US20050284082A1 - Deck system - Google Patents

Deck system Download PDF

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Publication number
US20050284082A1
US20050284082A1 US10/943,038 US94303804A US2005284082A1 US 20050284082 A1 US20050284082 A1 US 20050284082A1 US 94303804 A US94303804 A US 94303804A US 2005284082 A1 US2005284082 A1 US 2005284082A1
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Prior art keywords
deck
subfloor
subframe
surface
comprises
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Abandoned
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US10/943,038
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Brent Smith
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Smith Brent A
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Priority to US58342104P priority Critical
Application filed by Smith Brent A filed Critical Smith Brent A
Priority to US10/943,038 priority patent/US20050284082A1/en
Publication of US20050284082A1 publication Critical patent/US20050284082A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/18Separately-laid insulating layers; Other additional insulating measures; Floating floors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/003Balconies; Decks
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/08Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements only of stone or stone-like material, e.g. ceramics, concrete; of glass or with a top layer of stone or stone-like material, e.g. ceramics, concrete or glass

Abstract

A deck system includes an interconnected subframe operable to engage a ground surface and provide an elevated substantially horizontal support surface. A subfloor is coupled to the subframe and defines a working surface. A masonry floor surface including a plurality of brick pavers, for example, is disposed on the working surface. The masonry floor surface provides the advantages of durability and low maintenance while the subframe and subfloor allow construction at an elevated location, such as a second story of a home.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/583421, filed on Jun. 28, 2004. The disclosure of the above application is incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to decks and more specifically to an elevated deck system supporting a deck surface of masonry materials, such as brick pavers.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Decks are constructed on buildings to provide additional outdoor floor space for residential and commercial applications. Conventional decks are typically constructed of wood and are adapted to provide some degree of elevation relative to the ground. Often decks are arranged relative to a doorway such that convenient access between the building and the deck may be achieved. In some instances, a doorway may be provided on an upper level of a building whereby a deck is constructed having support structure consisting of vertical posts anchored in the ground and extending upward to the upper level to provide a raised deck surface.
  • Occasionally, decks are constructed on homes having multiple levels and/or walk-out style basements. On such homes it is common to construct a deck accessible from a main level of the home, or even levels above the main level, such as those extending off a bedroom located on an upper floor of the home. Many times such a deck includes an elevated portion that provides useable space underneath. For example, a walk-out basement may be accessed by walking under an elevated deck. In such a configuration, useable elevated floor space is created on the deck above the walkout access.
  • One alternative to constructing a conventional deck to increase outdoor living space includes laying a paver stone patio. Paver stone patios have become increasingly popular due to increased durability and reduced maintenance. Furthermore, paver stones provide a variety of color and pattern options available for personal customization.
  • Laying a paver stone patio requires a smooth ground surface for providing a solid foundation for the paver stones. In some instances compacted sand or crushed stone is used to form a substantially flat bed to accept the paver stones on top. As a result, preparing the ground including digging out portions of dirt and/or adding portions of dirt can become time consuming, costly and labor intensive. In addition, paver stone patios conventionally have been limited solely to preparation and creation directly on a ground surface.
  • In some instances retaining wall blocks have been used to provide a raised ground surface. However, such configurations tend to be cost prohibitive above two feet in elevation. Once a ground surface has been adequately prepared, the paver stones are arranged on top in a desired pattern. In many instances, the preparation of the ground surface accounts for a substantial amount of the overall installation time and expense.
  • It, therefore, would be desirable to provide an elevated deck system while providing the durability and low maintenance advantages associated with a masonry surface such as a paver stone patio. Specifically, it would be desirable to provide such a system that is cost effective system at elevations.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A deck system includes an interconnected subframe operable to engage a ground surface and provide an elevated substantially horizontal support surface. A subfloor is coupled to the subframe and defines a working surface. A masonry floor surface including a plurality of brick pavers, for example, is disposed on the working surface. The masonry floor surface provides the advantages of durability and low maintenance while the subframe and subfloor allow construction at an elevated location, such as a second story of a home.
  • The subframe can comprise wood and have at least one support post extending in a generally vertical orientation between the ground and the horizontal support surface. Also, the subfloor can comprise a plurality of passages defined through the working surface. The subfloor, which may comprise plastic, can include a plurality of recess portions for accepting a fastener head in an installed position. The subfloor provides a high strength-to-weight ratio and is easily workable with conventional woodworking tools. The masonry materials are generally selected from readily available materials, such as brick paving blocks, cultured stone, natural stone, slate, fieldstone, marble and conventional brick. According to other features, the deck system may include a fascia arranged around a perimeter of the deck system. A semi-permeable barrier comprised of a fabric material can be disposed between the subfloor and the plurality of masonry materials to retain sand and enable moisture pass through.
