US20060054521A1 - Container wrap and methods for making - Google Patents

Container wrap and methods for making Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060054521A1
US20060054521A1 US11260787 US26078705A US2006054521A1 US 20060054521 A1 US20060054521 A1 US 20060054521A1 US 11260787 US11260787 US 11260787 US 26078705 A US26078705 A US 26078705A US 2006054521 A1 US2006054521 A1 US 2006054521A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
material
sheet
wrap
edges
flexible sheet
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11260787
Inventor
Steven Tchira
Original Assignee
Steven Tchira
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D85/00Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials
    • B65D85/50Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials for living organisms, articles or materials sensitive to changes of environment or atmospheric conditions, e.g. land animals, birds, fish, water plants, non-aquatic plants, flower bulbs, cut flowers or foliage
    • B65D85/505Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials for living organisms, articles or materials sensitive to changes of environment or atmospheric conditions, e.g. land animals, birds, fish, water plants, non-aquatic plants, flower bulbs, cut flowers or foliage for cut flowers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D65/00Wrappers or flexible covers; Packaging materials of special type or form
    • B65D65/02Wrappers or flexible covers
    • B65D65/10Wrappers or flexible covers rectangular
    • B65D65/12Wrappers or flexible covers rectangular formed with crease lines to facilitate folding

Abstract

A decorative container wrap that comprises at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of contiguous edges with each sheet of material defining at least two layers joined at a fold. The wrap also includes a first adhesive material located on the sheet along the fold and binding it to one part of the contiguous edges such that the sheet defines a hollow shape. A second adhesive material is disposed on and adhered to inwardly bent portions of the sheet such that the inwardly bent portions define a closed end of the hollow shape. A moisture retaining insert is disposed within the container. Another flexible sheet of material sized to fit within the closed end of the container may also be adhered to inwardly bent portions of the sheet. Included is also a method for creating a wrap.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation-in-part application of co-pending and co-owned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/743,977 filed Dec. 23, 2003 which is a continuation-in-part application of co-pending and co-owned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/687,337 filed Oct. 16, 2003. The present application also claims priority to U.S. provisional patent application No. 60/643,811 filed Jan. 15, 2005, U.S. provisional patent application No. 60/662,318 filed Mar. 16, 2005, and U.S. provisional application No. 60/683,984 filed May 24, 2005. The entire disclosure of U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/743,977 and 10/687,337, and U.S. provisional patent application Nos. 60/643,811, 60/662,318, and 60/683,984 are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to materials and methods for wrapping potted plants and floral arrangements.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Conventional packages for wrapping floral arrangements and flower bunches use one or more sheets of paper or film. To wrap a flower bunch, square or rectangular sheets of the paper or film are folded by hand. Depending on the look the flower packer wants to achieve, the complexity of the folding may vary. More complex arrangements have more folds and require more time and labor to complete. Increased time and labor result in an increased cost of producing folded sheets for wrapping flower bunches. This increased cost can exceed the target cost that customers wish to pay for the flower wraps.
  • In addition to cost and pricing limitations, the paper and film sheets lack guides or indications showing how to fold the sheets, making it difficult for both manufacturers and end-users to achieve a consistent finished product. One solution to cost and pricing limitations is the flower sleeve. The flower sleeve is a conical shaped bag that is open at the top and at the bottom. Flower sleeves are available in many different sizes to meet the customer's need to properly pack the flowers and floral arrangements of varying size. Also, flower sleeves are produced in conventional bag making machines that make this an easily replicable product. Therefore, consistency from one unit to the other is achieved. Although flower sleeves are convenient and relatively inexpensive to produce, these sleeves lack the hand-wrapped appearance and decorative aspects of a folded sheet.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,228,234 is directed to a method and apparatus for manufacturing flower sleeves. The flower sleeve contains upper and lower parts connected to each other at their edges. Both parts taper from a wide corrugated opening edge to a narrow end. The central area of the opening edge of one container part protrudes beyond the opening edge of the other container part while the container part having the protruding opening edge is connected to this opening edge to an extension by means of a tear portion. The extension connects and suspends a plurality of containers. When the container is provided around a bunch of flowers, the container is torn loose from the extension thereby producing the final configuration of the container. The final configuration, however, is still a conventional flower sleeve. In addition, the amount that the one container part protrudes beyond the opening edge of the other container part is small distance, making it difficult to separate the two container parts and insert bunches of flowers into the flower sleeve.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a sheet of material, for example paper, plastic film or fabric, is pre-cut having a plurality of predetermined and contiguous edges such that each sheet may be folded and adhered to form a decorative container wrap. In one embodiment, each flexible sheet of material has a plurality of predetermined, contiguous edges designed to be folded such that the sheet forms two substantially overlapping layers joined at a fold. In one embodiment, for example, the sheet may be precut such that a portion of the edges of the sheet that define the open end of the container wrap substantially align to form stylistic or artistic layers when the sheet is folded. In another embodiment, the predetermined edges that define the open end of the container wrap are shaped such that one set of edges appears to be interspersed within another set of edges when the sheet is folded to form the double layers. Another set of predetermined edges are shaped to facilitate the creation of the closed end of the container wrap. Additionally, in the double-layered embodiment, each sheet has two predetermined edges, separated by an intermediate edge, that are shaped to be glued or adhered together such that the double-layered sheet defines a hollow cylindrical or frustoconical shape. One of the predetermined edges used to create the hollow shape may be, for example, the edge formed by the sheet at the fold. Continuing with that same example, glue or adhesive material is disposed on the sheet near or along the fold, and another of the predetermined edges is placed slightly overlapping the fold so that the sheet defines a substantially rounded hollow shape. The predetermined edges shaped to facilitate the creation of the closed end of the container wrap are bent inwardly to create a substantially closed base or flat end to the hollow shape. The inwardly bent parts of the sheet are held together by additional glue or adhesive material. In one embodiment, the adhesive material disposed on the base portion includes another sheet of material sized to fit the base portion of the container. The additional sheet of material is glued or adhered to the bottom to hold the inwardly bent portions, strengthen the bottom, and/or create a moisture barrier. The additional sheet may be adhered on the inside or the outside of the base.
  • In another embodiment, a moisture retaining insert sized to fit closely within the closed end of the hollow shaped container wrap may be inserted into the wrap to create an effective moisture barrier, preventing water from seeping through the wrap.
  • In yet another embodiment of the present invention, a similar, flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined edges, defining at least two layers, is adhered at two of the edges to form a hollow cylindrical or frustoconical shape. One set of edges projects upward to define the opening to the container wrap. Another set of edges projects downward toward the base of the container wrap. The downward projecting edges of the hollow shape are adhered to upwardly projecting walls of a moisture retaining base having a substantially flat, circular bottom with upwardly extending walls to create the container wrap.
  • In another exemplary embodiment in accordance with the present invention, the decorative container wrap comprises at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges. Two of the edges are spaced apart and shaped to overlap such that the sheet defines a hollow, frustoconical shape. The two edges are separated by at least one intermediate edge designed to be bent inward to form the base of the container wrap. A first adhesive material holds the overlapping portions of the two separated edges. A second flexible sheet of material is adhesively disposed on inwardly bent and overlapping portions of the intermediate edge to form the base of the container wrap. A moisture retaining insert sized to fit closely within the closed base is disposed within the container wrap.
  • The present invention is also directed to a system and method for creating a wrap for a container. The method includes the steps of providing at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined edges wherein the predetermined edges include first and second edges separated by at least one intermediate edge. The first and second edges are shaped to overlap. Other steps of the method comprise applying an adhesive to the sheet along the first edge, overlapping the second edge over the first edge such that the adhesive holds the fist and second edges near each other and the flexible sheet defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a cylindrical shape and a frustoconical shape, inwardly bending and overlapping the intermediate edge such that the bent and overlapping portions of the flexible sheet define a substantially closed end to the hollow shape, and adhering the overlapping edges at the substantially closed end. In one embodiment, the adhering step of the method may include placing a label carrying an adhesive material over at least a portion of the overlapping edges defining the substantially closed end.
  • The method may also include the step of inserting a moisture retaining insert inside the hollow shape formed by the flexible sheet, the insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within the closed end. Additionally, the method may further comprise folding the flexible sheet of material at a predetermined bisecting line such that the sheet forms two layers of substantially overlapping flexible sheets and the bisecting line defines one of the first and second edges used to create the hollow shape.
  • Another embodiment of a method for creating a container wrap comprises providing at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges, folding each of the flexible sheets of material such that each sheet defines two substantially overlapping layers joined at a fold and having first and second complementary edges separated by at least one intermediate edge, the first and second edges shaped to overlap; applying an adhesive to the sheet along the first edge; overlapping the second edge over the first edge such that the adhesive holds the fist and second edges near each other and the flexible sheet defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a cylindrical shape and a frustoconical shape; inwardly bending and overlapping portions of the intermediate edge such that the bent and overlapping portions of the flexible sheet define a substantially closed end to the hollow shape; and adhering the overlapping edges at the substantially closed end.
  • In a further embodiment of the method, the adhering step includes placing a label carrying an adhesive material over at least a portion of the overlapping edges defining the substantially closed end. Similarly, the method may also include inserting a moisture retaining insert inside the hollow shape formed by the flexible sheet, the insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within the closed end.
