US20060049580A1 - Card game simulator - Google Patents

Card game simulator Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060049580A1
US20060049580A1 US11/223,523 US22352305A US2006049580A1 US 20060049580 A1 US20060049580 A1 US 20060049580A1 US 22352305 A US22352305 A US 22352305A US 2006049580 A1 US2006049580 A1 US 2006049580A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
player
rules
card game
main unit
card
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/223,523
Inventor
Andrew Chung
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Chung Andrew B
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Publication date
Priority to US60864404P priority Critical
Application filed by Chung Andrew B filed Critical Chung Andrew B
Priority to US11/223,523 priority patent/US20060049580A1/en
Publication of US20060049580A1 publication Critical patent/US20060049580A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F2001/008Card games adapted for being playable on a screen
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2401Detail of input, input devices
    • A63F2009/2402Input by manual operation
    • A63F2009/241Touch screen
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2483Other characteristics
    • A63F2009/2488Remotely playable
    • A63F2009/2489Remotely playable by radio transmitters, e.g. using RFID
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/80Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game specially adapted for executing a specific type of game

Abstract

A card game simulator includes storage of a rules base having programming specific to enforcing rules of a number of discrete card games. The rules base may be internal to a main unit or may be a number of plug-in modules that are received by the main unit. The main unit includes at least one main display that is responsive to a processor to generate visual representations of activities that are to be accessible in common to all player during the enforcement of the rules of a particular card game. In addition to the main unit, there are a number of individual display units that are separately responsive to the processor of the main unit. Each player unit includes a player display that is enabled to generate visual representations of activities specific to a participant to whom the player unit is assigned.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority from copending provisional application Ser. No. 60/608,644, filed Sep. 9, 2004.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The invention relates generally to devices for coordinating game play and more particularly to systems for simulating participation in card games.
  • BACKGROUND ART
  • The rules of most games feature some combination of timing, scoring, and randomness. While most card games do not include timing restrictions, scoring is significant. The scoring may be based upon point totals, possession of chips, or movement along a board (such as in Pinochle). In card games, the randomness aspect is provided by card shuffling and deck cutting before the cards are distributed to the players.
  • While card games are popular, there are frustrations. For example, deck shuffling requires a dexterity that may not be available to young persons and the elderly. Another possible frustration relates to the need to keep track of items, such as chips or specialty game pieces. Moreover, there are occasions in which players disagree as to the rules of a game or are not aware of certain rules.
  • Game simulators may be used to electronically simulate playing of a card game. U.S. Pat. No. 4,380,334 to Minkoff et al. describes an electronic card game simulator having a display and a number of input keys. Electronic data processing circuitry allows automatic play of a hand of gin rummy in opposition to an operator. The simulator deals a hand of cards to the operator and to the electronic opponent. The play of the electronic component is controlled by circuitry to simulate the play of a human in accordance with the rules of the game.
  • Another game simulator is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,926,327 to Sidley. In the system of Sidley, poker is electronically simulated on a number of individual player consoles. Each player console is interconnected with a central computer unit which simulates and controls the game. Additionally, the central computer unit tabulates and displays all betting information for each participant. At each player console, the player's own cards are displayed, as well as the “up-cards” of the other players or the number of cards drawn by the other players (depending upon whether the game being played is stud poker or draw poker). Each player console also allows the player to input certain data to the central computer unit at specific times during the game. While known card game simulators are beneficial, further advancements are available.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A card game simulator includes storage of a rules base having programming specific to enforcing rules of a number of discrete card games and includes at least one main display that is responsive to a processor to generate visual representations of activities that are to be accessible in common to all players during the enforcement of the rules of a particular card game. In addition to the main unit, there are a number of individual player units that are separately responsive to the processor of the main unit. Each player unit includes a player display that is enabled to generate visual representations of activities specific to a participant to whom the player unit is assigned. The combination of the main display for activities that are common to all players and the player displays for individualized activities provides an effective means for electronically simulating a wide variety of card games.
  • Each player unit is preferably dimensioned for use as a hand-held device. The main unit is dimensioned for use as a table-top device. Each player unit includes an input means for enabling player selections, which may include the use of touch-screen technology. However, player selections may be entered using less complex approaches, such as the manipulation of buttons or a toggle. The type of player selection will depend upon the card game being electronically simulated. The use of the rules base store does not restrict the card game simulator to any one type of game, such as poker. Rather, programming may be entered for enforcing rules specific to unrelated games, such as Pinochle and childhood games. The card game simulator includes a program input for entering and updating the programming of the rules base store. Thus, the rules of additional games may be entered as described. Preferably, the rules base store and the processor are enabled to also implement electronic simulation of games which do not require cards, such as dice games and board games which require specialty game pieces (e.g., the tiles used in the board game sold under the trademark SCRABBLE).
  • The rules base store defines the rules for each card game, including rules related to card distribution, scoring, and the sequence for enabling player selections via the input means of the different player units. The main unit and the player units define a system that is dedicated to providing electronic simulation of the games. The player units may be wired to the main unit to enable the necessary signal exchanges. Alternatively, the player units may exchange signals with the main unit using a wireless technology.
  • The rules base store may be a number of different logic modules which are plugged into the main unit on an as-needed basis. In another embodiment, the main unit includes sufficient memory for storing rules for a large number of games. An advantage of the invention is that when the system is activated, the simulator automates shuffling, dealing, scoring, and adherence to the rules of the game being played. The individual player units allow each participant to view the cards dealt to that participant and allow the manipulation of the cards by use of the input means of the player unit. Discarded cards from the various players may appear in the main display of the main unit.