  • A method of constructing a deck includes assembling a subframe engaging a ground surface and presenting an elevated substantially horizontal support surface. A subfloor is attached to the frame structure. A plurality of paving blocks are arranged onto the subfloor.
  • According to still other features, assembling the subframe can include arranging at least one support post in a generally vertical orientation between the ground surface and the horizontal support surface. Alternatively, the subframe can be attached to an upper level of a building through a cantilever arrangement. Attaching the subfloor includes driving a fastener through the subfloor whereby a distal end of the fastener nests into a recess defined on the subfloor. A fascia is subsequently arranged on at least a portion of a perimeter of the deck, if desired.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will become more fully understood from the detailed description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1A is a perspective view of showing a partially constructed deck system according to the teachings of the invention;
  • FIG. 1B is a perspective view of a building including exemplary deck systems constructed according to the invention;
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the deck system of FIG. 1; and
  • FIG. 3 is an enlarged, partial perspective view of a subfloor of the deck system of FIG. 1 according to the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The following description of the preferred embodiment(s) is merely exemplary in nature and is in no way intended to limit the invention, its application, or uses.
  • With initial reference to FIGS. 1A-2, a deck system according to the present teachings is shown and identified generally at reference 6. The deck system 6 generally includes an elevated substructure 8 and a masonry deck surface 10. The elevated substructure 8 includes a subframe 12 and a subfloor 14. The masonry deck surface 10 includes a plurality of paving blocks 20. A semi-permeable barrier 22 is disposed between the subfloor 14 and the paving blocks 20. Fascia segments 26 are arranged around a periphery of the deck system 6.
  • As will become appreciated from the discussion herein, the deck system 6 provides an improved alternative to traditional decking or paving block patios. The deck system 6 provides the low maintenance advantages associated with paving blocks while providing a substructure for locating the paving blocks at elevation. The deck system 6 also provides considerable assembly advantages. In one advantage, a level working surface necessary for accommodating paving blocks may be constructed with less time and expense as compared to the ground surface preparation associated with traditional brick paver patios.
  • With reference to FIG. 1B, exemplary deck systems 6 are shown associated with a portion of an exemplary building B. The building B includes access doors D1, D2 and D3. In the exemplary building B, the access doors D1-D3 correspond to respective stories or floor levels of the building B. As shown, the deck system 6 associated with the access door D2 is arranged above the access door D1 (such as in a walk-out style basement configuration). Of note, the deck system 6 associated with the door D3 is shown in a cantilever arrangement attached directly to the building B. It is appreciated that the posts 30 shown associated with the deck system 6 arranged adjacent to the door D2 may additionally be provided on the deck system 6 arranged adjacent to the door D3.
  • The subframe 12 generally includes a series of interconnected horizontal support members 28 and vertically disposed posts 30. The horizontal support members 28 collectively define various beams and joists. The posts 30 are configured to be recessed and secured into the ground G according to conventional methods to provide foundational support. As is readily appreciated, the posts 30 may vary in length to compensate for uneven terrain. In an installed configuration (FIGS. 1A and 1B), the subframe 12 as a whole defines an elevated substantially horizontal support surface 32. The subframe 12 is made from a durable weather resistant material such as, but not limited to, pressure treated lumber. Of course other materials such as synthetic or composite materials, may be utilized.
  • While not specifically shown, traditional hardware such as joist hangers, screws, nails, bolts and nuts may be employed to operatively interconnect the horizontal support members 28 and posts 30 of the subframe 12 in a secure manner with the appropriate load bearing capacity. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the subframe 12 may be constructed according to conventional construction techniques with conventional woodworking tools. As a result, the size and shape of the subframe 12 may present complex shapes, as desired, and is not limited to any constrained dimensional specifications.
  • With continued reference to FIGS. 1A-2 and further reference to FIG. 3, the subfloor 14 will be described in greater detail. The subfloor 14 is adapted to securedly rest on the support surface 32 of the subframe 12. The subfloor 14 defines a working surface 36 and a plurality of passages 38 (FIG. 3). While the passages 38 of the subfloor 14 are represented as having a generally rectangular shape, the passages 38 may define other shapes such as, but not limited to circular, triangular and honeycomb.
  • The working surface 36 provides a level template for positioning the paving blocks into a desired pattern. A plurality of recessed screw pockets 40 are arranged across the working surface 36 (as best viewed in FIG. 3). The screw pockets 40 provide a recess for accommodating fasteners such as fasteners 44. In this way, a head 46 of the fastener 44 nests within the screw pocket 40 so as to maintain a smooth working surface 36. A distal end 48 of the fastener 44 passes beyond the subfloor 14 to threadably engage the subframe 12 (FIG. 3). It is appreciated that a greater or lesser amount of screw pockets 40 may be arranged in any pattern or variation across the subfloor 14.
