, extending the straight from the lower end nine of the first three cards. The fact that the eight of the fifth card position 22 is also a spade that beats the dealer card enables the player to win the third progressive wager as well. It will be noted that the three card second player position or hand contains a pair of threes, but as none of the three base cards beat the dealer card (the two threes are too low and of the wrong suits and the queen is of the wrong suit), no further cards may be added to this hand to form a five card poker hand.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a five-card flush poker hand in the left player position or hand 12 a. It will be seen that each of the first three cards in positions 14 through 18 beat the single dealer card in the hand 12 a, allowing that player to win a bonus equal to all three progressive wagers with the first three cards. In addition, the player receives two more cards to form a five-card poker hand. The fourth and fifth cards are also spades and complete the five card flush poker hand of the first playing position 12 a in FIG. 13. It will be noted that any flush poker hand formed according to the present card game, must be of the same suit as the dealer card. Even if the first three cards drawn are of the same suit, if they are of a different suit than the single dealer card they cannot possibly win the first progressive wager to allow the player continue playing the hand by receiving additional cards to play the second and third progressive wagers and to form a five card poker hand. It will also be noted in FIG. 13 that the hand of the second player position 12 b is also a winning hand, even though not a winning poker hand. The second player has received the ten of spades for his/her third card of the base “reverse phalanx” row, winning the initial progressive wager and entitling that player to two more cards. The fourth and fifth cards comprise the queen and jack of spades, both of which beat the dealer's five of spades to win the second and third progressive wagers even though the hand is not a winning poker hand.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates yet another poker combination in which the first player position 12 a comprises a full house poker hand having three jacks and a pair of sixes. The first jack of the first card position 14 beats the dealer card of the same suit, allowing the player to receive two additional cards to form a five card poker hand and to go on to play the second and third progressive wagers. The fourth card is of a different suit than the dealer card, and thus loses the second progressive bet. However, the fifth card beats the dealer card to win the third progressive bet, and also forms a pair with the fourth card to complete the full house poker hand. It will be noted that the hand of the second player position 12 b also contains a single winner in the base row, as well as a winning fourth card to win the second progressive wager. However, the pair of queens in the second player hand loses to the full house of the first player hand, if the players have placed optional poker bets as well.
  • In FIG. 15, the player of the first position 12 a has been dealt four of a kind in his/her five-card hand. The initial card, i.e., the nine of spades, beats the dealer's five of spades to win the initial progressive bet and allow the player to receive fourth and fifth cards. The first three cards received, and the fourth card received as a result of winning the initial progressive bet, are all nines to form a four of a kind poker hand. While the fourth card is of a different suit than the dealer card and hence cannot win the second progressive wager, the fifth card (jack of spades) is of the same suit and of higher rank than the five of spades dealer card, hence winning the third progressive bet.
  • FIG. 16 illustrates a poker hand containing five of a kind in the first player position 12 a. In FIG. 15, the first player has received the seven of spades in the first card position 14, and two more sevens of different suits for his/her second and third cards. The seven of spades wins over the five of spades dealer card, winning the initial progressive wager and allowing the player to receive fourth and fifth cards on those card positions 20 and 22. The fourth and fifth cards are also sevens, with the two seven of diamonds being possible when multiple decks are employed. However, neither of the fourth and fifth cards matches the suit of the dealer card, thereby causing the first player to lose his/her second and third progressive wagers. Nevertheless, the five of a kind poker hand would almost certainly win against any other poker hands likely to be drawn by other players, thus providing the first player with an alternative means to win the hand other than the three level progressive wager of the basic game.
  • FIG. 17 includes a five-card hand of even higher poker rank, comprising a straight flush. In FIG. 17, the first three card positions 14 through 18 of the first hand position 12 a have been dealt three hearts, with the eight of hearts being high and beating the six of hearts card of the dealer position 40. This has resulted in the addition of fourth and fifth cards to the hand, as well as winning the initial progressive wager. The fourth card is the seven of hearts, which not only wins the second progressive wager, but also fills in the gap between the six and eight of hearts in the first three cards to provide the possibility of a straight or straight flush, depending upon the fifth card. The fifth card turns out to be the four of hearts, which while not beating the dealer's six of hearts, does complete the straight flush poker hand for the first player position 12 a.
