US20050144760A1 - Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material - Google Patents

Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050144760A1
US20050144760A1 US11030278 US3027805A US2005144760A1 US 20050144760 A1 US20050144760 A1 US 20050144760A1 US 11030278 US11030278 US 11030278 US 3027805 A US3027805 A US 3027805A US 2005144760 A1 US2005144760 A1 US 2005144760A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
object
section
magnetically coupled
retainer
sections
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11030278
Inventor
Eugene Verbaas
Mary Verbaas
Original Assignee
Verbaas Eugene R.
Verbaas Mary A.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60RVEHICLES, VEHICLE FITTINGS, OR VEHICLE PARTS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60R11/00Arrangements for holding or mounting articles, not otherwise provided for
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F5/00Holders or carriers for hand articles; Holders or carriers for use while travelling or camping
    • A45F5/02Fastening articles to the garment
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/13Article holder attachable to apparel or body

Abstract

An apparatus for mounting an object, including functional objects as well as ornamental objects, to an intermediate sheet of material such as fabric or glass includes pieces that are magnetically coupled through the intermediate material so that the magnetically coupled pieces are securely and replaceably held thereto. An object retainer is secured in any desired manner to at least one of the magnetically coupled pieces. One or both of the magnetically coupled pieces may be placed into forms for added mechanical strength, ease of handling, distribution of force, or protection to the intermediate material. A coating layer may be placed on the retainer, on some or all of the magnetically coupled pieces, or on the forms if used, either over the entirety thereof or over selected surface areas.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This patent document claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/534,918 filed Jan. 7, 2004 (Verbaas et al., Magnetic holder apparatus), which hereby is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference thereto.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The invention relates generally to the mounting of an object on a sheet of material, and more particularly to apparatus and methods for magnetically mounting objects to sheets of material.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Ornamental items such as corsages typically are displayed from nonmetallic flexible material such as fabric, paper, and the like. A variety of techniques are known for mounting ornamental items to the material. Some of them rely solely on mechanical means, while others use a combination of magnetic and mechanical means.
  • Numerous exclusively mechanical approaches are used for hanging ornamental items on clothing worn to cover the body. U.S. Pat. No. 6,389,649 issued May 21, 2002 4(Metzler, Garment accessory mounting device and method) discloses a sharpened “S” shaped member used to spear a flower or other floral arrangement on one end, and a garment hook on the opposite end to allow the mounting of the arrangement on clothing. This approach requires either hooking onto the edge of a garment or penetrating through the garment, which results in mounting in an undesirable location or damage to the garment, respectively.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,559,675 issued Dec. 24, 1985 (Devenny, Corsage support) discloses a pair of elements having cooperative shapes wherein the cooperative shapes clamp together through an article of clothing. A held object, such as a corsage, is secured to one of the elements thereby holding the object to the clothing. However, the disclosed crimping mechanism requires deformation of the material resulting in unsightly lines to be apparent in the way the material hangs. Further, this crimping mechanism damages delicate clothing.
  • Generally speaking, known nonmagnetic corsage holders have disadvantages in the manner that they hold a corsage onto a piece of fabric. Some corsage holders deform or damage clothing during the process of mounting the corsage. Some corsage holders insecurely hold the corsage, or are difficult to position and often result in off-vertical axis orientation of the held object, or are difficult to replaceably mount.
  • Many known devices use magnets for hanging items to metallic surfaces. Examples of such magnetic holders may be found in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,155,523 issued Dec. 5, 2000 (Pitre, Magnetic base holder), U.S. Pat. No. 5,274,937 issued Jan. 4,1994 (Birnbaum, Magnetic holder), U.S. Pat. No. 5,221,006 issued Jun. 22, 1993 (Plumlee, Magnetic article holder), and U.S. Pat. No. 4,830,321 issued May 16, 1989 (Kenji, Magnetic holder). However, the disclosures of these patents concern using magnets to mount something to a metallic surface. Fabric typically is non-metallic and flexible.
  • Other devices are suitable for use with non-metallic material. U.S. Pat. No. 5,031,777 issued Jul. 16, 1991 (Knox, Magnetic holder for bows and similar accessories) discloses a ferromagnetic holder used for displaying hair bows and other accessories. Magnets are attached to the back side of a thin taut fabric strip. Magnetic forces are exerted through the strip to hold bows or other accessories that have ferromagnetic parts by magnetic attraction to the outwardly facing side of the strip, so that the attached items may be displayed in a display case or on a display rack. The held item contains a ferromagnetic part on which the magnetic forces may act.
  • Magnetic devices are known for attaching name tags to clothing. U.S. Pat. No. 6,006,455 issued Dec. 28, 1999 (Miller, Magnetic name-tag) discloses the use of a magnet to attach a name tag label envelope to clothing through magnetic forces exerted by the magnet from an inner surface of the clothing to a metal containing name tag envelope placed on the outside of the clothing. The name tag envelope has a transparent outer surface. A name tag is placed into the envelope. Inasmuch as a name tag holder is light and is not bulky, it may be held in place by a very simple arrangement of magnetically coupled pieces.