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that any suitable technique may be used to secure the subfloor 14 to the subframe 12. In this way, while threaded fasteners are shown to be utilized for securing the subfloor 14 to the subframe 12, other fastening methods may be employed such as, but not limited to, chemical adhesives or other mechanical fastening methods. Alternatively, the subfloor 14 may be held in a secure relationship with the subframe 12 by way of locating members (not shown) such as vertical posts or pegs extending upward from the subframe 12 and adapted to locate through one or more of the passages 38 (FIG. 3). The subframe 12 and subfloor 14 of the elevated substructure 8 are configured to meet or exceed the local building codes for load bearing.
  • The subfloor 14 may comprise a durable material such as, but not limited to, plastic. The material and configuration of the subfloor 14 provides a high strength-to-weight ratio. It is contemplated that the subfloor 14 is available in preformed segments such as, but not limited to, 4 foot by 8 foot sheets. The material of the subfloor 14 is suitable for use with conventional woodworking tools. Because the subfloor 14 is made of material suitable for conventional tools, the subfloor 14 may be easily manipulated and/or cut into preferred dimensions on-site to accommodate a variety of desired deck geometries.
  • The semi-permeable barrier 22 (FIG. 2) may comprise any suitable material such as, but not limited to, a fabric material or a plastic sheet. The semi-permeable barrier 22 is adapted to pass moisture through while retaining filler material, such as sand disposed between the respective paving blocks 20. The semi-permeable barrier 22 is also workable with conventional tools such that any desired shape may be easily cut or otherwise created to place over the subframe 14, as desired.
  • The paving blocks 20, while represented in the drawings as brick paving blocks, may similarly comprise other masonry materials. By way of example, cultured stone, natural stone, slate, fieldstone, marble, conventional brick or other units of various natural or artificial mineral products may be used.
  • The fascia 26 may comprise a plurality of segmented longitudinal members. The fascia 26 may be attached to the frame 12 and/or the subfloor 14 by any suitable method, such as conventional threaded fasteners for example. In an installed configuration (FIGS. 1A and 1B), the fascia 26 not only provides pleasing aesthetic properties to the deck system 10, but may also facilitate lateral retention of the paver blocks 20 in a secure position atop the subfloor 14. In one form, the fascia 26 is comprised of synthetic material for reduced maintenance. The fascia 26 may also comprise conventional materials such as pressure treated lumber or other woods.
  • While the deck system 6 illustrated in the drawings provides a fascia 26 for decorative purposes, a deck system 6 may alternatively be backfilled around at least portions of a perimeter thereof. Such a configuration would provide a raised paver stone patio supported by an elevated substructure while having at least portions of the perimeter accessible from a ground surface.
  • A method of constructing a deck according to the present teachings will now be described. At the outset, a plan is determined that satisfies functional and aesthetic goals as well as local building codes. One exemplary building code requires a structure suitable to accommodate at least 40 pounds per square foot, live load. First, the proper size of the horizontal support members 28 are determined based on the on-center (OC) spacing between the horizontal support members 28 and the overall length, or span, of the support members 28. In one example, 4 inch by 4 inch posts, 8 foot OC are utilized with 2 inch by 12 inch beams and 2 inch by 10 inch joists, 16 inches OC to provide a live load of 94 pounds per square foot.
  • Conventional paver blocks weigh approximately 28 pounds per square foot. As a result, it is appreciated that a variety of frame configurations may be engineered and constructed to support the paver blocks while still meeting or exceeding applicable building codes. Once the appropriate materials have been selected, the subframe 12 is engineered and constructed to meet code. Next, the subfloor 14 is suitably attached to the subframe 12 as described above. It is appreciated that portions or all of the subfloor 14 may be configured, as necessary, to fit appropriately across the horizontal support surface 32.
  • The fabric barrier 22 is then placed over the working surface 36 of the subfloor 14. At this point, the paver blocks 20 are laid on the fabric barrier 22 in the desired pattern. It may be necessary to cut portions of the paver blocks 20, such as those located at a perimeter or border. Optionally, sand may be applied to fill any gaps between adjacent paver blocks 20. As previously noted, the fabric barrier 22 facilitates the sanding process by retaining the sand above the subfloor 14. The fascia 26 are then attached to the frame 12 and/or subfloor 14 as desired.
  • While the invention has been described in the specification and illustrated in the drawings with reference to various embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the claims. Furthermore, the mixing and matching of features, elements and/or functions between various embodiments is expressly contemplated herein so that one of ordinary skill in the art would appreciate from this disclosure that features, elements and/or functions of one embodiment may be incorporated into another embodiment as appropriate, unless described otherwise above. Moreover, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiment illustrated by the drawings and described in the specification as the best mode presently contemplated for carrying out this invention, but that the invention will include any embodiments falling within the foregoing description and the appended claims.