  • In one embodiment, the decorative container wraps in accordance with exemplary embodiments of the present invention are provided with moisture retaining inserts that are sized to fit inside the wrap. Preferably, the insert is cup or pan shaped and is constructed of a material, for example plastic, that is capable of holding water. Therefore, the insert provides a water tight barrier for the bottom of the container wrap.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The subject matter which is regarded as the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the claims at the conclusion of the specification. The foregoing, and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention are shown and described in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments which should be viewed in conjunction with the accompanying drawings that form a part of the specification and are to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals are used to indicate like parts in the various views:
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of an embodiment of a sheet of material in an unfolded position in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of the sheet of material in a folded position holding a floral arrangement;
  • FIG. 3 is a front view of an embodiment of a sheet of material in a first partially folded position;
  • FIG. 4 is a front view of an embodiment of a sheet of material in a second partially folded position;
  • FIG. 5 is a front view of an embodiment of a sheet of material in a folded position;
  • FIG. 6 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of a sheet of material in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a first mold in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a second mold;
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view of a sheet of material in contact with the first mold;
  • FIG. 10 is a plan view of the sheet of material in contact with the second mold;
  • FIG. 11 is a view of one face of another embodiment of a mold in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 12 is a view through line 12-12 of FIG. 11;
  • FIG. 13 is a plan view of another embodiment of flower wrap with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 14 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 13 in a partially folded position;
  • FIG. 15 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 13 in a fully folded position;
  • FIG. 16 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 13 in a fully folded position with the releasable header removed;
  • FIG. 17 is a plan view of another embodiment of flower wrap with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 18 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 17 in a partially folded position;
  • FIG. 19 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 17 in a fully folded position;
  • FIG. 20 is a plan view of another embodiment of flower wrap with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 21 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 20 in a partially folded position;
  • FIG. 22 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 20 in a fully folded position;
  • FIG. 23 is a plan view of another embodiment of flower wrap with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 24 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 23 in a partially folded position;
  • FIG. 25 is a plan view of the flower wrap of FIG. 23 in a fully folded position;
  • FIG. 26 is a plan view of another two-layer embodiment of a flower package or container wrap for potted plants with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 27 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the flower packaging for potted plants of FIG. 26 with the header removed;
  • FIG. 28 is a perspective view of the flower packaging for potted plants of FIG. 27 being moved to a first partially folded position;
  • FIG. 29 is a plan view from a first side of the container wrap of FIG. 27 in the first folded position;
  • FIG. 30 is a plan view from a second side opposite the first side of the container wrap in the first folded position;
  • FIG. 31 is a partially view of the flower packing of FIG. 27 illustrating the die cut tabs for forming the closed bottom of the flower packaging;
  • FIG. 32 is a perspective view of the flower packaging of FIG. 27 being formed into the desired shape for use with a potted plant;
  • FIG. 33 is another perspective view of the sides of the flower packaging of FIG. 27 being formed into the desired shape for use with a potted plant;
  • FIG. 34 is yet another perspective view of the sides of the flower packaging of FIG. 27 being formed into the desired shape for use with a potted plant;
  • FIG. 35 is a perspective view of the sides of the flower packaging of FIG. 27 formed into the desired shape for use with a potted plant and secured in that position;
  • FIG. 36 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed flower packaging of FIG. 35 showing the tabs for forming the bottom of the flower packaging;
  • FIG. 37 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed container wrap of FIG. 35 illustrating two opposed tabs being folded to form the bottom;
  • FIG. 38 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed container wrap of FIG. 35 illustrating one of the tabs being completely folded to form the bottom;
  • FIG. 39 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed container wrap of FIG. 35 illustrating a second tab being completely folded to form the bottom;
  • FIG. 40 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed container wrap of FIG. 35 illustrating a third tab being completely folded to form the bottom;
  • FIG. 41 is a perspective view from the bottom of the formed container wrap of FIG. 35 illustrating a fourth tab being completely folded to form the bottom;
  • FIG. 42 is a perspective view of the sides of the flower packaging of FIG. 27 formed into the desired shape for use with a potted plant;
  • FIG. 43 is a perspective view of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 44 is another perspective view of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 45 is another perspective view of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 46 is another perspective view of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 47 is a perspective view from the top of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 48 is another perspective view of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 49 is another perspective view from the top of the completely folded flower packaging of FIG. 27 holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 50 is a plan view of another two-layer embodiment of a container wrap for potted plants with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 51 is a plan view of a single-layer embodiment of a container wrap for potted plants with releasable header in accordance with the present invention in an unfolded position;
  • FIG. 52 is a plan view of another embodiment of the single-layer container wrap of FIG. 51;
  • FIG. 53 illustrates the initial folding the single-layer container wrap of FIG. 51;
  • FIG. 54 illustrates sealing of the folded container wrap of FIG. 53 along an edge;
  • FIG. 55 illustrates a first step in sealing the bottom of the container wrap of FIG. 54;
  • FIG. 56 illustrates a second step in sealing the bottom of the container wrap of FIG. 55;
  • FIG. 57 illustrates a third step in sealing the bottom of the container wrap of FIG. 56;
  • FIG. 58 is a side view of the single-layer embodiment of the container wrap of FIG. 51 in a folded state holding a flower pot;
  • FIG. 59 is an illustration of the interior dimensions of a container wrap in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 60 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a container wrap in combination with a water retaining insert and floral arrangement in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 61 is an illustration of the exterior dimensions of an embodiment of a water retaining insert for use in container wraps in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 62 is a perspective view of the water retaining insert being placed into a container wrap;
  • FIG. 63 is a view of the bottom of an embodiment of the water retaining insert showing adhesive means attached thereto;
  • FIG. 64 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a container wrap and water retaining insert in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 65 is a perspective view of a first container wrap with the water retaining insert being placed inside a second container wrap with insert;
  • FIG. 66 is a perspective view of a first container wrap with the water retaining insert nested inside a second container wrapd with the water retaining insert;
  • FIG. 67 is a plan view of another embodiment of the single-layer container wrap;
  • FIG. 68 illustrates the initial folding of the single-layer container wrap of FIG. 67 to form a hollow frustoconical shape;
  • FIG. 69 illustrates insertion of a moisture retaining insert into the wrap of FIG. 67; and
  • FIG. 70 is a partial cut-away view of the container wrap of FIG. 67.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring initially to FIG. 1, a sheet of material 10 in accordance with the present invention is illustrated. The sheet of material 10 can be any geometric shape desired, for example circular, triangular, rectangular and square. In addition to regular geometric shapes, the sheet of material 10 can be arranged as a combination of shapes that create an irregular look. In general, the sheet of material 10 is a substantially two dimensional sheet of material having a thickness of from about 0.1 mils up to about 30 mils, preferably about 0.5 mils up to about 10 mils, more preferably from about 1 mil up to about 5 mils.
  • Suitable materials for the sheet of material 10 are selected to be generally flexible and foldable. These materials can be arranged as a single layer or as a laminate of two or more layers. Examples of suitable materials include paper, cardboard, metal foils, plastic or polymer films including polypropylene, polyethylene and cellophane films, non-polymer films, fabrics including woven, non-woven, natural and synthetic, fibers, cloths, burlaps and combinations thereof. Preferably, the materials are selected to be suitable for use as packaging or wrapping for flowers, plants, pots, plant containers and floral arrangements. The sheet of material 10 can be opaque, translucent, transparent and combinations thereof. The opaque, translucent and transparent appearance of the sheet of material 10 can be an inherent quality of the materials from which the sheet is constructed or can be the result of colors, objects, alpha-numeric characters and designs that are printed onto the sheet of material 10.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 1, the sheet of material 10 is in a first, unfolded position wherein the sheet of material 10 is substantially flat. Disposed on either the front or back or both the front and back of the sheet of material 10 are a plurality of intersecting lines 12, 118. The lines 12 divide the sheet of material 10 into a plurality of sections 14. Although the lines 12 can be printed, for example using ink, embossed or etched on the sheet of material 10, preferably the lines 12 are scored in the sheet of material. The lines 12 are arranged to define the lines across which the sheet of material 10 is folded into a second position or the lines 118 with which edges of the flower wrap are aligned. In this second position, the sheet of material 10 is fully folded and forms a package, holder or wrapping having a pre-determined shape as shown, for example, in FIG. 2. Preferably, the pre-determined shape is suitable to hold flowers, plants and floral arrangements.
  • In addition to the location of the fold lines in the sheet of material 10, the sequence of folding the sheet of material 10 across the plurality of lines 12 also contributes to the final appearance and function of the package formed when the sheet of material is moved from the first position to the second position. In one embodiment, the plurality of lines 12 are scored so as to create a pre-defined sequence for folding the sheet of material 10 in order to achieve the desired package shape. Therefore, the scored lines 12 act as creases so that the sheet of material 10 inherently folds across the lines 12 in the proper, pre-determined order or sequence.