  • FIG. 1 is a pictorial representation of a corsage and boutonniere “clip” 10, which is available from Pinless of Sierra Vista, Ariz., as product number 501. The clip 10 is characterized as being a reusable super magnet that makes attaching a corsage quick and does not damage the clothing. The clip 10 uses a single rigid magnet 18 which is placed on the inside of a shirt or jacket (not shown). A holder 11 having a metal base 16 with two extending metal tabs 12 and 14 is attracted to the magnet 18 through the shirt or jacket. The holder 11 is a single piece of metal, with the metal tabs 12 and 14 being digitally malleable so that the tabs 12 and 14 may be mechanically deformed by a person's hand and bent inward or crimped about a corsage stem to lock the corsage in place. The metal tabs 12 and 14 are at the extreme edge of one end of the metal base 16. U.S. Pat. No. 5,682,648 issued Nov. 4, 1997 (Miller, Flower attachment mechanism for clothing) discloses the use of a cradle to secure flowers or other ornamentation onto clothing. The cradle or holder partially encircles the flower stems and has prongs which are inserted into the stems. The cradle preferably is metallic and is placed on an exterior portion of the clothing while a magnet is placed on an opposing location on an interior portion of the clothing. Both approaches are disadvantageous in that the holder is visually intrusive. It extends beyond and around part of the ornamental object, and may detract from the appearance thereof.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,260,749 issued Jul. 17, 2001 (Horovitz, Small article holder including magnet means) discloses holders for various functional objects such as eyeglasses and keys. The holder is provided by the operational combination of a base member of a selected appearance, wherein the base includes a magnetizable area thereon. The holder is in cooperative combination with a permanent magnet. Holding means are secured to the base member for holding a desired small article thereto or therein. As the holder is visually intrusive, the base member of the holding means appears to be designed to approximately match the size and appearance of the article it is intended to hold.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention has a number of advantages over the related art. In some embodiments, one or more of the magnetically coupled pieces are resilient or flexible to maintain strong magnetic coupling even when the intervening material such as a fabric is stressed or distorted. In other embodiments, one or more of the magnetically coupled pieces includes multiple magnets, or are given a shape and size, or are placed within a form for various purposes such as, for example, to provide enhanced mechanical strength, ease of handling, distribution of force, protection of the intermediate material, or enhanced mechanical support for keeping bulky objects such as, for example, a corsage, from twisting away from a particular alignment. In other embodiments, a retainer is disposed at one of the magnetically coupled pieces, and both the retainer and the magnetically coupled piece are visually inobtrusive with respect to the object to be mounted. Suitable techniques include, for example, having one of or both the retainer and the magnetically coupled piece camouflaged with respect to the object to be mounted or with respect to the material to which the object is to be mounted, or of a relatively small with respect to the object to be mounted, or capable of being aligned with the object to be mounted. In other embodiments, one or more of the magnetically coupled pieces, or the retainer, or all pieces and the retainer include a coating or coated portions to protect delicate materials, which may be the intervening material or material in the object being held. In some of its embodiments, the present invention includes superior retainers for the object being held, such as, for example, supports for preventing a boutonniere from sagging or twisting.
  • Various embodiments of the present invention are suitable for mounting an object to various types of sheets of material (including multiple layers), such as, for example, fabric, paper, glass, cardboard, wallboard, partitions, layered masses, composite masses, laminates, and so forth. More particularly, two or more pieces are magnetically coupled through the intermediate sheet of material in a manner that securely yet replaceably mounts the object to the material. At least one of the magnetic pair of pieces includes a retainer for the object. An optional coating layer is placed onto one or more of the magnetically coupled pieces, either over the entire surfaces thereof or over selected surfaces (major surfaces, edges, and so forth) thereof for any desired purposes, such as to prevent damage to delicate clothing, to provide an attractive appearance or a camouflaged appearance, to facilitate handling by the user, to improve contact with the intermediate material, or any combination of the foregoing and other purposes. Some embodiments are suitable for mounting functional objects, while other embodiments are suitable for mounting ornamental objects.
  • One embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for removably retaining the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and a second magnetically coupled section. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections, and the first section and the object retainer are visually inobtrusive relative to the object.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and a second magnetically coupled section. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections, and at least one of the first and second sections comprises a unitary permanent magnet having a “Y” shape, an “X” shape, a horseshoe shape, or a loop shape.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; a second magnetically coupled section; a third magnetically coupled section; and a form. The second and third sections are disposed in the form. At least one of the first, second and third sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to others of the first, second and third sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; a second magnetically coupled section; and a coating covering at least part of the first section, the second section, the retainer, or any combination thereof. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; a light disposed at the first section; and a second magnetically coupled section. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and a second magnetically coupled section. At. at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections, and at least one of the first and second sections comprises a magnetically coupled flexible or resilient material.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section, a second magnetically coupled section, and a container for the object disposed at the first section. At. least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting a first object and a second object, comprising a first magnetically coupled section; a first retainer for the first object, the first object retainer being disposed at the first section; a second magnetically coupled section; and a second retainer for the second object, the second object retainer being disposed at the second section. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising a magnetized body having a first magnetically coupled section comprising a first surface and a second magnetically coupled section comprising a second surface, the first and second surfaces being opposing; and a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section. At least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for mounting an object, comprising first magnetically coupled means; second magnetically coupled means, wherein at least one of the first and second magnetically coupled means is permanently magnetized; and means for retaining the object to the first magnetically coupled means, disposed at the first section.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is a method of mounting an object on a sheet of material comprising placing a first magnetically coupled section on one side of the sheet of material, the first section having an object retainer; placing a second magnetically coupled section on another side of the sheet of material, opposing the first magnetically coupled section; bringing the first and second sections into proximity following the placing steps to enable magnetic coupling, wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections; and attaching the object to the retainer, wherein the object visually obscures the retainer and the first section.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective diagram of a prior art magnetic corsage holder.
  • FIG. 2 through FIG. 8 are schematic diagrams of various apparatus for mounting an object to a sheet of material, in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 through FIG. 16 are side plan views of various apparatus for mounting an object to a sheet of material, in accordance with the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION, INCLUDING THE BEST MODE
  • An apparatus for mounting an object to a sheet of material has two components, namely a mechanical component and a magnetic component. The mechanical component is designed for mechanically fastening to items, and preferably is optimized for mechanically fastening to one or several specific types of items. An example would be a pin, hook, prong or clamp specifically optimized for engaging an ornamental item such as a corsage, boutonniere, piece of art, decoration, or other ornamental piece. The magnetic component is of a material or materials suitable both for establishing a magnetic field and for forming a magnetic field path, and with which the mechanical component may be integrated in any convenient manner. The magnetic component includes a first section with which the mechanical component is integrated, and a second section that in use is spaced away from the first section by the thickness of an intermediate material through which the magnetic field path passes. The mechanical component and the first section of the magnetic components may be distinct pieces, or may be formed from the same material body. The first and sections of the magnetic component may be separate and distinct pieces, or part of the same piece.