Claims (25)

1. A deck system comprising:
an interconnected subframe operable to engage a foundation and provide a substantially horizontal support surface in an elevated orientation relative to a ground surface;
a subfloor supported by said subframe and defining a working surface; and
a deck surface comprising a masonry material disposed on said working surface.
2. The deck system of claim 1, further comprising a fascia arranged on at least a portion of a perimeter of the deck system.
3. The deck system of claim 1, further comprising a semi-permeable barrier disposed between said subfloor and said plurality of masonry material.
4. The deck system of claim 3 wherein said semi-permeable barrier comprises a fabric material.
5. The deck system of claim 1 wherein said subframe comprises wood and defines at least one support post extending in a generally vertical orientation between said ground surface and said horizontal support surface.
6. The deck system of claim 1 wherein said subfloor comprises a plurality of passages defined through said working surface.
7. The deck system of claim 6 wherein said subfloor comprises plastic and defines a plurality of recess portions for accepting a fastener head in an installed position.
8. The deck system of claim 1 wherein said masonry material is selected from the group consisting of brick paving blocks; cultured stone; natural stone; slate; fieldstone; marble; and conventional brick.
9. A deck assembly comprising:
a subframe supported by a foundation on a first end and presenting a substantially horizontal support surface elevated above a ground surface on an opposite end;
a subfloor extending across and coupled to said support surface of said subframe, said subfloor defining a working surface;
a semi-permeable barrier disposed over said working surface;
a masonry material arranged upon said working surface; and
a fascia arranged on at least a portion of a perimeter of the deck assembly.
10. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said fascia comprises synthetic material.
11. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said semi-permeable barrier comprises fabric.
12. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said subframe comprises wood and defines at least one support post extending in a generally vertical orientation between said ground surface and said horizontal support surface.
13. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said subfloor comprises a plurality of passages defined through said working surface.
14. The deck assembly of claim 6 wherein said subfloor defines a plurality of recess portions for accepting a fastener head of a fastener in an installed position, said fastener extending entirely through said subfloor and engaging said subframe in an installed position.
15. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said subfloor comprises plastic.
16. The deck assembly of claim 9 wherein said masonry material is selected from the group consisting of brick paving blocks; cultured stone; natural stone; slate; fieldstone; marble; and conventional brick.
17. A deck installation associated with a building and adapted to provide a floor space elevated from a ground surface and accessible from the building comprising:
an interconnected subframe defining a working surface;
a subfloor supported by said subframe and defining a working surface; and
a masonry material disposed on said working surface and defining a floor surface.
18. The deck installation of claim 17 wherein said floor surface is accessible from a second story of the building.
19. The deck installation of claim 17 wherein said floor surface is accessible from a third story of the building.
20. The deck installation of claim 17 wherein said subframe is coupled to the building.
21. The deck installation of claim 20 wherein said subframe is cantilevered to the building.
22. A method of constructing a deck comprising:
assembling a subframe engaging a ground surface and presenting a substantially horizontal support surface at an elevated location relative to said ground surface;
attaching a subfloor to said frame structure; and
arranging a plurality of paving blocks onto said subfloor.
23. The method of claim 22 wherein assembling said subframe comprises:
arranging at least one support post in a generally vertical orientation between said ground surface and said horizontal support surface.
24. The method of claim 22, further comprising:
arranging a fascia on at least a portion of a perimeter of the deck in a substantially transverse orientation to said horizontal support surface.
25. The method of claim 22 wherein attaching said subfloor comprises:
driving at least one fastener through said subfloor whereby a distal end of said at least one fastener penetrates said subframe and a proximal end of said at least one fastener nests into a recess defined on said subfloor.
US10/943,038 2004-06-28 2004-09-16 Deck system Abandoned US20050284082A1 (en)