  • As an optional feature, the system may enable the tracking of play for subsequent evaluation of strategy. For example, during the electronic simulation of a Bridge game, each decision may be stored, so that the effectiveness of decisions can be discussed while the system is in a review mode that presents the sequence of decisions.
  • The system may also include a connection capability (such as a standard USB connector) to other devices or systems. Thus, a scanner may be coupled to the system to enable capture of images of specialty cards and the like.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one example of a modular networked gaming system for providing card game simulation in accordance with the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is an example of one of the player units of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is an example of the main unit in the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram of selected components of the system of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a system for implementing the card game simulator 10 in accordance with the invention. The simulator includes a main unit 12 and a number of player units 14 and 16. While only two player units are shown, typically there are a greater number of player units, allowing more individuals to participate. In the system of FIG. 1, a plug-in memory module is inserted into the main unit 12 to allow the selection of the number of players and the game to be played. The system simulates traditional game play by electronically shuffling and dealing the “virtual cards” to each player. The shuffling and dealing aspects are simulated using the main display 18 of the main unit. Each player unit has a player display 20 that provides a visual representation of cards dealt to the player assigned to the particular player unit. The player units are shown as having a fanned configuration that simulates the conventional approach to holding the number of cards. Each player in turn is allowed to draw or play cards from the player's hand by touching or pressing the appropriate buttons or the appropriate areas of the player display. Cards which have been played or discarded appear on the main display 18 of the main unit. Alternatively or additionally, the played or discarded cards may be shown on a portion of the player display held by the individual player. The system monitors the play, confirms that the players make legal moves, and tracks all aspects of the game, including betting and/or scoring.
  • FIG. 2 shows a player unit 14 with some variations from the player unit 16 shown in FIG. 1. The player unit may be a hand-held device or may be configured to rest on a tabletop. The unit includes a video screen 20 to display the cards of the particular player. Additional information may be provided, such as the amount of money or the number of chips in the possession of the player.
  • The player unit includes an on/off setting 22 and a number of electronic buttons 24 and 26. The buttons provide input for enabling player selections of cards, betting, and other actions permitted under the rules of a particular game. The manipulation of virtual cards are represented on the player display 20. As one alternative, touch-screen technology may be used in the manipulation of the virtual cards. Each player unit may be hardwired to the main unit 12, but wireless technology would allow the units to be completely untethered.
  • The main unit 12 of FIGS. 1 and 3 acts as the card shuffler, card dealer, rule coordinator, and scorekeeper. The main unit manages the play of the game, accepting play from only the player unit of the individual for which the rules dictate (e.g., a dictated player-by-player sequence). Depending upon the card game, the main unit also shows cards which have been played, discarded or revealed by each player. In its scorekeeping role, the main unit tracks the score of the game, whether it is in terms of points, dollars, bets, bids or other scoring system.
  • In the card shuffling and dealing role of the main unit 12, the system has the ability to use a standard fifty-two card deck or may use the standard deck with any amount of jokers or other wildcards. The main unit may also simulate specialty decks, such as the forty-eight card deck used within the game of Pinochle or the proprietary decks sold with particular games. In the shuffling role, the unit employs a random number generator that randomizes the order of cards. As an added feature, the unit may allow players to “cut” the deck. The main unit may also randomly determine the player who will be the first virtual dealer, and therefore the player who is the first to play. Buttons 28 or other input mechanisms may be used to trigger or control operations allowed within the rules of the card game.
  • In operation, the player units 14 and 16 and the main unit 12 exchange signals either wirelessly or using wired connections. As the main unit “deals” the cards, the cards appear on the appropriate player units. Similarly, when the cards are played, the cards are displayed on the main display 18 of the main unit. Thus, the system defines a spoke-and-hub networked topology in which player-specific information is visually represented on the individual display units and commonly accessible information is visually represented on the main display. The various displays may be high resolution components and may provide the touch-screen capability.
  • A limited number of components of the main unit will be identified with reference to FIG. 4. The device may be powered by one or more batteries 128 and 130 or by an adapter 132 that connects to a standard source of AC power. A converter 134 regulates the voltage level. A microprocessor 136 receives signals from user inputs 140, such as a keypad on the main unit. A number of communication ports 112 enable signaling from the various player units. Again, the connections may be wired or wireless. The microprocessor provides visual representations on the display 120 in order to simulate game play. An indicator light 142 may be used to provide confirmation that the main unit is in an “on” condition. A communication port 112 may be of the type (e.g., USB port) to enable connection to peripherals or to other systems. Then, specialty items, such as specifically required cards, can be scanned and the images may be stored for use during play of games that require the specialty items.
  • Component 138 represents the rule base store. The rules for various games may be retained in internal memory of the main unit. The internal memory may be updated in order to add rules for different games or to modify the rules of an existing game. However, there are advantages to providing the main unit with a built-in reader that can accept specific memory cards or modules containing firmware for management of play. Each “page” of component 138 may represent a separate memory card/module. In this embodiment, the main unit contains the firmware reader, with the information regarding game management being uploaded to the various player units for game play coordination. The main unit then determines if a player move is “legal” according to the rules of the game being played.
  • With sufficient internal memory, the sequence of play of a game can be stored and subsequently reviewed to determine the effectiveness of decisions. This “review mode” is well suited for games such as Bridge.
  • While the invention has been described with reference to card games, other parlor games, such as bingo can be electronically simulated using the system described above.

