US20060000856A1 - Hydration pack - Google Patents

Hydration pack Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060000856A1
US20060000856A1 US10881843 US88184304A US2006000856A1 US 20060000856 A1 US20060000856 A1 US 20060000856A1 US 10881843 US10881843 US 10881843 US 88184304 A US88184304 A US 88184304A US 2006000856 A1 US2006000856 A1 US 2006000856A1
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Prior art keywords
backpack
bladder
hydration pack
strap
portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US10881843
Inventor
Zachary West
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MARMOT MOUNTAIN LLC
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K-2 Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/04Sacks or packs carried on the body by means of two straps passing over the two shoulders
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F5/00Holders or carriers for hand articles; Holders or carriers for use while travelling or camping
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/16Water-bottles; Mess-tins; Cups
    • A45F2003/166Hydration systems attached to the body by straps, e.g. incorporated in a backpack
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/16Water-bottles; Mess-tins; Cups

Abstract

A hydration pack is disclosed including a backpack (100), a bladder assembly (150), and a split belt assembly (130). The backpack includes a front panel (102) and a back panel (112) that are interconnected with baffle panels (140) to define a volume for receiving the bladder (151) of the bladder assembly. The split belt includes a lower belt portion (132L, 132R) and an upper belt portion (134L, 134R). The upper belt portion extends behind the backpack, over the bladder, thus compressing the fluid bladder and prevents it from shifting. In the disclosed embodiment, the split belt includes an elastic portion (138) that is retained in a keeper (139) disposed on the back panel. The back panel includes elongate straps (114L, 114R) that are slidably retained along the shoulder straps. A cover (120) is attached to the front panel and is attachable to the back panel.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the field of backpacks and, in particular, to hydration packs suitable for use while engaged in a vigorous activity.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • It is important for athletes to replenish lost fluids and/or nutrients when engaging in strenuous activities over an extended period of time. Athletes engaging in outdoor activities often carry water or other beverages in handheld containers such as canteens or water bottles. The containers may be carried by the user in a conventional backpack, fanny pack, belt attachment, or the like. Such handheld containers have certain disadvantages. For example, the quantity of fluid that can be conveniently carried is limited. It may also be inconvenient or impossible to use such containers without stopping the user's primary activity, such as biking. For example, the user may have to remove a backpack or other carrier to access the container. Also, such hand-carried containers may be dropped and damaged or set down and inadvertently left behind.
  • To overcome many of these problems, backpacks, commonly referred to as hydration packs, have been specially adapted to hold and dispense a fluid-typically, water. Hydration packs have become popular with sports enthusiasts such as bicyclists, hikers, runners, skiers, orienteers, and the like. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,060,833, to Edison et al., discloses a “camel back” hydration system for bicyclists, the system including a flexible bladder for containing a fluid, an elongate tube that extends from the bladder to the user's mouth, and a valve disposed at the distal end of the tube. The bladder fits within a pliable backpack, and allows the user to selectively draw fluid from the bladder through the valve without stopping the user's general activity. Other examples include U.S. Pat. No. 5,427,290, which discloses a water pouch backpack including a bladder pack adapted to fit within the body of a pack having shoulder straps and a hip strap, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,422,439, which discloses a combination backpack and hydration pack wherein a hydration pack is provided that releasably engages a backpack portion such that a user may use the hydration pack alone or as the combination.
  • While conventional hydration pack systems overcome many of the disadvantages of hand-carried water containers, they can be difficult to carry and/or interfere with the user's performance and enjoyment of the sport. In particular, when a user is engaged in relatively vigorous activity while carrying a consumable fluid, it is desirable that the fluid reservoir be maintained closer to the user's body and be relatively stable with respect to the user to avoid or mitigate undesirable stresses on the user. However, stabilizing the apparatus may be particularly difficult for hydration packs because the water is contained in a pliable bladder, typically disposed in a flexible carrier, and the momentum of the water generated during activities tends to cause the apparatus to shift about. Even when stationary, the weight of the water tends to cause the bladder to sag outwardly, away from the user. Moreover, as the fluid is consumed, the fluid level changes—which may enhance the tendency of the water to slosh around within the bladder and the bladder to shift within the backpack. Especially during vigorous activities, the bladder and/or backpack may shift about on the back of the user.
