Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20060014339A1
US20060014339A1 US11221161 US22116105A US2006014339A1 US 20060014339 A1 US20060014339 A1 US 20060014339A1 US 11221161 US11221161 US 11221161 US 22116105 A US22116105 A US 22116105A US 2006014339 A1 US2006014339 A1 US 2006014339A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
conductive
structure
spacer
landing
pad
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US11221161
Inventor
Dana Lee
Wen-Juei Lu
Felix Tsui
Original Assignee
Dana Lee
Wen-Juei Lu
Tsui Felix Y
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L21/00Processes or apparatus adapted for the manufacture or treatment of semiconductor or solid state devices or of parts thereof
    • H01L21/70Manufacture or treatment of devices consisting of a plurality of solid state components formed in or on a common substrate or of parts thereof; Manufacture of integrated circuit devices or of parts thereof
    • H01L21/71Manufacture of specific parts of devices defined in group H01L21/70
    • H01L21/768Applying interconnections to be used for carrying current between separate components within a device comprising conductors and dielectrics
    • H01L21/76838Applying interconnections to be used for carrying current between separate components within a device comprising conductors and dielectrics characterised by the formation and the after-treatment of the conductors
    • H01L21/76895Local interconnects; Local pads, as exemplified by patent document EP0896365

Abstract

A landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer adjacent a structure in a semiconductor device comprises two islands, each of which is substantially rectangularly shaped and is spaced apart from one another and from the structure. Conductive spacers are adjacent to each island and overlapping each other and overlapping with the conductive spacer adjacent to the structure. The contact to the landing pad is on the conductive spacers adjacent to the islands and spaced apart from the structure.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive polysilicon and more particularly wherein the conductive polysilicon is shaped as a spacer adjacent a structure in a semiconductor device.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Landing pads are well known in the art. They are used in a semiconductor device to provide electrical contact from one conductive layer, typically a metal layer to a conductive polysilicon layer through an insulating layer. Typically, conductive polysilicon is used in the formation of a logic or memory circuit, and the metal layer is used to carry signal and/or power to or from the circuit.
  • [0003]
    Referring to U.S. Pat. No. 6,329,685, whose disclosure is incorporated herein in its entirety, there is shown a non-volatile memory cell with a control gate made of conductive polysilicon in the shaped of a spacer. See FIG. 2H-4 thereof. This is also shown as FIG. 1 hereof. The memory cell 10 comprises a semiconductor substrate 11, of a first conductivity type, typically P type. The cell 10 comprises a first insulating layer 12 on the substrate 11. A floating gate 14, having a tip that permits Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of charges from the floating gate 14 to the control gate 40, is also made from conductive polysilicon and is formed on the first insulating layer 12. The floating gate 14 is also capacitively coupled to a region 30 in the substrate 11. A source contact 34, also typically made from a conductive polysilicon, electrically connects to the region 30 in the substrate 11. The source contact 34 is also insulated from the floating gate 14 by a second insulating layer 26. The structure 20 comprising the floating gate(s) 14, the first insulating layer 12, the source contact 34 and the second insulating layer 26 is generally rectangularly shaped, and has a substantially planar surface against which the control gate 40 in the shape of a spacer is formed. The spacer shaped control gate 40 is made of conductive polysilicon. As is well known, to form a spacer, polysilicon is conformally deposited on the structure 20. The polysilicon is then subject to an anisotropic etch which results in the spacer shape. The spacer shaped control gate 40 can be made conductive by, for example, ion implantation, either before the polysilicon is etched, or after the polysiclion is etched, i.e. after it is shaped into a spacer shape.
  • [0004]
    Referring to FIG. 2 there is shown a top view of the structure shown in FIG. 1. Generally, the structures 20 are fabricated as parallel strips, parallel to one another, with the control gate spacers 40, immediately adjacent to the structure 20, and therefore also parallel to one another.
  • [0005]
    The structure shown in FIG. 1 is further fabricated to form additional regions in the substrate 11, each of which is spaced apart from an associated region 30, and is between a pair of adjacent spacer control gates 40. Thereafter, insulating material (not shown), such as BPSG or any other form of glass or oxide material is deposited. Finally, landing pads are formed through the insulating material to contact the spacer shaped control gate 40. A landing pad, such as 50 shown in FIG. 2 is a hole or via, made in the insulating material that covers the structure shown in FIG. 1, so that a metal contact to the conductive polysilicon control gate 40 can be made. Although the formation of landing pads is well known, the formation of a landing pad to a spacer shaped conductive material, and in particular one that is used as a control gate creates a special problem.
  • [0006]
    Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown a landing pad 50 that is located to make electrical contact with the control gate 40. The formation of a landing pad 50 to a memory array in which rows of control gates 40 are formed parallel and spaced apart from one another means that the landing pad 50 must be accurately positioned in the X direction. If there is any significant deviation in the X direction, the landing pad 50 might make contact with the “wrong” row of control gate, i.e. 40 c instead of 40 b. Alternatively, the landing pad 50 might contact the source contact 34. Furthermore, the problem of making a landing pad 50 contacting a spacer conductor 40 is further exacerbated by the shape of the conductor 40. Thus, even if the landing pad 50 is positioned within the range of tolerance, i.e. it does not contact the control gate 40 c nor make contact with the source contact 34, because the spacer control gate 40 is curvilinearly shaped, the depth of the landing pad 50 required to make contact may differ significantly from one landing pad to another, leading to potential poor electrical contact.
  • [0007]
    Hence there is a need to develop a landing pad which can be used to make electrical contact with a spacer shaped conductive member.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    A landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer adjacent a structure in a semiconductor device comprises two islands, each of which is substantially rectangularly shaped and is spaced apart from one another and from the structure. Conductive spacers are adjacent to each island and overlapping each other and overlapping with the conductive spacer adjacent to the structure. The contact to the landing pad is on the conductive spacers adjacent to the islands and spaced apart from the structure.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1 is a cross section view of a non-volatile memory array semiconductor device having a conductive spacer to which the landing pad of the present invention may be used.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 2 is a top view of the device shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 3 is a top view of the landing pad of the present invention used in a memory cell array of the present invention.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 4 is a top view of a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 3, without the conductive spacers.
