US20050097827A1 - Reversible and flexible liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface and a method of using same - Google Patents

Reversible and flexible liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface and a method of using same Download PDF

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US20050097827A1
US20050097827A1 US10/997,135 US99713504A US2005097827A1 US 20050097827 A1 US20050097827 A1 US 20050097827A1 US 99713504 A US99713504 A US 99713504A US 2005097827 A1 US2005097827 A1 US 2005097827A1
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liner
decorative pattern
mold
approximately
concrete
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Abandoned
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US10/997,135
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Bradley Jordan
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Quick Imprint Systems Inc
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Quick Imprint Systems Inc
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Priority to US37561102P priority Critical
Priority to US10/423,619 priority patent/US20030223824A1/en
Application filed by Quick Imprint Systems Inc filed Critical Quick Imprint Systems Inc
Priority to US10/997,135 priority patent/US20050097827A1/en
Assigned to QUICK IMPRINT SYSTEMS, INC. reassignment QUICK IMPRINT SYSTEMS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JORDAN, BRADLEY
Publication of US20050097827A1 publication Critical patent/US20050097827A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02DFOUNDATIONS; EXCAVATIONS; EMBANKMENTS; UNDERGROUND OR UNDERWATER STRUCTURES
    • E02D29/00Independent underground or underwater structures; Retaining walls
    • E02D29/02Retaining or protecting walls