  • It would therefore be beneficial to provide a hydration pack wherein the hydration pack and, in particular, the bladder carrying the fluid are stable and comfortably disposed in the backpack portion of the apparatus.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A backpack adapted for carrying and dispensing a fluid (or hydration pack) is described herein that is particularly suited to use while engaged in a relatively vigorous activity. The hydration pack is adapted to hold the contained fluid securely and close to the user's back to prevent the generation of undesirable stressors on the user. The backpack includes a bladder assembly including a bladder and an elongate tube with a valve. The bladder assembly is removably insertable into a backpack having a front panel, back panel, and first and second side panels defining a volume for receiving the bladder. Left and right shoulder straps are attached to the front panel of the backpack and a split belt adapted to be fastened about the user's waist is provided. The split belt includes a first strap attached to the front panel of the backpack and a second strap that extends over the back panel of the backpack to hold the backpack and bladder close to the user.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, the shoulder straps and the lower strap of the split belt are an integral portion of the backpack front panel.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, the split belt upper strap includes an elastic portion that is slidably retained in a keeper on the backpack back panel.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, the volume for receiving the bladder is open at the top and a cover panel is fixedly attached to a top edge of the front panel and is releasably attachable to the back panel of the backpack to substantially cover the open top of the volume.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, the back panel of the backpack includes a pair of elongate straps that are slidably retained in keepers on the shoulder straps.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, a releasable chest strap is provided that releasably joins the left and right shoulder straps.
  • In an embodiment of the invention, the upper strap of the split belt applies a pressure to the bladder when the split belt is fastened about the waist of the user and holds the bladder adjacent the user's back.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The foregoing aspects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will become more readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a three-quarter front perspective view of an embodiment of a hydration pack in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a three-quarter rear perspective view of the hydration pack shown in FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 is a front view of the hydration pack shown in FIG. 1 with the hydration pack laid flat;
  • FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the hydration pack of FIG. 1 showing the attachment at the lower portion of the shoulder strap;
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B show a fragmentary view of the rear of the hydration pack shown in FIG. 1, showing the attachment and stretching of the upper portion of the split belt in this embodiment—FIG. 5A showing the unstretched belt and FIG. 5B showing the stretched belt;
  • FIG. 6 is a partially cut-away perspective view of the hydration pack shown in FIG. 1; and
  • FIG. 7 is a three-quarter rear perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a hydration pack in accordance with the present invention, utilizing a simplified belt structure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • A currently preferred embodiment of the present invention will now be described in detail with reference to the figures, wherein like numbers indicate like parts.
  • FIG. 1 shows a three-quarter front perspective view of an embodiment of a hydration pack 100 in accordance with the present invention, and FIG. 2 shows a three-quarter rear perspective view of the hydration pack 100. A front view of the hydration pack 100, laid out generally flat to more clearly show various aspects of the hydration pack 100, is shown in FIG. 3. The hydration pack 100 includes a front panel 102 that is generally adapted to be disposed adjacent the user's back (not shown) during use, and a back panel 112 that is attached to, and generally overlies, the front panel 102. The front panel 102 and back panel 112, partially defining a volume, are open at the top for receiving a bladder assembly 150 (shown in phantom in FIG. 2). The front panel 102 is preferably made, at least in part, from a relatively soft and porous or breathable material to enable some airflow between the user and the hydration pack 100 and may include, for example, a plurality of small holes and/or elongate channels to promote air circulation between the user and the hydration pack 100. The front panel 102 may also include padding (not shown) to enhance user comfort.