  • [0013]
    FIGS. 5 a-c are cross sectional views of the structure shown in FIG. 4 taken along the lines 5-5, showing a method of forming the landing pad of the present invention.
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 6 a-c are cross sectional views of the structure shown in FIG. 4 taken along the lines 6-6, showing a method of forming the landing pad of the present invention.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 7 a is a cross sectional view of a row of studs in a semiconductor device of the prior art to which another aspect of the present invention may be used to test potential defects in the manufacturing of the row of studs.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 7 b is a top view of the device shown in FIG. 7 a.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 7 c is a cross sectional view of a method of the prior art to test the potential defects in the manufacturing of the row of studs shown in FIG. 7 a.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 8 a is a cross sectional view of a row of studs in a semiconductor device tested in accordance with the method of the present invention.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 8 b is a top view of the row of studs shown in FIG. 8 a and tested with the method of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    Referring to FIG. 3 there is shown a top view of a landing pad 50 of the present invention used with a spacer shaped control gate 40 in a non-volatile memory array device. As shown and discussed in FIG. 1, the spacer shaped control gates 40 are formed adjacent to a structure which has a planar surface, adjacent to the control gate 40. However, in a preferred embodiment, unlike the structures shown in FIG. 2, the structures 20 shown in FIG. 3 are not linear and evenly spaced apart from one another. In particular, the distance of separation (measured as a perpendicular line from one structure 20 to an adjacent structure 20) varies. Where a landing pad 50 is located between two adjacent structures 20, the distance of separation between those two structures 20 is greater than the distance of separation between the two structures 20 at locations other than where the landing pad 50 is located. Similarly, of course, the control gates 40 which are immediately adjacent to the structures 20 are also not linear and evenly spaced apart from one another. The structures 20 (and the associated control gate spacers 40) generally run in a row direction (although the term row and column may be interchanged). Although FIG. 3 shows the structures 40 and the associated control gate spacers 40 as being not linear and evenly spaced, it is not necessary for the practice of the present invention that the control gates 40 be not evenly spaced and not linear. In fact, the present invention is not limited to the use of a landing pad 50 in a semiconductor memory device. The landing pad 50 of the present invention may be used with any spacer shaped conductive polysilicon.
  • [0021]
    The landing pad 50 comprises two islands 60 a and 60 b, each substantially rectangularly shaped, and spaced apart from one another and from the structure 20 which has the associated control gate spacer 40 to which the landing pad 50 is intended to make contact. Thus, as shown in FIG. 3, the landing pad 50 a is intended to make electrical contact with control gate 40 a which is adjacent to the structure 20 a. The landing pad 50 a comprises a first island 60 a 1 and a second island 60 b 1, each separated from one another, and separated from the structure 20 a (which is the definition of an “island”).
  • [0022]
    Surrounding each island 60 a and 60 b are electrically conductive spacers, which overlap with one another and overlap with the control gate spacer 40. Thus, the islands 60 a and 60 b must be spaced apart from one another and from the structure 20, such that the spacers that are formed about the islands 60 a and 60 b and the spacer 40 will overlap. This means that the islands 60 a and 60 b are spaced apart from one another by a distance which is less than twice the width of each conductive spacer, and from the structure 20 by a distance which is less than twice the width of the conductive spacer 40. The landing pad hole 50 that is formed to contact the control gate spacer 40 is then made at a location which is between the islands 60 a and 60 b and between the islands 60 a and 60 b and the structure 20. Because the conductive spacers that are formed around each of the islands overlap with one another and with the control gate spacer 40, the landing pad hole 50 can be positioned with more tolerance than heretofore. Further, as will be seen hereinafter, because the spacers overlap, the area where the landing pad hole 50 is formed will contact the overlapping spacers at a region where the spacers do not exhibit sharp curvilinear dimensions, thus providing for greater electrical contact in all of the landing hole contacts.
  • [0023]
    Referring to FIGS. 5(a-c) and 6(a-c) there is shown one method for making the landing pad 50 of the present invention in the memory array 10 of the prior art, to form the memory array of the present invention, shown in FIG. 3. In the first step, oxide layer 12 is deposited on the substrate 11. The oxide 12 is the same layer of oxide that is used in the structure 20. Thus, the formation of the oxide layer 12, outside of the structure 20 would not be an extra processing step.
  • [0024]
    A first layer of polysilicon 14 is then deposited on the oxide layer 12. The first polysilicon 14 is also the polysilicon that is used to form the floating gate 14 in the structure 20. Thus, again this step would not be an extra processing step.
  • [0025]
    The polysilicon 14 is then mask and etched, forming the floating gate 14, and the islands 60. Since a masking step is otherwise need to form the floating gates 14, this again would not necessitae an extra processing step. The only change is the pattern of the mask to accommodate the formation of the islands 60, as well as the non-linearity of the floating gate 14 as shown in FIG. 3.
  • [0026]
    Oxide 16 is then deposited over the structure. This would be the same oxide that is used in the formation of the structure 20 to cover the source contact 34. Thus, again the deposition of the oxide 16 to cover the polysilicon island 60 would not necessitate an extra processing step.
  • [0027]
    Polysilicon 40 is then deposited over the structure shown in FIGS. 5 a and 6 a. The polysilicon 40 is conformally deposited as it would be during the formation of the control gate spacers 40. Thus, this would not necessitate an extra processing step. The resultant structure is shown in FIGS. 5 b and 6 b.
  • [0028]
    The structure shown in FIGS. 5 b and 6 b is anisotropically etched. This etching step is the same process used to etch the poylsilicon 40 in the formation of the control gate spacer 40. Thus, this would not necessitate an extra processing step. The etching step causes the formation of spacers surrounding each of the islands 60. However, because the islands are spaced apart less than twice the width of the resultant spacers, the spacers 40 that surround each of the islands 60 would overlap, and also over lap with the control gate spacers 40.
  • [0029]
    Thereafter, the entire structure is covered with a dielectric material 42, such as BPSG or any other well known dielectric used in semiconductor processing. The dielectric 42 would be the same dielectric that would normally be used in the formation of the prior art memory cell array 10, to cover the control gate spacer 40. Thus, this would not necessitate an extra processing step.