  • In another embodiment, the sheet of material 10 also includes visual indicia 16, for example alpha-numeric indicia, or written instructions disposed adjacent or integrated within the lines 12 and arranged to illustrate the pre-defined folding sequence. The visual indicia 16 can be disposed on either the front or back of the sheet of material 10, and are placed on the sheet of material by any suitable method known in the art including printing, etching and embossing. Preferably, the visual indicia 16 are placed on the sheet of material so that after a first fold has been made across the line having the first visual indicia 18, subsequent indicia are readily viewable. However, the visual indicia 16 do not detract from the final appearance of the package and are preferably hidden from view when the sheet of material 10 is in the second position.
  • The process for forming the sheet of material 10 into packaging is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3-5. The desired appearance of the package constructed from the sheet of material 10 is selected, and the necessary arrangement of lines 12 in the sheet of material and the sequence of folding the sheet of material 10 across the lines 12 are determined. Next, the plurality of intersecting lines 12 is scored in the sheet of material 10 in accordance with the pre-determined arrangement. The method of scoring the lines 12 varies depending on the type material used. In one embodiment, a die is used to apply the scoring via pressure. In another embodiment, the sheet of material 10 is constructed of paper, and a plurality of sheets of paper is simultaneously scored with the desired arrangement of lines. In yet another embodiment, the sheet of material 10 is constructed from a film material, for example a polymer film, and a single film sheet is scored using a metallic die. Other methods for scoring the plurality of lines 12 in the selected sheet of material 10 are available as would be understood by one of skill in the art.
  • After scoring, the folding angle is defined, thus allowing the operator to easily fold the sheets using the scores on the sheet as guides. The plurality of lines 12 can also be printed on the sheet of material 10, and, if desired, the visual folding sequence indicia 16 are added or printed on the sheet of material 10.
  • The sheet of material 10 is then folded in the sequence defined by the plurality of scored lines 12 and illustrated by the visual indicia 16. Alternatively, the sheet of material 10 can be folded, either by hand or by a machine, without first scoring the plurality of lines 12 in the sheet of material. In this embodiment, the machine would fold a completely flat and non-scored sheet of material 10 in the proper sequence to form the pre-determined package shape. In either embodiment, the same sequence and arrangement for folding can be used to produce the same pre-determined packages.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, the sheet of material 10 is folded across the scored line containing the first visual indicia 18. Once folded, the second visual indicia 20 are visible. If in addition to being scored, the lines are also printed, the printed lines running along the scored lines and containing the second visual indicia 20 are also visible. In one embodiment, the printed lines 12 are visible because the lines are printed on the front 24 of the sheet of material 10, and the sheet of material 10 is transparent or translucent. Alternatively, the lines 12 are printed on both the front 24 and the back 26 of the sheet of material 10. Since the lines 12 can actually be scored into the sheet of material 10 so as to indicate both the location of the lines and sequence of folding, printing of the lines 12 or alpha-numeric indicia 16 is optional.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the sheet of material is folded across the scored line 12 containing the second visual indicia 20. Once folded, the next or third visual indicia 22 are visible. Next, the sheet of material 10 is folded across the line 12 containing the third visual indicia 22 to create the pre-determined package illustrated in FIG. 5. Although five intersecting fold lines defining a three-step folding sequence are illustrated, the number of fold lines is not limited to five but is determined by the desired final shape of the package.
  • The sheet of material 10 is then secured in the pre-determined package shape. As shown in FIG. 4, the sheet of material is secured in the pre-determined shape by applying a fastening means 28 to at least one portion or location on the flexible sheet of material 10. Alternatively, the fastening means is applied to a plurality of locations across the sheet of material. Preferably, the portions of the sheet of material 10 containing the fastening means 28 overlap when the sheet of material is in the second, folded position. Any fastening means capable of bonding one location on the sheet of material to another can be used. The fastening means can fixedly or releasably secure the sheet of material in the pre-determined shape. Suitable fastening means include adhesives, co-adhesives, double-sided tape, mechanical fasteners, direct bonds, heat sealing, either ultra-sonic or heated element sealing and combinations thereof. Once the sheet of material has been scored, folded and secured, the particular place where the scoring has been made will prevent the material from loosing the defined fold. In other words, the fold will stay in place.
  • Once folded and secured, the package is then shipped to the end user. This method facilitates the efficient manufacture of a consistent package for holding flowers, floral arrangements and plants. In an alternative embodiment, the sheet of material 10 can be shipped to the end user as a flat, scored sheet before folding and securing. Since the sheet of material is scored, the end user can easily and consistently fold the sheet into the desired package shape. In this embodiment, the fastening means 28 is applied to the sheet of material 10 in the proper location. A preferred fastening means in this embodiment is double-sided tape.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 5, the predetermined shape in one embodiment is generally conical having an open top 30 and bottom 32 and a plurality of peaked or pointed sections 36. This facilitates the placement of floral arrangements 14 in the package (FIG. 2). Although illustrated as a conical flower wrap, other package shapes are possible. In one embodiment, the pre-determined shape has the appearance of being wrapped by hand. In another embodiment, the pre-determined shape has the appearance of multiple overlapping layers of wrap.
  • The pre-determined shape can be enhanced by using an arrangement of markings disposed across the sheet of material 10 and arranged to produce a selected appearance when the sheet is in the second position. In one embodiment, this selected appearance is arranged to compliment the folded shape of the sheet of material 10. Suitable markings include arrangements of opaque, translucent and transparent areas. These areas can be an inherent quality of the sheet of material 10 or can be printed or otherwise placed on the sheet of material 10. The markings can be uniform or can vary across the entire sheet of material 10. In addition, the markings can correspond to the plurality of lines 12. For example, the markings can vary among the various sections 14 defined by the lines 12. In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 1, the markings include a portion containing a first translucent color 38 and a portion containing transparent areas 40 and areas having a second translucent color 42. In general, the markings are selected based upon the desired final appearance of the package. For example, in a conical package embodiment, the markings can be selected to produce a generally conical shaped package having the appearance of a generally translucent, colored inner wrap surrounded by a generally transparent outer wrap.
  • In another embodiment of the present invention as illustrated in FIG. 6, a single sheet of material can be arranged to have a plurality of second positions. Each second position corresponds to a distinct package. The plurality of lines 12 are arranged to define each one of the distinct packages based upon the folding sequence used when moving the sheet of material 10 from the first position to the second position. In order to make a sheet of material 10 in accordance with this embodiment, a plurality of lines 12 defining a plurality of distinct folding sequences are scored into the sheet of material. The desired package and associated folding sequence is then selected, and the sheet of material 10 is folded in accordance with the selected folding sequence. Distinct printed lines and visual alpha-numeric indicia 16 can be applied to the sheet of material to indicate the proper groupings and folding sequences of lines, for example A1-A3, B1-B3 and C1-C3. In addition, the indicia 16 can indicate the final package shape for a given selection of lines 12.
  • The present invention is also directed to a system and method for creating and making the folded flower wraps of the present invention either by hand or using an automated production line. In one embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, the system uses one or more molds 44 to provide for the folding of each flexible sheet of material 10 from the first unfolded position to the second folded position corresponding to the desired flower wrap shape. Each mold 44 is arranged to cover at least a portion of the sheet of material 10 and to define one or more lines to fold the sheet of material 10 across. Suitable arrangements for the lines defined by the mold correspond to the plurality of intersecting lines 12 that divide the sheet of material 10 into a plurality of sections 14 and are printed or scored into the sheet of material 10.
  • In order to define the fold lines, each mold 44 includes one or more folding edges 46. The folding edges 46 are arranged to be the edges across which the sheet of material is folded. Each mold 44 may also contain one or more additional edges 48. The additional edges 48 can be arranged to provide for the desired alignment between the mold 44 and the sheet of material 10, for storage or stacking with the other molds or for aesthetic purposes. For example, one or more of the additional edges can be arranged to be aligned with edges in the sheet of material 10, with the lines 12 printed or scored into the sheet of material 10, or with both edges and lines 12.
  • The molds 44 are arranged to provide for not only the desired location of the fold lines in order to create the pre-determined floral wrap shape but also the desired folding sequence. Therefore, by placing each one of the plurality of molds 44 into contact with the sheet of material 10 in accordance with the prescribed sequence and folding the sheet of material 10 across one or more folding edges 46 on each one of the molds 44, the sheet of material 10 is moved from the first position to the second position.
  • In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, the system includes a first mold 50 that is arranged to be brought into contact with the sheet of material 10 in the first unfolded or flat position (FIG. 9). The sheet of material 10 can then be moved to a partially folded position (FIG. 3) between first and second positions by folding across at least one folding edge 46 of the first mold 50. The second mold 52 is arranged to be aligned with and brought into contact with the sheet of material 10 when the sheet of material is in the partially folded position (FIG. 10). The sheet of material 10 can then be moved to the second, folded position (FIG. 5) by folding across two folding edges 46 of the second mold 52. Although illustrated with two molds 44 and at least one partial or intermediate folded position between the first and second positions, the system of the present invention can employ more than two molds 44. The number of molds 44 depends upon the desired appearance of the flower wrap and the folding sequence necessary to create the desired flower wrap from a flat sheet of material 10. As more molds 44 are used, the number of partially folded positions will increase accordingly, resulting in a plurality of partially folded positions corresponding to the number of required folds.