  • Various examples of mounting apparatus are schematically shown in FIG. 2 through FIG. 9. FIG. 2 shows an example of a object mounting device 20 in which the magnetic component includes a magnet 22 and a magnetizable plate 26, the magnet 22 being magnetically coupled in use to the plate 26 through fabric 24. The magnet 22 has a magnetic dipole that is parallel to the fabric 24. A suitable mechanical component 28 is mechanically coupled to the plate 26. FIG. 3 shows an example of a object mounting device 30 in which the magnetic component includes a magnet 32 and a magnetizable plate 36, the magnet 32 being magnetically coupled in use to the plate 36 through fabric 34. The magnetic dipole of the magnet 32 is perpendicular to the fabric 34. A suitable mechanical component 38 is mechanically coupled to the plate 36. FIG. 4 shows an example of a object mounting device 40 in which the magnetic component includes a magnetizable plate 42 and a magnet 46, the magnet 46 being magnetically coupled in use to the plate 42 through fabric 44. The magnetic dipole of the magnet 46 is parallel to the fabric 44. A suitable mechanical component 48 is mechanically coupled to the magnet 46. FIG. 5 shows an example of a object mounting device 50 in which the magnetic component includes a magnetizable plate 52 and a magnet 56, the magnet 56 being magnetically coupled in use to the plate 52 through fabric 54. The magnetic dipole of the magnet 56 is perpendicular to the fabric 54. A suitable mechanical component 58 is mechanically coupled to the magnet 56. FIG. 6 shows an example of a object mounting device 60 in which the magnetic component includes a magnet 62 and a magnet 66, which are mutually coupled in use through fabric 64. The magnetic dipoles of the magnets 62 and 66 are parallel to the fabric 64. A suitable mechanical component 68 is mechanically coupled to the magnet 66. FIG. 7 shows an example of a object mounting device 70 in which the magnetic component includes a magnet 72 and a magnet 76, which are mutually coupled in use through fabric 74. The magnetic dipoles of the magnets 72 and 76 are perpendicular to the fabric 74. A suitable mechanical component 78 is mechanically coupled to the magnet 76. FIG. 8 shows an example of a object mounting device 80 in which the magnetic component includes a single magnet 81 having poles 82 and 86. The magnet 81 preferably is bendable but resilient, so that the poles 82 and 86 can be separated and passed over an edge of the fabric 84, yet return into proximity through the fabric 84. When the object mounting device 80 is in use, the poles 82 and 86 are coupled through fabric 84. A suitable mechanical component 88 is mechanically coupled to the magnet 81.
  • In arrangements such as shown in FIGS. 3, 5 and 7 in which the mechanical component is within the magnetic field path, preferably the mechanical component is made small with respect to the magnetic component or is made of nonmagnetizable material so as not to weaken the magnetic field.
  • In the foregoing examples, the magnets and corresponding magnetizable plates may be rigid or flexible. While the examples show magnetic coupling through fabric, the coupling may be done through other intermediate materials, including other flexible materials or even through rigid materials such as glass. The intermediate material preferably is non-magnetizable to minimize weakening of the magnetic field. The mechanical component and the magnetic component are integrated in any desired manner. Illustratively, where the mechanical component is a metallic part such as a hook, pin, prong or clamp, and the magnetic component is metal, the mechanical component may be soldered or welded to the magnetic component. Other techniques for fixing the mechanical component to the magnetic component include adhesives and screws. The mechanical component may also be connected to the magnetic component through a joint, which may be a rotation joint, a malleable material, or any other type of movable or distortable joint to provide an alternative way to reposition the object other than to reposition the magnetic component.
  • The various components of the mounting apparatus preferably are optimized to exhibit particular performance characteristics. The mechanical component may be designed in any desired manner to achieve superior mounting performance, including the use of supports for preventing a object such as a boutonniere from sagging or twisting. Of particular advantage when the object is an ornamental object, the mechanical component may be camouflaged with respect to the object or the intermediate material, or the mechanical component may be made small relative to the object being fastened, or may be capable of being aligned with some structural element of the object being fastened, so as to be non-intrusive. Surfaces of the mechanical and magnetic components that could contact fabric when in use may be coated to protect delicate clothing. One or both of the sections of the magnetic component may be placed into a form for added mechanical strength, ease of handling, distribution of force, or protection of the fabric. One or more of the sections of the magnetic component may be made flexible so that the opposing surfaces remain in proximity even when the fabric is stressed or distorted, to maintain strong magnetic coupling. The magnetic component may include multiple magnets to provide additional support to keep elongated objects such as corsages from twisting away from proper alignment. Generally speaking, the ability to independently optimize the mechanical and magnetic components allows the entire object mounting device to be optimized for the secure, replaceable and repeatable attachment of a variety of different types of objects.
  • FIG. 9 shows a magnetic pair of pieces 92 and 96 which is used to fasten an object, such as a corsage (not shown), to a material 94, such as a piece of fabric. The magnetic pair of pieces 92 and 96 are attracted toward each other via a magnetic field. At least one of the magnetically paired pieces has attached to it object retainer 98 for securely and replaceably retaining the object. The attachment of the object retainer 98 to one of the pair of magnetic pieces 92 and 96, in combination with the magnetic field holding the two magnetic pieces to each other through the material 94, combines to provide a firm attachment of the object retainer 98 to the material 94 in a replaceable and secure manner without damage to the material 94. The object retainer 98 holds a decorative object, such as a corsage, to opposite sides of the material 94, such as clothing. Optional protective and/or decorative coatings are applied to one or both of the magnetic pair of pieces 92 and 96.