  • The back panel 112 may be made from a pliable and sturdy material, either natural or manmade, such as nylon, polytetrafluoroethylene (such as Gortex™), denim, or other suitable material. The back panel 112 and front panel 102 are preferably connected with stitching, although other attachment methods alternatively may be used as are well known in the art. In addition, although the volume between the front panel 102 and back panel 112 is preferably open at the top, alternative or additional access apertures may be provided. For example, one or more releasable fasteners, such as zipper assemblies 113, may allow access to at least a portion of the volume between the front panel 102 and the back panel 112.
  • The bladder assembly 150 (shown in phantom in FIG. 2) preferably includes a pliant bladder 151 fluidly connected to an elongate tube 152 having a distal valve 154, such as a bite valve. The particular details of the bladder assembly 150 are not important to the present invention, and various general aspects of bladder assemblies are well known. The bladder assembly 150 may be any conventional design as is well known in the art. Representative bladder assemblies are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,640 and/or U.S. Pat. No. 6,722,533, the disclosure of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • As seen most clearly in FIG. 2, a generally triangular cover panel 120 attaches along a back edge 122 to the top of the front panel 102 and extends rearwardly over the back panel 112. A buckle assembly 125 allows the user to releasably attach the distal end 121 of the cover panel 120 to the back panel 112. The buckle assembly 125 of the disclosed embodiment includes a lower buckle member 124 fixedly attached to the back panel 112 and an upper buckle member 126 attached to a short strap 128 on the distal end of the cover panel 120. It is contemplated that other releasable fastening mechanisms may alternatively be used—such as lacing, snaps, hook-and-loop materials, and the like. In the disclosed embodiment, the cover panel 120 connects the back panel 112 to the upper edge of the front panel 102, thereby aiding in supporting the back panel 112 against the outward force resulting from the weight of the bladder 151.
  • A pair of shoulder straps 104L, 104R extends from the front panel 102, are adapted to aid the user in carrying the hydration pack 100 on the user's shoulders. As seen most clearly in FIG. 3, the shoulder straps 104L, 104R may be formed integrally with the front panel 102, simplifying construction and providing a rugged product. The shoulder straps 104L, 104R extend generally from the top of the front panel 102 to near the bottom of the hydration pack 100. Each of the shoulder straps 104L, 104R includes a plurality of keepers 106 (two shown) spaced along the shoulder straps 104L, 104R.
  • The back panel 112 includes a corresponding pair of elongate straps 114L, 114R, that extend over the top of the front panel 102 and are slidably retained by the keepers 106 attached to the front panel shoulder straps 104L, 104R. In the disclosed embodiment, the elongate straps 114L, 114R are formed integrally with the back panel 112. The distal ends of each associated pair of straps 104L, 114L and 104R, 114R are connected with a relatively short connecting strap 108 that slidably engages an adjuster buckle 110.
  • FIG. 4 shows a fragmentary side view of the distal end of the shoulder strap 104L and related structure, with the adjuster buckle 110 shown in cross-section to illustrate a particular aspect of this embodiment of the present invention. The relative position of the distal end of the shoulder strap 104L and the distal end of the back panel strap 114L may vary as the connecting strap 108 slides in the adjuster buckle 110. It will now be appreciated from FIGS. 1 and 2 that the slideable strap structure permits the back panel 112 to adjust to accommodate the varying volume of fluid in the bladder 151 as the fluid is used or replenished. For example, when the bladder 151 is substantially full, the back panel 112 will accommodate the bladder 151 as the elongate straps 114L, 114R slide rearwardly in the keepers 106 along the shoulder straps 104L, 104R. As the fluid level decreases, the elongate straps 114L, 114R can slide along the shoulder straps 104L, 104R such that the bladder 151 is maintained desirably close to the user's body.
  • As seen most clearly in FIG. 2, the adjuster buckle 110 is adjustably connected to a lower portion of the hydration pack 100 with a lower strap 109, such that the effective length of the lower strap 109 may be increased or decreased to achieve a comfortable fit for the user. An optional releasably-engageable chest strap having a left portion 111L and a right portion 111R may also be provided, extending between the shoulder straps 104L, 104R, to maintain the shoulder straps at a desired spacing.
