US20050115135A1 - Gunstock - Google Patents

Gunstock Download PDF

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Publication number
US20050115135A1
US20050115135A1 US10914792 US91479204A US2005115135A1 US 20050115135 A1 US20050115135 A1 US 20050115135A1 US 10914792 US10914792 US 10914792 US 91479204 A US91479204 A US 91479204A US 2005115135 A1 US2005115135 A1 US 2005115135A1
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
holder
firearm
barrel
gunstock
support
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10914792
Inventor
Gerald Thompson
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Accurate Innovations LLC
Original Assignee
Accurate Innovations LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A21/00Barrels; Gun tubes; Muzzle attachments; Barrel mounting means
    • F41A21/48Barrel mounting means, e.g. releasable mountings for replaceable barrels
    • F41A21/485Barrel mounting means, e.g. releasable mountings for replaceable barrels using screws or bolts

Abstract

The action and barrel of a firearm are in direct contact with a high modulus of elasticity holder that receives the vibrations of recoil directly and distributes the vibrations over a wide area. The high modulus of elasticity holder, which may be made of a metal such as aluminum, transfers the forces to the wooden portion of a wooden gunstock over a wide area greater than 12 square inches so that there are substantially no concentrated stresses placed upon the wood.

Description

    RELATED CASES
  • This application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/494,138 filed Aug. 11, 2003, by inventor, Gerald Robert Thompson. The benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/494,138 is claimed.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to gunstocks.
  • It is known for long barrel firearms such as rifles to have wooden gunstocks or gunstocks made of synthetic such as plastic or gunstocks comprising a metal platform with a synthetic portion of the stock formed onto it. For example, in one known embodiment, a metal platform is attached to the synthetic portion of the stock as a metal insert in the cavity of an injection molding apparatus to have the synthetic portion of the stock molded onto it.
  • Wood stocks, without a metal insert have several disadvantages, such as for example: (1) there are small microscopic openings that in time admit some moisture causing eventual warping; (2) laminates may have voids that weaken the stock and permit eventual failure; (3) wood is subject to harmonics and subharmonics of the barrel vibrations after each round is fired; (4) the strength of the wood is not predictable and failure of the wood can be sudden and unexpected; (5) in the normal manufacturing of laminates, for reasons of economy, the adhesives used are sprayed in a continuous process of specific volume of adhesive per unit area, whereas the voids that need to be filled are irregular and, thus, some voids do not get filled; (6) many wood stocks have very small areas of contact with the barrel that must adsorb the entire force of recoil thus increasing the pressure on the points of contact; and (7) the forces imposed on the wood stock near the breech area of the firearm by fasteners cause damaging stress on the wood.
  • Synthetic stocks without an insert and with an insert molded into the synthetic also have disadvantages such as imparting a sharper more concentrated kick because the recoil force tends to impact the shooter close in time with vibrations from resonance effects.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a novel firearm.
  • It is a further object of the invention to provide a novel method of making a firearm.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel gunstock which is more durable and delivers less of a recoil to the shooter.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel wooden gunstock with a holder or support for a barrel.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a wooden gunstock for a firearm which is not subject to excessive warping in time.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel wood gunstock that is not excessively subject to harmonics and subharmonics of barrel vibrations.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel laminated wood gunstock.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel firearm in which the force of recoil is distributed over a substantial portion of the area of the gunstock rather than being concentrated.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a gunstock in which the fasteners fastening the breech to the gunstock do not cause concentrated stress.
  • In accordance with the above and further objects of the invention, a firearm is provided in which there is a recess in the gunstock that accommodates a holder or support for the barrel and the breech. Forces of recoil are thus transferred to the holder and from the holder to the wood stock in a less concentrated form. The holder has a higher modulus of elasticity than the wood and tends to prevent the wood from warping. It also avoids concentrated forces from being applied to the wood to avoid untimely fractures of the wood. In the preferred embodiment, the modulus of elasticity of a single one piece holder that supports both the barrel and the breech is above three million psi and preferably between nine million and ten million psi. However, it must be high enough to retard warping of the gunstock and reduce the concentration of the forces of recoil. To avoid the transmission of concentrated forces to the wood stock, the holder has a contact area with the wood stock of at least twelve square inches.
  • When the firearm is fired, the recoil forces are transferred to a holder directly rather than being transferred directly to the wood stock. The holder absorbs the forces and passes them on to the wood stock across an area of at least twelve square inches. It is stronger and less subject to warping than the wood stock and tends to hold the wood stock against warping.