  • At least one of the two magnetic pair of pieces 92 and 96 includes a magnet. The magnet is preferably a permanent magnet. The selected magnet is based upon the required holding power, steric parameters, size, shape, and/or cost. The magnet may be of any type. Some example magnet types include rare earth, neodymium, samarium cobalt, alnico, ceramic, and ferrite. The second magnetically paired piece is attracted toward the first magnetically paired piece via a magnetic field. The requirements for the second piece is that is allows for an attractive magnetic force to exist between the second paired piece and the first magnet. A number of material types fulfill this requirement, including a piece of metal or other magnetizable material, a nonmagnetizable material impregnated with magnetizable material, and a second magnet. Hence, the two magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96 may include any of a pair of magnets, a magnet and a magnetizable object, and a magnet and a piece of metal.
  • Each of the first and second magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96 preferably has at least one relatively flat surface. The flat surface of the first magnetically coupled piece is attracted to the flat surface of the second magnetically coupled piece by the magnetic field. The magnetically coupled pieces preferably are rigid, resilient, or flexible. The flexible pieces and to some extent the resilient pieces allow for conformity to a non-flat surface.
  • The flat section of the magnetically coupled piece 96 is referred to as a base. The object retainer 98 preferably is attached to this base. Optionally, the object retainer 98 is integrated into one of the magnetically couple pieces 92 and 96. Alternatively, the object retainer 98 is an additional piece coupled to the base. The connection between the object retainer 98 and one of the magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96 is either a permanent or a removably attached connection to the base. The magnetically coupled piece that contains a base is on the side of material 94 where the object is to be displayed. For example, if the object is a corsage, the object retainer 98 may be a hanging mechanism projecting from the piece away from the body and on the outside of the material 94.
  • A number of different types of object retainers 98 are known for holding an object. Malleable tabs such as shown in FIG. 1 may be crimped about the object to be retained. For example, a corsage stem may be placed next to a base from which the tabs extend, and the tabs may be crimped about the corsage stem.
  • FIG. 11 shows magnetically coupled pieces 111, 112, 113 and 116 with another type of object retainer, a metal pin or spear 118 that may optionally have a sharp tip. The metal pin 118 is used to pierce the object to be retained. For example, in a case where an object to be retained is a corsage, the metal pin pierces the corsage and the resulting combination piece is securely and removably attached to a base 116 of the magnetically couple pieces 111, 112, 113 and 116. A straight pin 118 is an example of a suitable type of pin.
  • FIGS. 12 and 13 show another type of pin, a safety pin 128, which is welded or soldered to an elongated rigid metal base plate 126 and which is used to pierce an object to be mounted. The base plate 126 is one of several magnetically coupled pieces, which also include another elongated metal plate 125 and magnets 121, 122 and 123. Magnets 121, 122 and 123 are abutted against the plate 125 and are magnetically coupled to the base plate 126 through fabric 124, and have their magnetic dipoles oriented perpendicular to the plates 125 and 126. The plate 125 is fully embedded in a preferably nonmagnetizable form 120 of any suitable material including, for example, plastic, rubber and ceramic. The magnets 121, 122 and 123 are partially embedded in the form 120 with one of their surfaces being free of the form 120. These free surfaces are preferably coplanar and are used to magnetically couple to the base plate 126.
  • FIG. 14 shows a “J” shaped hook 148 that is securely mechanically coupled to a base piece 146. The base piece 146 is one of several magnetically coupled pieces, which also include magnets 141, 142 and 143. The base piece 146 is magnetically coupled to the magnets 141, 142 and 143 through fabric 144, thereby mounting on the fabric 144 an object fastened by the hook 148. Other hanger shapes may be used if desired, including an “S” shaped hook and a clothes hanger form.
  • Any of a variety of other different object retainers may be used if desired. One example is clamp or clip (not shown). The clamp may optionally be spring loaded, such as a potato bag clip. Alternatively, the clamp may be mechanically held together with a screw device, such as a wood clamp. A clamp attached to the base may grab and securely hold the stem of a corsage. Another example of an object retainer is a container with spaced-apart sides and a bottom, such as a cup (not shown). A further example of an object retainer is a semi-permanent bonding agent (not shown). Other examples include adhesive, glue, Velcro, and welds. Yet another example of an object retainer is an elastic band (not shown). An elastic band, such as a rubber band, is attached to at least one of the magnetically coupled pieces. The elastic band holds an object due to its elastic nature. Alternatively, the elastic band is retracted and held in place by pulling on itself. Another example is a tie wrap.
  • The size of the object retainer may be variable as needed. For example, a small spring loaded clamp is preferably used with a small held object, while a larger spring loaded clamp is preferably used with a larger held object.
  • The object retained by the object retainer may be ornamental or functional in nature. Examples of objects that may be retained include a garment accessory, a floral item, a corsage, a boutonniere, a flower, a floral arrangement, jewelry, an ornamental item, a patch, a decoration, a sign, a name tag, a hanger, and a container. A garment accessory is an item attached to a garment as a fashion accessory. A floral item is a garment accessory such as a living or artificial flower or plant.