Claims (14)

1. A card game simulator comprising:
a main unit having a processor and a rules base store, said rules base store including programming specific to enforcing rules of a plurality of discrete card games by means of said processor, thereby enabling electronic simulations of distributions of shuffled cards to a plurality of players, said main unit further having at least one main display that is responsive to said processor to generate visual representations of activities that are to be accessible in common to all said players during said enforcing of said rules of one of said card games; and
a plurality of individual player units that are separately responsive to said processor of said main unit with respect to said programming that is specific to enforcing said rules, each said player unit including a player display enabled to generate visual representations of activities specific to a single said player during said enforcing of said rules of one of said card games, each said player unit further including an input means for enabling player selections.
2. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said player units are dimensioned for use as hand-held devices, said main unit being dimensioned for use as a table-top device.
3. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said rules base store defines said rules for each said card game, with said rules being specific to card distribution, scoring and the sequence for enabling player selections via said input means of said player units.
4. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said rules base store includes programming specific to enforcing rules for games that include Pinochle.
5. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said rules base store includes programming for enforcing rules of parlor games that are unrelated to the use of cards.
6. The card game simulator of claim 5 wherein said parlor games for which said rules base store includes programming comprise dice games and Scrabble.
7. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said main unit and said player units define a system that is dedicated to providing electronic simulation of said games.
8. The card game simulator of claim 7 wherein said player units are wired to said main unit to enable signal exchanges.
9. The card game simulator of claim 7 wherein said player units exchange signals with said main unit using a wireless technology.
10. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said programming implements visual representations of shuffling of a deck of cards, deck cutting and card dealing from said deck.
11. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said input means for enabling said player selections includes touch screen technology as applied to each said player display.
12. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said input means for enabling said player selections includes at least one of buttons and toggle.
13. The card game simulator of claim 1 further comprising a program input for entering and updating said programming of said rules base store.
14. The card game simulator of claim 1 wherein said rules base store is a plurality of plug-in memory cards configured to be received at a connector of said main unit.
US11/223,523 2004-09-09 2005-09-09 Card game simulator Abandoned US20060049580A1 (en)