  • In manufacturing the wood stock, a recess is formed sufficiently large to receive the breech and the barrel. A holder is formed that fits within the recess with contact with the wood stock of at least twelve square inches of area. The holder is fastened to the wood stock.
  • The barrel and the breech of the firearm is in contact with the holder so that it passes the recoil forces to the holder and not to the wood stock. The firing mechanism such as the trigger and the like pass through an opening in the applicator and in the wood stock to protrude from the wood stock in the conventional manner without providing a point for transferring forces to the wood stock. The applicator is fastened to the wood stock by relatively large tubular connectors instead of the breech being attached directly to the wood stock. Thus, the fasteners do not pass concentrated forces in the manner that would happen if the breech itself were fastened directly to the wood stock.
  • From the above description, it can be understood that the firearm of this invention has several advantages, such as for example: (1) the high modulus of elasticity holder holds the wood stock against warping from moisture over a period of time; (2) the high modulus of elasticity holder reduces failure from weaknesses in the wood stock; (3) the high modulus of elasticity holder reduces harmonics and subharmonics in the wood stock after rounds are fired; (4) the high modulus of elasticity holder reduces failure in the woods from concentrated recoil forces; (5) the high modulus of elasticity holder dissipates the concentrated forces that are occurring when the firearm is fired over a wider area and applies forces that are to be transmitted to the wood stock in less concentrated form over the wide area; and (6) it does not have fasteners extending from the breech into the wood stock to apply concentrated forces to the wood stock and loosen the fasteners.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The above noted and other features of the invention will be better understood from the following detailed description when considered together with the accompanied drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of a holder mounted within a rifle stock;
  • FIG. 2 is a side elevational view, partly broken away, showing a barrel and breech lock section within a rifle stock having a holder;
  • FIG. 3 is a top view of a holder in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a right side view of the holder of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a left view of the holder of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the holder of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 7 is a plan view of a stock adapted to receive the holders in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a block diagram showing the steps in making a firearm in accordance with an embodiment of the invention; and
  • FIG. 9 is a flow diagram showing the steps in firing a firearm in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In FIG. 1, there is shown a plan view of a rifle stock 12 having a holder 14 mounted within a recess 16 within the stock 12. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the firearm stock 12 is a wood stock and the holder 14 is an aluminum holder. However, other materials can be used. Generally, the holder 14 will have a modulus of elasticity greater than three million psi and in the preferred embodiment, it is approximately nine million psi (pounds per square inch). It is mounted to have a large area of at least twelve square inches and the surface area of contact should be at least ten percent of the surface area of the support itself. The amount of surface area will of course depend upon the particular weapon but it is desirable to maximize the surface to spread the force of recoil throughout the high modulus of elasticity holder and transfer it to the wood stock over the widest possible area to avoid concentrated forces on the wood stock.
  • The holder 14 includes a breech block section 38, the barrel supporting section 18 preferably has a flat upper surface against which the barrel rests to receive the vibrations from the barrel. The breech block section 38 includes on its upper surface a recess portion 22, first and second through openings 26 and 28, a curved support 24, a bushing support 32, cut away portions 34 and 30, and a shoulder 36. Bushings 40 and 42 having central openings for bolts extending downwardly from the top surface of the holder to receive fasteners for tightly fastening the holder against the firearm stock. The recess portion 22 receives a correspondingly shaped portion of the breech block to hold it in place, while the breech block itself extends and is exposed in the opening 26 and the trigger mechanism extends downwardly through the opening 28 to protrude from the bottom of a corresponding opening in the wood stock. The curved support 24 receives the chamber which is correspondingly shaped and has through it the bushing 40 for holding the holder to the firearm stock. At the near end of the breech block extending away from the barrel support section 18 is a support 34 that accommodates the bushing 42. The cut away portion 34 accommodates the breech lever and the cutaway portion 30 and shoulder 36 receive correspondingly shaped portions of the breech block.
  • With this arrangement, the holder receives the recoil vibrations upon firing and conducts the strain throughout the holder where it is imparted to a wide surface area of the wood stock. Also, it holds the wood stock against curved warping because it is fully recessed with its sides in contact with the inner side of the recess of the wood stock to prevent such bending. Because of the extensive contact both laterally and at the underside, there is sufficient restraining force against such warping. With a modulus of elasticity of more than three million psi, its strength is greater than that of conventional firearm stocks so that it has ample strength to resist the forces of recoil.