Abstract

A liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface, such as concrete, and a method of doing same, wherein the liner is flexible so as to imprint on curved surfaces and reversible so as to imprint opposing indentations of the decorative pattern. The liner comprises bottom and top faces, opposing side edges, and opposing end edges. Due to the flexibility, the opposing end edges and opposing side edges may contact each other, which allows for the liner to be used in any curved mold for imprinting any curved surface. Due to the reversibility, either protruding or recessed mortar joints may be imprinted on the surface. The method provides for removably securing the liner to the mold; pouring a wetted flowable material into the mold that will harden; and separating the mold and liner combination from the hardened surface.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • The present application is a continuation-in-part and claims priority benefit, with respect to all common subject matter, of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/423,619, filed Apr. 24, 2003, entitled “WALL SYSTEM,” and herein incorporated by reference. U.S. application Ser. No. 10/423,619 claims priority benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/375,611, filed Apr. 24, 2002, and entitled “QUICK SET RETAINING WALL,” which is also incorporated into the present application by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to imprinting decorative patterns on malleable surfaces, such as concrete. More particularly, the invention relates to a liner having a decorative pattern formed thereon and for use in lining a form or mold so that wetted concrete poured within the form or mold and allowed to set is imprinted with the decorative pattern. The liner may be used to imprint both vertical and horizontal concrete sections.
  • 2. Description of the Prior Art
  • Imprinted concrete has become a popular, attractive, and inexpensive way of simulating laid brick, stone, or rock. Although many methods and devices are known for imprinting concrete, most have drawbacks. For example, applicant invented a method and device for imprinting concrete using a roller, disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,033,906 (the '906 patent), which is herein incorporated by reference. The roller is primarily designed for imprinting a pattern on only a top face of poured, semi-hardened concrete that is relatively flat.
  • To imprint both a bottom and a top face of a concrete section, such as both sides or faces of a concrete wall, prior art methods use a rigid liner approximately four feet wide, approximately nine feet long, and approximately one-half to one inch thick. The liner has a brick, stone, or rock pattern formed thereon, and the liner is glued or otherwise casted to a thick, heavy plywood board. The rigid liner is casted to the plywood board during manufacture, such that end users of the liner cannot remove the liner from the plywood board without damaging the liner. The end user lines a frame defining the desired concrete section with the board and liner combination, with the formed pattern on the liner facing upwards. Wetted concrete is then poured over the liner and allowed to set. The top face of the concrete may then be imprinted or stamped using the above-described roller or other known imprinting or stamping methods and devices. Once the concrete is set, the concrete section is lifted, and the board and liner combination is separated from the section. Without the board, prior art liners tear very easily and cannot withstand repeated uses.
  • The liner is made of a material that is relatively porous and thus has a plurality of small pock marks and indentations, such that the wetted concrete fills the pock marks and indentations. Once the concrete has hardened, the plurality of filled pock marks and indentations grip or otherwise hold the liner to the concrete section. Additionally, the liner is compressible, such that the wetted concrete compresses against the liner. Therefore, after the concrete has hardened and the board and liner combination must be removed from the concrete section, a large amount of force, and sometimes tools, must be used to separate the board and liner combination from the concrete section. Every time the liner is used and subsequently removed from a concrete section, the liner is damaged because the pock marks and indentations tear and are made larger by the required force to separate the liner from the concrete section.
  • Additionally, the board is commonly three-quarter inch cabinet grade plywood approximately four feet wide and nine feet long so as to approximate the dimensions of the liner. As can be appreciated, the board is very heavy, and at least two persons are required to lift the board. Thus, because the hardened concrete set into the plurality of pock marks and indentations grips the liner and because the board and liner combination is very heavy, the board and liner combination is not easily removed from the concrete section.
  • Importantly, the concrete section must be relatively flat so as to receive the imprinting from the rigid liner. Because the liner is rigid, it cannot be curved so as to follow the form of a curved concrete section. Therefore, known prior art liners allow for only imprinting flat sections of concrete, which significantly limits the types or shapes of concrete sections that may be imprinted.
  • Even if the liner was removed from the plywood board, it is still rigid enough that it could only be curved a very slight degree. For example, the flexibility of prior art liners can be compared to cardboard. If the cardboard was folded in half, such that opposing halves of an inner face of the cardboard touched each other, then the cardboard would have a permanent crease along the fold line that could not be removed. Similarly, the prior art rigid liner does not offer enough flexibility to fold the liner in half, either along the length of the liner or the width of the liner, without permanently damaging the liner. Although it is rare that the liner would need to be folded in such a manner to imprint the concrete section, such lack of flexibility does severely impede the concrete sections that may be imprinted. For example, if the concrete section is curved to a degree to which the prior art liner cannot be curved, then the curved concrete section cannot be imprinted with the rigid liner, notwithstanding the fact that the rigid liner is permanently casted to a rigid plywood board.
  • Another disadvantage of prior art rigid liners is that a pattern is formed on only one face of the liner. The pattern may comprise recessed joints or protruded joints, but not both. For example, if the liner is imprinted with a pattern such that the joints are protruded or bubbled, then when concrete is poured over the liner and set, the concrete section will have recessed joints. Conversely, if the liner is imprinted with a pattern having recessed joints, then when concrete is poured over the liner and set, the concrete section will have protruded or bubbled joints. Because the rigid liners are glued or otherwise substantially permanently mounted to the plywood board, only one face of the liner can be imprinted with a pattern.
