US20050109381A1 - Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber - Google Patents

Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050109381A1
US20050109381A1 US10958515 US95851504A US2005109381A1 US 20050109381 A1 US20050109381 A1 US 20050109381A1 US 10958515 US10958515 US 10958515 US 95851504 A US95851504 A US 95851504A US 2005109381 A1 US2005109381 A1 US 2005109381A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
shelter
telescopic body
body portions
disposed
body portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10958515
Inventor
Kevin Mosteller
Original Assignee
Kevin Mosteller
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63CLAUNCHING, HAULING-OUT, OR DRY-DOCKING OF VESSELS; LIFE-SAVING IN WATER; EQUIPMENT FOR DWELLING OR WORKING UNDER WATER; MEANS FOR SALVAGING OR SEARCHING FOR UNDERWATER OBJECTS
    • B63C11/00Equipment for dwelling or working underwater; Means for searching for underwater objects
    • B63C11/02Divers' equipment
    • B63C11/32Decompression arrangements; Exercise equipment
    • B63C11/325Decompression arrangements; Exercise equipment chambers used for it
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61GTRANSPORT OR ACCOMODATION FOR PATIENTS; OPERATING TABLES OR CHAIRS; CHAIRS FOR DENTISTRY; FUNERAL DEVICES
    • A61G10/00Treatment rooms or enclosures for medical purposes
    • A61G10/02Treatment rooms or enclosures for medical purposes with artificial climate; with means to maintain a desired pressure, e.g. for germ-free rooms
    • A61G10/023Rooms for the treatment of patients at over- or under-pressure or at a variable pressure
    • A61G10/026Rooms for the treatment of patients at over- or under-pressure or at a variable pressure for hyperbaric oxygen therapy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62BDEVICES, APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR LIFE-SAVING
    • A62B31/00Containers or portable cabins for affording breathing protection with devices for reconditioning the breathing air or for ventilating, in particular those that are suitable for invalids or small children

Abstract

A shelter in the form of a tubular structure with closeable openings at each end. Material is to be a lightweight core, such as PVC or Rohacell foam, sandwiched between two skin layers, each of which consists of fiberglass, carbon fiber, or aramid fiber. Form is to be several sections that can be expanded and contracted telescopically thereby allowing for transport as a backpack while contracted, and shelter for a supine adult while expanded. The sections are to be linked and not independent or free-standing. The sections at either end are to have rigid doors that allow access to the shelter interior. When fully expanded, the sections lock together providing for an airtight, rigid structure. This structure may serve as shelter and hyperbaric chamber for treatment of illnesses such as those resulting from exposure to low barometric pressures at high altitudes (e.g., HACE, HAPE). The structure can be fitted with a pump and a pressure release valve, which allow for control of barometric pressure to relieve such ailments associated with high altitudes. The shelter takes the place of separate backpack, tent or other shelter, insulating pad, sleeping bag, and transportable hyperbaric device.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/508,685, filed on Oct. 6, 2003.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention generally relates to a unique collapsible shelter which can act as a shelter and/or hyperbaric chamber. In particular, this novel device can be collapsible for easy storage and transporting, as well has adapted with a pressure regulator to act as a hyperbaric chamber if necessary.
  • 2. Discussion of the Background Art
  • Throughout time, man has depended during his travels upon a standard system of warmth and shelter. This system has often included a tent of some sort, blankets or a sleeping bag, an insulating pad or additional blanket, and a backpack or alternative bag in which to transport these items. In recent times, as man has sought the summits of high altitude peaks, research and technology has enabled the advent of portable hyperbaric chambers, which counter the physical ailments caused by low barometric pressures. This tool has contributed yet another bulky variable to the equipment equation. Although the materials used to produce these tools have evolved over time, the equipment itself has not changed appreciably in over 75 years. One need only look at the equipment of a modem mountain climber as compared to that used on the failed 1924 British Everest Expedition to realize the amazing lack of development in mountaineering gear.