  • In one embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, each mold 44 is constructed from a substantially two-dimensional material. In general, the material is sufficiently rigid to provide for the folding of the sheet of material 10. That is, the mold 44 does not bend or flex substantially when the sheet of material 10 is folded across it and provides for a sufficiently well defined folding line. Suitable materials include cardboard, paper, wood, plastic, metal, glass, laminated materials and combinations thereof. The thickness of the mold 44 is selected to be no more than is needed to provide for the necessary rigidity given the type of material. Preferably, the material is as thin as possible to allow the sheet of material to be folded as far as possible with the mold 44 in place against the sheet of material 10. Therefore, materials that provide for maximum rigidity with a minimum thickness are preferred. The folding edges 46 may also be tapered to provide for a more complete fold.
  • In another embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, each mold 44 can be constructed as a substantially three dimensional object. Suitable materials for the three dimensional object include cardboard, paper, wood, plastic, metal, glass and combinations thereof. Instead of using a plurality of separate molds 44 to define the sequence and arrangement of folds, the three dimensional embodiment has a plurality of mold faces 54. In the embodiment illustrated, the mold 44 includes two mold faces 54 arranged to cover a portion of the sheet of material 10 and to define the lines to fold the sheet of material across. As shown in FIG. 12, these two faces are separated by a distance 56. The mold 44 also includes additional faces 58 as dictated and needed by the three dimensional arrangement of the mold faces 54. In addition, more than two mold faces 54 can be provided.
  • In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, the mold 44 includes two mold faces 54, a first mold face 60 and a second mold face 62. These mold faces 54, as illustrated, provide functionality similar to the first and second molds 50, 52 illustrated above. The first and second mold faces 60, 62 include folding edges 46 to define one or more lines to fold the sheet of material 10 across. The sheet of material 10, however, may not be able to be completely folded with the three dimensional mold 44 in place. Therefore, the sheet of material 10 is preferably creased along one or more of the folding edges 46 of the mold faces 54, and then the mold 44 is removed to facilitate complete folding of the sheet of material 10 along the creases.
  • In one embodiment, multiple flower wraps can be generated from a single set of two dimensional molds 44 or a single three dimensional mold 44 having two or more mold faces 54. When a set of a plurality of two dimensional molds is used, the final appearance of the flower wrap is determined by the number and type of molds used, the sequence of using the molds and the folding edges of each mold that are used. For a single three dimensional mold 44 containing a plurality of distinct mold faces 54, the final appearance of the flower wrap is dictated by the number and type of mold faces 54 used, the sequence with which the selected mold faces 54 are brought into contact with the sheet of material 10 and the folding edges 46 of each mold face that are used.
  • In one embodiment each mold 44, including both the two dimensional and three dimensional embodiments, contains visual indicia 64 corresponding to the arrangement of the visual indicia 16 on the sheet of material 10, for example the lines and alpha-numeric indicia. The corresponding visual indicia 64 on the molds 44 are arranged to indicate the folding sequence, to facilitate proper alignment of each mold with the flexible sheet of material, to indicate the groupings of the various molds 44 or faces 54 and to indicate the sequence of using the molds 44 or faces 54 within a given grouping. The visual indicia 64 can be placed on the mold 44 or face 54 by any suitable process including printing, etching and embossing.
  • In an embodiment of a method for creating folded flower wraps using the mold system in accordance with the present invention, the desired appearance of the folded floral wrap is determined, and a flexible sheet of material to be folded into the desired flower wrap is selected. One or more molds are then placed in contact with at least a portion of the flexible sheet, and the sheet of material is folded across each one of the molds to create the desired folded flower wrap. When two or more molds are used, each mold is placed in contact with the flexible sheet in a sequence corresponding to the predetermined final appearance of the folded flower wrap.
  • In one embodiment, in order to place the molds 44 in contact with the sheet of material 10 and to fold the sheet of material across the molds, a first, substantially two dimensional mold is brought into contact with at least a portion of the flexible sheet of material when the sheet of material is in the unfolded position. The sheet of material is then folded across one or more edges of the first mold to a first partially folded position. Once folded, the first mold is removed. A second mold is then brought into contact with at least a portion of the sheet of material while the sheet of material is in the first partially folded position. The sheet of material is then folded across one edge of the second mold from the first partially folded position to a second partially folded position. The sheet of material is then folded again across the second mold from the second partially folded position to the second, folded position. The second mold is then removed, and, if desired, the sheet of material is secured in the second position using the fastening means. Additional molds can be brought into contact with the sheet of material depending upon the desired appearance of the folded flower wrap and the number of folds required.
  • In another embodiment of placing the molds in contact with the flexible sheet of material and folding the sheet of material, a first face of a substantially three dimensional mold is brought into contact with at least a portion of the flexible sheet of material when the sheet of material is in a first unfolded position. The sheet of material is then creased along an edge of the first face, and the mold is removed. Once removed, the sheet of material is folded along the crease to place the sheet of material in a first partially folded position. With the sheet of material in the first partially folded position, a second face of the mold is brought into contact with the sheet of material, and the sheet of material is creased along two edges of the second face. The mold is removed again, and the sheet of material is folded along the two creases into the second, fully folded position.
  • In another embodiment of the method, visual indicia, for example lines and alpha-numeric indicia, are placed on the flexible sheet of material to indicate the folding sequence and to facilitate proper alignment of each mold with the flexible sheet of material. Each two dimensional mold or each face of the three dimensional mold is aligned with the visual indicia when placing the molds in contact with the flexible sheet of material. In one embodiment, corresponding visual indicia are placed on one or more of the two dimensional molds or on one or more faces of the three dimensional mold.
  • The present invention uses the systems and methods to facilitate assembly of the flower containers and wraps either by hand or using a machine. Using the sheets, molds and methods in accordance with the present invention, a large number of flower wraps can be produced having substantially the same appearance. The present invention facilitates the production of the floral wrap in a timely fashion. For example, when a customer places an order, an expected delivery date is specified. The expected delivery date in many cases is set by the flora holiday, for example Valentines Day. The flower packer will not have enough time to purchase flat sheets and fold them into wraps. Therefore, the flower packer needs the wraps provided folded. Moreover, if the wraps are not delivered to the bouquet packers prior to the designated holiday, the opportunity to sell these wraps will have lapsed at least for one year and possibly completely lost. If one would try to make all these wraps by hand with no scoring, then it would greatly hinder production efficiency. In addition, the present invention resolves the technical problem of being able to produce these at a reasonable and comparable cost to producing a flower sleeve.
  • The present invention is also directed to flower wraps having a hand-wrapped appearance and to flower packages or container wraps for use with potted plants that contain removable headers. In addition, the present invention is directed to methods for making these flower wraps and packages with removable headers and to methods for using these flower wraps and potted plant containers. Removable headers can be applied to any of the embodiments of the present invention disclosed herein. Each flower wrap can contain a single removable header or two or more removable headers. Suitable materials and material arrangements for flower wraps and flower packages and other container wraps with headers in accordance with this embodiment are the same as for all other embodiments are discussed above.
  • Referring to FIGS. 13-17, an embodiment of a flower wrap having a hand-wrapped appearance 130 is illustrated. In general, all of the materials, methods and variations associated with and described with respect to embodiments described above can be applied to this embodiment, and the materials, methods and variations of this embodiment can be applied to all of the other embodiments described herein. As illustrated, the flower wrap 130 is cut from a sheet of material 112. Suitable sheets of material are the same as those disclosed above. Suitable methods for cutting include die cutting, for example using heated cutting members, using knives or scissors, stamping or any other suitable method for cutting the sheet of material. One or more lines 114 or edges in the flower wrap 130 are completely cut through, and one or more lines 126 are cut as perforated lines. The perforated lines 126 or partial cut lines separate the removable header 128 portion from the rest of the flower wrap 130. The arrangement of lines including both the completely cut lines and the perforated lines is selected based upon the desired final shape, size and appearance of the flower wrap. Preferably, the arrangement of the fully cut and partial cut lines is selected to contribute to the hand-wrapped appearance of the flower wrap 130. As illustrated, the lines are arranged to produce a plurality of peaks 136 in the final folded flower wrap.
  • The flower wrap 130 can also contain lines or visual indicia 116, 118 indicating the location or direction of folds in the flower wrap 130. As used herein, visual indicia for the present embodiment are the same as the lines and visual indicia for the embodiments described above and include indicia 116 that indicate lines across which the flower wrap is folded and lines 118 with which one or more edges 114 of the flower wrap 130 are aligned for folding. Indicia 116, 118 can be placed anywhere in which one or more edges 114 overlap the sheet of material. In one embodiment, as illustrated, these indicia are located and formed to indicate the size and shape of the lower opening of the flower wrap, e.g. the sides of a triangle, and can be used in any of the embodiments disclosed herein. Other shapes for the bottom opening are also possible.
  • These indicia are provided by the methods as described above and include printing or embossing on the flower wrap. The locations of the indicia may also be scored either by hand or by machine. As illustrated, two lines indicating two folds and dividing the flower wrap into a central portion 138, a first fold member 134 and a second fold member 137 are provided. Although illustrated with two folds, any number of folds including a single fold and three or more folds can be utilized. As with the other embodiments, the present embodiment can be folded by hand or by machine, either before or after cutting and with or without either scored lines or visual indicia.