  • An even further disadvantage of prior art liners is the type of board used on which to mount the liner. As noted above, the three-quarter inch plywood boards are heavy (approximately 240 lbs.), expensive, and inherently cumbersome to use. However, such large, thick boards are necessary to provide the needed support for the rigid liner. The boards have a limited use life due to water from the poured concrete contacting the boards and rotting or otherwise destroying them, requiring disposal of both the boards and liners. Even if the boards were capable of more uses, the liner itself is usually limited to less than twenty uses.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for an improved liner and method of using same for imprinting concrete that overcomes the limitations of the prior art. More particularly, there is a need for a liner that allows for imprinting curved sections of concrete. Additionally, there is a need for a reversible liner imprinted on both faces of the liner so that either recessed or protruding joints may be imprinted. Further, there is a need for board material that is lighter, easier to use, less expensive, and less consuming of natural resources. Finally, there is a need for a longer-wearing liner that can withstand numerous uses.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention solves the above-described problems and provides a distinct advance in the art of imprinting malleable surfaces, such as concrete. More particularly, the present invention provides a reversible, flexible liner that may be used for imprinting both flat and curved malleable surfaces with a decorative pattern.
  • The liner of a first preferred embodiment of the present invention broadly comprises a top and a bottom face; opposing end edges; and opposing side edges. The liner is generally rectangular in shape and is extruded to provide a decorative pattern on both the top and bottom faces. The top face of the liner includes protrusions for imprinting recessed joints, and similarly, the bottom face of the liner includes recesses for imprinting protruding joints.
  • The liner is flexible enough that it may fit within any curved mold for forming a curved concrete section. Additionally, because the liner is extruded to provide the pattern on both the top and bottom faces, the liner is reversible to provide imprinting of both protruding and recessed joints. The liner preferably weighs approximately six pounds and may be used approximately thirty to fifty times.
  • To form a flat concrete section, the liner is removably secured to a light, fibrous board, and the board and liner combination is positioned within a frame sized to form a concrete section. Wetted, flowable material, such as concrete, is poured on top of the liner and allowed to harden. Once hardened, the concrete section is lifted up, and the board and liner combination is easily removed from the concrete section.
  • A liner of a second preferred embodiment is substantially similar to the liner of the first preferred embodiment, except that the liner is used to imprint a curved concrete section. For this embodiment, the liner is preferably secured directly to a mold for the concrete section, such as a SONOTUBE. The mold may be any shape, such as circular, rectangular, etc, so as to form a column or other preferred shape. A location of where end edges of the liner meet is marked. Wetted concrete is poured into the mold and allowed to set. Once hardened, the mold is cut along the marked location so as not to cut the liner. The mold and liner combination easily removes from the concrete section, and the liner is removed from the mold so as to create the column or other shape.
  • By constructing a liner as described herein, numerous advantages are realized. For example, the liner of the present invention is flexible enough to imprint curved concrete sections. Additionally, because both faces of the liner are provided with the decorative pattern, the liner may imprint both protruding and recessed joints as dictated by the aesthetic desires of the user. Further, the board and liner combination is light and easily removed from the concrete section. Further yet, the liner of the present invention is approximately ten times less than prior art lines. Prior art liners with the plywood board cost approximately $1200, whereas the liner and board combination of the present invention costs approximately $120.
  • These and other important aspects of the present invention are described more fully in the detailed description below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES
  • A preferred embodiment of the present invention is described in detail below with reference to the attached drawing figures, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first preferred embodiment of a liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface;
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a plurality of concrete sections, including flat and curved concrete sections, imprinted using the liner of the first preferred embodiment;
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of the liner of the first preferred embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the liner taken through line 4-4 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the liner abutting and interconnecting with a second liner;
  • FIG. 6 is an exploded fragmentary perspective view of a frame for forming a concrete section within which is positioned a board and the liner; and
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a liner of a second preferred embodiment mounted within a curved mold for forming a curved concrete section.
  • The drawing figures do not limit the present invention to the specific embodiments disclosed and described herein. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 through 7, a liner 10 for forming decorative patterns on a malleable surface, such as concrete, and a method of doing same is constructed in accordance with a first preferred embodiment of the present invention. Although the liner 10 may be used to imprint any malleable surface, the liner 10 is ideally configured for imprinting concrete surfaces, and therefore, imprinting of only concrete surfaces will hereinafter be discussed. It is understood, however, that the liner 10 and method of using same of the present invention may be used on all malleable surfaces.
  • Use of the liner 10 in conjunction with the hardening of a wetted, flowable material, such as concrete, produces a stone, brick, rock, or marble-like appearance on the face of the concrete. The liner 10 may be used to imprint decorative patterns on both generally flat and generally curved surfaces, as illustrated in FIG. 2 and as illustrated in FIG. 1 of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/423,619, having the same applicant as the present invention and herein incorporated by reference. Additionally, because the liner 10 is reversible, a single liner 10 may be used to imprint both recessed and protruded mortar joints, as discussed in more detail below.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, the liner 10 of the first preferred embodiment comprises a top face 12 and a bottom face 14, opposing end edges 16, and opposing side edges 18. The liner 10 is generally rectangularly-shaped, although it may be any other polygonal shape or may be curvilinear, and is approximately 3 feet wide, 6 feet long, and 0.078 inch thick, although the width may range between 1 and 10 feet, the length may range between 1 and 16 feet, and the thickness may range between 0.03 inch and 5 inches.
  • The liner 10 is preferably reversible and extruded to have the decorative pattern formed thereon. It can be said that the liner 10 comprises a substrate 11 having the decorative pattern formed thereon, such that top and bottom faces 12,14 of the liner 10 present opposing sides of the pattern that may then imprint opposing indentations on the concrete section, as illustrated in FIG. 1. In particular, if the pattern on the top face 12 has protruded or bubbled mortar joints 20, then the pattern on the bottom face 14 has recessed mortar joints 22, as best illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 4. Thus, the pattern formed during the extrusion process of manufacturing the liner 10 includes raised, concave protrusions 20 on the top face 12 and generally bowl-shaped recesses 22 on the bottom face 14 for producing simulated recessed or protruding mortar joints 20, respectively. If it is desired that the imprinted pattern on the concrete section have protruded joints 20, then the bottom face 14 of the liner 10 having recessed joints 22 should be adjacent the poured concrete, as further discussed below. Conversely, if it is desired that the imprinted pattern on the concrete section have recessed joints 22, then the top face 12 of the liner 10 having protruded joints 20 should be adjacent the poured concrete. It can also be said that the patterns on the top and bottom faces 12,14 are reflections of each other, such that the pattern on the bottom face 14 provides a reflection of the pattern on the top face 12.