  • The material 94 (FIG. 9) resides between the magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96 when the mounting apparatus is in use. The material 94 is not a part of the mounting apparatus, but is rather a material upon which the mounting apparatus acts. Some examples of suitable material include fabric, clothing, plastic, metal, glass, wallboard, partitions, and skin. The material 94 preferably should not disrupt the attractive forces between the magnetically coupled pieces, but if it does, it should not do so to a degree that the attractive forces are insufficient to hold the magnetically coupled pieces together during normal use of the mounting apparatus. The magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96 are placed on either side of the material 94, as shown in FIG. 9. The magnetic field pulls via magnetic force the pieces together, as shown at a subsequent time in FIG. 10. The ornamental object affixed to the base piece 96 is thus held next to the material 94. The mounted ornamental object may be affixed before or after the magnetically coupled pieces are attracted toward each other. The use of a magnetic field to hold the magnetically coupled pieces together allows the item to be replaceably attached to the material 94, even if the material is very delicate. Examples of delicate material include a blouse or shirt made up of a piece of fabric, such as silk or polyester. The magnetically paired pieces do not pierce or damage the clothing.
  • Shape, Size and Mechanical Considerations
  • A number of different shapes and orientations of the magnetically coupled pieces may be used to achieve various objectives. Suitable shapes and orientations include round bar, rectangular bar, “Y” shape, “X” shape, rod, horseshoe, ring or donut, disk, rectangle, kidney, trapezoidal, multi-fingered ring, a multisided object, an object with at least one curved side, and other geometric shapes.
  • Some magnets are cast into a mold and require grinding to achieve final dimensions. Other magnets start as a powder, which is subsequently pressed into a mold, pressure bonded, or sintered. The orientations of the shapes are rotated as mechanical forces necessitate keeping the flat surface next to the material.
  • Force Considerations
  • The force needed between the magnetically coupled pieces is dependent upon the mass and structure of the retained object and the composition and thickness of the intermediate material. For example, a one-tenth ounce nametag requires a smaller magnetic field than a twelve ounce corsage. Similarly, a thin material, such as a silk or polyester blouse, would necessitate a smaller magnetic force to hold an object than a thick sweater or a work shirt.
  • The force of the magnetic field between magnetically coupled pieces varies in accordance with a number of factors, including magnet type, magnetizable material type, size of the magnet, quantity of magnets used, and the relative positioning of the magnets. For example, a stronger neodymium magnet may be used in place of a ferrite magnet when a larger magnetic force is desirable. As another example, two, three, four, five, or more magnets may be used on either side of the material. As yet another example, two widely spaced magnets, such as greater than one-half inch apart, may be used on a given side of the material in order to increase mechanical and magnetic strength.
  • Mechanical Considerations
  • The magnetically coupled pieces attached to opposite sides of a material provide mechanical support to a mounted object through the attaching means. The magnetically coupled pieces and optionally other structural material in contact with the intermediate material are preferably shaped in a manner to firmly holding the fastened object. In many applications, the intermediate material between the magnetically coupled pieces is flexible. A heavy mechanical load attached to the magnetically coupled pieces would potentially deform the material, thereby potentially damaging the material or resulting in a sagging or misalignment of the mounted object. Adapting the size of the magnetically coupled pieces to the application provides an appropriate degree of mechanical strength. For example, the pieces on either side of the material optionally have contact areas with the material that independently range from less than a quarter square inch to greater than three square inches. Examples include a contact surface area of approximately 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, and 5 square inches. As noted above, many shapes are suitable. A preferable orientation of the shapes is to have the greater dimension be vertical. This helps to prevent sagging of the fastened object by allowing the body to act as a force against the innermost of the two magnetically coupled pieces. The orientation of the magnetically coupled pieces is optionally used to minimize tilting or twisting of the held object. For example, an inverted “Y” shape for the inner magnetically couple piece provides an outer force from the body to be applied to the base of the “Y” and to the tips of the “Y,” thereby minimizing tilting and rotation of the held object. In still another example, at least one of the magnetically couple pieces is round and had a diameter of approximately one inch. In yet another example, a backing material, such as a semi-rigid material, is against one or both of the magnetizable pieces. In this example, the backing material is optionally on the garment side or opposite side of the magnetizable piece.
  • FIGS. 11 through 14 are examples of how one or more of the magnetically coupled pieces may be placed in a form such as form 110 (FIG. 11), form 120 (FIGS. 12 and 13), and form 140 (FIG. 14) to achieve the mechanical goals described above. The forms 110, 120 and 140 may have any of the shapes described above for the magnets. Any number of the magnetically coupled pieces may be placed into a form. As an example, smaller and relatively inexpensive round magnets may be firmly placed and recessed into a “Y” shaped or rectangular bar shaped forms, as shown in FIG. 11 (magnets 111, 112 and 113 are recessed into form 110) and in FIG. 14 (magnets 141, 142 and 143 are recessed into form 140). The magnet is attached to the form via a magnetic field, through a compression fit, or both. The flat surface of the magnetically coupled piece attracted toward the paired piece is preferably minimally obscured or not interfered with by the form into which it is placed. In this example, the form adds mechanical strength. Since the forms should not completely disrupt the attractive forces between the two magnetically coupled pieces, non-magnetizable material such as plastic, rubber and ceramic are well suited. However, magnetizable material including metal may be used in some configurations where care is taken to avoid completely disrupting the attractive forces.
  • One or both of the magnetically coupled pieces may be rigid or resilient or flexible. Resilient and flexible magnetically coupled pieces are particularly useful when it is desirable to conform to the shape of the material between the magnetically coupled pieces. This results in less mechanical stress on the intermediate material and hence less damage done to it. Suitable resilient materials include some plastics and rubber. Suitable flexible materials include some plastics and woven nylon webbing.
  • Coatings and Coloration
  • The surfaces of any of the magnetically coupled pieces, the object retainers, and the forms may be coated entirely or partially with materials selected to achieve particular purposes. FIG. 15 and FIG. 16 show the back piece 92, and the base piece 96 and the object retainer 98 having respective coating layers 152 and 154 on their surfaces except for the opposing surfaces of the magnetically coupled pieces 92 and 96. Optionally or alternatively, these opposing surfaces may be coated. The coatings serve one or more purposes, including protection of delicate clothing, an extension for mechanical support, formation of a mounting element, an ornamental presentation, and a camouflage function.
  • The coatings may take various forms. For example, the coating may cover rough edges to further protect the intermediate material, such as a fine silk, from damage. As another example, the coating may be elongated to provide mechanical support. In still another example, the coating may be shaped into a pin or hook that becomes the object retainer. In yet another example, the coating has a floral, geometric, or colored pattern that is ornamental in presentation. In still yet another example, the coating resembles the color, texture, or hue of the intermediate material or mounted object acting as a camouflage. Optionally, the coating is plastic or flexible.
  • If one desires that the mounting apparatus be inconspicuous, potentially visible parts of it may be designed as small as possible to be obscured from view by the held object. Alternatively or additionally, the mounting apparatus may be made visually inobtrusive by camouflaging visible parts from view by suitably establishing the color and pattern of any of the outermost surface of any of the magnetically coupled pieces, the object retainer, and/or the form. The outermost layer may be color-coordinated with the intermediate material or the mounted object in order to camouflage the mounting apparatus.
  • Alternatively, the most visible surface of the mounting apparatus may be provided with an appearance that is aesthetically appealing by itself, such as a geometric or floral pattern. For example, the mounted object is optionally surface-coated onto one of the magnetically couple pieces itself, is a picture or piece of art, or is a broach.
  • Lighting Considerations
  • An optional light source may be added to the hanging apparatus for decorative purposes in order to create lighting effects. One or more lights are either embedded into either of the two magnetically coupled pieces or are attached to one of the two magnetically coupled pieces as an extension. The light source is either powered via a small battery or is a fluorescent or phosphorescent device that uses energy from the battery power supply or from conversion an external source of photons, such as sunlight. Alternatively the light element is one or more light emitting diodes. The light source is used to create or enhance graphical or decorative presentations.
  • In one illustrative application, a magnetically coupled pair of pieces are attracted toward each other through an inflexible material, such as a piece of glass or a window material. One or both of the magnetically coupled pieces may be base elements associated with respective object retainers that may be used to mount objects on one or both sides of the inflexible material. The magnetically coupled pair of pieces and the object retainers, and optionally forms, may be as described above, the primary difference being that objects optionally may be held on both sides of the intermediate material. In an example, two magnetically coupled pieces are attracted toward each other through a window material, a hanging hook projects from the magnetically coupled piece on the inside of the window and is used to hang a decorative item. In another example, two magnetically coupled pieces are attracted toward each other through a window material, hanging hooks respectively project from the magnetically coupled pieces, and decorative items are hung from both sides of the window.
  • The description of the invention and its applications as set forth herein is illustrative and is not intended to limit the scope of the invention as expressed in the claims that follow. Variations and modifications of the embodiments described herein are possible, and practical alternatives to and equivalents of the various elements of the embodiments would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art upon study of this patent document. These and other variations and modifications of the embodiments described herein may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (31)

  1. 1. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for removably retaining the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and
    a second magnetically coupled section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections; and
    wherein the first section and the object retainer are visually inobtrusive relative to the object.
  2. 2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein:
    the object comprises a corsage having a stem section;
    the first section comprises an elongated first metal plate having generally parallel first and second surfaces;
    the second section comprises:
    a second metal plate;
    a plurality of permanent magnets having first and second generally parallel flat surfaces containing magnetic poles, the permanent magnets being respectively coupled to the second magnetic plate by the second surfaces thereof; and
    a nonmagnetizable form, the second plate being embedded in the form and the permanent magnets being partially embedded in the form with the first surfaces thereof being coplanar and outside of the form for magnetically coupling to the second surface of the first metal plate; and
    the object retainer is a safety pin permanently attached to the first surface of the first metal plate.
  3. 3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the first magnetically coupled section and the object retainer are alignable relative to a footprint of the object.
  4. 4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein:
    the object comprises a corsage having a stem section;
    the first section is an elongated body alignable with the stem section of the corsage; and
    the object retainer is a safety pin.
  5. 5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first magnetically coupled section and the object retainer are small relative to the object.
  6. 6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first magnetically coupled section and the object retainer are camouflaged relative to the object.
  7. 7. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a first body and a second body distinct from one another, the first body comprising the first section and the second body comprising the second section.
  8. 8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein:
    the first section comprises a surface and is integrated into a magnetized body;
    the second section comprises a surface and is integrated into the magnetized body; and
    the surfaces of the first and second sections are opposing.
  9. 9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first section comprises material other than digitally malleable metal.
  10. 10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the first and second sections is rigid.
  11. 11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the first and second sections is flexible.
  12. 12. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the first and second sections is resilient.
  13. 13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retainer comprises a straight pin, a safety pin, a clamp, a screw holder, an adhesive, an elastic band, a hanger, or at least one crimpable tab.
  14. 14. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the first and second sections comprises a plurality of permanent magnets.
  15. 15. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and
    a second magnetically coupled section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections; and
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections comprises a unitary permanent magnet having a “Y” shape, an “X” shape, a horseshoe shape, or a loop shape.
  16. 16. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section;
    a second magnetically coupled section;
    a third magnetically coupled section; and
    a form, the second and third sections being disposed in the form;
    wherein at least one of the first, second and third sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to others of the first, second and third sections.
  17. 17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein the form has a “Y” shape, an “X” shape, a horseshoe shape, or a loop shape.
  18. 18. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein the second and third sections comprise respective permanent magnets, the permanent magnets being disposed in the form.
  19. 19. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section;
    a second magnetically coupled section; and
    a coating covering at least part of the first section, the second section, the retainer, or any combination thereof;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  20. 20. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the coating comprises a plastic layer, a rubber layer, a camouflage layer, an ornamental design, or a picture.