  • Additional written indicia can also be provided on one of the flower wrap 130 or header 128 including company names or logos 122, product names, and indicia 120 indicating the size or width 132 of the large opening in the folded flower wrap that is used to accept the flower bunches. In one embodiment, the header is formed of a size equal to the size 132 of the top opening of the folded flower wrap. In order to create the folded flower wrap, the first fold member 134 is folded across the indicated line 116 (FIG. 14) and the second fold member 137 is folded across the indicated line 116 (FIG. 15). Alternatively, the flower wrap is folded so that edges of the flower wrap align with the edge indicating visual indicia 118. Adhesive or fastening means 140 including double sided tape and heat welds are provided at one or more locations on the flower wrap 130 to secure the wrap in the folded position. Folding can be accomplished by hand or through the use of a machine and with or without the guidance of either scored lines or visual indicia.
  • The header 128 is removable or releasable from the balance of the flower wrap 130. The header 128 can be attached to any location along the flower wrap 130. Any suitable method for providing releasable attachment can be used. Preferably, perforated lines 126 that are cut into the sheet of material at the same time that the shape of the flower wrap is cut are used. Although illustrated as a single header, a plurality of headers, including two or more headers can be used. In addition, one or more headers can be provided with any of the flower wrap embodiments illustrated herein.
  • The header provides for attachment of the flower wrap to a frame, post, dispenser or clamp to facilitate holding and dispensing of the flower wrap and also the filling of the flower wrap with a bunch or flowers, a potted plant or a growing medium. Therefore, the header is made of a sufficient size to accommodate the frame or dispenser to which it is attached. The header 128 also includes one or more holes 124 or slots to facilitate attachment to the dispensing frame. As illustrated, two holes are provided 124 for attachment to posts, i.e. hanging the of flower wrap. A single flower wrap 130 can be used on a frame or dispenser or a plurality of flower wraps can be placed on a single frame. The frame itself, for example, the posts or clamps contained in the frame can be used to hold the plurality of flower wraps. Alternatively, the plurality of flower wraps is assembled into a bundle using the header. The bundle can contain any desired number of flower wraps, for example, 25, 50 or more. Any suitable method can be used to bond the headers together including using heat bonding, ultrasonic welding, adhesives, mechanical clamping and edge binding as used for example with books and pads of paper. In one embodiment, the headers are secured together using heat at the same time that the holes 124 are cut into the header. In one embodiment, the headers are bundled together and one or more heated elements, for example a rod, tube or point, are pierced through the bundled heaters. Suitable sizes for the heated element include a 4 mm diameter point. Therefore, the headers are bound together at the location of the holes 124. Alternatively as illustrated in FIG. 15, the headers are bound together along an edge 142 using for example heat and compression or held together using an adhesive or co-adhesive disposed between the adjacent headers.
  • Examples of systems for bonding and dispensing can be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,091,925, 4,854,451 and 5,228,234. The entire disclosures of these patents are incorporated herein by reference.
  • By binding the headers together, multiple flower wraps can be assembled and dispensed. For example in one example of using the flower wrap with the header, a bundle is attached to a dispenser. The flower wrap 130 on the top of the bundle is pulled open, for example, by pulling one of the first or second folding portions away from the central portion of the flower wrap. The arrangement of the flower wrap and the hand wrapped appearance make it very easy to open the flower wrap as there are many surfaces and significant gaps to grasp and pull. Once opened, a bunch of flowers is inserted, and the header is removed from the flower wrap (FIG. 16). The header remains attached to the bundle and the frame or dispenser. Alternatively, the flower wrap can be removed from the header before inserting the flowers. In one embodiment, the flower wrap is bundled in a folded and flattened state. Opening or un-flattening of each flower wrap in the bundle can be accomplished by hand or through the use of an automated packing machine. Automated packing machines, which are known and used in the art, open the flower wrap from its flattened state, insert the floral arrangement and remove or disengage the wrapped floral arrangement from the header. The automated packing machine utilizes hooks, suction or vacuum members to open the flower wrap. This includes, but is not limited to pulling a front portion created by the first and second fold members 137, 134 away from the central back portion 138 of the flower wrap. Ease of opening is provided by ensuring that a space, gap or recess exists between the front and back portions. In one embodiment, for example, the central back portion 138 extends beyond the front portions. The recess can also be provided by a combination of the header 208, upper openings 30, and the peaks 136 attached to the back portion 138. Therefore, the back portion can be gripped and held in place independent of the front portion, facilitating gripping and opening of the front portion. In another embodiment, the flower wraps can be provided in bundles in an unfolded state, removed from the header and folded.
  • As discussed above, opening of any of the embodiments of the flower wraps disclosed herein including wraps for flower bundles, potted plants and growing mediums, insertion of flowers and removal of the header can be accomplished by hand or can be automated and performed by one or more machines. For example, the bundle header is secured in the machine and a mechanical arm or hook or preferably one or more air suction cups or devices grasps one of the first or second folding members and pulls these portions away from the central portion to open the flower wrap. The flowers are then inserted, and the flower wrap is removed from the header either using the same mechanical arm or suction mechanism or another arm or mechanism.
  • FIGS. 17-25 illustrate additional embodiments of the hand-wrapped flower wrap 130 with attached header in accordance with the present invention. These embodiments contain variations of features including, but not limited to size, shape and number and size of peaks. With respect to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 20-22, the perforated lines 128 are formed not straight, but with a slight arc to produce a smooth rounded appearance and single peak in the folded flower wrap.
  • FIGS. 26-49 illustrate an embodiment of the flower wrap, container wrap or packaging with a removable header for use with a potted plant. As illustrated in FIG. 26, the potted plant flower package or container wrap 200 is releasably attached to a header 208 along one or more perforated lines 210. The materials for making the container wrap 200 and methods for making the container wrap from these materials are the same as for the flower wrap, including cutting, e.g. die cutting the potted plant flower wrap with removable header from a sheet of material. In general, all of the materials, methods and variations associated with and described with respect to embodiments described above can be applied to this embodiment, and the materials, methods and variations of this embodiment can be applied to all of the other embodiments described herein. As illustrated the header includes a plurality of holes 212 for attachment to a dispenser, posts or other type of frame. A plurality of these container wraps 200 can be bounded together using the header and dispensed for folding or assembly.
  • In one embodiment, the container wraps 200 in accordance with this embodiment are bundled in an unfolded state, removed from the header one at a time and folded. In another embodiment, the potted plant container wraps are folded, flattened and bundled together in the folded and flattened state. In this embodiment, opening and insertion of the potted plants or growing medium is accomplished by hand or using an automated packing machine as described above for the folded flower wraps. In another embodiment, the container wrap does not contain a header. In this embodiment, a plurality of potted plant container wraps 200 are formed and nested together without flattening. The nested container wraps are dispensed by sequentially removing each package from the top or bottom of the nested stack.
  • As illustrated, the container wrap 200 contains a first section 202 and a second section 204 and a plurality of peaks 250. The peaks 250 are formed by a plurality of predetermined and contiguous edges 252. The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 26 includes first and second sections 202, 204 joined at a fold or dividing line 260. The two sections are shaped so as to be folded at fold 260, defining two layers. Although illustrated with first and second sections 202, 204, the container wrap 200 can be formed from a single section defining a single layer. When the container wrap and header are cut form a sheet of material, a plurality of tabs 206 are also formed that are attached to or extend from at least one of the first or second sections. Tabs 206 are defined by a plurality of predetermined and contiguous edges 254 on either side of edges 256. The tabs are shaped to be folded and preferably bonded or heat sealed to form the bottom of the assembled container wrap 200. Each tab can include fastening means 28 as described herein. In one embodiment, tabs 206 are separated by either fully cut or perforated lines 209. In addition, perforated lines or marked or scored indicia 207 can be formed between the tabs and at least one of the first section or second section.
  • FIGS. 27-49 illustrate a method of dispensing and forming the potted plant container wrap of the present embodiment. Initially, the header 208 is removed from the sheet 201 used to form the container wrap or flower packaging 200 (FIG. 27), and the second section 204 is folded over the first section 202 along fold line 260 (FIGS. 28-29). The tabs 206 are separated from each other along the perforated or cut lines 209 and folded along the lines 207 separating the tabs 206 from the first section if the tabs have not already been scored or folded along these lines (FIGS. 30-31). In another embodiment, tabs 206 are not separated by cut or perforated lines but are shaped to be folded and overlapped (FIGS. 50-66). The sides of the potted plant container wrap are then formed. Since the pot containing the flower or plant is generally cylindrically or frustoconically shaped, the first and second sections are rolled to form the sides of the container wrap (FIGS. 32-34, 42) to match the shape of the pot. The tabs 206 are aligned for folding to form the bottom. Once the sides have been formed, they are secured using any suitable fastening means 214 as described herein including an adhesive such as tape and heat sealing (FIG. 35). The flexible sheet 201 thus defines a hollow, cylindrical or frustoconical shape (FIGS. 35-37). The container wrap 200 is then flipped over (FIGS. 36-37) to access the contiguous edge that define stabs 206. Tabs 206 are inwardly bent or folded to form the bottom (FIGS. 38-41) by folding a first tab 220 (FIG. 40), followed by a second tab 222, followed by a third tab 224, followed by a fourth tab 226. The process is continued for all tabs in accordance with a pre-defined folding sequence until the bottom of the container wrap is complete. Once complete, the tabs are held in the folded position using a suitable fastening means. Preferably, the tabs are heat sealed to form a substantially water tight bottom for the container wrap 200. In one embodiment, folding of the tabs to form the bottom of the container wrap is accomplished with the flower pot inserted to act as a mold, guide or folding surface. Alternatively, the tabs are folded to form the bottom without inserting the flower pot. In another embodiment, a folding surface, for example, a disk attached to a post is used as folding pressure surface to form the tabs into the bottom of the container wrap. The shape of the folding surface is chosen to correspond to the size and shape of the bottom of the flower pot to be held by the container wrap. These shapes include circles, squares and other geometric shapes. Suitable materials for the disk a chosen to provide a surface rigid enough to act as a folding surface and include materials as disclosed above for the folding molds.