  • The liner 10 is preferably flexible and may be rolled or bent, such that for a liner 10 having the preferred size discussed above (approximately three feet wide, six feet long, and 0.078 inch thick), the opposing end edges 16 of the liner 10 can contact each other and the opposing side edges 18 can contact each other without damaging the liner 10, as partially illustrated in FIG. 1. The liner 10 is preferably made of a synthetic resin, such as a polyethylene copolymer material, which may be extruded to form a plurality of patterns. Due to the lightweight material of the liner 10, the liner 10 weighs only approximately 6 pounds. Further due to the material of the liner 10 and to the below-described method of using the liner 10, the liner 10 may be used for approximately thirty to fifty uses.
  • One of the opposing side edges 18 of the liner 10 includes a flange 24 to provide a closed side 26 for the liner 10, as best illustrated in FIG. 4. The other opposing edge 16 does not have a flange so as to provide an open side 28 for the liner 10, as also illustrated in FIG. 1. Immediately adjacent the flange 24 is a mold for a joint 30, similar to the extruded joints 20,22 otherwise forming the decorative pattern. Two or more liners 10 having closed and open sides 26,28 may be interconnected by abutting the flange 24 on the closed side 26 of the liner 10 against an open side 28′ of a second liner 10′, as illustrated in a slightly offset configuration in FIG. 5. Because the pattern formed on each liner 10,10′ is substantially exactly the same, aligning the open side 28′ with the closed side 26 provides for a seamless, contiguous pattern. Additionally, both end edges 16 of the liner 10 are open ends, similar to the open side, so that two or more liners 10,10′ may abut end-to-end (not shown) without interfering or otherwise destroying the seamlessness of the pattern. Therefore, the imprinted concrete surface will show no seam where two liners meet, so as to provide the contiguous pattern.
  • As noted above, the liner 10 is flexible and is operable to imprint curved surfaces. To determine the flexibility of the liner 10, a tear test complying with the test method found in ASTM D 624-00, entitled “Tear Strength of Conventional Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic Elastomers,” was performed on the liner 10 by Midwest Research Institute of Kansas City, Mo.
  • The results of the tear test are provided in Tables 1-3 below. Samples of the liner material were subjected to a tear force at three temperatures: cold—32° F. (0° C.); ambient—72° F. (23° C.); and hot—131° F. (55° C.). The liner 10 was cut into Type-C test specimens as described in the referenced ASTM test method. The size of each liner specimen before testing was approximately 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) wide; approximately 0.078 inch (1.98 mm) thick; and approximately 4 inches (101.6 mm) long. An Instron machine, Model 4505, was used to conduct the test. The Instron machine was positioned in an environmental chamber for testing at the three, above-referenced temperatures. Prior to testing, the Instron machine was calibrated against known weights. An extensometer to measure the displacement by the Instron machine was selected, and the accuracy of the extensometer was verified against dial calipers. A digital thermocouple was used to measure the temperature within the environmental chamber during the tests.
  • The ASTM test method D 624-00 measures the tear strength of a material. “Tear strength” is hereinafter defined as the amount of force required to tear a known thickness of a material. The tear strength is a good indicator of the durability of a material when subjected to shear type tearing forces. The ASTM test performed also determined the Young's modulus, which is also referred to as the “elastic modulus” and is defined in the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 80th ed., as the ratio of stress to corresponding strain in the tension or compression of a body below its elastic limit.
  • The Instron machine gripped each liner specimen with a grip distance of approximately 3 inches (76.2 mm). The Instron machine then pulled the liner specimen with a known, measured force. The results of the tests are as follows: TABLE 1 Testing at 32° F. Load/Width Max Tear Stress at Strain at Load/Width Young's at Max Load Resistance Max Load Max Load at Yield Modulus (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm2) (mm/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) Sample 1 1.73 11.07 0.87 0.20 1.73 5.11 Sample 2 1.71 10.94 0.86 0.23 1.71 4.59 Sample 3 1.87 11.96 0.94 0.23 1.87 5.59 Sample 4 1.65 11.87 0.94 0.23 1.85 6.03 Sample 5 1.70 10.91 0.86 0.21 1.70 5.20 Sample 6 1.88 12.03 0.95 0.24 1.88 5.98 Sample 7 1.72 11.01 0.87 0.23 1.72 5.10 Sample 8 1.75 11.20 0.88 0.23 1.75 4.87 Sample 9 1.67 10.69 0.84 0.23 1.67 4.11 Sample 10 1.82 11.69 0.92 0.23 1.82 5.71 Sample 11 1.68 10.77 0.85 0.25 1.68 4.36 Average 1.76 11.29 0.89 0.23 1.76 5.15 Standard 0.08 0.50 0.04 0.01 0.08 0.64 Deviation Variance 0.01 0.25 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.40
  • TABLE 2 Testing at 72° F. Load/Width Max Tear Stress at Strain at Load/Width Young's at Max Load Resistance Max Load Max Load at Yield Modulus (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm2) (mm/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) Sample 1 1.39 8.89 0.70 0.27 1.39 2.93 Sample 2 1.48 9.49 0.75 0.26 1.48 3.10 Sample 3 1.53 9.81 0.77 0.26 1.53 3.30 Sample 4 1.66 9.95 0.78 0.27 1.55 3.26 Sample 5 1.39 8.93 0.70 0.26 1.39 3.14 Sample 6 1.39 8.90 0.70 0.25 1.39 3.36 Sample 7 1.22 7.83 0.62 0.25 1.21 2.83 Sample 8 1.23 7.90 0.62 0.25 1.23 2.52 Sample 9 1.37 8.79 0.69 0.26 1.37 3.33 Sample 10 1.41 9.03 0.71 0.27 1.41 2.95 Sample 11 1.35 8.66 0.68 0.26 1.35 2.83 Sample 12 1.21 7.75 0.61 0.26 1.21 2.57 Average 1.38 8.83 0.70 0.26 1.38 3.02 Standard 0.11 0.73 0.06 0.01 0.11 0.30 Deviation Variance 0.01 0.53 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.09
  • TABLE 3 Testing at 131° F. Load/Width Max Tear Stress at Strain at Load/Width Young's at Max Load Resistance Max Load Max Load at Yield Modulus (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm2) (mm/mm) (kgf/mm) (kgf/mm) Sample 1 0.86 5.52 0.44 0.31 0.86 1.12 Sample 2 0.77 4.91 0.39 0.32 0.77 1.08 Sample 3 0.82 5.23 0.41 0.31 0.82 0.98 Sample 4 0.75 4.81 0.38 0.30 0.75 0.92 Sample 5 0.84 5.36 0.42 0.32 0.84 1.11 Sample 6 0.80 5.10 0.40 0.30 0.80 1.12 Sample 7 0.84 5.37 0.42 0.31 0.84 1.02 Sample 8 0.90 5.74 0.45 0.32 0.90 1.15 Sample 9 0.87 5.58 0.44 0.31 0.87 1.07 Sample 10 0.90 5.80 0.46 0.30 0.90 1.13 Average 0.83 5.34 0.42 0.31 0.83 1.07 Standard 0.05 0.33 0.03 0.01 0.05 0.07 Deviation Variance 0.00 0.11 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01
  • A non-ASTM flex test was also performed by Midwest Research Institute on a sample of the liner 10. The sample size was approximately 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) wide; approximately 0.078 inch (1.98 mm) thick; and approximately 4 inches (101.6 mm) long. This test comprised firmly holding the sample of the liner 10 between a tester's thumb and index finger using both hands to form a small flex radius of approximately one-half inch. The sample was then flexed ±90° from a generally flat state when positioned between the thumb and index finger. The sample was flexed rapidly more than fifty times. This test was done at room temperature on several samples, and each of the samples showed no cracks, breaks, or other changes in the surface of the material. The test was repeated at 32° F. with the same results. The results of this test demonstrate a high degree of flexibility and durability when compared to most other materials.