  21. 21. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section;
    a light disposed at the first section; and
    a second magnetically coupled section; and
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  22. 22. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of lights disposed at the first section for illuminating the object.
  23. 23. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section; and
    a second magnetically coupled section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections; and
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections comprises a magnetically coupled flexible or resilient material.
  24. 24. The apparatus of claim 23 further comprising the object, the object being a picture, a piece of art, or a broach, wherein the object is mounted to the first section by the object retainer.
  25. 25. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a second magnetically coupled section; and
    a container for the object disposed at the first section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections.
  26. 26. An apparatus for mounting a first object and a second object, comprising:
    a first magnetically coupled section;
    a first retainer for the first object, the first object retainer being disposed at the first section;
    a second magnetically coupled section; and
    a second retainer for the second object, the second object retainer being disposed at the second section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another of the first and second sections.
  27. 27. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    a magnetized body having a first magnetically coupled section comprising a first surface and a second magnetically coupled section comprising a second surface, the first and second surfaces being opposing; and
    a retainer for the object, the object retainer being disposed at the first section;
    wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections.
  28. 28. The apparatus of claim 26 wherein the magnetized body is a unitary permanent magnet.
  29. 29. An apparatus for mounting an object, comprising:
    first magnetically coupled means;
    second magnetically coupled means, wherein at least one of the first and second magnetically coupled means is permanently magnetized; and
    means for retaining the object to the first magnetically coupled means, disposed at the first section.
  30. 30. A method of mounting an object on a sheet of material comprising:
    placing a first magnetically coupled section on one side of the sheet of material, the first section having an object retainer;
    placing a second magnetically coupled section on another side of the sheet of material, opposing the first magnetically coupled section;
    bringing the first and second sections into proximity following the placing steps to enable magnetic coupling, wherein at least one of the first and second sections is permanently magnetized for magnetically coupling to another one of the first and second sections; and
    attaching the object to the retainer, wherein the object visually obscures the retainer and the first section.
  31. 31. The method of claim 30 wherein the sheet of material comprises fabric, clothing, plastic, metal, glass, or skin.
US11030278 2004-01-07 2005-01-06 Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material Abandoned US20050144760A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US53491804 true 2004-01-07 2004-01-07
US11030278 US20050144760A1 (en) 2004-01-07 2005-01-06 Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11030278 US20050144760A1 (en) 2004-01-07 2005-01-06 Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050144760A1 true true US20050144760A1 (en) 2005-07-07

Family

ID=34713244

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11030278 Abandoned US20050144760A1 (en) 2004-01-07 2005-01-06 Apparatus and method for magnetically mounting an object to a sheet of material

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20050144760A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050230023A1 (en) * 2004-04-20 2005-10-20 Hunter Nicolette T No holes pin
US20070101643A1 (en) * 2005-09-16 2007-05-10 Nancy Yowney Floral attachment device
US20080164267A1 (en) * 2007-01-09 2008-07-10 Alissa Huber Apparatuses, systems and methods for holding portable devices or instruments
US20090242597A1 (en) * 2008-03-27 2009-10-01 Morgan Clyde S Systems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US20120086530A1 (en) * 2010-10-12 2012-04-12 Donald Pateman Rathbun Multipole magnet for holding items to clothing
US20150152981A1 (en) * 2012-05-21 2015-06-04 Martin Goodall Cable stay
USD775993S1 (en) 2015-04-10 2017-01-10 Boutstix Inc. Magnetic boutonniere appliance
USD791633S1 (en) 2016-04-13 2017-07-11 NY Plan B Holdings Inc. Magnetic boutonniere appliance

Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1778246A (en) * 1929-11-25 1930-10-14 Deans Ralph Corsage retainer
US2601424A (en) * 1949-09-17 1952-06-24 Craig C Baker Tie holder
US2660771A (en) * 1950-08-28 1953-12-01 Dominic A Zarlengo Corsage support
US3416195A (en) * 1967-05-31 1968-12-17 Theodore H. Borthwick Floral corsage and fastener
US4559675A (en) * 1983-01-06 1985-12-24 Kirk Devenny Corsage support
US4830321A (en) * 1987-06-10 1989-05-16 Ken Ken Co., Ltd. Magnetic holder
US5031777A (en) * 1990-06-26 1991-07-16 Knox Montye S Magnetic holder for bows and similar accessories
US5221006A (en) * 1992-02-21 1993-06-22 Plumlee Bille L Magnetic article holder
US5274937A (en) * 1991-12-05 1994-01-04 Irving Birnbaum Magnetic holder
US5347733A (en) * 1992-03-30 1994-09-20 Whittington Richard W Magnetic name tag
US5682653A (en) * 1993-03-26 1997-11-04 Bergloef; Fredrik Magnetic fastening device
US5682648A (en) * 1996-08-12 1997-11-04 Miller; Marilyn Flower attachment mechanism for clothing
US5732451A (en) * 1997-03-26 1998-03-31 Mars; Mary Kay Magnetic attachment device
US6006455A (en) * 1998-02-23 1999-12-28 Miller; Marilyn Magnetic name-tag