  • [0030]
    A masking step is then used to form contact holes 50 in the dielectric 42. This would be the same masking step that is normally used to form the contact holes 50, as is done in the prior art. Thus, no additional processing step is required. However, because the contact hole 50 will contact the poylsilicon 40 in a regions where the spacers overlap, and where there is less slope, the depth of the contact hole 50 is more reliable in contacting the spacer 40 than in the prior art.
  • [0031]
    Metal layer 44 is then deposited on the dielectric 42, and in the contact hole 50. The metal layer 44 is then masked. Again, this would be the same processing step as is done in the prior art, and thus no additional processing step is required. The resultant structure is shown in FIGS. 5 c and 6 c. As can be seen from the foregoing, with the landing pad 50 of the present invention, greater electrical contact reliability can be achieved, and in one embodiment without requiring any additional processing step. Further, not only is there increased reliability in not contacting undesired structures, but also reliability in the depth of contact to the spacer 40, but there is also an increase in electrical reliability in electrical current flow in the lateral direction. Referring to FIG. 4, which is a top view of a landing pad of the present invention, as can be seen from FIG. 4, current can flow from the landing pad 50 in two directions, around the island 60. Thus, there is increased electrical reliability current flow in the lateral direction as well. The spacing between the islands 60 and between the islands 60 and the structure 20 can be as small as the lithographic dimensions or as large as two times the width of the spacer 40 that surrounds the islands 60 and the control gate spacer 40.
  • [0032]
    Referring to FIG. 7 there is shown a structure to which another aspect of the present invention can be used. In FIG. 7 there is shown a row of spaced apart electrically conductive studs 1(a-d) on a substrate 11. Typically, the studs 1 can be found as the resistive elements in a cross-point memory array. Another aspect of the present invention is to test the process architecture in the formation of the plurality of studs 1. Thus, the present invention can be used to determine if the studs are formed, and if so, whether they are of the “correct” dimensions. For example, stud 1 c is shown as being possibly defective, being either of the incorrect lateral dimensions or non-existent. Of course, one would not know before hand that stud 1 c is defective. Stud 1 c is shown as for illustration purpose only.
  • [0033]
    In the prior art, to determine if all the studs 1(a-d) have been made correctly, i.e. the process flow would produce the studs 1(a-d), diffusion regions 2 a, 2 bc, and 2 d are formed in the eh substrate 11, connecting studs 1 a, 1 b to 1 c, and 1 d respectively. Further, polysilicon connections 3 ab and 3 cd are made connecting the top of the studs 1 a to 1 b, and 1 c to d, respectively. The polysilicon connections 3 ab and 3 cd are separated by a distance S>2xOL+F, where OL is the overlap (between elements 3 ab and 1 b or between 3 cd and 1 c) and F is a feature size spacing between the conductors 3 ab and 3 cd. A continuity test is then performed between diffusion regions 2 a and 2 d. In the event one of the studs is defective (i.e. the stud is non-existent or it is dimensionally too narrow), there would not be any current flow between diffusion regions 2 a and 2 d.
  • [0034]
    In another method of the present invention, electrically conductive spacers 4 are formed about each of the studs 1(a-d). The width of the spacer W is chosen to be ½ of the spacing between each stud 1(a-d) that is to be checked. The spacer width W is not lithographically limited; thus, the spacing can be arbitrarily close. Once the spacers 4 are formed around each stud 1, an electrical continuity test is performed between spacers 4 a 1 and 4 d 2, which lie at the ends of the row of studs 1(a-d). If there is continuity, then the studs 1(a-d) are formed. If there is no continuity, i.e. if the stud 1 c is missing, then there would not be any spacer formed surrounding the stud 1 c, thereby breaking the continuity. Finally, if a stud is too small or too narrow, then again the continuity will be broken.
  • [0035]
    The method of the present invention to test the process to determine the formation of a row of spaced apart studs 1(a-d) can also be made to test a row of spaced apart holes. To test the holes, each hole is first converted to a stud by the use of the well known damascene process, in which material (such as polysilicon or dielectric) is deposited into the holes to fill the holes, and the surrounding material is then etched away leaving a plurality of spaced apart studs. The converted studs can then be tested in the manner previously described.
  • [0036]
    As can be seen from the foregoing, with the present invention, the reliability of an electrical contact between a conductive layer, such as metal to an underlying conductive spacer, through a dielectric is increased. In addition, with the present invention, the formation of a plurality of spaced apart studs, or holes (which are first converted to studs), can be electrically tested.

Claims (13)

1-4. (canceled)
5. A method of forming a landing pad to a conductive spacer adjacent a structure, said method comprising:
forming the structure on a semiconductor substrate, said structure having a substantially planar side;
forming two islands on the semiconductor substrate, each island substantially rectangularly shaped and spaced apart from one another and from the planar side of the structure;
forming conductive spacers adjacent to the planar side of the structure between the structure and the islands, and adjacent to each of the islands, surrounding each island, with said conductive spacers overlapping one another between the islands and between the islands and the structure; and
forming a landing pad, said landing pad being on said conductive spacers, between the islands and between the islands and the structure.
6. The method of claim 5 wherein said conductive spacers are made of conductive polysilicon.
7. The method of claim 6 wherein said forming conductive spacers step further comprises:
conformally depositing a layer of polysilicon on said islands and on said structure and therebetween;
anisotropically etching said layer of polysilicon to form said conductive spacers.
8. The method of claim 7 wherein said forming a landing step further comprises:
masking said islands, structure and conductive spacers with a layer of insulating material;
selectively removing a portion of said layer of insulating material at a position between the islands and between the islands and the structure to form the landing pad.
9. The method of claim 8 wherein the islands are spaced apart form one another by a distance which is less than twice the width of each conductive spacer.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein the islands are spaced apart from the structure by a distance which is less than twice the width of each conductive spacer.
11-16. (canceled)
17. A method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs on a semiconductor substrate wherein each stud is separated by a distance of 2X from an adjacent stud, said method comprising:
forming a plurality of conductive spacers with each spacer formed adjacent each stud, and overlapping with an adjacent spacer, each spacer having a width of at least X; and
electrically testing the continuity of the plurality of conductive spacers;
wherein in the event of failure of the testing step, said failure is indicative of the existence of one or more defects.