  • As illustrated by FIGS. 43-49, the folded container wrap 200 is arranged to hold a pot 230 for a potted plant and is sized and shaped in order to provide a sufficiently form fitting arrangement for the pot 230. The peaks 250 of the first and second sections and any marking, transparency or translucence and other indicia on either the first or second sections of the container wrap 200 are provided to enhance the functionality and final appearance of the folded flower wrap 200 for holding potted plants.
  • Referring to FIGS. 50 and 51, another embodiment of the container wrap or packaging with a removable header for use with a potted plant is illustrated. As illustrated in FIG. 50, the potted plant container wrap 205 is arranged as a double-layer wrap that is releasably attached to a header 208 along one or more perforated lines 210. As illustrated in FIG. 51, the potted plant container wrap 270 is arranged as a single-layer wrap that is releasably attached to a header 208 along one or more perforated lines 210. All materials and material arrangements for making container wraps 205, 270 and all methods for making the container wrap from these materials are the same as for the flower wrap 200. In general, all of the materials, methods and variations associated with and described with respect to embodiments described above can be applied to this embodiment, and the materials, methods and variations of this embodiment can be applied to all of the other embodiments described herein.
  • As illustrated, each header 208 includes a plurality of holes 212 for attachment to a dispenser, posts or other type of frame. A plurality of these container wraps 205, 270 can be bundled together using the header and dispensed for folding or assembly, bundled together in a folded, flattened state or folded and nested as described above.
  • In one embodiment, the container wraps 205, 270 in accordance with this embodiment are bundled in an unfolded state, removed from the header one at a time and folded. In another embodiment, the potted plant container wraps are folded, flattened and bundled together in the folded and flattened state. In this embodiment, opening and insertion of the potted plants or growing medium is accomplished by hand or using an automated packing machine as described above for the folded flower wraps. In another embodiment, the container wrap does not contain a header. In this embodiment, a plurality of potted plant container wraps 205, 270 are formed and nested together without flattening. The nested container wraps are dispensed by sequentially removing each package from the top or bottom of the nested stack.
  • As illustrated, the double-layered container wrap 205 is formed from a flexible sheet of material 201 containing a first section 202 and a second section 204 separated by a dividing or folding line 260 and a plurality of peaks 250. The single-layered package 270 contains a first section 202 only and a plurality of peaks 250. The peaks 250 are defined by a plurality of predetermined and contiguous edges 252. The contiguous edges are predetermined because the dimensions and shapes incorporated into the cut sheet determine the size of the container wrap, the artistic characteristics of the edges that surround the upper edge of the potted plant, and the size and shape of the edges used to form the cylindrical or frustoconical shape and the bottom of the container. When the container wraps 205, 270 and headers 208 are cut from a sheet of material, at least one intermediate tab section 280 is also formed that is attached to at least one of the first or second sections 202, 204. The tab in either embodiment is inwardly bent or folded and preferably bonded, adhered or heat sealed to form the bottom of the assembled container wrap 205, 270. In one embodiment, in order to provide for a substantially water-tight seal for the bottom the of the container wraps 205, 270, the tab 280 is preferably a single tab that is neither cut nor perforated, reducing the number of joints or gaps that have to be sealed and that could potentially leak. In addition, perforated lines or marked or scored indicia 207 can be formed between the tab 280 and at least one of the first section or second section.
  • In another embodiment, additional sealing of the container wraps 205, 270 are provided by providing fastenings means 28 at one or more locations on the packages. As illustrated, the fastening means 28 is provided at a first location 290 and a second location 300 on the first section 202. The first and second locations are preferably disposed to provide a substantially continuous seal along the overlapping edges of the container wraps when folded or wrapped. When forming a continuous seal, the first and second locations provide a guide or indicia to indicate how to fold the container wrap and how much of the container wrap to overlap. Additional guidance is provided by including visual indicia, for example a dashed line or colored strip, in at the first and second locations. Upon folding the container wrap and aligning the first and second sections, the desired shape, size and appearance of the container wrap is achieved. Additional alignment is provided by aligning the folded dividing line 260, or a first edge 370 in the single layer embodiment, with a second edge 390. First and second edges 370, 390 form part of the plurality of predetermined contiguous edges that define the boundary of the flexible sheet of material that makes up the wrap of the present invention. In the double-layered embodiment, the fold 260 becomes a first edge used to align with second edge 390 for form the hollow shaped of the container wrap. The first and second sections 202, 204 can extend into the tab 280. In one embodiment, the first location 290 is an area near and along edge 390. The area is defined by a flap 310 extending from the first section 202. This flap can be separated from the balance of the container wrap by a line 380 including a drawn line or a perforated line. Area 310 is adhered to area 300 near edge 370. One of the edges is placed atop the other to form the seam of the hollow shape.
  • Another embodiment of the single-layer potted plant wrap 270 is illustrated in FIG. 52, constructed, for example, from a sheet of opaque material.
  • FIGS. 53-58 illustrate an embodiment of dispensing and forming the single-layer potted plant container wrap 270 of the present embodiment. As illustrated, the container wrap 270 is cut, for example, by die cutting one or more sheets of transparent, flexible material 201. When bundled together as a plurality of unfolded container wraps, the container wrap 320 is initially removed from the header 208 (FIG. 53), and the first section 202 is folded into the desired potted plant wrap 330 until the wrap overlaps by the desired amount 340, for example by aligning the edges or the dashed or dotted lines indicating the location of the portions containing the fastening means. The double-layer embodiment also requires an initial fold across the dividing line or fold 260. As shown in FIG. 54, the container wrap 270 is then secured in the wrapped position using the fastening means 28. Since the pot containing the flower is generally cylindrical or frustoconical, the first section is rolled to form the sides of the container wrap while aligning the tab 280 to form the bottom.
  • The tab 280 extends down and is then bent inward or folded to provide a substantially water-tight seal for the bottom of the container wrap 270 and to provide for a substantially closed end for the container wrap 270. As illustrated in FIG. 55, in one embodiment at least one initial seal 350 is provided in the tab 280. Alternatively, the tab 280 is folded inwardly, for example at the location of the initial seal. Once folded, the tab 280 is sealed back or bonded to the bottom of the container wrap. Therefore, the initial seal 350 is eliminated. In this embodiment, indicia, e.g. a line, can be provided on the tab to illustrate the location of this initial fold. Suitable methods for creating the initial seals 350 or the bonding of the tab following the initial fold are the same as for the fastening means 28. In one embodiment, a heat seal is provided. The heat seal is sized to provide the desired water-tight seal. In one embodiment, the seal 350 runs completely along the tab 280 and is about 3 mm thick. In another embodiment a bonding substance such as glue, hot glue, adhesive or co-adhesive is used. In the embodiment without the initial seal, the predetermined edges that define the bottom of the container are bent inwardly such that portions are overlapping to form a substantially closed end to the container wrap. The inwardly bent and overlapping portions are adhered.
  • As shown in FIG. 56, following the first seal 350 or initial fold the excess material of the tab 280 is folded up against the bottom of the flower wrap 270 and secured there by a suitable fastening means 28. Preferably, the excess material is secured in a folded state using an adhesive applied, for example, from a hot glue gun, but any suitable means for adhesion may be used, such as glue, double-sided tape, or tape placed atop the folded portions. Preferably, the excess material is folded against the bottom of the flower wrap to provide a substantially flat bottom. Additional securing of the excess material and providing of a flat bottom can be achieved by applying one or more adhesive pads 360 or stickers to the bottom of the container wrap 270 (FIG. 57). The adhesive pad can contain alpha-numeric indicia such as bar codes, company information and pricing. As shown in FIG. 58, the flower wrap 270 in the folded or wrapped state is sized to hold a flower pot. The steps of folding or wrapping the flower wrap 270 can be achieved without inserting the flower pot, or the flower pot can be used as a mold or template to guide the formation and wrapping of the flower wrap including the folding and sealing of the tab 280. Alternatively, a folding, pressure surface can be provided to assist in forming the tab into the bottom of the container wrap as described above with respect to other embodiments of the potted plant container wrap. The folding surface or inserted potted plant can also be used in combination with presses or heated elements, e.g. a hot iron, to provide for additional sealing or to further flatten the bottom of the container wrap. As illustrated, the folded container wrap 270 is arranged to hold a pot 230 for a potted plant and is sized and shaped to provide a sufficiently form fitting arrangement for the pot 230. The peaks 250 of the first section and any marking, transparency or translucence and other indicia on either the first or second sections of the container wrap 270 are provided to enhance the functionality and final appearance of the folded flower wrap 270 for holding potted plants, including providing a hand-wrapped appearance or the appearance of multiple layers of wrap including an inner colored paper wrap surrounded by an outer clear or transparent plastic wrap. More than one sheet may be used together to create different appearances and/or different structural characteristics such as holding capacity or strength.