  • The shelter of the present invention radically changes the status quo scenario of mountaineering. In doing so, it remedies a number of problems with which climbers have attempted to deal over the course of nearly a century. These problems include:
      • (a) Heavy weight resulting from the need for separate backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad, tent, and hyperbaric chamber;
      • (b) Complexity of and resultant disorganization in dealing with each backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad, tent, and hyperbaric chamber; interdependency of tent, sleeping bag, and insulating pad such that each must be present and fully functioning in order to reap the benefits of any single element;
      • (c) Dangerously lengthy deployment and breakdown time for sleeping bag, insulating pad, tent, and hyperbaric chamber, particularly in adverse conditions;
      • (d) Frailty of tents that are prone to damage or catastrophic failure in adverse conditions, such as exposure to high winds, i.e., tents are easily damaged by exposure to heat, fuels, mildew, sharp instruments, a simple misplaced step, or simply by setting it up too quickly;
      • (e) Loud noise produced by tents in wind, which inhibits sleep and promotes high levels of mental stress;
      • (f) Non-utility of sleeping bags when wet, and non-waterproof backpacks;
      • (g) Need for a shelter site that is level and large enough to accommodate a tent and its contents. A great deal of time and energy is often expended in the location and leveling of a site, which renders repeated breakdown, moving, and set-up of tents several times in the course of a short traveling window impractical and often impossible. Additionally, selected and leveled sites may remain uncomfortable;
      • (h) Heavy weight and bulkiness of hyperbaric chambers such that climbers usually bring fewer chambers than members on an expedition, negating the possibility of treating multiple victims of high altitude ailments simultaneously;
      • (i) Unnecessary difficulty in placing a debilitated person into a portable hyperbaric chamber;
      • (j) Need to insert a sleeping bag into current portable hyperbaric chambers in order to warm a victim during treatment;
      • (k) Use of excessive space, which is at a premium in any expedition, by the need for separate tent, sleeping bag, insulating pad, and hyperbaric chamber. This space could be used for other required supplies or equipment;
      • (l) Purchase of separate tent, backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad, and hyperbaric chamber, whereby consumers purchase products from different manufacturers or retailers;
      • (m) Susceptibility of inflatable insulating pads to puncture, rendering them nearly useless;
      • (n) Insufficiency of tent, sleeping bag, and insulating pad—even when functioning to utmost capability—in protecting against natural elements, especially cold;
      • (o) Need to remove supplies contained within a backpack in order for them to be ministered within a shelter;
      • (p) Multiple guy lines and anchor points necessary for tent support. Each anchor point requires an anchor, thereby necessitating the buying of more needed equipment or the carrying of more anchor tools;
      • (q) Multiple materials and methods required for separate manufacture of tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, insulating pads, and hyperbaric chambers;
      • (r) Inflexibility of tent, sleeping bag, and insulating pad sizes so that multiple patterns and sizes needed to suit different proportions;
      • (s) Unsuitable surfaces of tents and backpacks for the permanent attachment of a solar array; and
      • (t) Difficulty in cleaning tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, insulating pads, and portable hyperbaric chambers.
  • The present invention overcomes many of the aforementioned problems by significantly reducing weight by combining the shelter, backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad and hyperbaric chamber into a single item. The present invention also provides simplification and increased orderliness through combining of shelter, backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad and hyperbaric chamber into one item. It also provides for easy and quick deployment to ensure greater simplicity and singularity of gear so as to enable travel during short periods of good conditions. Such facility of movement has not been possible previously and significantly increases one's chances of success and safety. The present invention also provides superior resistance to exterior forces, heat, fuels, organic growth, and sharp instruments as a result of its' composition and deployment of the hard-walled rigid shelter.
  • The present invention also provides comparatively quiet interior resulting from muffling effects of the present invention's composition resulting in decreased mental stress of climbers. Due to the present invention's unique composition it is impervious to water and is water resistant in both modes, as backpack and as shelter. The present invention also provides an ability to insulate the occupant whether wet or dry.
  • The present invention may be deployed on non-level surfaces, including rough surfaces, and on sites smaller than the shelter where the shelter may overhang an edge. The interior comfort is the same whether the shelter is deployed suspended or on a smooth, level surface.