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US60864404P true 2004-09-09 2004-09-09
US11/223,523 US20060049580A1 (en) 2004-09-09 2005-09-09 Card game simulator

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160296844A1 (en) * 2015-04-13 2016-10-13 Egenpower Inc. Mahjong game system using touch panel
US9600963B2 (en) * 2015-06-05 2017-03-21 Jimmie Ray Kilby Gaming machine, gaming system, and gaming method presenting games with artificially intelligent players

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US4380334A (en) * 1980-03-24 1983-04-19 Mattel, Inc. Electronic card game simulator
US4614342A (en) * 1984-04-19 1986-09-30 Doyle Davis Electronic game machine suitable for chance and gambling card games
US4926327A (en) * 1983-04-05 1990-05-15 Sidley Joseph D H Computerized gaming system
US5669817A (en) * 1996-01-25 1997-09-23 Tarantino; Elia R. Casino card table with video display
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US6165069A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-12-26 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing live casino table games having tabletop changeable playing card displays and monitoring security features
US20020111216A1 (en) * 1997-08-08 2002-08-15 Atsunori Himoto Memory device, controller and electronic device
US6544126B2 (en) * 2000-04-25 2003-04-08 Nintendo Co., Ltd. Portable game machine with download capability
US6651985B2 (en) * 1998-03-11 2003-11-25 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing live casino table games having tabletop changeable playing card displays and play monitoring security features
US7048629B2 (en) * 1998-03-11 2006-05-23 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing casino games having changeable displays and play monitoring security features
US7115031B2 (en) * 2001-05-02 2006-10-03 Nintendo Co., Ltd. Game system displaying a game world on a common display and an individual display

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4380334A (en) * 1980-03-24 1983-04-19 Mattel, Inc. Electronic card game simulator
US4926327A (en) * 1983-04-05 1990-05-15 Sidley Joseph D H Computerized gaming system
US4614342A (en) * 1984-04-19 1986-09-30 Doyle Davis Electronic game machine suitable for chance and gambling card games
US5669817A (en) * 1996-01-25 1997-09-23 Tarantino; Elia R. Casino card table with video display
US5702305A (en) * 1996-02-15 1997-12-30 Motorola Electronic game system
US20020111216A1 (en) * 1997-08-08 2002-08-15 Atsunori Himoto Memory device, controller and electronic device
US6270404B2 (en) * 1998-03-11 2001-08-07 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing live casino table games having tabletop changeable playing card displays and play monitoring security features
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US6651985B2 (en) * 1998-03-11 2003-11-25 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing live casino table games having tabletop changeable playing card displays and play monitoring security features
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160296844A1 (en) * 2015-04-13 2016-10-13 Egenpower Inc. Mahjong game system using touch panel
US9776094B2 (en) * 2015-04-13 2017-10-03 Egenpower Inc. Mahjong game system using touch panel
US9600963B2 (en) * 2015-06-05 2017-03-21 Jimmie Ray Kilby Gaming machine, gaming system, and gaming method presenting games with artificially intelligent players

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