  • In FIG. 2, there is shown a fragmentary side, elevational view of a firearm 46 having the breech block 48, a trigger mechanism 50 and a barrel 52 resting on the holder 14 (FIG. 1). With this arrangement, when the firearm 46 is fired, the barrel 52 vibrates against the holder primarily to pass concentrated stresses to it. The breech block 48 has points of high force that also impinge against the holder, which in the preferred embodiment, is a single piece so that the forces enter the holder and are conducted through it because of its relatively high modulus of elasticity. The recoil force is also transmitted backwardly through the stock, which is preferably wood, while the recoil vibrations are within the holder to reduce the total recoil force against the shoulder of the shooter.
  • In FIG. 3, there is shown a top view of the holder 14 shown without the fasteners that would go within the bushings 42 and 40 or within the opening 54 to fasten the holder to the bottom of the wood stock. However, the parts are otherwise the same as in FIG. 1 and are numbered accordingly. As can be best seen in this view, in the preferred embodiment, the holder is made as a single unit except for the fasteners to increase the translation of vibrations that are perpendicular to the plane of the holder into vertical strains, to convert vibrational energy to heat energy, dissipate the heat energy and to transfer the vibrations with reduced amplitude over a wide area of the stock.
  • In FIGS. 4 and 5, there is shown, respectively, right and left elevational views of the holder 14 showing the bushing 42, the bushing 40, the barrel supporting section 18 and the opening 54 for a fastener. In FIG. 4, there is shown the cut away portions 34 and 30 to receive breech levers. At the bottom of the barrel supporting section 18, in spaced apart relation to each other, are protruding parallelopiped integrally formed units 55 and 56 that fit into corresponding openings in the wood stock under the barrel supporting section 18 for a firmer connection to increase the connection between the barrel supporting section 18 and the wood stock.
  • In FIG. 6, there is shown a bottom view of a holder 14 indicating the parts shown in FIGS. 3-5 by the identical numbers and showing more clearly serrations 58, two of which are numbered and which extend throughout the length of the barrel supporting section and a portion of the breech block supporting section 20 in some embodiments to hold more epoxy for a better connection between the barrel holding section and the wood stock.
  • In FIG. 7, there is shown a plan view of a stock 12 including the opening 16 for receiving the holder and having the openings 60, 62, 64, 66 and 68. In the barrel support section, there is a raised triangular portion 70. The openings 62 and 68 are to receive the bushings 40 and 42 (FIGS. 1, and 3-5), the breech block section opening 64, the trigger mechanism opening 66, the spacer wedge 70 and the gripping openings 60.
  • In FIG. 8, there is shown a flow diagram 71 of the steps which may be used to make an embodiment of firearm in accordance with the invention comprising the step 72 of preparing a wooden gunstock with a recess for holder, barrel and breech or action mechanism, the step 74 of preparing a one-piece high modulus of elasticity holder, the step 76 of mounting the holder to the wood stock with a large contact area, and the step 78 of mounting the barrel and breech on the holder without substantial contact with the wood stock. With these steps, a holder is provided in a firearm which distributes the vibrational forces over an area of the wood stock and tends to hold the wood stock from bending.
  • In FIG. 9, there is shown a flow diagram 80 illustrating the actions taken in using a firearm in accordance with an embodiment of the invention comprising the step 82 of firing a firearm having a wooden stock and a one-piece high modulus of elasticity holder, the step 84 of transferring the recoil vibrations directly to the holder without barrel or breech contact of the stock, and the step 86 of transferring vibrations to a wide area of the wooden stock without concentrated forces. With this arrangement, the firearm is fired, but instead of the recoil vibrations being transferred directly to the wooden portion of the stock, they are transferred to the high modulus of elasticity holder where they are distributed over a wide area greater than 12 square inches and then transferred to the wooden portion of the stock.
  • As can be understood from the above description, the firearm of this invention has several advantages, such as for example: (1) a high modulus of elasticity holder holds the wood stock against warping from moisture over a period of time; (2) a high modulus of elasticity holder for the barrel and action of the firearm reduces failure from weakness in the wood stock; (3) a high modulus of elasticity holder for the firearm action and barrel reduces harmonics and subharmonics in the wood stock after rounds are fired; (4) a high modulus of elasticity holder reduces failure in the wood from concentrated recoil forces; (5) a high modulus of elasticity holder dissipates the concentrated forces that are occurring when the firearm is fired over a wider area and applies forces that are to be transmitting to the wood stock in less concentrated form over the wide area; and (6) it is not necessary to have fasteners extending from the breech of the firearm into the wood stock and thus avoids concentrated forces being applied to the wood stock to loosen the fasteners.

Claims (12)

  1. 1. A method of making a firearm comprising the steps of:
    forming a gunstock with a recess sufficiently large to receive a barrel and action of the firearm;
    fastening a holder to the gunstock in the recess;
    supporting the barrel and action of the firearm on the holder, wherein the holder has a high modulus of elasticity and vibration conductivity, whereby recoil forces are distributed over the holder without damages to the holder and from a holder to a contact area with the gunstock of at least 12 square inches whereby vibrational forces in the holder are transferred to the gunstock over a wide area without concentration of forces.
  2. 2. A method according to claim 1 wherein the step of supporting the barrel and action of the firearm comprises the step of supporting the barrel and action on a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of at least 3 million psi.
  3. 3. A method according to claim 2 wherein the step of supporting the barrel and action of the firearm on a one-piece holder comprises the step of supporting the barrel and action on a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of between nine million and ten million psi.
  4. 4. A method of firing a firearm having a barrel and breech support and a firearm stock comprising the steps of:
    firing the firearm;
    transmitting vibrations of the barrel and breech to the support without transmitting vibrations from the barrel and breech directly to the stock;
    transmitting the vibrations from the support to a wide area of the stock, whereby concentrated vibrational forces are not applied directly to the stock from the support and vibrational forces are not applied directly from the barrel and breech to the stock;
    the step of transmitting vibrations of the barrel and breech to the support including the substep of distributing the vibrations throughout the support; and
    the step of transmitting vibrations from the support to a wide area of the stock including the substep of transmitting vibrations over an area of at least 12 square inches and at least 10 percent of the support.
  5. 5. A method according to claim 4 wherein the step of transmitting vibrations of the barrel and breech to the support comprises the step of supporting the barrel and action on a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of at least 3 million psi.
  6. 6. A method according to claim 4 wherein the step of transmitting vibrations of the barrel and breech to the support comprises the step of supporting the barrel and action on a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of between nine million and ten million psi.
  7. 7. A firearm comprising:
    a barrel;
    a breech;
    a gunstock;
    a holder;
    said gunstock having a recess sufficiently large to receive the holder, barrel and breech of the firearm;
    the holder being fastened in the recess to the gunstock;
    the barrel and breech of the firearm being fastened on the holder;
    the holder having a high modulus of elasticity, whereby recoil forces are distributed over the holder without damages to the holder; and
    said gunstock and holder having at least 10 square inches in contact with each other and at least 10 percent of the support, whereby vibrational forces in the holder are transferred to the gunstock over a wide area without concentration of forces.
  8. 8. A firearm according to claim 7 in which the holder is a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of at least 3 million psi.
  9. 9. A firearm according to claim 7 in which the holder is a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of between nine million and ten million psi.
  10. 10. A support for a firearm, comprising:
    a top surface for supporting a barrel and breech of the firearm;
    a bottom surface for contacting a gunstock of the firearm;
    fastener means for fastening a holder to the gunstock of the firearm;
    said holder having an opening positioned to be aligned with a corresponding opening in the gunstock of the firearm for permitting a firing mechanism to extend below the gunstock of the firearm;
    the holder being fastened in a recess to the gunstock;
    the holder having a high modulus of elasticity, whereby recoil forces are distributed over the holder without damages to the holder; and
    said gunstock and holder having at least 12 square inches in contact with each other, whereby vibrational forces in the holder are transferred to the gunstock over a wide area without concentration of forces.
  11. 11. A support for a firearm according to claim 10 in which the holder is a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of at least 3 million psi.
  12. 12. A support for a firearm according to claim 10 in which the holder is a one-piece holder having a modulus of elasticity of between 9 and 10 million psi.
US10914792 2003-08-11 2004-08-10 Gunstock Abandoned US20050115135A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US49413803 true 2003-08-11 2003-08-11
US10914792 US20050115135A1 (en) 2003-08-11 2004-08-10 Gunstock

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10914792 US20050115135A1 (en) 2003-08-11 2004-08-10 Gunstock
US11045445 US20050235545A1 (en) 2003-08-11 2005-01-25 Gunstock

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US20050115135A1 true true US20050115135A1 (en) 2005-06-02

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US10914792 Abandoned US20050115135A1 (en) 2003-08-11 2004-08-10 Gunstock

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8769854B1 (en) 2012-04-10 2014-07-08 Vincent P. Battaglia Solid chassis rifle
US9091505B1 (en) 2012-04-10 2015-07-28 Vincent P. Battaglia Solid chassis rifle
US20150267988A1 (en) * 2013-08-05 2015-09-24 Timothy Sellars Method for Improving Rifle Accuracy
USD742470S1 (en) 2012-04-10 2015-11-03 Vincent P. Battaglia Cheek piece for rifle

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3206885A (en) * 1963-10-01 1965-09-21 Dye Garnett Jethro Firearm with metal bearing member and plastic material between receiver and stock
US3830003A (en) * 1970-04-16 1974-08-20 J Clerke Floated barrel rifle with metal stock for improved barrel action bedding
US3972143A (en) * 1974-02-06 1976-08-03 J. G. Anschutz Gmbh Weapon for target competition
US3987571A (en) * 1973-01-31 1976-10-26 Hector Mendoza Orozco Portable submachine gun
US4312146A (en) * 1979-12-07 1982-01-26 Alpha Arms, Inc. Rifle barrel and receiver mounting means for rifle stock
US4385464A (en) * 1980-09-15 1983-05-31 Casull Richard J Mounting of barrell and action to rifle stock
US5075995A (en) * 1990-11-02 1991-12-31 Kennel Gordon H Recoil redistribution gunstock
US5247758A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-09-28 Mason James D Rifle barrel truss mounting
US5737865A (en) * 1995-03-31 1998-04-14 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Repeater shot gun
US5798473A (en) * 1997-04-30 1998-08-25 Roblyer; Steven Harmonic optimization system for rifles
US6301817B1 (en) * 1996-11-14 2001-10-16 Aaron G. Hogue Long gun stock
US6560911B2 (en) * 1999-10-06 2003-05-13 Ronnie L. Sharp Adjustable gun stock

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3206885A (en) * 1963-10-01 1965-09-21 Dye Garnett Jethro Firearm with metal bearing member and plastic material between receiver and stock
US3830003A (en) * 1970-04-16 1974-08-20 J Clerke Floated barrel rifle with metal stock for improved barrel action bedding
US3987571A (en) * 1973-01-31 1976-10-26 Hector Mendoza Orozco Portable submachine gun
US3972143A (en) * 1974-02-06 1976-08-03 J. G. Anschutz Gmbh Weapon for target competition
US4312146A (en) * 1979-12-07 1982-01-26 Alpha Arms, Inc. Rifle barrel and receiver mounting means for rifle stock
US4385464A (en) * 1980-09-15 1983-05-31 Casull Richard J Mounting of barrell and action to rifle stock
US5075995A (en) * 1990-11-02 1991-12-31 Kennel Gordon H Recoil redistribution gunstock
US5247758A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-09-28 Mason James D Rifle barrel truss mounting
US5737865A (en) * 1995-03-31 1998-04-14 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Repeater shot gun
US6301817B1 (en) * 1996-11-14 2001-10-16 Aaron G. Hogue Long gun stock
US5798473A (en) * 1997-04-30 1998-08-25 Roblyer; Steven Harmonic optimization system for rifles
US6560911B2 (en) * 1999-10-06 2003-05-13 Ronnie L. Sharp Adjustable gun stock

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8769854B1 (en) 2012-04-10 2014-07-08 Vincent P. Battaglia Solid chassis rifle
US9091505B1 (en) 2012-04-10 2015-07-28 Vincent P. Battaglia Solid chassis rifle
USD742470S1 (en) 2012-04-10 2015-11-03 Vincent P. Battaglia Cheek piece for rifle
US20150267988A1 (en) * 2013-08-05 2015-09-24 Timothy Sellars Method for Improving Rifle Accuracy
US9285178B2 (en) * 2013-08-05 2016-03-15 Timothy Sellars Method for improving rifle accuracy

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ACCURATE INNOVATIONS, L.L.C., SOUTH DAKOTA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:THOMPSON, GERALD ROBERT;REEL/FRAME:015406/0751

Effective date: 20040903