18. The method of claim 17 wherein said step of forming a plurality of conductive spacers comprises:
depositing conformally a layer of conductive polysilicon over said string of studs;
anisotropically etching said layer of conductive polysilicon to form said plurality of conductive spacers.
19. A method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart holes in a semiconductor device wherein each hole is separated by a distance of 2X from an adjacent hole, said method comprising:
converting each hole into a stud;
forming a plurality of conductive spacers with each spacer formed adjacent each stud, and overlapping with an adjacent spacer, each spacer having a width of at least X; and
electrically testing the continuity of the plurality of conductive spacers;
wherein in the event of failure of the testing step, said failure is indicative of the existence of one or more defects.
20. The method of claim 19 wherein said step of forming a plurality of conductive spacers comprises:
depositing conformally a layer of conductive polysilicon over said string of studs;
anisotropically etching said layer of conductive polysilicon to form said plurality of conductive spacers.
21. The method of claim 19 wherein said converting step comprises a damascene process.
US11221161 2003-10-23 2005-09-06 Method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs Granted US20060014339A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10693067 US6960803B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2003-10-23 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer
US11221161 US20060014339A1 (en) 2003-10-23 2005-09-06 Method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11221161 US20060014339A1 (en) 2003-10-23 2005-09-06 Method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs
US12266443 US7749779B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2008-11-06 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20060014339A1 true true US20060014339A1 (en) 2006-01-19

Family

ID=34522283

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10693067 Active 2024-01-23 US6960803B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2003-10-23 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer
US11221161 Granted US20060014339A1 (en) 2003-10-23 2005-09-06 Method of detecting one or more defects in a string of spaced apart studs
US12266443 Active US7749779B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2008-11-06 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10693067 Active 2024-01-23 US6960803B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2003-10-23 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12266443 Active US7749779B2 (en) 2003-10-23 2008-11-06 Landing pad for use as a contact to a conductive spacer

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US6960803B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9040375B2 (en) * 2013-01-28 2015-05-26 Infineon Technologies Dresden Gmbh Method for processing a carrier, method for fabricating a charge storage memory cell, method for processing a chip, and method for electrically contacting a spacer structure

Citations (93)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6171373B2 (en) *
US18013A (en) * 1857-08-18 Charles s
US28895A (en) * 1860-06-26 Machine for wetting paper
US55529A (en) * 1866-06-12 Improved baby-walker
US81263A (en) * 1868-08-18 Job dyson
US107173A (en) * 1870-09-06 Improvement in spring carriages
US188012A (en) * 1877-03-06 Improvement in metal roofs
US3647624A (en) * 1969-07-24 1972-03-07 Wisconsin Alumni Res Found Treatment of blood with oleaginous substance
US3958939A (en) * 1975-01-08 1976-05-25 Coulter Electronics, Inc. Method for clarification of lipemic serum
US3983008A (en) * 1974-05-27 1976-09-28 Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. Method of extracting useful components from microbial cells
US4103685A (en) * 1976-01-05 1978-08-01 Lupien Paul J Method and apparatus for extravascular treatment of blood
US4258010A (en) * 1975-11-19 1981-03-24 Eszakmagyarorszagi Vegyimu_ vek Solvent extraction apparatus
US4350156A (en) * 1980-05-29 1982-09-21 Japan Foundation For Artificial Organs Method and apparatus for on-line filtration removal of macromolecules from a physiological fluid
US4391711A (en) * 1980-03-19 1983-07-05 Davy Mckee (Minerals & Metals) Limited Method of, and apparatus for, effecting liquid-liquid contact
US4399217A (en) * 1979-05-02 1983-08-16 Laboratoires Goella Process and a device for the determination of serum lipoproteins
US4402940A (en) * 1982-03-12 1983-09-06 Kuraray Co., Ltd. Method for treating blood plasma employing a hollow fiber membrane
US4435289A (en) * 1981-12-23 1984-03-06 Romicon, Inc. Series ultrafiltration with pressurized permeate
US4463988A (en) * 1982-09-07 1984-08-07 Cities Service Co. Horizontal heated plane process
US4522809A (en) * 1980-02-11 1985-06-11 Institut Pasteur Process for obtaining lipid envelope virus sub-units, notably antigens for use as vaccines, the products obtained and their applications
US4581231A (en) * 1982-06-10 1986-04-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Health And Human Services Inactivation of viruses containing essential lipids
US4591505A (en) * 1982-04-14 1986-05-27 New York Blood Center, Inc. Process for inactivating hepatitis B virus
US4643718A (en) * 1983-02-22 1987-02-17 Applied Immunesciences, Inc. Therapeutic apheresis
US4645512A (en) * 1985-05-06 1987-02-24 The Dow Chemical Company Continuous process for removing water-soluble particles from organic liquids
US4647280A (en) * 1984-06-27 1987-03-03 Akzo Nv Binder for low density lipoproteins
US4648974A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-03-10 Intermedicat Gmbh Process for the selective extracorporeal separation of blood constituents
US4668398A (en) * 1983-07-21 1987-05-26 Colgate-Palmolive Company Continuous extraction apparatus and process
US4671909A (en) * 1978-09-21 1987-06-09 Torobin Leonard B Method for making hollow porous microspheres
US4677057A (en) * 1985-03-11 1987-06-30 Scripps Clinic And Research Foundation Diagnostic assay for the presence of apolipoproteins associated with plasma high density lipoproteins
US4676905A (en) * 1975-12-15 1987-06-30 Toray Industries, Inc. Fluid separation method and apparatus
US4680320A (en) * 1984-12-06 1987-07-14 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Method for preparation of droplets
US4832034A (en) * 1987-04-09 1989-05-23 Pizziconi Vincent B Method and apparatus for withdrawing, collecting and biosensing chemical constituents from complex fluids