  • Referring to FIGS. 59-70, exemplary embodiments in accordance with the present invention of a container wrap or wrap having a hand-wrapped appearance 300 in combination with a moisture retaining insert 310 are illustrated. In general, all of the materials, methods and variations associated with and described with respect to embodiments described above can be applied to this embodiment, and the materials, methods and variations of this embodiment can be applied to all of the other embodiments described herein. Although illustrated in combination with an embodiment of a hand-wrapped potted plant flower wrap, the moisture retaining insert 310 can be used in combination with any of the embodiments of the flower and container wraps in accordance with the present invention including embodiments used for floral arrangements, cut flowers, potted plants and plants contained in growing mediums.
  • The moisture retaining insert 310 is sized and shaped in accordance with the pre-determined dimensions of the flower wrap or container wrap into which it is to be inserted. In one embodiment, the moisture retaining insert is generally conical or frustoconical in shape. However, the moisture retaining insert 310 can be formed or arranged in any suitable shape. This shape can be generally the same as the container wrap or substantially different than the container wrap. For example, a generally rectangular container wrap can contain a generally cylindrical or conical moisture retaining insert such that the rectangular container wrap can more easily hold a conventional round flower pot. Alternatively, the moisture retaining insert 310 has substantially the same shape as at least the portion of the container wrap into which it is inserted (FIG. 70).
  • In addition to the shape of the moisture retaining insert, the size of the insert is selected based upon the desired fit and appearance of the container wrap and floral arrangement. In one embodiment, the moisture retaining insert is sized such that just a single insert fits inside the container wrap. The insert 310 is sized to fit closely within the closed end of the container wrap.
  • Referring to FIG. 59, the interior dimensions of the container wrap are illustrated including the diameter at the interior bottom of the container wrap 312, about 75 mm, the height of the container wrap at the lowest point 314, about 102 mm, the diameter of the of the container wrap at the lowest point 316, about 112-113 mm, and the diameter 315 of the interior of the container wrap at the top of the area occupied by the insert 313, about 110 mm. The dimensions are for illustrative purposes only, and these dimensions can be any size. As is shown in FIG. 60, the lowest point height 314 is the lowest point defined between the peaks 250 of the container wrap and corresponds to the maximum height that the insert can obtain before it is visible and not covered by the container wrap. In one embodiment, the height 318 of the insert is selected to be the minimum height necessary to provide the desired amount of water retention.
  • As is shown in FIG. 61, in one embodiment the exterior dimensions of the insert 310 are selected to be as close as possible to the interior dimensions of the container wrap. This provides for as close, snug and form-fitting of an arrangement between the insert 310 and the container wrap as possible. This also helps to maintain the container wrap in its desired shaped and inhibits bunching of the sides of the container wrap. The exterior dimensions of the insert 310 are also selected to provide for adhesives or other structures that are to be placed between the insert and the container wrap. As illustrated, the insert has a height 318 of about 68 mm, a bottom diameter 320 of about 74 mm and a top diameter 319 of about 99 mm. Therefore, the dimensions of the insert and the container wrap differ by only about 1 mm each. In general, the insert is placed into the container wrap and positioned to rest at substantially the bottom of the container wrap (FIG. 64). In another embodiment, the exterior dimensions of the insert are selected so as to provide sufficient room to allow material, for example, sand, polystyrene foam or other filler to be placed between the insert and the container wrap. In one embodiment, the exterior dimensions of the insert are selected to facilitate placing two or more inserts into a single container wrap.
  • The interior shape and dimensions of the insert 310 are selected based upon the flower pot or flower arrangement to be held. In one embodiment, the interior shape and dimension of the insert is selected to provide for nested stacking of container wraps containing inserts as illustrated in FIGS. 65 and 66. These interior shapes can be the same as or different from the exterior shapes of the insert.
  • In one embodiment, the insert 310 is placed into the container wrap after the container wrap has been completely folded, and if desired, secured in the folded position. Alternatively, the insert 310 is placed in the container wrap before the package is folded or when the package is in a partially folded position. In this embodiment, the insert 310 can be used as a mold or form to assist in folding the container wrap and in particular the bottom of the container wrap.
  • In another embodiment, illustrated in FIGS. 67-70, the insert 310 forms the base of the container wrap 200. As illustrated in FIG. 67, the flexible sheet of material 201 includes a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges 252, 370, 390, 392. Although the exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIG. 67 is single-layered, the container wrap 200 of FIGS. 67-70 may also be multi-layered and may be made in accordance with the teachings and methods described above. First and second edges 370, 390 are separated by intermediate edges 392. First and second edges 370, 390 are shaped to overlap as illustrated in FIG. 68 such that the sheet 201 forms a hollow frustoconical shape. As previously discussed, the layout, dimensions and shape of the edges determines the characteristics of the hollow shape formed by the sheet 201. The two edges 370, 390 are bonded or adhered together through any suitable means. Next, the moisture retaining insert is placed into the top opening of the hollow shape as indicated by arrows 394 in FIG. 69. Insert 310 is secured to bottom portions of the hollow shape defined by intermediate edges 392 by an adhesive or fastening means 321 (FIG. 70).
  • In order to hold or secure the insert 310 in the container wrap, an adhesive or fastening means is provided between the insert and the container wrap. Suitable fastening means are as described above for other embodiments and include glues, double-sided tape, heat welds, adhesives, co-adhesives, hot glue, ultrasonic welds and combinations thereof. Again, these fastening means are also available to bond other parts of the sheets that make up the various embodiments of the inventions described herein. In one embodiment, the fastening means are provided at one or more locations between the container wrap and the insert. In one embodiment, the fastening means is double sided adhesive tape that is initially applied to one or more locations in the interior of the container wrap or one or more locations on the exterior of the insert. As illustrated in FIGS. 62-64, 69 & 70 the double sided adhesive tape is applied to the exterior surfaces of the insert. The double-sided adhesive tape includes one or more side pieces 321 attached to the side or vertical surfaces of the insert and one or more bottom pieces 322 applied to the bottom of the insert. The side pieces 321 can be arranged in any suitable pattern that provides the desired amount of adhesion between the insert and the container wrap including complete bands around the insert, partial bands, vertical strips, random discrete pieces and combinations thereof. The arrangement of the bottom pieces 322 are also selected based upon the desired adhesion and include circles, concentric shapes or circles, discrete pieces, two crossed pieces and combinations thereof. In one embodiment, a single bottom piece is provided that covers substantially the entire bottom of the insert.
  • In general, the insert 310 is arranged to provide a substantially moisture or liquid-tight container or catchment for the floral arrangements or potted plant placed within the container wrap. Therefore the materials and construction of the insert are selected to provide a liquid tight container that is compatible with the any liquids or solid materials associated with the floral arrangements or potted plant placed within the container wrap 200. These liquids and solid materials include water, growing mediums, synthetic materials, fertilizers and moisture absorbent materials. In one embodiment, the insert material is selected based upon compatibility with the liquids and solid materials. For example, the insert materials can be selected to be absorbent or adsorbent with respect to the liquids and solid materials. In addition, the insert material can be chosen to be hydrophobic, hydrophilic, oleophobic or oleophilic. Suitable materials include plastics, rubbers and polymers including polypropylene and high density and low density polyethylene, polystyrene and paper materials. The insert materials can be arranged as a single layer or as a laminate containing layers of different materials. For example, an outer layer of polystyrene can be laminated over an inner layer or polyethylene to create a softer outer layer the can accept push pins or other mechanical fasteners.
  • The insert can be formed by any suitable method known and available in the art including extrusion methods, injection molding, pressure molding, thermo forming and vacuum forming.
  • The invention described and claimed herein is not to be limited in scope by the specific embodiments herein disclosed, since these embodiments are intended as illustrations of several aspects of the invention. Any equivalent embodiments are intended to be within the scope of this invention. Indeed, various modifications of the invention in addition to those shown and described herein will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing description. Such modifications are also intended to fall within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (18)

  1. 1. A decorative container wrap comprising:
    at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges, each said sheet of material defining at least two layers joined at a fold;
    a first adhesive material located on said sheet of material along said fold and binding said fold to one part of said predetermined contiguous edges such that said at least one flexible sheet defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a substantially cylindrical shape and a substantially frustoconical shape;
    a second adhesive material disposed on and adhering inwardly bent portions of said at least one flexible sheet such that said inwardly bent portions define a closed end of said hollow shape; and
    a moisture retaining insert sized to fit closely within said closed end of said hollow shape formed by said at least one flexible sheet.