  • A split belt assembly 130 extends from a lower portion of the hydration assembly 100. The split belt assembly 130 includes left and right lower belt portions 132L, 132R. As seen most clearly in FIG. 3, the lower belt portions 132L, 132R may conveniently be formed as integral extensions of the front panel 102. Alternatively, the lower belt portions may be formed separately and attached to the hydration pack 100.
  • The split belt assembly 130 also includes an upper belt 134 having left and right upper belt portions 134L, 134R. The distal ends of the corresponding upper and lower belt portions—that is, 132L, 134L and 132R, 134R—are connected, for example, by stitching, as seen most clearly in FIG. 3. The distal ends also include an adjustable buckle assembly having releasably-engageable left and right portions 136L, 136R that allow the user to adjustably secure the split belt assembly 130 generally about the user's waist, as is well known in the art.
  • Referring again to FIG. 2, the upper belt 134 extends around and overlies a portion of the back panel 112 and the bladder assembly 150, such that the upper belt 134 holds the lower portion of the bladder assembly 150 in close proximity to the user. The split belt 130, therefore, prevents the lower portion of the hydration assembly 100 from excessive motion while the user is engaged in the desired activity. In particular, the upper belt 134 prevents the bladder assembly 150 from sagging outwardly from the weight of the fluid therein or from excessive motion within the volume defined by the hydration pack 100. The upper belt 134 may also apply a pressure to the bladder assembly 150, pressurizing the bladder to facilitate drawing fluid from the bladder assembly 150. In the disclosed embodiment, the portion of the upper belt 134 disposed directly behind the bladder assembly 150 is relatively wide, thereby distributing the pressurizing force over a larger area.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 5A and 5B, the left and right upper belt portions 134L, 134R are interconnected with an elastic section 138 that is slidably retained by a keeper 139 attached to the back panel 112. The elastic section 138 allows the user to adjust the split belt assembly 130 such that the upper belt 134 maintains a desired pressure on the bladder assembly 150 even as the fluid in the bladder assembly 150 is reduced over a range of fluid levels. It will be appreciated that larger or smaller elastic sections may be used to achieve a desired overall result, although user comfort considerations make it preferable that the elastic section not extend beyond the edges of the back panel 112. FIG. 5B shows the elastic section 138 generally stretched out for maximum effect, as indicated by the arrows, with the unstretched elastic section 138 shown in phantom.
  • FIG. 6 shows a three-quarter rear perspective view of the hydration pack 100 with most of the back panel 112 removed to illustrate another aspect of the present invention. In the disclosed embodiment of the hydration pack 100, a pair of generally upright baffle panels 140 connects the front panel 102 with the back panel 112 along at least a substantial portion of the length of the hydration pack 100. The baffle panels 140, cooperatively with the front panel 102 and back panel 112, define the volume that receives the baffle assembly 150 (shown in phantom). The baffle panels 140 constrain the relative motion between the front panel 102 and back panel 112, thereby limiting the bladder assembly's 150 tendency to shift and/or sag during use of the hydration pack 100.
  • In the disclosed embodiment, one or both of the baffle panels 140 include an aperture 142 therethrough to accommodate the elongate tube 152 of the baffle assembly 150. The upper edge 144 of the baffle panels 140 extends to the shoulder straps 104L, 104R and is not stitched across at least a portion of the top, whereby the elongate tube 152 may be slidably disposed between one of the baffle panels 140 and the shoulder strap 104L, providing convenient access to the user.
  • To use the hydration pack 100, the user fills the bladder 151 of the bladder assembly 150 with the desired fluid, such as water, and inserts the bladder into the volume defined by the front panel 102, back panel 112, and baffle panels 140 with the elongate tube 152 extending through the aperture 142 in one of the baffle panels 140. The elongate tube 152 extends upwardly, generally along the baffle panel 140, and over the shoulder strap 104L where it may be retained in a convenient location for the user. The cover 120 is closed over the bladder 151 and fastened with the buckle assembly 125. The user then dons the hydration pack 100 by inserting the user's arms through the shoulder straps 104L, 104R, fastening the chest strap 111 and split belt assembly 130, as desired. The lengths of the various straps may be adjusted to accommodate the user's comfort and preferences. It will be appreciated that the bladder 151 will be held close to the user with very little shifting, even during strenuous activities, allowing the user to hydrate as necessary with only limited encumbrance from the hydration pack 100.