  • A second, non-ASTM test performed by Midwest Research Institute was a ductility test, which assesses the durability of a material. The ductility test is a 180° double bend test comprising bending the material back on itself in a tight radius bend. Like the above-discussed test, a sample of the liner 10 was used, with the sample size being approximately 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) wide; approximately 0.078 inch (1.98 mm) thick; and approximately 4 inches (101.6 mm) long. The test comprised bending the sample 180° from a beginning generally flat, at rest position, such that opposing ends of the same face of the sample touched each other. The sample was then bent 360°, such that opposing ends of the opposite face touched each other. The sample was bent in a tight radius bend so as to show a break in the face(s) of the sample. This test is commonly performed to show breaks in an upper surface of sheet metal, such as aluminum or steel. The harder the material, the more quickly cracks begin to show. For ductile aluminum, breaks will begin to show after one double bend. Hard aluminum will show serious cracks on the first bend. Hard steel will break before the first bend is complete. The test on the sample of the liner 10 was run at 32° F. because cold testing is most detrimental. The sample of the liner 10 withstood ten double bends without cracking. In the course of the first two to three bends, the sample thinned substantially at the bend point to form a “hinge” line. Thereafter, the hinge line did not appear visually to change or weaken.
  • The liner 10 is also preferably dense so as not be compressible. The liner 10 thus resists compression by the concrete while the concrete is hardening or curing. Further, unlike prior art liners, a board need not be used with the liner 10 to provide support while the concrete is hardening. The liner 10 can be used to imprint the concrete surface without a board or any backing, except for a form or mold, as described below.
  • The method of the first preferred embodiment comprises the steps of preparing a form or mold 32 in the shape of a concrete section 34 to be formed, wherein the form or mold 32 is generally flat and horizontal; laying a board 36 for the liner 10 within the form 32; removably securing the liner 10 to the board 36; if more than one liner 10 is required for imprinting the concrete section 34, laying a board (not shown) and corresponding liner (not shown) for the remaining area of the form 32; pouring the concrete into the form 32; allowing the concrete to set so as to form the concrete section 34; lifting the concrete section 34 from the form 32; and removing the board 36 and liner 10 from the concrete section 34.
  • The step of preparing the form 32 for the concrete section 34 is well known in the art and generally comprises measuring an area of the concrete section 34 to be formed and outlining the area with a support frame 38 strong and stable enough to hold the wetted concrete in the desired position while it is hardening. Other methods of preparing the form 32 may be used, as are also well known in the art.
  • Because the liner 10 is to be removably secured to the board 36, and the board 36 is to be positioned within the form 32, the form 32 must be generally flat. Therefore, a bottom face 40 of the concrete section 34, i.e., the face that is adjacent the liner 10 removably secured to the board 36, will be generally flat. Thus, the board 36 described serves to provide a flat surface for the wetted concrete when forming the concrete section; the board 36 is not required to support the liner 10. Preferably, the wetted concrete is poured such that a top face 42 of the concrete section 34 is also generally flat, although such is not required if the top face 42 is not to be imprinted with the decorative pattern. It is to be understood that deviations in the geometry of the top face 42 of the concrete section 34 across relatively large surface areas does not affect the ability to imprint the top face 42 of the concrete section 34 with the roller disclosed in applicant's '906 patent. However, to use the liner 10 of the present invention to imprint the bottom face 40 of the concrete section 34, the bottom face 40 must be generally flat. It can be appreciated that the larger an area of the liner 10, the less the necessity that the bottom face 40 be generally flat. A method for imprinting a curved concrete section is described below in a second preferred embodiment.
  • The board 36 is preferably approximately the width and length of the liner 10, and the board 36 is approximately two inches in thickness, although the thickness may range between one-half inch and ten inches. If necessary, the board 36 may be cut to fit the form 32 of the concrete section 34. The board 36 is preferably made of a fibrous, natural material, such as a paper product, and preferably, the board 36 is made of recycled material, although any lightweight, sturdy material that may removably receive the liner 10 may be used. The board 36 may be used approximately two to four times before it no longer sufficiently provides a flat surface for the liner 10 and must be discarded. Even with the above-described dimensions, the board 36 is light enough that one person can easily lift the board 36. Further, because the board 36 is preferably made of recycled material, the board 36 is substantially less expensive than prior art plywood boards and is a more efficient use of natural resources.
  • The liner 10 is preferably secured to the board 36 by stapling the liner 10 to the board 36, although any method of removably securing the liner 10 to the board 36 without substantially damaging the liner 10 may be used. Once the board 36 is positioned within the form 32, the liner 10 is removably secured to the board 36. Alternatively, the liner 10 may be removably secured to the board 36 prior to positioning the board 36 within the form 32. If more than one board 36 and liner 10 combination is being used to imprint the concrete section 34, then multiple board 36′ and liner 10′ combinations must be positioned within the form 32, such that the liners 10,10′ abut as described above to provide a seamless, contiguous pattern. Once the board 36,36′ and liner 10,10′ combinations are positioned within the form 32, the concrete or other wetted flowable material may be poured over the liners 10,10′ and allowed to set. As the concrete sets, the pattern is imprinted on the bottom face 40 of the concrete section 34. If the top face 42 of the concrete section 34 is to be imprinted, upon reaching a predefined hardness, the top face 42 is also imprinted with the decorative pattern using the roller or other known imprinting devices and methods.
  • At the time of removably securing the liner 10 to the board 36, the user must determine which face 12, 14 of the liner 10 should be facing upwards to be in contact with the poured concrete. As noted above, the liner 10 of the present invention is reversible so as to provide opposing indentations in the concrete section 34, i.e., either recessed joints 22 or protruded joints 20. Depending on the preferred aesthetic, the reversible liner 10 will provide different impressions, as described above.
  • It is also noted that the liner 10 shape may not be the same shape as the form 32. As such, the liner 10 may be easily cut to fit the shape of the form 32. The liner 10 pieces may then be taped together, such as by using duct tape, to the liner's original shape.