  2. 2. A decorative container wrap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second adhesive material includes a second flexible sheet of material adhesively disposed on said inwardly bent portions of said sheet.
  3. 3. A decorative container wrap comprising:
    at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges, each said sheet of material defining at least two layers joined at a fold;
    a first adhesive material located on said sheet of material along said fold and binding said fold to one of said predetermined contiguous edges such that said sheet of material defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a substantially cylindrical shape and a substantially frustoconical shape;
    a moisture retaining base having a substantially flat, circular bottom with upwardly extending walls; and
    a second adhesive material located between said upwardly extending walls of said base and a portion of said sheet of material near one opening of said shape.
  4. 4. A decorative container wrap comprising:
    at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges, two of said edges being a first and second edge separated by at least one intermediate edge;
    a first adhesive material adhering overlapping portions of said first and second edges such that said at least one sheet of material defines a hollow frustoconical shape;
    a second adhesive material adhering inwardly bent and overlapping portions of said at least one intermediate edge defining a substantially closed base portion of the decorative container; and
    a moisture retaining insert sized to fit closely within said substantially closed base portion.
  5. 5. A decorative container wrap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second adhesive material includes a second flexible sheet of material adhesively disposed on said inwardly bent and overlapping portions of said at least one intermediate edge.
  6. 6. A decorative container wrap comprising:
    at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges, two of said edges being a first and second edge separated by at least one intermediate edge;
    a first adhesive material adhering overlapping portions of said first and second edges such that said at least one sheet of material defines a hollow frustoconical shape;
    a second flexible sheet of material adhesively disposed on inwardly bent and overlapping portions of said at least one intermediate edge; said portions defining a substantially closed base of the decorative container; and
    a moisture retaining insert sized to fit closely within said closed base.
  7. 7. A method for creating a container wrap comprising:
    providing at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined edges wherein said predetermined edges include first and second edges separated by at least one intermediate edge, said first and second edges shaped to overlap;
    applying an adhesive to said at least one sheet along said first edge;
    overlapping said second edge over said first edge such that said adhesive holds said fist and second edges near each other such that said at least one flexible sheet defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a cylindrical shape and a frustoconical shape;
    inwardly bending and overlapping portions of said at least one intermediate edge such that the bent and overlapping portions of said at least one flexible sheet define a substantially closed end to said hollow shape; and
    adhering said bent and overlapping portions at said substantially closed end.
  8. 8. The method of claim 7 wherein said adhering step includes placing a label carrying an adhesive material over at least a portion of said bent and overlapping portions.
  9. 9. The method of claim 7 further comprising the step of inserting a moisture retaining insert inside said hollow shape formed by said at least one flexible sheet, said insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within said closed end.
  10. 10. The method of claim 7 further comprising the step of folding said at least one flexible sheet of material at a predetermined bisecting line such that said at least one flexible sheet forms at least two layers of substantially overlapping flexible sheets and said bisecting line defines one edge from the group consisting of said first and second edges.
  11. 11. The method of claim 8 further comprising the step of inserting a moisture retaining insert inside said hollow shape formed by said at least one flexible sheet, said insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within said closed end.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 further comprising the step of folding said at least one flexible sheet of material at a predetermined bisecting line such that said at least one flexible sheet forms at least two layers of substantially overlapping flexible sheets and said bisecting line defines one edge from the group consisting of said first and second edges.
  13. 13. A method for creating a container wrap comprising:
    providing at least one flexible sheet of material having a plurality of predetermined contiguous edges;
    folding said at least one flexible sheet of material such that each said sheet defines two substantially overlapping layers joined at a fold and having first and second edges separated by at least one intermediate edge, said first and second edges shaped to overlap;
    applying an adhesive to said at least one sheet along said first edge;
    overlapping said second edge over said first edge such that said adhesive holds said fist and second edges near each other such that said at least one flexible sheet defines a hollow shape from the group consisting of a cylindrical shape and a frustoconical shape;
    inwardly bending and overlapping portions of said at least one intermediate edge such that the bent and overlapping portions of said at least one flexible sheet define a substantially closed end to said hollow shape; and
    adhering said bent and overlapping portions at said substantially closed end.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13 wherein said adhering step includes placing a label carrying an adhesive material over at least a portion of said bent and overlapping portions.
  15. 15. The method of claim 13 further comprising the step of inserting a moisture retaining insert inside said hollow shape formed by said at least one flexible sheet, said insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within said closed end.
  16. 16. The method of claim 13 wherein said applying step includes applying adhesive to said at least one sheet along said fold and said fold defines one edge from the group consisting of said first and second edges.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein said adhering step includes placing a label carrying an adhesive material over at least a portion of said bent and overlapping portions.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17 further comprising the step of inserting a moisture retaining insert inside said hollow shape formed by said at least one flexible sheet, said insert having a shape adapted to fit closely within said closed end.
US11260787 2003-10-16 2005-10-27 Container wrap and methods for making Abandoned US20060054521A1 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10687337 US7396320B2 (en) 2003-10-16 2003-10-16 Pre-folded and pre-glued flower wrap sheets and methods for making
US10743977 US20050085365A1 (en) 2003-10-16 2003-12-23 Pre-folded and pre-glued flower wrap sheets and methods for making
US64381105 true 2005-01-15 2005-01-15
US66231805 true 2005-03-16 2005-03-16
US68398405 true 2005-05-24 2005-05-24
US11260787 US20060054521A1 (en) 2003-10-16 2005-10-27 Container wrap and methods for making

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11260787 US20060054521A1 (en) 2003-10-16 2005-10-27 Container wrap and methods for making

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060054521A1 true true US20060054521A1 (en) 2006-03-16

Family

ID=36032738

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11260787 Abandoned US20060054521A1 (en) 2003-10-16 2005-10-27 Container wrap and methods for making

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20060054521A1 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL1033166C2 (en) * 2007-01-04 2008-02-25 Zwapak B V Packaging case and method.
US20090031671A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Temkin International, Inc. Wraps for pots, pot assemblies and methods therefor
NL2012152C (en) * 2014-01-27 2015-07-29 Knud Jepsen As Receiving device for a potted plant, receiving device with a potted plant and blank for forming a wall for such a receiving device.
EP2960180A1 (en) 2014-06-24 2015-12-30 Koen Pack B.V. Flexible wrapping material for wrapping flowers and/or plants
USD768534S1 (en) * 2015-04-28 2016-10-11 Derrick WILTURNER Holder for a match with an incense flag attachment
WO2015164539A3 (en) * 2014-04-22 2016-11-24 Steven Tchira Method and system for making pre-folded and pre-secured flower wrapping sheets

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL1033166C2 (en) * 2007-01-04 2008-02-25 Zwapak B V Packaging case and method.
US20090031671A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Temkin International, Inc. Wraps for pots, pot assemblies and methods therefor
NL2012152C (en) * 2014-01-27 2015-07-29 Knud Jepsen As Receiving device for a potted plant, receiving device with a potted plant and blank for forming a wall for such a receiving device.
WO2015164539A3 (en) * 2014-04-22 2016-11-24 Steven Tchira Method and system for making pre-folded and pre-secured flower wrapping sheets
EP2960180A1 (en) 2014-06-24 2015-12-30 Koen Pack B.V. Flexible wrapping material for wrapping flowers and/or plants
NL2013062B1 (en) * 2014-06-24 2016-07-06 Koen Pack B V Flexible wrapping material for wrapping flowers and/or plants.
US9517878B2 (en) 2014-06-24 2016-12-13 Koen Pack B.V. Flexible wrapping material for wrapping flowers and/or plants
USD768534S1 (en) * 2015-04-28 2016-10-11 Derrick WILTURNER Holder for a match with an incense flag attachment

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6141906A (en) Sleeve having expandable skirt
US5775057A (en) Optical effect material and methods
US5576089A (en) Optical effect material and methods
US5701720A (en) Optical effect material and methods
US5758472A (en) Floral sleeve having scalloped perforations
US5813194A (en) Method of attaching a sleeve to a pot
US4660737A (en) Carton and pouch system
US5634318A (en) Optical effect material and methods
US5966866A (en) Plant flat-collapsible-container
US5740655A (en) Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5861199A (en) Optical effect material and methods
US5575133A (en) Method of packaging a potted plant
US6723417B2 (en) Decorative flower pot cover having an appearance simulating cloth
US5985380A (en) Decorative grass made from optical effect material
US3288353A (en) Wrapping material and the fashioning of packaging blanks therefrom
US5566439A (en) Method for forming a decorative cover
US5661951A (en) Method of wrapping a floral product with a sheet of material having a three dimensional pattern printed thereon
US6071574A (en) Folded corrugated material and method for producing same
US6221000B1 (en) Folded corrugated material
US6286255B1 (en) Floral covering
US5161895A (en) Gift sack with drawstring or the like and method for making the same
US5557882A (en) Plant package having a waxy wrapper
US6427380B2 (en) Decorative assembly for a floral grouping
US4413464A (en) Process of producing a package or wrapping for storing or shipping material
US20020037396A1 (en) Optical effect material and methods