US6155523A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-12-05 Magnafix Inc. Magnetic base holder
US6260749B1 (en) * 1999-10-15 2001-07-17 Eitan Horovitz Small article holder including magnet means
US6367126B1 (en) * 2000-03-23 2002-04-09 Bernard Rivkin Magnetic force eyeglass holder
US6389649B1 (en) * 2000-08-18 2002-05-21 Joyce Metzler Garment accessory mounting device and method
US6446372B1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2002-09-10 Reeves Company, Inc. Magnetic name plate assembly
US20020170147A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2002-11-21 Yaacov Heller Eyeglass holder
US6574897B1 (en) * 1999-06-03 2003-06-10 Dana W. Timmer Display frame assembly and method of use
US20050262666A1 (en) * 2004-05-28 2005-12-01 Mcintosh Amy R Magnetic floral attachment device
US20060005361A1 (en) * 2004-07-09 2006-01-12 O' Banion David S Magnetic attachment device and methodology
US7131745B2 (en) * 2004-04-29 2006-11-07 Sibbett Gary M Mountable illuminable display
US7131744B2 (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-11-07 Ching-Hui Lee Shining costume jewelry

Patent Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1778246A (en) * 1929-11-25 1930-10-14 Deans Ralph Corsage retainer
US2601424A (en) * 1949-09-17 1952-06-24 Craig C Baker Tie holder
US2660771A (en) * 1950-08-28 1953-12-01 Dominic A Zarlengo Corsage support
US3416195A (en) * 1967-05-31 1968-12-17 Theodore H. Borthwick Floral corsage and fastener
US4559675A (en) * 1983-01-06 1985-12-24 Kirk Devenny Corsage support
US4830321A (en) * 1987-06-10 1989-05-16 Ken Ken Co., Ltd. Magnetic holder
US5031777A (en) * 1990-06-26 1991-07-16 Knox Montye S Magnetic holder for bows and similar accessories
US5274937A (en) * 1991-12-05 1994-01-04 Irving Birnbaum Magnetic holder
US5221006A (en) * 1992-02-21 1993-06-22 Plumlee Bille L Magnetic article holder
US5347733A (en) * 1992-03-30 1994-09-20 Whittington Richard W Magnetic name tag
US5682653A (en) * 1993-03-26 1997-11-04 Bergloef; Fredrik Magnetic fastening device
US5682648A (en) * 1996-08-12 1997-11-04 Miller; Marilyn Flower attachment mechanism for clothing
US5732451A (en) * 1997-03-26 1998-03-31 Mars; Mary Kay Magnetic attachment device
US6006455A (en) * 1998-02-23 1999-12-28 Miller; Marilyn Magnetic name-tag
US6155523A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-12-05 Magnafix Inc. Magnetic base holder
US6574897B1 (en) * 1999-06-03 2003-06-10 Dana W. Timmer Display frame assembly and method of use
US6260749B1 (en) * 1999-10-15 2001-07-17 Eitan Horovitz Small article holder including magnet means
US6367126B1 (en) * 2000-03-23 2002-04-09 Bernard Rivkin Magnetic force eyeglass holder
US6446372B1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2002-09-10 Reeves Company, Inc. Magnetic name plate assembly
US6389649B1 (en) * 2000-08-18 2002-05-21 Joyce Metzler Garment accessory mounting device and method
US20020170147A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2002-11-21 Yaacov Heller Eyeglass holder
US7131745B2 (en) * 2004-04-29 2006-11-07 Sibbett Gary M Mountable illuminable display
US20050262666A1 (en) * 2004-05-28 2005-12-01 Mcintosh Amy R Magnetic floral attachment device
US20060005361A1 (en) * 2004-07-09 2006-01-12 O' Banion David S Magnetic attachment device and methodology
US7131744B2 (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-11-07 Ching-Hui Lee Shining costume jewelry

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050230023A1 (en) * 2004-04-20 2005-10-20 Hunter Nicolette T No holes pin
US20070101643A1 (en) * 2005-09-16 2007-05-10 Nancy Yowney Floral attachment device
US20080164267A1 (en) * 2007-01-09 2008-07-10 Alissa Huber Apparatuses, systems and methods for holding portable devices or instruments
US20090242597A1 (en) * 2008-03-27 2009-10-01 Morgan Clyde S Systems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US7987522B2 (en) * 2008-03-27 2011-08-02 Morgan Clyde S Systems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US20120017353A1 (en) * 2008-03-27 2012-01-26 Morgan Clyde S Systems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US8359664B2 (en) * 2008-03-27 2013-01-29 Morgan Clyde S Systems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US20120086530A1 (en) * 2010-10-12 2012-04-12 Donald Pateman Rathbun Multipole magnet for holding items to clothing
US8615853B2 (en) * 2010-10-12 2013-12-31 Donald P Rathbun Multipole magnet for holding items to clothing
US20150152981A1 (en) * 2012-05-21 2015-06-04 Martin Goodall Cable stay
USD775993S1 (en) 2015-04-10 2017-01-10 Boutstix Inc. Magnetic boutonniere appliance
USD791633S1 (en) 2016-04-13 2017-07-11 NY Plan B Holdings Inc. Magnetic boutonniere appliance

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3350045A (en) Article holder
US5974634A (en) Decorative multi-use magnetic buttons
US5740557A (en) Magnetic image-display system for apparel
US6012203A (en) Interchange snap-on adornments for fashion accessories
US20100171021A1 (en) Holder systems for mobile devices
US6279804B1 (en) Strap attachment system
US6339866B1 (en) Method and apparatus for a removable nametag or insignia
US6880737B2 (en) Cell phone holster subsidiary strap and holder
US5119979A (en) Eyewear holder for shorts, bathing suits and the like
US3591442A (en) Decorative wreaths
US6688316B1 (en) Decorative hair accessory kit with interchangeable decorations and storage board
US6155002A (en) Sanitary folding paper bug catcher
US5921110A (en) Interchangeable jewelry assembly
US3416195A (en) Floral corsage and fastener
US5630517A (en) Holder for hair styling tools and appliances
US7918620B2 (en) Magnetically mated cosmetic brushes and/or applicators and holder therefor
US5052602A (en) Lanyard
US5842613A (en) Eyeglass holder
US3842980A (en) Magnetic supporting means
US5950815A (en) Universal frame for mounting earrings and other jewelry
US5598926A (en) Decorative pager ornament cover
US6085393A (en) Badge strap attachment
US5857220A (en) Strap logo
US5201444A (en) Dispensing apparatus
US5732451A (en) Magnetic attachment device