  • FIG. 18 illustrates a five-card poker type hand containing a royal flush. The only difference between a royal flush and a straight flush is that the royal flush contains cards ranking from ace through ten inclusive, thus containing the three “royal” face cards. This is the rarest, and thus highest ranking, of the poker hands. In the example of FIG. 18, the dealer has turned up the six of hearts on the dealer card position 40. The first player has drawn the king, ten, and ace of hearts for his/her first three cards, all of which beat the dealer's six of hearts to win an amount equal to the entire three level progressive bet for that player. In addition, the player is dealt fourth and fifth cards, i.e., the queen and jack of hearts, to complete the royal flush. These fourth and fifth cards both beat the dealer's card, thus providing a bonus payout of two hundred to one when all five of a player's cards beat the dealer card. Again, the payouts may be adjusted as desired or required according to the rules of the gambling establishment and/or gaming commission. A player receiving such a hand would certainly also win any poker wager which may have been placed by the player, in addition to the bonus payout noted above.
  • In addition to the various types of poker hands described above and illustrated in FIGS. 8 through 18, the present game may also include a provision for a blackjack hand formed of two specific cards. In the example of FIG. 5, the first player position 12 a has received the jack of spades in the second card position 16, with this card also serving as the winning card for the initial progressive wager to allow fourth and fifth cards to be provided for that hand. The fourth card is of a different suit than the dealer card, hence losing the second progressive wager. However, the player receives the ace of spades for his/her fifth card, with the ace not only beating the dealer card to win the third progressive wager, but also providing the second of the two specific cards required for blackjack according to the rules of the present game, i.e., the jack and ace of spades. The present game contains no provision for combining all card values, alternative values for aces, and/or accepting or refusing additional cards, as in conventional blackjack. In the present game, only the jack and ace of spades comprise a blackjack, with other cards being irrelevant. Payouts for blackjack may be provided in accordance with the rules of the gaming establishment and/or gaming commission, and/or the blackjack hand may be ranked in comparison with other poker hands to establish winning and losing hands among players who have placed poker bets.
  • The present game is particularly well suited for casino play, but may be played in other environments as well. In addition, various types of video gambling machines may be programmed for play of the present game, if so desired. FIG. 20 provides an illustration of such an exemplary machine 42 having a screen 44 displaying the five card positions 14 through 22 used in the present game, as well as the three progressive player wagering points 26 through 30 and a single dealer card position 40. Coin or token acceptance slots 46 may also be provided, along with various controls 48 for the player.
  • In conclusion, the present card game provides numerous interesting levels of play, with many of those levels building upon earlier levels to increase the enjoyment and excitement of playing the game. While the basic concept of the game is simple, i.e., drawing at least one card which matches the suit and beats the rank of the single dealer card, the various alternatives which may occur during play and which are available to the players result in a game which will hold the interest of players throughout the period of play. The provision of additional wagering for poker hands formed after a successful first level of play provides further interest and challenge to players. Accordingly, the present game will find great acceptance and interest by players and in casinos and other gambling establishments, both in its live dealer format as well as a video electronic version.
  • It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (20)

1. A method of playing a card game, comprising the steps of:
(a) placing a series of progressive wagers by each player;
(b) dealing a single dealer card face up;
(c) dealing an initial series of three cards face up to each player;
(d) comparing the three cards of each player to the single dealer card;
(e) paying a winning first progressive wager to each player having at least one card of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card;
(f) collecting all wagers and the initial series of three cards from each player failing to have at least one card of the same suit and of higher or equal rank to the single dealer card;
(g) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having at least one card of the same suit and of higher or equal rank to the single dealer card in the first three cards;
(h) comparing the fourth card to the single dealer card;
(i) paying a winning second progressive wager to each player having a fourth card of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card;
(j) collecting a losing second progressive wager from each player having a fourth card not of the same suit and of higher or equal rank to the single dealer card;
(k) comparing the fifth card to the single dealer card;
(l) paying a winning third progressive wager to each player having a fifth card of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card; and
(m) collecting a losing third progressive wager from each player having a fifth card not of the same suit and of higher or equal rank to the single dealer card.
2. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the steps of:
(a) returning the first progressive wager to each player having at least one of the initial series of three cards of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card;
(b) returning the second progressive wager to each player having the fourth card of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card; and
(c) returning the third progressive wager to each player having the fifth card of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card.
3. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
4. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards and one of the fourth and fifth cards of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
5. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards and the fourth and fifth cards all of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
6. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the steps of:
(a) placing at least one poker wager by at least one player;
(b) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having at least one winning card in the first three cards;
(c) considering the initial series of three cards along with the fourth card and fifth card as a five-card poker hand;
(d) paying a winning poker wager to the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a winning poker hand; and
(e) collecting a losing poker wager by the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a losing poker hand.
7. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the steps of:
(a) placing at least one poker wager by at least one player;
(b) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having at least one card of the same suit and of higher or equal rank than the single dealer card in the first three cards;
(c) examining the initial series of three cards along with the fourth card and fifth card for a two-card blackjack combination;
(d) paying a winning poker wager to the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a winning blackjack combination; and
(e) collecting a losing poker wager by the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a losing poker hand devoid of a winning blackjack combination.
8. The method of playing a card game according to claim 1, further including the step of using multiple card decks for the play of the card game.
9. A method of playing a card game, comprising the steps of:
(a) dealing a single dealer card face up;
(c) dealing an initial series of three cards face up to each player;
(d) comparing the three cards of each player to the single dealer card;
(e) designating the initial series of three cards as a winning hand when at least one of the three cards is of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card; and
(f) designating the initial series of three cards as a losing hand when none of the three cards are of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
10. The method of playing a card game according to claim 9, further including the steps of:
(a) placing at least one wager by each player before dealing any of the cards;
(b) paying a winning first wager to each player having a winning hand; and
(c) collecting all wagers and the initial series of three cards from each player having a losing hand.
11. The method of playing a card game according to claim 10, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
12. The method of playing a card game according to claim 10, further including the step of returning the first wager to each player having at least one of the initial series of three cards of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card.
13. The method of playing a card game according to claim 9, further including the steps of:
(a) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having at least one card of the same suit and of higher or equal rank than the single dealer card;
(b) comparing the fourth card to the single dealer card;
(c) designating the fourth card as a winning card when the fourth card is of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card;
(d) designating the fourth card as a losing card when the fourth card is of not the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card;
(e) comparing the fifth card to the single dealer card;
(f) designating the fifth card as a winning card when the fifth card is of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card; and
(g) designating the fifth card as a losing card when the fifth card is of not the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
14. The method of playing a card game according to claim 13, further including the steps of:
(a) placing a series of three progressive wagers by each player before dealing any of the cards;
(b) paying a winning second progressive wager to each player having a winning fourth card;
(c) collecting a losing second progressive wager from each player having a losing fourth card;
(d) paying a winning third progressive wager to each player having a winning fifth card; and
(e) collecting a losing third progressive wager from each player having a losing fifth card.
15. The method of playing a card game according to claim 14, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards and one of the fourth and fifth cards of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
16. The method of playing a card game according to claim 14, further including the step of paying a bonus wager to each player having all of the initial series of three cards and the fourth and fifth cards all of the same suit and of higher rank than the single dealer card.
17. The method of playing a card game according to claim 14, further including the steps of:
(a) returning the first progressive wager to each player having at least one of the initial series of three cards of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card;
(b) returning the second progressive wager to each player having the fourth card of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card; and
(c) returning the second progressive wager to each player having the fifth card of the same suit and equaling the rank of the single dealer card.
18. The method of playing a card game according to claim 14, further including the steps of:
(a) placing at least one poker wager by at least one player;
(b) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having a winning hand;
(c) considering the initial series of three cards along with the fourth card and fifth card as a five-card poker hand;
(d) paying a winning poker wager to the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a winning poker hand; and
(e) collecting a losing poker wager by the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a losing poker hand.
19. The method of playing a card game according to claim 9, further including the steps of:
(a) placing at least one poker wager by at least one player;
(b) dealing a fourth card and a fifth card to each player having a winning hand;
(c) examining the initial series of three cards along with the fourth card and fifth card for a two-card blackjack combination;
(d) paying a winning poker wager to the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a winning blackjack combination; and
(e) collecting a losing poker wager by the at least one player placing at least one poker wager and having a losing poker hand devoid of a winning blackjack combination.
20. The method of playing a card game according to claim 9, further including the step of using multiple card decks for the play of the card game.
US11/005,241 2004-10-15 2004-12-07 Card game Abandoned US20060082064A1 (en)

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