  • One of the unique multifunctional capabilities of the present invention is that it can also serve as a hyperbaric chamber, thereby obviating the need for carrying a separate chamber. Thus, the present invention has the dual advantage of eliminating additional bulk and weight as well as ensuring that each climber may be treated through the use of his own shelter.
  • Another problem which the present invention addresses is that it provides easy ingress of a debilitated or unconscious victim of high altitude-induced ailments for hyperbaric treatment permitted by the openings at either end of the present invention. The rigid nature of the present invention also alleviates problems for the administrators of treatment that are associated with a deflated hyperbaric bag.
  • The present invention also eliminates the need for a sleeping bag or blanket with which to keep warm a patient being treated hyperbarically due to the insulating quality of the present invention.
  • The present invention also substantially decreases the possibility of damage and subsequent system inefficacy due to the shelter floor's insulating and resilient composite material.
  • The present invention also eliminates the need for separate removal and transfer of supplies from a backpack into a tent, as the shelter serves as both. That is, one may simply access the contents by entering the shelter.
  • Another unique aspect of the present invention is that it does not need structural support from guy lines due to the shelter's hard rigid body. Only a few guy lines are necessary for anchoring the shelter in high winds or leveling it off. Fewer guy lines require fewer anchors, in turn requiring fewer buried tools or anchor tools.
  • The present invention is easily made to order for individual customers due to the shelter's modular design. The nesting of the sections allows each to be used for a different part of the shelter depending upon the dimensions of the customer. This modularity allows for the simple production and storage of disassembled shelters and for the simple replacement of damaged sections. The modularity also allows the manufacturer to keep in supply a relatively specific range of shelter sizes, which can be cut to fit the length of the individual consumer.
  • The present invention also provides many additional advantages, which shall become apparent as described below.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A collapsible shelter comprising: at least two telescopic body portions disposed such that at least a first body portion is collapsibly disposable within a second body portion when in a collapsible mode; and at least one door disposed on an end portion of the telescopic body portion which is not adjacent another telescopic body portion; wherein the telescopic body portions may be expanded and affixed to one another when in an expanded mode.
  • The shelter further comprises at least one window disposed within at least one telescopic body portion. Preferably, the window is removably disposed within a side wall of the telescopic body portion.
  • The telescopic body portions are affixed to one another in an expanded mode by means of oppositely disposed flanges, wherein the flanges are disposed on adjacent end portions of the telescopic body portions and wherein at least one of the flanges comprise a lock pin, wherein the lock pin secures the first and second body portions when in the expanded mode. Preferably, at least one of the flanges comprises a gasket, thereby forming an airtight seal between the adjacent telescopic body portions when the telescopic body portions are in the expanded mode.
  • The telescopic body portions preferably comprise an insulating layer and a hollow core. The insulating layer comprises a core layer disposed between a pair of external layers. The core layer is at least one insulating material selected from the group consisting of: expanded hexagonal aramid, PVC Foam, and Rohacell® foam. The external layers are at least one material selected from the group consisting of: plastic, fibers immersed in a thermoset plastic, and fiberglass.
  • According to another embodiment of the present invention, the shelter further comprises a pressure regulator, thereby allowing the shelter to act as a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure regulator comprises a valve disposed about a side wall of one of the telescopic body portions for increasing the air pressure within the shelter; and a pressure relief valve disposed about a side wall of one of the telescopic body portions for controlling the pressure within the shelter.
  • In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the shelter further comprises a backpack frame disposed about the outer surface of the largest diameter telescopic body portion, thereby acting as a backpack when in the collapsible mode.
  • The present invention also involves a method for forming a shelter, comprising: expanding a collapsible shelter comprising at least two telescopic body portions disposed such that at least a first body portion is collapsibly disposable within a second body portion; and at least one door disposed on an end portion of the telescopic body portion which is not adjacent another telescopic body portion; and affixing the telescopic body portions to one another to avoid collapsing of the shelter during use. This method may further comprise the step of regulating the pressure within the shelter, thereby allowing the shelter to act as a hyperbaric chamber.
  • Further objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be understood by reference to the following drawings and detailed description.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a one-dimensional cross-sectional rendering, which shows the three-layer sandwich composite wall of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a one-dimensional cross-sectional rendering as viewed from the side, which shows the pin locking mechanism within the three-layer sandwich composite wall at the structural junction of two invention sections. This exemplifies the flange used to secure the expanded sections.
  • FIG. 3 is a rendering of a cross section of the invention as viewed from the end, with the enclosed occupant.
  • FIG. 4 is a three-dimensional rendering, which shows the fully expanded invention with associated parts.
  • FIG. 5 is an exploded via of a plug/valve port according to the present invention when shelter is to be used as a hyperbaric chamber.
  • FIGS. 6 a and b are a cross-sectional side view and a front planar view of a relief valve which may be inserted into the plug/valve port of FIG. 5.
  • FIGS. 7 a and b are a cross-sectional side view and a front planar view of a inflation valve which may be inserted into the plug/valve port of FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 8 is a exploded view of a body portion of the shelter having a backpack harness disposed thereon according to another embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • Modern-day mountaineering requires time, endurance, and, most important, dependable equipment. The present invention directly affects each of these elements. By decreasing the weight of the mountaineer's load, the invention exponentially increases the chances of the mountaineer's success. A lighter load enables one to move more rapidly. Easier and faster shelter deployment also facilitates quick movement between sites and with less depletion of energy. Most importantly, with a nearly indestructible and completely insulating shelter, one can climb with a greatly lowered risk of exposure to the elements, and subsequently, a lowered risk of serious injury or death. Moreover, the shelter offers hyperbaric chamber capability, rendering treatment of high altitude induced ailments easier and more effective. The shelter eliminates equipment, weighs less, is extremely resilient, and is more easily and faster deployed than anything developed in the past.
  • The present invention is a shelter in the form of a tubular triangular structure with closeable openings at each end that can be expanded and contracted telescopically. Its primary use is to protect an adult in a cold and/or high altitude environment (FIG. 3). The shelter replaces tent, backpack, sleeping bag, insulating pad, and/or portable hyperbaric chamber.
  • The shelter is comprised of several hollow cylindrical sections whose walls are constructed of a three-layer sandwich composite (FIG. 1). The evacuated core layer 1 is comprised of a strong lightweight core material, such as rigid expanded PVC foam bonded between two outer layers 2, each of which is made of a woven sheet of fiberglass fibers immersed in a thermoset plastic. This composite structure is routinely used in the construction of aerospace vehicles. Each hollow cylindrical section 3 is sized to nest within the next larger section thereby allowing several nested sections to telescope outward. Each end of the assembled shelter is fitted with a corresponding frame 8 and door structure 4, both constructed of the same sandwich composite as specified for the walls.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, each hollow cylindrical section 3 has a flange 5 a or 5 b circumscribing the opening at each end of the section. The two outer cylinders of the shelter have flanges 5 a or 5 b on only the ends in contact with middle cylinder(s) since the terminal end of each outer cylinder will accommodate a doorframe instead. Each flange 5 a is accordingly offset either within the cylinder or without in order to oppose the corresponding flange 5 b of the cylinder that nests within. When the structures are assembled and the resultant shelter is expanded outward, the corresponding flanges engage 5 a and 5 b, prohibiting the cylinders from separating. Several locking pins 6 are then engaged on the exterior of the shelter 3, which prohibit the cylinders from nesting and permitting an airtight connection to be formed between oppositely disposed flanges 5 a and 5 b by means of gaskets 15. Once the flanges 5 a and 5 b are in place, then one end 16 of pin 6 is forced via spring 17 into locking port or hole 18 disposed within the oppositely disposed cylindrical section 3. The shelter is thereby fully expanded, locked, and rigid (FIG. 4).
  • Round window holes 7 between three and five inches in diameter are present in the walls of the largest of the cylinders and in each door. Disposed within window holes 7 are a sealing neoprene gasket 26. A short, thin, round plastic cylinder is threaded and sleeves each hole 10. The holes are mated with identically threaded round plugs of corresponding diameter and cylinder wall thickness 11. The round plugs are constructed of transparent plastic that is hollow and evacuated. As depicted in FIG. 5, a second round plug configuration 20 is constructed similarly to the first plug, but with a relief valve or inflation valve of FIGS. 6 a,b and FIGS. 7 a,b, respectively, being threaded into a collar 22, which perforates through the center of the plug. The respective relief or inflation valve is seated into collar 22 by means of a neoprene washer 24. This valve is either the Halkey-Roberts type of pressure inflation valve as shown in FIGS. 7 a,b, commonly used on whitewater rafts, or a Halkey-Roberts pressure relief valve as shown in FIGS. 6 a,b. The pressure inflation valve and the pressure relief valve configurations are used simultaneously during the invention's use as a hyperbaric chamber.
  • The preferred pressure relief valve is shown in FIGS. 6 a,b as valve 30 comprising a body 32 of aluminum black anodize with a spring 34 and spring guide 36. Valve 30 also includes a neoprene gasket 38 and washer 40, as well as a nut 42 threadably disposed about a threaded portion of body 32.
  • The preferred inflation valve is shown in FIGS. 7 a,b as valve 50 comprising a body portion 52, gasket 54, steel spring 56, polypropylene poppet guide 58, cap 60, pull cord 62, nut 64, stem 66, hypalon seal 68 and o-ring 70.
  • Disengaging locking pins 6 and nesting the cylinders together collapses the shelter. In its collapsed form, the shelter may be utilized as a container and transported as a backpack. Doorframes 8 are attached to either end of the shelter 3 using adhesive or fasteners. The doors 4 may be attached to the doorframes 8 from the inside or outside of the shelter by placing the door in the shelter opening and engaging the locks 9, not shown in detail, located on three corners of the door 4.
  • The shelter can be used as a hyperbaric chamber to treat symptoms of low barometric pressure induced ailments such as pulmonary edema. The victim is placed inside the shelter and an inflation valve plug and a pressure relief valve plug are threaded into the window holes and sealed by means of a neoprene gasket. The doors 4 of the shelter are attached from the inside of the shelter and locked. A common foot operated bellows or compressed air tank is fitted with a corresponding hose and attached by threads to the inflation valve as would be done inflating a white water raft. Air pressure within the shelter is then increased through the use of the pump or tank until it surpasses the pressure rating of the set relief valve, when the interior air is exhausted. The increased air pressure is continued until further treatment is deemed unnecessary.
  • The shelter walls may be produced in a manner similar to that used in the production of composite sandwich structures utilized in the aerospace industry. A molding tool is constructed, around which (or within which) the composite walls are formed. A fiberglass-impregnated thermoset plastic layer is wrapped around the tool, followed by the lightweight rigid foam core material and then the second fiberglass-impregnated thermoset plastic layer. An adhesive is used between the layers. Another tool is then positioned to help compress the sandwich layers. The assemblage is placed in a vacuum bag and hoses connected to a vacuum pump pulling between 5.0 and 29.9 inches of mercury at STP are connected to the vacuum bag. The arrangement is placed in an industrial autoclave and compressed and heated for the duration and standards specified by the thermoset plastic manufacturer. The doorframes, doors, and window plugs are produced in a like manner. Completed cylinder section may be selected and nested according to the body size of the user. The total thickness of the sandwich composite walls, doorframes, and window plugs is between 0.25 and 1.0 inch depending upon the final length of the expanded shelter. The total thickness of the doors is 0.75 inch.
  • All hard points requiring parts constructed of material other than the sandwich composite materials or material already mentioned are made from a resilient thermoplastic or thermoset plastic. The flanges utilize plastic of this type. All seams are lined with a flexible, insulating neoprene foam gasket sized to fit the corresponding space. The gasket material used to insulate and seal the seams may vary as long as the final result is acceptable within the parameters of usage, weight, strength, and insulation.
  • The cross-sectional shape of the shelter may be any shape that results in a hollow cylinder. Moreover, there may alternatively be only one door opening in either end of the shelter instead of one at both ends. Moreover, the number of cylinder sections may be decreased to two sections, or increased to any number of sections as long as the structural strength, overall volume, and function are within usage limits. The length of each section may also vary according to the needs of the user as long as the above parameters are met.
  • One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the walls of the shelter may be constructed of materials other than those described above as long as the weight, strength, insulating, and volume qualities are similar or improved.
  • The flanges may be of a variety of different shapes know to those of ordinary skill in the art and may be made of different materials from those described above; provided that the flanges provide a lock fit and are airtight.
  • The number, placement, and dimension of the window openings are unlimited in possible variation provided that the overall function of the invention is not compromised.
  • The door locks may vary in number and may be located either on the door(s) or on the door frame(s) or on both.
  • The sandwich composite may consist of up to and exceeding seven layers, including wool and Mylar™, in order to best function. Final thickness of the walls and door(s) may vary within the usage parameters outlined above.
  • Alternatively, a backpack harness 80, as shown in FIG. 8, can be affixed to the exterior side wall of a telescopic body portion 82 for easy of transport. Harness 80 is preferably affixed to body portion 82 by means of Nylon™ webbing or straps 82 which are connected to the surface of body portion 82 via multiple hardpoints or latches 86.
  • While I have shown and described several embodiments in accordance with my invention, it is to be clearly understood that the same may be susceptible to numerous changes apparent to one skilled in the art. Therefore, I do not wish to be limited to the details shown and described but intend to show all changes and modifications that come within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (21)

  1. 1. A collapsible shelter comprising:
    at least two telescopic body portions disposed such that at least a first body portion is collapsibly disposable within a second body portion when in a collapsible mode; and
    at least one door disposed on an end portion of said telescopic body portion which is not adjacent another telescopic body portion;
    wherein said telescopic body portions may be expanded and affixed to one another when in an expanded mode.
  2. 2. The shelter according to claim 1, further comprising at least one window disposed within at least one telescopic body portion.
  3. 3. The shelter according to claim 2, wherein said window is removably disposed within a side wall of said telescopic body portion.
  4. 4. The shelter according to claim 1, wherein said telescopic body portions are affixed to one another in an expanded mode by means of oppositely disposed flanges, wherein said flanges are disposed on adjacent end portions of said telescopic body portions and wherein at least one of said flanges comprise a lock pin, wherein said lock pin secures said first and second body portions when in said expanded mode.
  5. 5. The shelter according to claim 4, wherein at least one of said flanges comprises a gasket, thereby forming an airtight seal between said adjacent telescopic body portions when said telescopic body portions are in said expanded mode.
  6. 6. The shelter according to claim 1, wherein said telescopic body portions comprise an insulating layer and a hollow core.
  7. 7. The shelter according to claim 6, wherein said insulating layer comprises a core layer disposed between a pair of external layers.
  8. 8. The shelter according to claim 7, wherein said core layer is at least one insulating material selected from the group consisting of: expanded hexagonal aramid, PVC foams and other foams.
  9. 9. The shelter according to claim 7, wherein said external layers are at least one material selected from the group consisting of: plastic, fibers immersed in a thermoset plastic, and fiberglass.
  10. 10. The shelter according to claim 1, further comprising a pressure regulator, thereby allowing said shelter to act as a hyperbaric chamber.
  11. 11. The shelter according to claim 10, wherein said pressure regulator comprises a valve disposed about a side wall of one of said telescopic body portions for increasing said air pressure within said shelter; and a pressure relief valve disposed about a side wall of one of said telescopic body portions for controlling the pressure within said shelter.
  12. 12. The shelter according to claim 1, further comprising a backpack frame disposed about the outer surface of the largest diameter telescopic body portion, thereby acting as a backpack when in said collapsible mode.
  13. 13. A method for forming a shelter, comprising:
    expanding a collapsible shelter comprising at least two telescopic body portions disposed such that at least a first body portion is collapsibly disposable within a second body portion; and at least one door disposed on an end portion of said telescopic body portion which is not adjacent another telescopic body portion; and
    affixing said telescopic body portions to one another to avoid collapsing of said shelter during use.
  14. 14. The method according to claim 13, wherein said telescopic body portions are affixed to one another means of oppositely disposed flanges, wherein said flanges are disposed on adjacent end portions of said telescopic body portions and wherein at least one of said flanges comprise a lock pin, wherein said lock pin secures said first and second body portions.
  15. 15. The method according to claim 14, wherein at least one of said flanges comprises a gasket, thereby forming an airtight seal between said adjacent telescopic body portions.
  16. 16. The method according to claim 13, wherein said telescopic body portions comprise an insulating layer and a hollow core.
  17. 17. The method according to claim 16, wherein said insulating layer comprises a core layer disposed between a pair of external layers.
  18. 18. The method according to claim 71, wherein said core layer is at least one insulating material selected from the group consisting of: expanded hexagonal aramid, PVC foams and other foams.
  19. 19. The method according to claim 17, wherein said external layers are at least one material selected from the group consisting of: plastic, fibers immersed in a thermoset plastic, and fiberglass.
  20. 20. The method according to claim 13, further comprising regulating the pressure within said shelter, thereby allowing said shelter to act as a hyperbaric chamber.
  21. 21. The method according to claim 20, wherein the regulating of said pressure is performed by a pressure regulator which comprises a valve disposed about a side wall of one of said telescopic body portions for increasing said air pressure within said shelter; and a pressure relief valve disposed about a side wall of one of said telescopic body portions for controlling the pressure within said shelter.
US10958515 2003-10-06 2004-10-05 Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber Abandoned US20050109381A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US50868503 true 2003-10-06 2003-10-06
US10958515 US20050109381A1 (en) 2003-10-06 2004-10-05 Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10958515 US20050109381A1 (en) 2003-10-06 2004-10-05 Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050109381A1 true true US20050109381A1 (en) 2005-05-26

Family

ID=34594704

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10958515 Abandoned US20050109381A1 (en) 2003-10-06 2004-10-05 Collapsible, transportable, composite shelter and hyperbaric chamber

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20050109381A1 (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2351809A1 (en) * 2008-07-31 2011-02-10 Oscar Boada Barrao reducing oxygen equipment control hypoxia.
US20140007521A1 (en) * 2011-05-11 2014-01-09 Gregory Michael McMahon Physical exercise training techniques
CN104814849A (en) * 2015-04-30 2015-08-05 烟台宏远氧业有限公司 Soft pressurizing chamber for rescue
CN105031848A (en) * 2015-08-10 2015-11-11 北京空间飞行器总体设计部 Modular safety cabin
US20160120724A1 (en) * 2014-10-29 2016-05-05 Ibex Medical Systems Co., Ltd. Overlay portable hyperbaric oxygen chamber
WO2016078629A1 (en) * 2014-11-21 2016-05-26 Univerzita Palackého v Olomouci Portable hyperbaric mini-chamber
US20170100294A1 (en) * 2015-10-12 2017-04-13 Efrain Acevedo Portable Hybrid Hyperbaric Chamber

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3754551A (en) * 1971-09-20 1973-08-28 Us Navy Portable collapsible recompression chamber
US4196656A (en) * 1977-10-20 1980-04-08 Taylor Diving & Salvage Co., Inc. Method and apparatus for transporting and housing tunnel workers active in high pressure environments
US4974829A (en) * 1985-06-10 1990-12-04 Portable Hyperbarics, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US5063924A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-11-12 Comitato Nazionale Per La Ricerca E Per Lo Sviluppo Dell'energia Nucleare E Delle Energie Alternative Protective device, individual, portable, with total insulation and controlled atmosphere
US5109837A (en) * 1987-02-02 1992-05-05 Hyperbaric Mountain Technologies, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US5678543A (en) * 1995-11-16 1997-10-21 Portable Hyperbarics, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US5771639A (en) * 1993-04-22 1998-06-30 Wood; Marcus Bennett Emergency shelter
USRE36958E (en) * 1992-02-19 2000-11-21 Hyperbaric Mountain Technologies, Inc. Hypobaric sleeping chamber
US6321746B1 (en) * 2000-05-17 2001-11-27 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Adminstration Portable hyperbaric chamber

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3754551A (en) * 1971-09-20 1973-08-28 Us Navy Portable collapsible recompression chamber
US4196656A (en) * 1977-10-20 1980-04-08 Taylor Diving & Salvage Co., Inc. Method and apparatus for transporting and housing tunnel workers active in high pressure environments
US4974829A (en) * 1985-06-10 1990-12-04 Portable Hyperbarics, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US5109837A (en) * 1987-02-02 1992-05-05 Hyperbaric Mountain Technologies, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US5063924A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-11-12 Comitato Nazionale Per La Ricerca E Per Lo Sviluppo Dell'energia Nucleare E Delle Energie Alternative Protective device, individual, portable, with total insulation and controlled atmosphere
USRE36958E (en) * 1992-02-19 2000-11-21 Hyperbaric Mountain Technologies, Inc. Hypobaric sleeping chamber
US5771639A (en) * 1993-04-22 1998-06-30 Wood; Marcus Bennett Emergency shelter
US5678543A (en) * 1995-11-16 1997-10-21 Portable Hyperbarics, Inc. Hyperbaric chamber
US6321746B1 (en) * 2000-05-17 2001-11-27 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Adminstration Portable hyperbaric chamber

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2351809A1 (en) * 2008-07-31 2011-02-10 Oscar Boada Barrao reducing oxygen equipment control hypoxia.
US20140007521A1 (en) * 2011-05-11 2014-01-09 Gregory Michael McMahon Physical exercise training techniques
US9797155B2 (en) 2011-05-11 2017-10-24 Gregory Michael McMahon Physical exercise training techniques
US9987183B2 (en) * 2014-10-29 2018-06-05 Ibex Medical Systems Co., Ltd. Overlay portable hyperbaric oxygen chamber
US20160120724A1 (en) * 2014-10-29 2016-05-05 Ibex Medical Systems Co., Ltd. Overlay portable hyperbaric oxygen chamber
WO2016078629A1 (en) * 2014-11-21 2016-05-26 Univerzita Palackého v Olomouci Portable hyperbaric mini-chamber
CN104814849A (en) * 2015-04-30 2015-08-05 烟台宏远氧业有限公司 Soft pressurizing chamber for rescue
CN105031848A (en) * 2015-08-10 2015-11-11 北京空间飞行器总体设计部 Modular safety cabin
US20170100294A1 (en) * 2015-10-12 2017-04-13 Efrain Acevedo Portable Hybrid Hyperbaric Chamber

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3336060A (en) Collapsible supporting structures
US5720303A (en) Portable stretcher system
US4924893A (en) Beach umbrella safety system
US3798686A (en) Self inflatable air mattress, and sleeping bag
US4943252A (en) Avalanche flotation ball
US6651277B1 (en) Multiple chamber self-inflatable body
US4415198A (en) Seat for invalid walker
US5228158A (en) Portable rollable light-weight pillows
US1323610A (en) price
US5384923A (en) Sleeping mat and seating arrangement
US5839932A (en) Multi-purpose aquatic rescue gear
US4996733A (en) Air mattress reinforced sleeping bag with head covering
US4922562A (en) Rescue pouch
US3343189A (en) Rescue litter floatation assembly
US20020083653A1 (en) Rapidly deployable protective enclosure
US4974829A (en) Hyperbaric chamber
US5978989A (en) Flexible patient transporter with foot pocket
US5386604A (en) Patient rescue bag
US20020139408A1 (en) Auto-airplane-tent-cushion inflatable protection cover
US4531330A (en) Bed/shelter unit
US6167898B1 (en) Tent with integral air mattress
US4679260A (en) Flexible stretcher device
US4639958A (en) Combined head rest, sun shade and bag
US2875771A (en) Inflatable tent
US6889882B1 (en) Backpack strap system for carrying loads of various sizes and/or shapes