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Cited By (9)

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US20080168732A1 (en) * 2007-01-17 2008-07-17 Bart Stuchell Support Members And Methods For The Installation of Brick Patios, Decks and Paths
US20100223880A1 (en) * 2009-03-04 2010-09-09 Steven George Smith Structural paver decking assembly and method for same
US20100300027A1 (en) * 2009-05-27 2010-12-02 Mcfarland Cascade Holdings, Inc. Interlocking Platform Panels and Modules
US20110140437A1 (en) * 2010-05-26 2011-06-16 Satish Vemuri Self-supporting platform for a wind turbine
US20110192106A1 (en) * 2006-01-31 2011-08-11 Busby Philip J Flooring, Deck and Patio Surface System and Method of Use
US8696234B2 (en) 2009-03-04 2014-04-15 Vast Enterprises, Llc Methods for installing a bounded paving system
US8747018B2 (en) 2008-05-01 2014-06-10 Vast Enterprises, Llc Method of installing a paving system
US20150052845A1 (en) * 2013-08-22 2015-02-26 JD Concepts LLC Enhanced deck assembly facilitation methods and systems
JP2015052220A (en) * 2013-09-06 2015-03-19 ミサワホーム株式会社 Support structure for ancillary structure

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US8984832B2 (en) * 2006-01-31 2015-03-24 Philip J. Busby Flooring, deck and patio surface system and method of use
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