US4836928A (en) * 1984-04-28 1989-06-06 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Separation method, separation device and separation apparatus for separating body fluid into respective components
US4895558A (en) * 1985-07-15 1990-01-23 University Of Queensland Autologous plasma delipidation using a continuous flow system
US4908354A (en) * 1984-06-16 1990-03-13 B. Braun-Ssg Ag Process for the selective extracorporeal precipitation of low-density lipoproteins
US4909942A (en) * 1987-10-16 1990-03-20 Tanabe Seiyaku Co., Ltd. Process for removing pyrogens
US4909940A (en) * 1987-12-30 1990-03-20 New York Blood Center, Inc. Extraction of process chemicals from labile biological mixtures with organic alcohols or with halogenated hydrocarbons
US4923439A (en) * 1981-09-10 1990-05-08 B. Braun-Ssc Ag Process for the selective extracorporeal precipitation of low-density lipoproteins from whole serum or plasma
US4935204A (en) * 1984-06-16 1990-06-19 B. Braun-Ssc Ag Process and device for the specific adsorption of heparin
US5026479A (en) * 1990-02-13 1991-06-25 Union Carbide Industrial Gases Technology Corporation Fluid separation device
US5080796A (en) * 1985-12-19 1992-01-14 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Thermofiltration of plasma
US5089602A (en) * 1988-02-08 1992-02-18 Rotkreuzstiftung Zentrallaboratorium Blutspendedienst Srk Process for the manufacture of apolipoproteins from human blood plasma or serum
US5112956A (en) * 1987-12-02 1992-05-12 The Nutrasweet Company Method for extraction of lipids and cholesterol
US5126240A (en) * 1986-09-29 1992-06-30 Curtiss Linda K Hybridomas and monoclonal paratopic molecules to apolipoprotein a-i
US5128318A (en) * 1987-05-20 1992-07-07 The Rogosin Institute Reconstituted HDL particles and uses thereof
US5187010A (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-02-16 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Membrane having high affinity for low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5203778A (en) * 1986-02-18 1993-04-20 Boehringer Laboratories Process and apparatus for removal of insoluble fat from blood of a patient
US5211850A (en) * 1991-07-26 1993-05-18 Research Medical, Inc. Plasma filter sorbent system for removal of components from blood
US5236644A (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-08-17 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Process of making membrane for removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5279540A (en) * 1992-09-24 1994-01-18 Davidson Michael H Method for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis
US5301694A (en) * 1991-11-12 1994-04-12 Philip Morris Incorporated Process for isolating plant extract fractions
US5391143A (en) * 1993-03-12 1995-02-21 Kensey Nash Corporation Method and system for effecting weight reduction of living beings
US5393429A (en) * 1991-11-05 1995-02-28 Jgc Corporation Liquid-liquid contactor
US5401415A (en) * 1990-06-12 1995-03-28 B. Braun Melsungen Ag Adsorption material for the selective removal of LDL and/or vLDL and method of using therefor
US5401466A (en) * 1993-06-01 1995-03-28 Miles Inc. Device for the direct measurement of low density lipoprotein cholesterol
US5418061A (en) * 1990-11-27 1995-05-23 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Microporous polysulfone supports suitable for removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol
US5419759A (en) * 1988-11-17 1995-05-30 Naficy; Sadeque S. Apparatus and methods for treatment of HIV infections and AIDS
US5424068A (en) * 1992-12-07 1995-06-13 P. Doina International Ltd. Method for immunization of mammals against atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical compositions for obtaining said immunization
US5429969A (en) * 1994-05-31 1995-07-04 Motorola, Inc. Process for forming electrically programmable read-only memory cell with a merged select/control gate
US5484396A (en) * 1988-11-17 1996-01-16 Naficy; Sadeque S. Method and device for treatment of HIV infections and AIDS
US5496637A (en) * 1990-11-27 1996-03-05 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. High efficiency removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5523096A (en) * 1993-03-16 1996-06-04 Applied Immune Sciences, Inc. Removal of selected factors from whole blood or its components
US5600168A (en) * 1994-04-20 1997-02-04 Lg Semicon Co., Ltd. Semiconductor element and method for fabricating the same
US5634893A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-06-03 Haemonetics Corporation Autotransfusion apparatus
US5637224A (en) * 1994-09-14 1997-06-10 New Jersey Institute Of Technology Hollow fiber contained liquid membrane pervaporation for removal of volatile organic compounds from aqueous solutions
US5652339A (en) * 1993-12-31 1997-07-29 Rotkreuzstiftung Zentrallaboratorium Method of producing reconstituted lipoproteins
US5707673A (en) * 1996-10-04 1998-01-13 Prewell Industries, L.L.C. Process for extracting lipids and organics from animal and plant matter or organics-containing waste streams
US5719194A (en) * 1995-08-22 1998-02-17 Ausimont S.P.A. Prevention and treatment of topical viral infections with perfluoropolyethers or compositions thereof
US5744038A (en) * 1993-07-30 1998-04-28 Aruba International Pty Ltd. Solvent extraction methods for delipidating plasma
US5753227A (en) * 1993-07-23 1998-05-19 Strahilevitz; Meir Extracorporeal affinity adsorption methods for the treatment of atherosclerosis, cancer, degenerative and autoimmune diseases
US5855782A (en) * 1993-08-10 1999-01-05 Falkenhagen; Dieter Arrangement for removing substances from liquids, in particular blood
US5858238A (en) * 1996-03-08 1999-01-12 Baxter Research Medical, Inc. Salvage of autologous blood via selective membrane/sorption technologies
US5877005A (en) * 1992-03-02 1999-03-02 Aphios Corporation Viral inactivation method using near critical, supercritical or critical fluids
US5879685A (en) * 1991-05-08 1999-03-09 Schweiz, Serum- & Impfinstitut Bern Immunostimulating and immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes and vaccines containing them
US5885578A (en) * 1987-06-10 1999-03-23 The Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US5891432A (en) * 1997-07-29 1999-04-06 The Immune Response Corporation Membrane-bound cytokine compositions comprising GM=CSF and methods of modulating an immune response using same
US5911698A (en) * 1995-12-22 1999-06-15 Aruba International Pty. Ltd. Treatment for cardiovascular and related diseases
US5919369A (en) * 1992-02-06 1999-07-06 Hemocleanse, Inc. Hemofiltration and plasmafiltration devices and methods