  • An alternative embodiment of a hydration pack 200 according to the present invention, is shown in FIG. 7. The hydration pack 200 includes a front panel 202 adapted to lay next to the user's back and a back panel 212 attached to and generally overlying the front panel 202, the front and back panels at least partially defining a volume for receiving the bladder assembly 150. The hydration pack 200 is in general similar to the hydration pack 100 described above, and a description of the similar portions will not be repeated here. However, the construction of this embodiment is simpler in that the hydration pack 200 does not utilize a split belt assembly, but rather includes a simpler adjustable waist strap 230L, 230R that is attached directly to the back panel 212.
  • In particular, the back panel 212 is formed with oppositely disposed tab portions 213 that are attached to the front panel 202 with intermediate straps 215. The left portion of the waist strap 230L slidably engages the one intermediate strap 215 and the right portion of the waist strap 230R slidably engages the other intermediate strap 215 through semirigid buckle loops 217 (one shown). Therefore, when the waist strap 230L, 230R is secured and tensioned about the waist of the user, the waist strap 230L, 230R will pull on the tab portions 213 and urge the back panel 212 toward the front panel 202, thereby holding the bladder assembly in desirably close proximity to the user. This alternative embodiment is somewhat simpler in construction than the hydration pack 100 described above and may be less restrictive to the user for some applications.
  • While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (17)

  1. 1. A hydration pack comprising:
    a flexible bladder assembly including a bladder, an elongate tube having a proximal end in fluid communication with the bladder and a distal end, and a valve disposed at the distal end of the elongate tube;
    a backpack having a front panel adapted to lay adjacent the user's back, a back panel attached to the front panel, first and second side panels attached to the front panel and the back panel, the front panel, back panel, and first and second side panels defining a volume for receiving the bladder;
    a left shoulder strap and a right shoulder strap, the shoulder straps attached to the front panel of the backpack; and
    a split belt having a first strap attached to the front panel of the backpack and a second strap that extends over the back panel of the backpack, the split belt adapted to be releasably fastened about the waist of the user.
  2. 2. The hydration pack of claim 1, wherein the first strap of the split belt is an integral portion of the front panel.
  3. 3. The hydration pack of claim 1, wherein at least a portion of the split belt second strap is elastic.
  4. 4. The hydration pack of claim 3, wherein the back panel of the backpack further comprises a keeper and wherein the elastic portion of the second strap is slidably retained by the keeper.
  5. 5. The hydration pack of claim 1, wherein volume for receiving the bladder is open at the top and wherein the hydration pack further comprises a cover panel that is fixedly attached to a top edge of the front panel and is releasably attachable to the back panel of the backpack to substantially cover the open top of the volume.
  6. 6. The hydration pack of claim 1, wherein the back panel of the backpack further comprises left and right elongate strap portions that are adapted to extend generally along the left and right shoulder straps.
  7. 7. The hydration pack of claim 6, wherein the left and right shoulder straps further comprise a plurality of keepers and wherein the left and right elongate strap portions of the front panel are slidably retained by the plurality of keepers.
  8. 8. The hydration pack of claim 1, further comprising a releasable chest strap having a first portion attached to the left shoulder strap and a second portion attached to the right shoulder strap.
  9. 9. The hydration pack of claim 1, wherein the second strap of the split belt is adapted to apply a pressure to the bladder when the split belt is fastened about the waist of the user.
  10. 10. The hydration pack of claim 9, wherein the split belt holds the bladder adjacent to the user's back when the split belt is fastened about the waist of the user.