  • After the concrete has hardened to the desired level, the concrete section 34 is lifted from the form 32. Preferably, the liner 10 is coated with a release agent prior to the concrete being poured, such that the board 36 and liner 10 combination is easily removed from the concrete section 34. The release agent is preferably concrete form release oil, but any suitable release agent may be used, such as diesel oil, a bio-degradable based food or animal oil, or a liquid release for rubber stamps. Use of the release agent protects the liner 10 and extends the use life of the liner 10. Use of the release agent is not required, however, and the board 36 and liner 10 combination may still be removed from the concrete section 34 without use of the release agent.
  • Applicant has found that in most instances, the board 36 and liner 10 combination falls away from the concrete section 34 without any or very little interaction by the user of the present invention. The maximum amount of work required by the user to separate the board 36 and liner 10 from the concrete section 34 is gently pulling on the board 36 by only one user with the user's hand. Therefore, neither tools nor multiple users are required to separate the board 36 and liner 10 from the concrete section 34, and separation can be accomplished in less than ten seconds. The ease of use of the present invention thus provides a significant improvement over prior art boards and liners that require more work and time to separate the board and liner from the concrete section.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 7, to imprint the decorative pattern on a vertical concrete section 134 or a curved concrete section 134, the second preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for removably securing a liner 110, substantially similar to the liner 10 of the first preferred embodiment, to a mold 132, wherein the mold 132 is in the shape of the desired concrete section 134; positioning the mold 132 in a desired location for the concrete section 134; if applicable, marking a location in the mold 132, indicated at letter A in FIG. 7, of where end edges 116 of the liner 110 abut within the mold 132; if required, positioning reinforcing material 144 in the mold 132, such as rebar; pouring wetted concrete or other wetted, flowable material into the mold 132 and allowing it to set; if applicable, once the concrete has set, cutting the mold 132 along the marked location A; and separating the mold 132 and liner 110 combination from the concrete section 134. Unlike the first preferred embodiment, the mold 132 need not be generally flat and horizontal; instead, the mold 132 may be a generally rectangularly-shaped, upstanding tube; a cylindrical tube; a long, thin rectangular shape, such as for a wall; or any other desired shape or form. Additionally, the entire mold 132 need not necessarily be curved; instead, only a portion of the mold 132 may be curved. The liner 110 is removably secured directly to the mold 132, without use of the board 36 of the first preferred embodiment. As illustrated in FIG. 7, the liner 110 is removably secured to the cylindrical tube 132, commonly referred to in the art as a SONOTUBE and available from Sonoco of Hartsville, S.C. SONOTUBEs are often used to form cylindrical concrete pillars. The illustration of the cylindrical tube in FIG. 7 is for illustrative purposes only, and as noted above, any mold 132 of any shape or form may be used.
  • As is well known in the art, to form the concrete pillar or section 134, the SONOTUBE or other mold 132 is positioned where the concrete section 134 is to be positioned. Alternatively, after the concrete section 134 has been formed, a crane or other similar mechanism may be used to position the concrete section 134. The mold 132 is then supported by wood beams 146 or other suitable mechanism so that it will not move while the wetted concrete is being poured and is setting. Rebar 144 is positioned within the mold 132 to reinforce and support the concrete section 134. As noted above, before positioning the mold 132 in the desired location, the flexible liner 110 is removably secured to the inside of the mold 132, such that the desired decorative pattern is facing inwards away from the mold 132. Additionally, the release agent is preferably applied to the liner 110. The liner 110 may be removably secured to the mold 132 using screws, staples, or other suitable securing mechanism that allows for removal of the liner 110 without causing damage to the liner 110.
  • If the liner 110 is curved within the mold 132, then preferably, the location A where the opposing end edges 116 of the liner 110 meet is marked on the mold 132, such that after the concrete has set, the mold 132 may be cut along the marked location A so as to not cut the liner 110. Once the concrete is set and the mold 132 is cut, the mold 132 and liner 110 combination is separated from the concrete section 134. It can be appreciated that the more curved the mold 132 is, the more desirable it is that the mold 132 and liner 110 combination separates easily from the concrete section 134. Due to the material of the liner 110 and the applied release agent, the mold 132 and liner 110 combination separates easily from the concrete section 134. Applicant has found that even without use of the release agent, the mold 132 and liner 110 combination separates easily from the concrete section 134. However, as noted in the first preferred embodiment, application of the release agent extends the use life of the liner 110.
  • As noted above, the flexible liner 110 may be removably secured within any shape mold 132. This advantageously allows for imprinting any shape concrete section 134, whether it be a vertical concrete section 134 and/or a curved concrete section 134. For example, if the mold 132 is a rectangular-shaped mold, the liner 10 can be folded in the 90° corners of the mold 132 without damaging the liner 10 and still providing a seamless, contiguous pattern. It is also noted that liners 110 having different decorative patterns may be used on the concrete section 134 depending on the desired aesthetic. For example, it may be desired that a front half of a cylindrical concrete section 134 be imprinted with a first type of decorative pattern, and a rear half of the concrete section 134 be imprinted with a second type of decorative pattern. Further, because the liner 110 is reversible, joints 120, 122 imprinted on the concrete section 134 may be either recessed or protruded, as discussed above in the first preferred embodiment. For example, in FIG. 7, protruded joints 120 are facing outwards towards the mold. Therefore, when the mold 132 and liner 110 are removed from the concrete section 134, the decorative pattern on the concrete section 134 will have protruded joints 120.
  • Although the invention has been described with reference to the preferred embodiment illustrated in the attached drawing figures, it is noted that equivalents may be employed and substitutions made herein without departing from the scope of the invention as recited in the claims. For example, the liner 10 may be made of a material that is not as durable as the material described for the present invention. Such may be desired if the liner 10 is to be used for a single application. For example, if a majority of the form or mold 32 is lined with the liner 10, but a small section of the form or mold 32 is not lined, it may not be possible to line the small section with the full liner 10 that is reusable. Therefore, it may be desired to cut a small portion of the single-use liner 10 to fit the pattern within the form or mold 32.
  • The liner 10 may also be provided with different decorative patterns on each face 12,14 of the liner 10. For example, if the liner 10 was made slightly thicker, a first pattern may be provided on the top face 12, and a second pattern may be provided on the bottom face 14, thus allowing multiple patterns to be imprinted using the same liner 10. This would be cost-effective for a user who would not have to purchase two liners to imprint the separate patterns.
  • Having thus described the preferred embodiment of the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent includes the following:

Claims (26)

1. A reversible liner for imprinting a malleable surface comprising:
a top face having a decorative pattern thereon; and
a bottom face having a decorative pattern thereon, such that either the top face or the bottom face may be used to imprint indentations in the malleable surface.
2. The liner as claimed in claim 1, wherein the liner is formed from an extruded polyethylene copolymer material.
3. The liner as claimed in claim 1, wherein the liner has a width of approximately one foot to ten feet and a length of approximately one foot to sixteen feet.
4. The liner as claimed in claim 1, the liner further including opposing end edges and opposing side edges.
5. The liner as claimed in claim 4, wherein the liner is flexible, such that the opposing end edges may contact each other and the opposing side edges may contact each other without damaging the liner.
6. The liner as claimed in claim 5, wherein the top face of the liner provides a protrusion and the bottom face of the liner provides a recess.
7. The liner as claimed in claim 1, wherein an edge of the liner is provided with a flange, such that an open side of a second liner may abut the flange to provide a seamless, contiguous pattern.
8. In a liner for imprinting a malleable surface, the liner comprising opposing end edges, opposing side edges, and top and bottom faces and having a decorative pattern formed on at least one of the faces, the liner having a Young's modulus in the range of approximately 2.00 (kgf/mm2)/(mm/mm) to 4.00 (kgf/mm2)/(mm/mm) at approximately 72° F. when having a size of approximately 0.5 inch wide, 0.078 inch thick, and 4 inches long.
9. The liner as claimed in claim 8, wherein the liner can be used to imprint the malleable surface approximately thirty to fifty times.
10. The liner as claimed in claim 9, wherein the liner is reversible, such that a second of the at least one faces has an opposing decorative pattern formed thereon.
11. The liner as claimed in claim 10, wherein for a liner having a size of approximately 1 to 10 feet wide, approximately 1 to 16 feet long, and approximately 0.03 inch to 1 inch thick, the opposing end edges may contact each other and the opposing side edges may contact each other.
12. The liner as claimed in claim 11, wherein the liner may imprint the malleable surface without first being casted onto a board.
13. A liner having a decorative pattern formed thereon and operable to be bent so as to imprint the decorative pattern on a curved, malleable surface without use of a support board.
14. The liner as claimed in claim 13, wherein the liner is formed from an extruded polyethylene copolymer material.
15. The liner as claimed in claim 13, the liner including opposing end edges and opposing side edges forming closed and open sides, respectively, wherein the first side edge is provided with a flange to form the closed side so that an open side of a second liner may abut the flange to provide a seamless, contiguous pattern
16. The liner as claimed in claim 15, wherein due to the liner's flexibility, the opposing end edges may contact each other and the opposing side edges may contact each other.
17. The liner as claimed in claim 16, wherein the decorative pattern includes a plurality of raised, concave protrusions to imprint simulated mortar joints on the malleable surface.
18. A flexible liner for imprinting a malleable surface comprising:
a top face provided with a decorative pattern that includes a plurality of protrusions;
a bottom face provided with a reflection of the decorative pattern that includes a plurality of recesses;
opposing end edges; and
first and second opposing side edges forming closed and open sides, respectively, wherein the first side edge is provided with a flange to form the closed side so that an open side of a second liner may abut the flange to provide a seamless, contiguous pattern,
wherein the flexible liner may be shaped to imprint the decorative pattern on a curved malleable surface, such that the opposing end edges may contact each other and the opposing side edges may contact each other.
19. A method of imprinting a decorative pattern on a curved malleable surface comprising the steps of:
removably securing a liner providing the decorative pattern to a mold,
wherein the mold is operable to receive a wetted flowable material that when hardened produces the imprinted malleable surface, and
wherein the mold includes at least one generally curved portion;
pouring the wetted flowable material into the mold;
allowing the material to harden into the malleable surface; and
separating the mold and liner removably secured thereto from the surface.
20. The method as claimed in claim 19, wherein the liner includes bottom and top faces, opposing end edges, and opposing side edges.
21. The method as claimed in claim 20, wherein the liner is formed from an extruded polyethylene copolymer material.
22. The method as claimed in claim 20, wherein the liner has a width of approximately one foot to ten feet and a length of approximately one foot to sixteen feet.
23. The method as claimed in claim 22, wherein the liner is flexible, such that the opposing end edges may contact each other and the opposing side edges may contact each other.
24. The method as claimed in claim 23, wherein the top face of the liner provides a protrusion and the bottom face of the liner provides a recess for producing protrusions and recesses on the surface.
25. The method as claimed in claim 19, wherein an edge of the liner is provided with a flange, such that an open side of a second liner may abut the flange to provide a seamless, contiguous pattern.
26. The method as claimed in claim 19, wherein the liner may used to imprint the malleable surface without first being casted onto a board.
US10/997,135 2002-04-24 2004-11-24 Reversible and flexible liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface and a method of using same Abandoned US20050097827A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US37561102P true 2002-04-24 2002-04-24
US10/423,619 US20030223824A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2003-04-24 Wall system
US10/997,135 US20050097827A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2004-11-24 Reversible and flexible liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface and a method of using same