US6022333A (en) * 1997-05-01 2000-02-08 S.L.I.M. Tech, Ltd. Method and system for removing materials from lymphatic and other fluids
US6037323A (en) * 1997-09-29 2000-03-14 Jean-Louis Dasseux Apolipoprotein A-I agonists and their use to treat dyslipidemic disorders
US6037458A (en) * 1987-11-20 2000-03-14 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Adsorbent for serum amyloid protein
US6046166A (en) * 1997-09-29 2000-04-04 Jean-Louis Dasseux Apolipoprotein A-I agonists and their use to treat dyslipidemic disorders
US6080778A (en) * 1998-03-23 2000-06-27 Children's Medical Center Corporation Methods for decreasing beta amyloid protein
US6171373B1 (en) * 1996-04-23 2001-01-09 Applied Ceramics, Inc. Adsorptive monolith including activated carbon, method for making said monolith, and method for adsorbing chemical agents from fluid streams
US6180461B1 (en) * 1998-08-03 2001-01-30 Halo Lsi Design & Device Technology, Inc. Double sidewall short channel split gate flash memory
US6193891B1 (en) * 1996-07-10 2001-02-27 American National Red Cross Methods for the selective separation of organic components from biological fluids
US6337368B1 (en) * 1997-06-03 2002-01-08 Kaneka Corporation Lipoprotein adsorbent and lipoprotein adsorber made with the use of the same
US6514828B2 (en) * 2001-04-20 2003-02-04 Micron Technology, Inc. Method of fabricating a highly reliable gate oxide
US6525371B2 (en) * 1999-09-22 2003-02-25 International Business Machines Corporation Self-aligned non-volatile random access memory cell and process to make the same
US6605588B1 (en) * 1996-11-27 2003-08-12 Boston Heart Foundation, Inc. Low density lipoprotein binding proteins and their use in diagnosing and treating atherosclerosis
US6706008B2 (en) * 2001-03-06 2004-03-16 Baxter International Inc. Automated system and method for withdrawing compounds from blood
US6737066B1 (en) * 1999-05-06 2004-05-18 The Immune Response Corporation HIV immunogenic compositions and methods
US6759712B2 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-07-06 Micron Technology, Inc. Semiconductor-on-insulator thin film transistor constructions
US20050054167A1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2005-03-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Local SONOS-type nonvolatile memory device and method of manufacturing the same

Family Cites Families (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6329685B1 (en) * 1999-09-22 2001-12-11 Silicon Storage Technology, Inc. Self aligned method of forming a semiconductor memory array of floating gate memory cells and a memory array made thereby
US6821847B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2004-11-23 Mosel Vitelic, Inc. Nonvolatile memory structures and fabrication methods
US6844631B2 (en) * 2002-03-13 2005-01-18 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. Semiconductor device having a bond pad and method therefor
US6909300B2 (en) * 2002-05-09 2005-06-21 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd Method for fabricating microelectronic fabrication electrical test apparatus electrical probe tip having pointed tips
US7173305B2 (en) * 2003-04-08 2007-02-06 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Self-aligned contact for silicon-on-insulator devices
US7105379B2 (en) * 2004-04-28 2006-09-12 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Implementation of protection layer for bond pad protection
CA2581176A1 (en) * 2004-09-20 2006-03-30 Bayer Healthcare Llc An optical sensor and methods of making it
US7279707B2 (en) * 2005-02-25 2007-10-09 United Microelectronics Corp. Test key structure
US7391226B2 (en) * 2006-05-31 2008-06-24 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Contact resistance test structure and methods of using same
US8110416B2 (en) * 2007-12-24 2012-02-07 Texas Instruments Incorporated AC impedance spectroscopy testing of electrical parametric structures
US8987014B2 (en) * 2008-05-21 2015-03-24 Stats Chippac, Ltd. Semiconductor wafer and method of forming sacrificial bump pad for wafer probing during wafer sort test

Patent Citations (100)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US188012A (en) * 1877-03-06 Improvement in metal roofs
US18013A (en) * 1857-08-18 Charles s
US28895A (en) * 1860-06-26 Machine for wetting paper
US55529A (en) * 1866-06-12 Improved baby-walker
US81263A (en) * 1868-08-18 Job dyson
US107173A (en) * 1870-09-06 Improvement in spring carriages
US6171373B2 (en) *
US3647624A (en) * 1969-07-24 1972-03-07 Wisconsin Alumni Res Found Treatment of blood with oleaginous substance
US3983008A (en) * 1974-05-27 1976-09-28 Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. Method of extracting useful components from microbial cells
US3958939A (en) * 1975-01-08 1976-05-25 Coulter Electronics, Inc. Method for clarification of lipemic serum
US4258010A (en) * 1975-11-19 1981-03-24 Eszakmagyarorszagi Vegyimu_ vek Solvent extraction apparatus
US4676905A (en) * 1975-12-15 1987-06-30 Toray Industries, Inc. Fluid separation method and apparatus
US4103685A (en) * 1976-01-05 1978-08-01 Lupien Paul J Method and apparatus for extravascular treatment of blood
US4671909A (en) * 1978-09-21 1987-06-09 Torobin Leonard B Method for making hollow porous microspheres
US4399217A (en) * 1979-05-02 1983-08-16 Laboratoires Goella Process and a device for the determination of serum lipoproteins
US4522809A (en) * 1980-02-11 1985-06-11 Institut Pasteur Process for obtaining lipid envelope virus sub-units, notably antigens for use as vaccines, the products obtained and their applications
US4391711A (en) * 1980-03-19 1983-07-05 Davy Mckee (Minerals & Metals) Limited Method of, and apparatus for, effecting liquid-liquid contact
US4350156A (en) * 1980-05-29 1982-09-21 Japan Foundation For Artificial Organs Method and apparatus for on-line filtration removal of macromolecules from a physiological fluid
US4923439A (en) * 1981-09-10 1990-05-08 B. Braun-Ssc Ag Process for the selective extracorporeal precipitation of low-density lipoproteins from whole serum or plasma
US4435289A (en) * 1981-12-23 1984-03-06 Romicon, Inc. Series ultrafiltration with pressurized permeate
US4402940A (en) * 1982-03-12 1983-09-06 Kuraray Co., Ltd. Method for treating blood plasma employing a hollow fiber membrane
US4591505A (en) * 1982-04-14 1986-05-27 New York Blood Center, Inc. Process for inactivating hepatitis B virus
US4581231A (en) * 1982-06-10 1986-04-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Health And Human Services Inactivation of viruses containing essential lipids
US4463988A (en) * 1982-09-07 1984-08-07 Cities Service Co. Horizontal heated plane process
US4643718A (en) * 1983-02-22 1987-02-17 Applied Immunesciences, Inc. Therapeutic apheresis
US4648974A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-03-10 Intermedicat Gmbh Process for the selective extracorporeal separation of blood constituents
US4668398A (en) * 1983-07-21 1987-05-26 Colgate-Palmolive Company Continuous extraction apparatus and process
US4836928A (en) * 1984-04-28 1989-06-06 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Separation method, separation device and separation apparatus for separating body fluid into respective components
US4935204A (en) * 1984-06-16 1990-06-19 B. Braun-Ssc Ag Process and device for the specific adsorption of heparin
US4908354A (en) * 1984-06-16 1990-03-13 B. Braun-Ssg Ag Process for the selective extracorporeal precipitation of low-density lipoproteins
US4647280A (en) * 1984-06-27 1987-03-03 Akzo Nv Binder for low density lipoproteins
US4680320A (en) * 1984-12-06 1987-07-14 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Method for preparation of droplets
US4677057A (en) * 1985-03-11 1987-06-30 Scripps Clinic And Research Foundation Diagnostic assay for the presence of apolipoproteins associated with plasma high density lipoproteins
US4645512A (en) * 1985-05-06 1987-02-24 The Dow Chemical Company Continuous process for removing water-soluble particles from organic liquids
US4895558A (en) * 1985-07-15 1990-01-23 University Of Queensland Autologous plasma delipidation using a continuous flow system
US5080796A (en) * 1985-12-19 1992-01-14 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Thermofiltration of plasma
US5203778A (en) * 1986-02-18 1993-04-20 Boehringer Laboratories Process and apparatus for removal of insoluble fat from blood of a patient
US5126240A (en) * 1986-09-29 1992-06-30 Curtiss Linda K Hybridomas and monoclonal paratopic molecules to apolipoprotein a-i
US4832034A (en) * 1987-04-09 1989-05-23 Pizziconi Vincent B Method and apparatus for withdrawing, collecting and biosensing chemical constituents from complex fluids
US5128318A (en) * 1987-05-20 1992-07-07 The Rogosin Institute Reconstituted HDL particles and uses thereof
US5895650A (en) * 1987-06-10 1999-04-20 The Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US5916806A (en) * 1987-06-10 1999-06-29 The Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US6017543A (en) * 1987-06-10 2000-01-25 The Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US5885578A (en) * 1987-06-10 1999-03-23 The Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US5928930A (en) * 1987-06-10 1999-07-27 Immune Response Corporation Prevention and treatment of retroviral disease
US4909942A (en) * 1987-10-16 1990-03-20 Tanabe Seiyaku Co., Ltd. Process for removing pyrogens
US6037458A (en) * 1987-11-20 2000-03-14 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Adsorbent for serum amyloid protein
US5112956A (en) * 1987-12-02 1992-05-12 The Nutrasweet Company Method for extraction of lipids and cholesterol
US4909940A (en) * 1987-12-30 1990-03-20 New York Blood Center, Inc. Extraction of process chemicals from labile biological mixtures with organic alcohols or with halogenated hydrocarbons
US5089602A (en) * 1988-02-08 1992-02-18 Rotkreuzstiftung Zentrallaboratorium Blutspendedienst Srk Process for the manufacture of apolipoproteins from human blood plasma or serum
US5419759A (en) * 1988-11-17 1995-05-30 Naficy; Sadeque S. Apparatus and methods for treatment of HIV infections and AIDS
US5484396A (en) * 1988-11-17 1996-01-16 Naficy; Sadeque S. Method and device for treatment of HIV infections and AIDS
US5026479A (en) * 1990-02-13 1991-06-25 Union Carbide Industrial Gases Technology Corporation Fluid separation device
US5401415A (en) * 1990-06-12 1995-03-28 B. Braun Melsungen Ag Adsorption material for the selective removal of LDL and/or vLDL and method of using therefor
US5236644A (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-08-17 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Process of making membrane for removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5418061A (en) * 1990-11-27 1995-05-23 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Microporous polysulfone supports suitable for removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol
US5496637A (en) * 1990-11-27 1996-03-05 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. High efficiency removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5187010A (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-02-16 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Membrane having high affinity for low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
US5879685A (en) * 1991-05-08 1999-03-09 Schweiz, Serum- & Impfinstitut Bern Immunostimulating and immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes and vaccines containing them
US5211850A (en) * 1991-07-26 1993-05-18 Research Medical, Inc. Plasma filter sorbent system for removal of components from blood
US5393429A (en) * 1991-11-05 1995-02-28 Jgc Corporation Liquid-liquid contactor
US5301694A (en) * 1991-11-12 1994-04-12 Philip Morris Incorporated Process for isolating plant extract fractions
US5919369A (en) * 1992-02-06 1999-07-06 Hemocleanse, Inc. Hemofiltration and plasmafiltration devices and methods
US5877005A (en) * 1992-03-02 1999-03-02 Aphios Corporation Viral inactivation method using near critical, supercritical or critical fluids
US5279540A (en) * 1992-09-24 1994-01-18 Davidson Michael H Method for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis
US5424068A (en) * 1992-12-07 1995-06-13 P. Doina International Ltd. Method for immunization of mammals against atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical compositions for obtaining said immunization
US5391143A (en) * 1993-03-12 1995-02-21 Kensey Nash Corporation Method and system for effecting weight reduction of living beings
US5523096A (en) * 1993-03-16 1996-06-04 Applied Immune Sciences, Inc. Removal of selected factors from whole blood or its components
US5401466A (en) * 1993-06-01 1995-03-28 Miles Inc. Device for the direct measurement of low density lipoprotein cholesterol
US5753227A (en) * 1993-07-23 1998-05-19 Strahilevitz; Meir Extracorporeal affinity adsorption methods for the treatment of atherosclerosis, cancer, degenerative and autoimmune diseases
US6264623B1 (en) * 1993-07-23 2001-07-24 Meir Strahilevitz Extracorporeal affinity adsorption methods for the treatment of atherosclerosis, cancer, degenerative and autoimmune disease
US6039946A (en) * 1993-07-23 2000-03-21 Strahilevitz; Meir Extracorporeal affinity adsorption devices
US5744038A (en) * 1993-07-30 1998-04-28 Aruba International Pty Ltd. Solvent extraction methods for delipidating plasma
US5855782A (en) * 1993-08-10 1999-01-05 Falkenhagen; Dieter Arrangement for removing substances from liquids, in particular blood
US5652339A (en) * 1993-12-31 1997-07-29 Rotkreuzstiftung Zentrallaboratorium Method of producing reconstituted lipoproteins
US5600168A (en) * 1994-04-20 1997-02-04 Lg Semicon Co., Ltd. Semiconductor element and method for fabricating the same
US5429969A (en) * 1994-05-31 1995-07-04 Motorola, Inc. Process for forming electrically programmable read-only memory cell with a merged select/control gate
US5637224A (en) * 1994-09-14 1997-06-10 New Jersey Institute Of Technology Hollow fiber contained liquid membrane pervaporation for removal of volatile organic compounds from aqueous solutions
US5634893A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-06-03 Haemonetics Corporation Autotransfusion apparatus
US5719194A (en) * 1995-08-22 1998-02-17 Ausimont S.P.A. Prevention and treatment of topical viral infections with perfluoropolyethers or compositions thereof
US5911698A (en) * 1995-12-22 1999-06-15 Aruba International Pty. Ltd. Treatment for cardiovascular and related diseases
US5858238A (en) * 1996-03-08 1999-01-12 Baxter Research Medical, Inc. Salvage of autologous blood via selective membrane/sorption technologies
US6171373B1 (en) * 1996-04-23 2001-01-09 Applied Ceramics, Inc. Adsorptive monolith including activated carbon, method for making said monolith, and method for adsorbing chemical agents from fluid streams
US6193891B1 (en) * 1996-07-10 2001-02-27 American National Red Cross Methods for the selective separation of organic components from biological fluids
US5707673A (en) * 1996-10-04 1998-01-13 Prewell Industries, L.L.C. Process for extracting lipids and organics from animal and plant matter or organics-containing waste streams
US6605588B1 (en) * 1996-11-27 2003-08-12 Boston Heart Foundation, Inc. Low density lipoprotein binding proteins and their use in diagnosing and treating atherosclerosis
US6022333A (en) * 1997-05-01 2000-02-08 S.L.I.M. Tech, Ltd. Method and system for removing materials from lymphatic and other fluids
US6337368B1 (en) * 1997-06-03 2002-01-08 Kaneka Corporation Lipoprotein adsorbent and lipoprotein adsorber made with the use of the same
US5891432A (en) * 1997-07-29 1999-04-06 The Immune Response Corporation Membrane-bound cytokine compositions comprising GM=CSF and methods of modulating an immune response using same
US6037323A (en) * 1997-09-29 2000-03-14 Jean-Louis Dasseux Apolipoprotein A-I agonists and their use to treat dyslipidemic disorders
US6046166A (en) * 1997-09-29 2000-04-04 Jean-Louis Dasseux Apolipoprotein A-I agonists and their use to treat dyslipidemic disorders
US6080778A (en) * 1998-03-23 2000-06-27 Children's Medical Center Corporation Methods for decreasing beta amyloid protein
US6440387B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2002-08-27 Children's Medical Center Corporation Methods for determining risk of Alzheimer's disease
US6180461B1 (en) * 1998-08-03 2001-01-30 Halo Lsi Design & Device Technology, Inc. Double sidewall short channel split gate flash memory
US6737066B1 (en) * 1999-05-06 2004-05-18 The Immune Response Corporation HIV immunogenic compositions and methods
US6525371B2 (en) * 1999-09-22 2003-02-25 International Business Machines Corporation Self-aligned non-volatile random access memory cell and process to make the same
US6706008B2 (en) * 2001-03-06 2004-03-16 Baxter International Inc. Automated system and method for withdrawing compounds from blood
US6514828B2 (en) * 2001-04-20 2003-02-04 Micron Technology, Inc. Method of fabricating a highly reliable gate oxide
US6759712B2 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-07-06 Micron Technology, Inc. Semiconductor-on-insulator thin film transistor constructions
US20050054167A1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2005-03-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Local SONOS-type nonvolatile memory device and method of manufacturing the same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20050090063A1 (en) 2005-04-28 application
US6960803B2 (en) 2005-11-01 grant
US20090061547A1 (en) 2009-03-05 application
US7749779B2 (en) 2010-07-06 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5714416A (en) Semiconductor memory device and write-once, read-only semiconductor memory array using amorphous-silicon and method therefor
US7800155B2 (en) Semiconductor device
US4656732A (en) Integrated circuit fabrication process
US20040051133A1 (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory device and process for producing the same
US20030006795A1 (en) Semiconductor device, method of measuring the same, and method of manufacturing the same
US6451652B1 (en) Method for forming an EEPROM cell together with transistor for peripheral circuits
US6080624A (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory and method for manufacturing the same
US6028324A (en) Test structures for monitoring gate oxide defect densities and the plasma antenna effect
US6251790B1 (en) Method for fabricating contacts in a semiconductor device
US5200355A (en) Method for manufacturing a mask read only memory device
US5457334A (en) Semiconductor memory device
US5106780A (en) Semiconductor device and method of manufacturing the same
US5659500A (en) Nonvolatile memory array with compatible vertical source lines
US20030157767A1 (en) Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
US20020130350A1 (en) Flash memory device and a method for fabricating the same
US20030166322A1 (en) Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
US20050017281A1 (en) Methods of fabricating buried digit lines and semiconductor devices including same
US20090140313A1 (en) Nonvolatile memory devices and methods of forming the same
US6551867B1 (en) Non-volatile semiconductor memory device and method for manufacturing the same
US20030190805A1 (en) Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
US20030166320A1 (en) Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
US6004829A (en) Method of increasing end point detection capability of reactive ion etching by adding pad area
US20030166321A1 (en) Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
US20060209586A1 (en) Semiconductor component and method for fabricating it
US6806529B1 (en) Memory cell with a capacitive structure as a control gate and method of forming the memory cell