  11. 11. A hydration pack comprising:
    a nonrigid backpack defining a volume, the backpack having a left shoulder strap, a right shoulder strap, and a bottom portion;
    a split belt assembly attached to the bottom portion of the backpack, the split belt assembly having a lower belt portion disposed below the backpack and an upper belt portion that extends behind the backpack over the defined volume, the split belt assembly further having a buckle assembly adapted to releasably fastened split belt assembly about the user; and
    a pliable bladder removably insertable into the defined volume such that the upper belt portion overlies the pliable bladder, the pliable bladder further including a tube having a proximal end in fluid communication with a lower portion of the pliable bladder and a distal end, wherein the tube is adapted to extend over the top of the backpack.
  12. 12. The hydration pack of claim 11, wherein the backpack comprises a breathable front panel, a pliable back panel, and at least two side panels that connect the front panel and the back panel.
  13. 13. The hydration pack of claim 11, wherein at least some of the upper belt portion of the split belt assembly is elastic.
  14. 14. The hydration pack of claim 11, wherein the backpack further comprises a keeper disposed on a back portion of the backpack and wherein the upper belt portion of the split belt assembly is slidably retained by the keeper.
  15. 15. The hydration pack of claim 12, wherein the left and right shoulder straps each further comprises at least one keeper, and further, wherein the pliable back panel of the backpack further comprises left and right elongate strap portions that are slidably retained by the left and right shoulder strap keepers.
  16. 16. The hydration pack of claim 11, further comprising a chest strap having a first portion that is attached to the left shoulder strap, a second portion that is attached to the right shoulder strap, and a buckle assembly for releasably connecting the first and second portions.
  17. 17. The hydration pack of claim 11, wherein the split belt assembly is adapted to apply a pressure to the bladder.
US10881843 2004-06-30 2004-06-30 Hydration pack Abandoned US20060000856A1 (en)

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US20050035160A1 (en) * 2003-08-13 2005-02-17 Forsman Barley A. Waist-mounted hydration system
US20070187442A1 (en) * 2006-02-14 2007-08-16 Errol Martin Doggy camelback
US20080047857A1 (en) * 2007-08-13 2008-02-28 Roger Cleveland Golf Co., Inc. Golf bag
US20080067202A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-20 Igloo Products Corp. High Visibility Safety Vest With Integrated Hydration Bladder System
US20080217367A1 (en) * 2007-03-09 2008-09-11 Lillie Theodore P Fluid pack
US20080277433A1 (en) * 2007-03-19 2008-11-13 Fiskars Brands, Inc. Modular personal hydration and storage system
US20090179057A1 (en) * 2008-01-12 2009-07-16 Basye Cathy M Posture supporting backpack
EP2258234A1 (en) * 2009-06-05 2010-12-08 Salomon S.A.S. Rucksack such as a hydration rucksack
US20110036883A1 (en) * 2009-08-14 2011-02-17 Kyle Nicolas Sevelle Cox D.A.S. (Dual Action Stabilizer)
WO2011087436A1 (en) * 2010-01-14 2011-07-21 Vallgatan I Åhus Ab Carrying system
US20120018479A1 (en) * 2010-07-21 2012-01-26 Thibadeau Jr Thomas Mark Adjustable Waist Belt System for a Carrying Apparatus
KR101132100B1 (en) 2009-11-24 2012-04-04 백지숙 Buckle for shoulder strap of knapsack
WO2012081013A1 (en) * 2010-12-16 2012-06-21 Source Vagabond Systems Ltd. Load carrier device
USD740020S1 (en) * 2014-05-05 2015-10-06 Kahuna Kohen Vest with integrated fluid chambers and straw
US9314088B2 (en) 2013-12-23 2016-04-19 Colin Lesch Cinch sack
USD778051S1 (en) * 2014-09-10 2017-02-07 Under Armour, Inc. Shoulder strap system for a backpack
US9585462B2 (en) * 2015-03-27 2017-03-07 USWE Sports AB Device for carrying an object

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