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/997,135 US20050097827A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2004-11-24 Reversible and flexible liner for imprinting a decorative pattern on a malleable surface and a method of using same

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US10/423,619 Continuation-In-Part US20030223824A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2003-04-24 Wall system

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Cited By (8)

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US20060147656A1 (en) * 2005-01-04 2006-07-06 Mathieu Theodore J Simulated coral rock and method of manufacture
US20130177354A1 (en) * 2012-01-10 2013-07-11 Grant Eugene Farrell Method and apparatus for stamping concrete
US8852724B2 (en) 2011-08-29 2014-10-07 Advanced Formliners, Llc Bridge member spanning formliner joint
US8888067B1 (en) 2007-03-12 2014-11-18 Advanced Formliners, Llc Thermoplastic liner for casting textures and objects into poured wall
US10060143B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2018-08-28 Advanced Formliners Formliner layout member
US10106989B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-10-23 Advanced Formliners, Llc Apparatus for setting objects
US10119280B2 (en) 2014-07-11 2018-11-06 Advanced Formliners, Llc Form liner for visually enhanced concrete
USD860479S1 (en) 2017-12-01 2019-09-17 SpeedyMason, LLC Architectural panel

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060147656A1 (en) * 2005-01-04 2006-07-06 Mathieu Theodore J Simulated coral rock and method of manufacture
US8888067B1 (en) 2007-03-12 2014-11-18 Advanced Formliners, Llc Thermoplastic liner for casting textures and objects into poured wall
US8852724B2 (en) 2011-08-29 2014-10-07 Advanced Formliners, Llc Bridge member spanning formliner joint
US10060143B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2018-08-28 Advanced Formliners Formliner layout member
US20130177354A1 (en) * 2012-01-10 2013-07-11 Grant Eugene Farrell Method and apparatus for stamping concrete
US9045868B2 (en) * 2012-01-10 2015-06-02 Grant Eugene Farrell Method and apparatus for stamping concrete
US10106989B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-10-23 Advanced Formliners, Llc Apparatus for setting objects
US10119280B2 (en) 2014-07-11 2018-11-06 Advanced Formliners, Llc Form liner for visually enhanced concrete
USD860479S1 (en) 2017-12-01 2019-09-17 SpeedyMason, LLC Architectural panel

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AS Assignment

Owner name: QUICK IMPRINT SYSTEMS, INC., MISSOURI

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:JORDAN, BRADLEY;REEL/FRAME:016148/0979

Effective date: 20041203

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION