US20050095949A1 - Dancing toy lollipop - Google Patents

Dancing toy lollipop Download PDF

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Publication number
US20050095949A1
US20050095949A1 US10/698,231 US69823103A US2005095949A1 US 20050095949 A1 US20050095949 A1 US 20050095949A1 US 69823103 A US69823103 A US 69823103A US 2005095949 A1 US2005095949 A1 US 2005095949A1
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Prior art keywords
movable
edible
holding stick
pieces
lollipop
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Abandoned
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US10/698,231
Inventor
Rodolfo Fernandez
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Fernandez Rodolfo Jr.
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Priority to US10/698,231 priority Critical patent/US20050095949A1/en
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Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23GCOCOA; COCOA PRODUCTS, e.g. CHOCOLATE; SUBSTITUTES FOR COCOA OR COCOA PRODUCTS; CONFECTIONERY; CHEWING GUM; ICE-CREAM; PREPARATION THEREOF
    • A23G3/00Sweetmeats; Confectionery; Marzipan; Coated or filled products
    • A23G3/34Sweetmeats, confectionery or marzipan; Processes for the preparation thereof
    • A23G3/50Sweetmeats, confectionery or marzipan; Processes for the preparation thereof characterised by shape, structure or physical form, e.g. products with supported structure
    • A23G3/56Products with edible or inedible supports, e.g. lollipops
    • A23G3/563Products with edible or inedible supports, e.g. lollipops products with an inedible support, e.g. a stick
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/003Dolls specially adapted for a particular function not connected with dolls
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/16Dolls made of parts that can be put together
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/04Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts
    • A63H33/10Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements
    • A63H33/107Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements using screws, bolts, nails, rivets, clamps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/04Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts
    • A63H33/10Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements
    • A63H33/108Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements with holes

Abstract

Dancing toy lollipop, comprising one or more movable edible pieces of diverse sizes, shapes, colors and flavors, provided with an interior assembling cavity into which is inserted the upper portion of a holding stick, provided, in turn, with suitable retaining means, in such a way, that said edible pieces are free to move in relation to the stick, by the action of the user's tongue, when the candy is licked or sucked, or as a simple toy, whenever it is conveniently moved by the user's hand, resembling random dancing movements, and this toy lollipop may be supplied assembled or unassembled, in kits with separate pieces properly packaged, simplifying its manufacturing, and adding to the user's amusement and entertainment, the option to assemble the toy lollipop in a great variety of combinations, as well as propitiating many alternate and attractive designs for its components.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • (Not Applicable)
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FED. SPONSORED R & D
  • (Not Applicable)
  • REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING
  • (Not Applicable)
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to lollipops and, particularly, to the way in which the lollipops edible part is assembled to a stick, replacing the single edible part tightly fixed to a stick with one or more edible and/or inedible independent pieces loosely assembled to said stick and free to move in relation to it, allowing their separate production and the creation of a great variety of designs, and, as alternative, the packaging and distribution of unassembled lollipops to be assembled in diverse combinations by the user, and at the same time, the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention can be used as a simple toy which performs dancing like motions when the user manually shakes it or moves it in different ways.
  • In their simple basic form, lollipops have been known for long time, and many different inventions have been developed regarding this type of candy. The lollipop consumption has been growing year after year, and their fields of use have been diversified, including pharmaceutical products and other edible confectioneries and toys.
  • Despite the numerous innovations and devices related to lollipops that have been created, one characteristic has remained unchanged in all of them: the tight attachment of a candy or edible piece at one end of a disposable holding stick or a holder stem. Therefore, consumers have enjoyed sucking, licking or biting the edible piece rigidly attached to a stick, what provides several advantages such as, for example, when the user wants to speak or drink some beverage, may easily take out the candy from his/her mouth and hold it safely in the meantime, but with the limitations to enjoy it imposed by its rigid connection to a holding element. That rigid connection between the edible piece and its holding stick or stem, limits its movements inside the mouth, in comparison to common candies, without a stick rigidly attached.
  • Consequently, many patents and designs have been issued for improvements and novelties, and a great variety of designs has been introduced in the field of lollipops, but, according to our search, those patents have been always related to lollipops with fixed and rigid connection between the edible piece and a stick or a holder stem.
  • The main property of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, is that the lollipop edible pieces are loosely assembled to the lollipop stick, and due to that significant difference in comparison to known lollipops, the present invention constitutes the creation of a new kind of lollipop, which allows more pleasant free movements inside the consumer's mouth, almost like common candies and, in addition, may be moved like a simple toy by the user's hand, increasing his/her pleasure.
  • The sticks and the movable edible parts of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention may be independently and separately produced, propitiating the development of much more configuration alternatives for these main components of lollipops.
  • Some patents have been issued for lollipops with flexible or elastic sticks, or holding sticks with slits, but in all cases, the inventions are also consistently referred to candies tightly attached around one end of a stick.
  • On the other hand, in order to increase the user's amusement while consuming lollipops, many different types of driving holders, some of them included in the references above, have been invented to provide the candy with different motions, sounds, and/or illumination patterns.
  • However, in all patented candy holders, when the author claims any novel elements or features apparently similar in name or function to some mentioned in the present invention, such elements or features are completely different in location, function and purpose, due to the fact that they refer to candy holders which are intended to transmit amusing movements to conventional or novelty lollipops rigidly attached to sticks which are inserted to said driving candy holders and, in general, to candies securely attached to holding devices.
  • Although Liaw, in his Lollypop holder, U.S. Pat. No. 5,536,054 issued on July 1996, teaches what at first sight looks like a dancing toy lollipop, and mentions a movable candy, an upper end portion and an open cavity, said upper end portion is located at the top end of his candy holder and said open cavity is located in said upper end portion, being its purpose to receive the free end of the stick of a conventional lollipop or novelty confectionery, to make the candy lollipop as a whole to perform a certain pattern of motion caused by the candy holder, which is the object of his invention. In the present invention, wherein the object is not a driving candy holder, but a simple lollipop with innovative features to be manually moved, the cavity is located inside the edible part of a new type of lollipop, and its purpose is to provide an opening for its loose assembling to the lollipop stick, thereby transforming the edible piece into a movable element relative to the lollipop stick, when the candy is manually moved in different ways by the user, while, in turn, the lollipop stick is converted into a holding stick, which is an independent disposable or reusable holding element for the movable edible pieces.
  • Therefore, when Liaw teaches the candy holder with all its components, he refers to the main object of his invention, which is to hold and actively cause the movement of conventional lollipops or confectioneries as a whole, by means of the candy holder, which is in fact a certain type of battery powered driving device.
  • When Liaw and others mention and describe retaining means, they refer to elements located in the cavity of a candy driving holder device, with the purpose of retaining securely in position the holding stick of conventional or novelty lollipops inserted into the holder device cavity or, alternately, in the case of candy holders with male holding elements in the form of stems, they refer to secure means to retain tightly and securely attached candy pieces of female configuration to match the holder stem, while in the present invention, the retaining means are located on the stick of the lollipop, and their purpose is to retain one or more movable edible pieces of the lollipop loosely assembled to said lollipop holding stick, and not to any driving holder device.
  • The retaining means of the holding stick, combined with the interior assembling cavity of the movable edible pieces integrating the present invention, instead of the usual tight union, provide a loose union between both basic components of lollipops, in order to allow, in a passive way, a great variety of free motions of the edible pieces of the lollipop in relation to its holding stick, when the candy toy is conveniently moved by the user's hand.
  • Coleman et al. have patented many different candy holders devices, such as the Novelty candy holder and dispenser, U.S. Pat. No. 5,874,119, issued on February 1999; the Swirlee pop, U.S. Pat. No. 5,921,841, issued on July 1999; the Nearly headless noisemaker candy toy, U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,580, issued on June 2002, and many others with a great variety of innovations, but all of them refer to driving candy holders, battery or manually powered, whose main purpose is to securely hold lollipops or novelty candies and actively cause their movement in diverse amusing patterns, and their innovative features are always related to driving holding devices.
  • Filo et al, invented a Sound-transmitting amusement device and method, U.S. Pat. No. 5,902,167, issued on May 1999, but his invention comprises sound emission devices, related, like in the previously mentioned inventions, to candy holders as separate devices to which known lollipops and confectioneries are connected in different ways.
  • Contrary to Liaw's and many other inventions, which refer to candy holders driving devices, the present invention refers to a simple lollipop with an edible piece assembled to a holding stick almost as in conventional lollipops, but with the essential difference that, instead of being tight and rigid as in conventional lollipops, the union between the edible piece and the stick is loose, in order to allow, (and not to cause, as most lollipops holders do), the free movement of the edible piece in relation to said holding stick, when the candy, alone as a whole, is subjected to movement caused by the user's hand holding the stick of the lollipop, as a simple funny toy, or by the user's tongue, inside his/her mouth, when the dancing toy lollipop is licked and/or sucked by the user, almost as easily as common candies not rigidly attached to a stick as known lollipops are.
  • More related to the present invention is the Safety Lollipop invented by Davis, U.S. Pat. No. 3,264,115, issued on August 1966, comprising a novel lollipop articulated stick, since it refers to a novel lollipop candy and not to a holding driving device. However, in his invention, the edible part of the lollipop is tightly attached to the holding stick, as usual in known lollipops. Therefore the only similarity between Davis' invention and the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention is that both refer to the same general field of lollipops or candies provided with holding elements.
  • In general, although candy holders undoubtedly play an important roll to make lollipops more attractive, contributing to their market expansion, lollipop holders and driving devices are relatively complex and expensive, what highlights the relevance of the innovation introduced by the present invention, consisting in a rather simple lollipop, wherein the edible part of the lollipop is loosely assembled to the lollipop stick, in such a way, that it combines some of the advantages of common candies without stick, with the advantages of lollipops provided with holding sticks, but adding special features to improve the user's amusement. One of the main additional features of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, is that its edible part may be sucked, licked and moved inside the user's mouth almost like a common candy, without the limitations imposed by the rigid union to a stick or to a candy holder device, as in known or prior art lollipops, increasing the user's joy and pleasure.
  • One of the main additional features of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, is that its edible part may be sucked, licked and moved inside the user's mouth almost like a common candy, without the limitations imposed by the rigid union to a stick or to a candy holder device, as in known or prior art lollipops, increasing the user's joy and pleasure.
  • Other feature of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention is that it behaves like a very simple toy, when the user manually moves it in different ways, making the movable pieces, loosely assembled to the stick, perform funny random motions, like a sort of dancing, increasing his/her amusement.
  • Furthermore, the present invention allows the manufacturers the option to package and supply the lollipops in kits with the components unassembled, possibly reducing production costs and, at the same time, giving the user the opportunity to create different lollipops combinations, assembling to the holding stick in random order, either single or multiple edible and/or inedible pieces with diverse sizes, shapes, colors and flavors in one same lollipop.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In known lollipops, usually a single candy or edible piece is tightly attached to one end of a stick, and both components are manufactured and supplied assembled as a whole.
  • It is an object of the present invention, to create a new and different kind of lollipop, comprising one or more edible and/or inedible pieces assembled to a modified lollipop stick, so transformed into a holding stick, being said pieces loose and free to move in diverse ways in relation to the holding stick, and converted, in turn, into movable edible pieces, facilitating the sucking and licking of said movable edible pieces by the action of the consumer's tongue inside his/her mouth, almost like common candies without rigidly inserted sticks as known lollipops.
  • Other object of the present invention is to create a lollipop, which, at the same time, constitutes a simple manually movable toy for the user's amusement, usually a child, driven just by his/her active hand movements, without the aid of mechanical and/or battery powered electrical holders, which generally are relatively complex and expensive.
  • Still other object of the present invention is to make possible for confectioneries manufacturers, to produce a new and different kind of lollipop wherein the holding stick and the other components of the lollipop may be produced independently, even though using current manufacturing processes and without the requirement of new or sophisticated technologies, including as a significant advantage, that the different components of the dancing toy lollipop may be packaged and supplied unassembled as separate parts.
  • Another object of the present invention is the creation of lollipops with holding sticks, which may be manufactured and supplied as independent and separate components, made of nontoxic plastics or any other suitable material, which may be washable and reusable, and which may have as optional or alternate properties, elasticity, flexibility, and other properties combined to increase the random movements of the movable pieces, allowing the development of much more attractive and pleasant lollipops that move and oscillate or vibrate when the holding stick is conveniently moved by the user's hand.
  • An additional object of the present invention is to increase the user's pleasure and the lollipop appeal, promoting and facilitating the design of many different and attractive configurations and candy combinations, with a great variety of colors, flavors and configurations.
  • One advantage of the present invention, as a result of its main objects and features, is that it makes economically and technically feasible to manufacture, by well known manufacturing processes, holding sticks of several suitable materials, eventually reusable, with many different configurations, from the simplest to relatively complex shapes, including, but not limited to, ramified holding sticks with two, three or more branches resembling plant stems, stylized rattlesnake like holding sticks, which may be bent and wound at will by the user, etc., to which may be assembled similar or different movable edible pieces, resembling dancing dolls, Halloween pumpkins, stylized rattlesnake disks, fruits or flowers or any other type of configurations.
  • Other advantage of the present invention is that it makes possible to produce a great variety of toy lollipops with one or more movable edible and/or inedible pieces, stacked one above the other onto the same holding stick, or assembled to ramified holding sticks, in many combinations of sizes, flavors, colors and shapes.
  • Another advantage of the present invention is that some of the independent inedible components may have the additional function of finger guards, preventing the direct contact between the user's fingers and the edible parts, contributing to a cleaner and more hygienic handling of the dancing toy lollipop while it is consumed.
  • An additional advantage of this invention is that the user has the option to assemble customized combinations of edible and inedible decorative components, which may be supplied separately wrapped inside packaged kits, being such options to some users an interesting feature improving the amusement and entertainment inherent to this new type of lollipop.
  • All components and the assembly of all possible alternative designs of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention are feasible by means of very well known conventional manufacturing processes and materials, since none of its elements or features requires the development and use of any kind of sophisticated, special or new technologies or materials.
  • These features and advantages, and some others, will become evident to those skilled in the art, and with basic knowledge of mechanical design and manufacturing processes, through the figures and descriptions illustrating the present invention, which refers to a new kind of lollipop.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1A to 1E illustrate two relatively simple embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with single movable edible pieces and holding stick attachments.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate another relatively simple embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention and its components in exploded and assembled views.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with one movable edible piece integrated by two equal halves.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a cylindrical movable edible piece assembled to a holding stick.
  • FIGS. SA to SC illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a holding stick provided with a mechanically assembled movable piece, around which is molded a movable edible piece.
  • FIGS. 6A to 61 illustrate in magnified detail views, some different alternate configurations of upper portions of holding sticks provided with several possible embodiments of retaining means located at the top end and at intermediate and lower positions, that may be used in diverse possible embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 7A to 7H illustrate two alternate embodiments of holding sticks and two alternate embodiments of a sliding retaining element, which may be used in different embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 8A to 8H illustrate in axial section views several alternate configurations of movable edible pieces that can be used in different embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 9A to 9C illustrate an alternate preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with two movable edible pieces.
  • FIGS. 10A to 10 C illustrate enlarged partial section views related to the preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention previously shown in FIGS. 9A to 9C, and a possible way in which the retaining means are elastically deformed during the assembling of the movable edible pieces to the holding stick.
  • FIGS. 11A to 11C illustrate another simple alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece shaped like a sphere.
  • FIGS. 12A and 12B illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with three movable edible pieces with different geometric shapes.
  • FIGS. 13A to 13C illustrate another simple alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece shaped like a little bell.
  • FIGS. 14A to 14C illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with two movable edible pieces shaped like little bells.
  • FIGS. 15A to 15C illustrate another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece conformed like an inverted little bell.
  • FIGS. 16A to 16C illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with two movable edible pieces shaped like inverted little bells.
  • FIGS. 17A to 17C illustrate an external perspective and front views of an alternate preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, resembling a little dancing doll supported on a rocking base.
  • FIGS. 18A to 18E illustrate another alternate preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, resembling a little dancing doll, with a supporting base.
  • FIG. 19 illustrates other possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a ramified holding stick resembling a plant stem with leaves, and three movable edible pieces resembling little fruits, one on each holding stick end tip.
  • FIG. 20 illustrates another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a ramified holding stick resembling a plant stem with leaves, similar to that shown in FIG. 19, but with the three movable edible pieces resembling little flowers at each end tip of the holding stick.
  • FIG. 21 illustrates another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with an alternate ramified embodiment of the holding stick and three movable edible pieces, resembling inverted little bells.
  • FIG. 22 illustrates another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a different ramified holding stick configured as a trident, provided with crimped holding attachments at each tip, to which are assembled movable edible pieces, with the configuration of little spheres.
  • FIG. 23 illustrates another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with multiple movable edible pieces stacked one above the other, resembling a worm or caterpillar.
  • FIG. 24 illustrates another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece resembling a flower supported above a spacer resembling a stylized plant stem with leaves.
  • FIGS. 25A and 25B illustrate another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, showing the position displacement of several movable edible pieces stacked onto a holding stick and supported by a sliding retaining element.
  • FIG. 26 illustrates in central and lateral oscillating displaced positions, a possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, which comprises a resilient holding stick and several movable edible pieces.
  • FIG. 27 illustrates a possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention similar to that shown in FIG. 26, but with a grip portion attachment resembling a stylized rattlesnake partially wound to form a standing support.
  • FIGS. 28A and 28B illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, comprising a main or primary holding stick with several movable attachments and multiple secondary short holding sticks with movable edible pieces assembled to each of them.
  • FIGS. 29A to 29C illustrate in three steps a possible procedure to be followed by the user for the assembling of a dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, and for the unwrapping of a movable edible piece after the assembling.
  • FIGS. 30A and 30B illustrate a possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, previously shown in FIG. 18A, encased under a protecting transparent cover.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, like conventional lollipops, comprises at least two basic components, although may have as many supplementary components as desired. The two basic components are: a holding stick and a candy or edible piece attached to one end of the holding stick. However, contrary to conventional lollipops, the union between both components is not rigid, but loose, due to a special assembling cavity inside the candy or edible piece and one or more sets of retaining means, integrated to the holding stick or assembled to it, which match within said assembling cavity to retain both basic components in the desired axial position relative to each other, but, at the same time, leaving sufficient free space between the matching elements to allow the movement of the assembled edible piece in relation to the holding stick, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user's hand.
  • The term holding stick is preferred instead of the term lollipop stick because in the present invention, though this main part of the lollipop can be almost as simple as in known lollipops, it is provided with special miniature retaining means, and this particular feature turns it into a more useful and special component, eventually washable and reusable.
  • As explained above, the holding stick and the edible part of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention may be apparently similar to those currently used in traditional or novelty lollipops, but instead of a rigid tight union between the holding stick and the edible pieces, in the present invention these are loose and free to move with respect to the holding stick, when the user manually moves the dancing toy lollipop, while, at the same time, said movable edible pieces remain retained on the holding stick by appropriate retaining means, which are either integral part of said holding stick or separate elements attached to it.
  • Throughout the description of the invention, the components equivalent to the edible part in conventional lollipops are referred to as movable edible pieces, because, as explained above, the main feature of the present invention, is that said parts are movable in relation to the holding stick, differing from known lollipops, in which the edible parts are molded around and tightly fixed to an end of a stick.
  • The movable pieces in the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention can be edible or inedible, because some of them may be made of non-toxic inedible plastic or any other suitable material. When edible, movable pieces may be either candies or medicinal confectioneries. When the movable edible pieces are candies, they may be either regular or dietetic, and when medicinal, they may have either prophylactic or therapeutic purposes.
  • The retaining means may be resilient or articulated elements or rigid stops. The resilient or articulated elements, in turn, may be unidirectional or bidirectional, with many different configurations, provided that they accomplish their function retaining in reliable axial positions the movable edible pieces, but at the same time allowing their free movement in relation to the holding stick when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user's hand.
  • Both kinds of retaining means, resilient elements and rigid stops, may adopt many different shapes, and may be located in different positions on the holding stick.
  • The function of the resilient retaining elements located immediately at the upper end of the holding stick is to allow the entry of movable pieces and, at the same time, prevent them from sliding back easily out of said holding stick.
  • The function of the bi-directional resilient retaining elements is to retain one or more movable edible pieces in the desired positions on the holding stick, but allowing the axial displacement of said movable edible pieces in both directions, requiring little effort by the user.
  • Since the retaining means may be of different types, such as resilient or articulated latches or flaps or rigid stops, and may adopt many configurations, throughout the present description, they may be referred to, indistinctly, as retaining means or elements, resilient retaining means or elements, resilient latches, retainers, etc.
  • All components of the present invention, in all their possible variations, can be produced using current manufacturing processes, which allow high rates of production, are reliable and highly efficient, and are very well known in the fields of confectionery and injection molding. Neither new nor special or sophisticated processes or materials are required for the development and introduction in production of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention.
  • In the consecutive drawings, the elements or parts of elements are designated with combinations of three or more digits. The last two digits at the right, followed or not by a lower case letter or prime symbols, are related to the function or type of element or part of element, rather than to its configuration, since there are a great number of different possible shapes for the same type of component. The remaining digits to the left identify the number of the figure where an element or part of element with the same configuration was referred to for the first time throughout the detailed description of the invention. When two or more elements of the same type and function, but with different configuration, are referred to in a same figure or group of figures, since all the digits will be the same, one of them will be identified adding a lower case letter or a prime symbol at the right end of its designation. On the other hand, for the indications of movement, dotted line arrows are used, designated by a capital M followed by consecutive numbers, which are repeated in different figures, whenever components with the same function are involved in movements that are of the same type and direction. To designate sections, details and direction of views, consecutive not repeated roman numbers are used.
  • All main features of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention are explained in the detailed description of the illustrative drawings; however, the possible embodiments of the components of the present invention may be much more diversified than those shown in the following figures.
  • FIGS. 1A to 1E illustrate two simple possible embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with two different holding sticks combined with two different configurations of movable edible pieces and holding sticks attachments.
  • In FIG. 1A is shown an axial section view of a possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, which comprises a holding stick 101, substantially equal to the cylindrical holding stick used in common lollipops, but at whose top end is securely fixed the holding stick attachment 111 a. In this embodiment the holding stick attachment 101 a is of female type, provided with a socket 110 and is securely attached to the top end of the stick 101, by the notches 111, crimped on the socket 110 of the holding stick attachment 110 a after its assembling. The top end 103 of said attachment 101 a is rounded to facilitate the assembling of the single movable edible piece 102, which has spherical shape in this case. The holding stick attachment 101 a is provided with upper resilient retaining elements 104, consisting, in this case, in a couple of thin rounded fin like flexible elements protruding to opposite sides of said holding stick attachment which, in addition, is also provided with a lower retainer consisting in a stop 105. The upper retaining elements 104 are immediately adjacent to the top end 103, and the lower stop 105 is located at short distance below, forming a neck space 106 between both of them. In this view, the movable edible piece 102 is shown axially sectioned, in a momentary axial position, during its assembling to the holding stick 101, combining a downward displacement with a twisting clockwise motion, as indicated by the arrows M1 and M2, respectively, in a sort of helical movement. At the position illustrated, a constrained interior circular edge or insertion throat 109, at the bottom of the tapered assembling cavity 108 in the movable edible piece 102, is passing over the resilient retaining elements 104, elastically bending clockwise both opposite round fin like flexible retaining elements 104 toward the holding stick axis to allow the assembling of the movable edible piece 102 to the holding stick attachment 101 a.
  • In FIG. 1B is shown a magnified section view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1A through the plane designated by the line I-I in the same figure. In this view can be observed a magnified cross section of the lower portion of the movable edible piece 102 during its assembling, at an instant in which the upper resilient retaining elements 104 are elastically bent clockwise toward the axis of the holding stick attachment 101a, so that the outer distance from tip to tip of the opposite fin like elements is momentarily reduced and substantially equal to the diameter of the insertion throat 109 in the movable edible piece 102.
  • In FIG. 1C is shown an elevation view, looking in the direction indicated by the arrow II in FIG. 1B, of the same possible embodiment previously shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, held by the user's hand 100, with the movable edible piece 102 viewed in axial section, already assembled in its final position, wherein the insertion throat 109, at the bottom of the assembling cavity 108, is engaged at the neck space 106, being retained said movable edible piece 102 in axial position by the resilient retaining elements 104 and the lower stop 105 on the holding stick attachment 101 a, in such a way, that said movable edible piece is free to rock, tilt and/or rotate to any side in relation to the holding stick 101, as indicated by the arrow M3 and illustrated by the dashed line contours, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user's hand 100.
  • The resting position of the movable edible piece depends upon the height of its center of gravity relative to its insertion throat or plane of support. When the insertion throat or plane of support is lower than the center of gravity, as in the case of the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1A to 1C, the normal resting position of the movable edible piece is inclined or tilted to a side. When the insertion throat or plane of support is higher than, or coincident with, the center of gravity, as in other embodiments that will be shown further, the resting position of the movable edible pieces may be centered.
  • FIG. 1D is a top view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 1C.
  • In FIG. 1E is shown an axial section view of an alternate simple embodiment of the present invention, in which the holding stick 101′ consists in a hollow cylinder stick similar to common drinking straws, to which is securely inserted a holding stick attachment 101 a′. In this alternate embodiment the holding stick attachment 101 a′ is of male type, provided with a lower stem 112. The holding stick attachment 101 a is securely fitted to the hollow holding stick 101′ by tight fit, using a currently available non-toxic adhesive or by any suitable procedure. In this embodiment, the top end 103′ of the holding stick attachment 101 a′ is split open, allowing the elastic inward depression of the resilient retaining elements 104′, which consist in a pair of opposite upper flexible tiny latches, to allow the attachment and retention of the movable edible piece 102′, shaped like an inverted truncated cone or inverted little bell, so that the insertion throat 109′, located in this case at an intermediate section of the assembling cavity 108′, is engaged at the neck space 106′ of the holding stick attachment 101 a′, located between the upper flexible latches 104′ and the stop 105′. In this view, as in FIG. 1C, can be appreciated the free space between the assembling cavity in the movable edible piece and the holding stick attachment, such that said movable edible piece 102′, though reliably retained in axial position, is free to swing and/or swivel in relation to the holding stick 101′, in a sort of random dancing motions, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently flipped, shaken or revolved manually by the user. Furthermore, when the movable edible piece is being consumed, inside the consumer's mouth, it may be sucked, licked and moved by the user's tongue in a way very similar to the possible movements of common candies which, unlike known lollipops, are not restrained by rigidly inserted holding sticks.
  • FIGS. 2A to 2E illustrate another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a simple holding stick combined with an alternate embodiment of a movable edible piece, which is provided with an optional edible plug.
  • In FIG. 2A is shown an exploded elevation view of a possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop. At the lower part of the figure, is shown a holding stick 201, which consists in a cylindrical stick with its lower end 207 rounded, and with the core section of its upper end tip 103 reduced and provided with resilient retaining elements 104, comprising, in turn, opposite thin rounded fin like elements like those referred to for the first time in FIG. 1C, whose normally expanded width is slightly larger than the section of the body of the holding stick, forming a smaller section space or neck 106, which is below, adjacent to said retaining elements 104, adopting a configuration similar to the upper portion of the holding stick attachment 101 a previously shown in FIGS. 1A to 1D.
  • In the same FIG. 2A, above the holding stick, is shown an axial section view of a movable piece 102, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1A, with the configuration of a sphere, in which the assembling cavity 108 has the shape of a tapered hole, with the lower end opening reduced to form the insertion throat 109. The size of the insertion throat 109 is slightly smaller than the width of the normally expanded flexible round fin like retaining elements 104, and slightly smaller than the diameter of the body of the holding stick 201 previously described, and shown below in FIG. 2A. At the same time, said insertion throat 109 is slightly larger than the width of the section at the neck space 106.
  • On top of FIG. 2A is shown an axial section view of an edible plug 213, in this particular embodiment configured as a tapered cylinder with a flat upper surface.
  • In FIG. 2B is shown an axial section view of the same possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop previously shown exploded in FIG. 2A, with the holding stick 201, the movable edible piece 102 and the edible plug 213, after their complete assembling. As can be seen in this figure, the resilient retaining elements 104, prevent said movable edible piece 102 from going out upward easily, because their normal expanded width is slightly larger than the diameter of the insertion throat 109 at the bottom of the assembling cavity 108 in said movable edible piece and, on the other hand, said insertion throat is slightly smaller than the main body section of the holding stick 201, so that said movable edible piece may not slip down either. In this figure can be seen also that there is a significant gap between the assembling cavity 108 of the movable edible piece 102 and the upper portion 103 of the holding stick 201 with the expanded resilient retaining elements 104. Therefore, though said movable edible piece is retained in a reliable axial position, it is free to rotate, swing and/or swivel in relation to the holding stick 201, as illustrated by the dotted line contours, in a sort of dancing random movements, whenever the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently flipped, shaken or revolved by the user's hand.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a simple holding stick combined with another possible embodiment of movable edible piece integrated by two identical halves.
  • In FIG. 3A is shown an elevation view illustrating an exploded view of an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop, comprising a holding stick 301, provided with a spherical rigid stop at its top end stop 303 and two symmetrical hollow semi spherical candy halves 302 a, shown in axial section before its assembling to the holding stick 301.
  • In FIG. 3B is shown an axial section view of the same embodiment after the assembling of both halves 302 a around the top end stop 303 of the holding stick 301. The union of both halves may be achieved by any appropriate procedure such as an edible and currently available sugar-based adhesive. In this figure may be appreciated the now integral spherical hollow movable edible piece 302, with its interior assembling cavity in the form of a spherical chamber, substantially larger than the top end stop 303 but with a narrow opening or insertion throat 309 at its bottom, such that said movable edible piece 302, after its assembling, cannot be removed from the holding stick 301, but is free to rotate, swing and/or swivel in relation to said holding stick, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently flipped, shaken or revolved by the user′ hand.
  • In FIG. 4 is shown an axial section view of another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, comprising a single movable edible piece 402 with cylindrical shape, and a holding stick 401 provided at its top end 403 with the resilient retaining elements 404, consisting in opposite laterally protruding resilient pins, which can be elastically bent downward to allow the insertion of the holding stick 401 into the assembling cavity 408 inside the movable edible piece 402, which is open at its bottom, and said assembling cavity, in turn, is provided with transverse holes 408′, into which the resilient retaining pins 404 expand, thereof retaining in axial position the movable edible piece 402 on the holding stick 401, but with a loose fit that allows swinging movements of said movable edible piece in relation to said holding stick, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • FIGS. 5A to 5C illustrate another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a holding stick provided with a movable attachment, around which is tightly molded the candy mass.
  • In FIG. 5A is shown an exploded axial section view of an alternate embodiment of a combined holding stick for the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, comprising a basic holding stick 501, which consists in a cylindrical stick with a semispherical top end stop 503, shown at the lower part of the figure, while separate above it, is shown a movable attachment 514, consisting in a thin wall hollow cylindrical shell or socket closed at its upper end.
  • In FIG. 5B is shown the same embodiment, after the assembling of said movable attachment 514 to the top end stop 503 of the holding stick 501 with the shell constricted below said top end stop to a diameter smaller than the top end stop diameter, forming a throat 509 and a union with the holding stick that behaves as a sort of universal joint, such that said movable attachment cannot be disassembled from the holding stick 501, while its loose fit allows said movable attachment to move in relation to the holding stick when the dancing toy lollipop provided with such type of combined holding stick is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 5C is shown the same embodiment previously illustrated in FIGS. 5A and 5B, after the complete assembling of the dancing toy lollipop, by a manufacturing process almost like the current process, wherein the candy mass is tightly molded around the movable shell attachment 514, integrating with it a movable edible piece 502, with spherical shape, like some movable edible pieces shown in other figures.
  • The holding stick 501 and its top end stop 503 may adopt many different configurations, and can be made using diverse materials, so as the movable attachment 514, which can be made of different suitable materials with appropriate chemical and mechanical properties.
  • In FIGS. 6A to 61 are shown magnified details of some different alternate configurations of upper portions of holding sticks, provided with several possible embodiments of retaining means for the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, located in different positions on the holding sticks. The purpose of the retaining means is to retain the movable edible pieces of the dancing toy lollipop, shown in other figures, assembled to the holding stick in the desired axial positions, but with a loose connection between said movable edible pieces and the holding stick, because when the retaining elements expand inside the assembling cavity of said movable pieces, there is a wide empty space or clearance between the expanded retaining elements and the cavity, such that said retaining means allow (not cause) the motions of said movable edible pieces in relation to the holding stick, when the user holding the dancing toy lollipop conveniently moves it with his/her hand. These alternate embodiments of retaining means at the upper portions of holding sticks have been or will be referred to and described for the first time in other figures.
  • FIGS. 7A to 7H illustrate two different possible embodiments of holding sticks that interact with two possible embodiments of sliding retaining elements, which may be used optionally in alternate embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, as will be shown in other figures.
  • In FIG. 7A is shown an elevation view of an alternate preferred embodiment of the holding stick 701, in which the top end 303 has the configuration of a sphere like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 3A, acting as rigid stop, with its diameter slightly larger than the holding stick body, which, in turn, is provided with a series of notches 715 along its surface, in a rack like pattern, while the lower end 207 of the holding stick, in this case the entry end, is rounded, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 2A, to make easier its insertion through the assembling cavities of the movable edible pieces, shown in other figures.
  • In FIG. 7B is shown an elevation view of the same holding stick 701 illustrated in FIG. 7A, looking in the direction indicated by the arrow III in said figure. In this view can be seen the unidirectional profile of the notches 715, which allows upward and opposes downward displacements.
  • In FIG. 7C is shown an elevation view of an alternate embodiment of the holding stick 701′ with a smooth elongated body and with a spherical top end stop 303.
  • In FIG. 7D is shown a top view of a possible embodiment of a sliding retaining element 716, to be used in combination with the rack type holding stick 701, configured like a sort of conical flange 717 with a center hub 718.
  • In FIG. 7E is shown an axial section view of the sliding retaining element 716 shown in FIG. 7D, through the plane designated by the line IV-IV in said figure, wherein can be seen its center hub 718, with an axial hole to allow the insertion of the holding stick 701.
  • In FIG. 7F is shown a magnified detail view of the encircled area designated by the arrow V in FIG. 7E, showing a resilient flap type unidirectional locking element 719, located at the cylindrical wall of the center hub and angularly protruding toward the axis of the hub, whose function is to engage into a matching notch on the rack type holding stick 701 to lock in axial position the sliding retaining element 717, preventing it from slipping down, but easily allowing its upward displacement by the user.
  • Combining a rack type holding stick 701 and a sliding retaining element 716 provided with a lock element 719, the user may assemble and disassemble the dancing toy lollipop, removing the sliding retaining element 716 from the holding stick 701. To remove the sliding retaining element from the holding stick, it is only necessary for the user to rotate said sliding retaining element either clockwise or counterclockwise, so that the resilient locking element 719 is pushed out, disengaged from the notch, and rotated to the smooth surface area of the holding stick body, so that the sliding retaining element is released and free to be displaced along the holding stick in any direction. This useful feature allows the user to create different combinations of movable edible pieces, not shown, or to replace those worn out.
  • In FIG. 7G is shown an axial section view of another alternate embodiment of sliding retaining element 716′, to be used in combination with the smooth body holding stick 701′, which is provided with a central hub 718′ with an axial tapered hole, and at opposite sides of said hub, protrude angularly downward a sort of small levers 722, resembling doll legs in this case, which the user may push inwardly with his/her fingers as indicated by the arrows M4, to expand the upper and smaller end of the tapered hole of the hub 718′, as indicated by the arrow M7.
  • In FIG. 7H is shown a magnified detail view of the encircled area designated by the arrow VI in FIG. 7G. In this figure can be clearly seen that at the upper and smaller end 720 of the tapered hole 721, the hub 718′, has two 180 degrees opposite slits 723, cut at a plane rotated 90 degrees relative to the protruding levers 722, being the normal diameter of said smaller end 720 slightly smaller than the diameter of the smooth body section of the holding stick 701′, in order to provide an elastic tight fit between both components, being such fit tight enough to accomplish the desired retaining function. To displace toward the top end of the smooth body holding stick 701′ the lower movable edible pieces, or to remove the sliding retaining element 716′, to assemble new replacement movable edible pieces, the user moves the sliding retaining element along the holding stick, releasing it by pressing its levers 722 inwardly, as explained in FIG. 7G, elastically expanding the slits 723, so that the upper smaller end 720 of the tapered hole 721 expands to a size slightly larger than the holding stick section, as illustrated by the dashed line contours, and then the sliding retaining element 716′ may be easily displaced at will upward or downward along the holding stick 701′ by the user.
  • In addition, said sliding retaining elements described above, may be used as finger guards to prevent the direct contact of the user's hand with the movable edible pieces, contributing to a cleaner and more hygienic handling of the dancing toy lollipop
  • FIGS. 8A to 8H illustrate axial section views of different alternate embodiments of movable edible pieces for the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, varying in external shape and in the configuration and position of the assembling cavity. These configurations of movable edible pieces have been or will be referred to in other figures.
  • FIGS. 9A to 9C illustrate a preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, wherein an alternate embodiment of the holding stick is combined with two possible embodiments of movable edible pieces stacked one above the other.
  • In FIG. 9A is shown an axial section view of an alternate preferred embodiment of the present invention at rest or central position, comprising a holding stick 901 with the configuration of a cylindrical stick, similar to that previously shown in FIG. 6B, and two movable edible pieces, one above the other. The upper one has the shape of a sphere resembling a stylized doll head 902, like that shown in FIG. 8E, while the lower movable edible piece 102′ is configured as a truncated cone, resembling a little bell or a stylized doll skirt, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E. The plug 913 is an optional piece similar to that shown in FIG. 2, identified as 213, but with its outer surface convex instead of flat. Said plug 913 is tightly and securely inserted into the upper opening of the upper movable edible piece 902, with the aid of pressure, heat, an edible sugar based adhesive or any other suitable procedure.
  • From this central position, both movable edible pieces 902 and 102′ may swing or rock in any direction in relation to the holding stick 901, as indicated by the arrows M3 and M5, when the toy lollipop is conveniently flipped or shaken by the user's hand. In addition, the movable edible pieces 902 and 102′ are free to be rotated by the user around the holding stick 901.
  • In FIG. 9B is shown the same preferred embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 9A, with the movable edible pieces 902 and 102′ rocked or swung to the left, as indicated by the arrows M6 and M7.
  • In FIG. 9C is shown the same preferred embodiment of the present invention shown in FIGS. 9A and 9B, with the movable edible pieces 902 and 102′ rocked or swung to the right, as indicated by the arrows M8 and M9.
  • Depending upon the intensity of the shaking, flipping or revolving action applied to the holding stick by the user, and the friction between the movable edible pieces, both of them can rock or swing to the same direction, or each one to different directions, and/or rotate around the holding stick, in a sort of random dancing like movements.
  • FIGS. 10A to 10C illustrate in magnified details the preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop previously shown in FIGS. 9A to 9C, to teach the behavior of the particular type of resilient retaining means used in said embodiment, during the assembling process.
  • In FIG. 10A is shown a magnified axial section view of the same embodiment of the present invention previously illustrated in FIGS. 9A to 9C, showing the upper portion of the holding stick 901, during the assembling of a movable edible piece 102′ to it. In this view can be observed that the resilient retaining elements 1004, conformed like a miniature slotted arrow at the top end 1003 of the holding stick 901, are elastically depressed inwardly toward the axis of said holding stick, when the narrow section or insertion throat 109′ in the assembling cavity 108′ of the movable edible piece 102′ is slid over them, closing the gap between the inner walls of the slot 1024, which, at the instant shown, is partially collapsed, thus reducing the width of the holding stick 901 at the section where said resilient retaining elements 1004 are located, in such a way, that momentarily, the exterior section width of the retaining elements becomes substantially equal to the width or diameter of the insertion throat 109′ in the assembling cavity 108′ of the movable edible piece 102′, allowing the axial displacement of said movable edible piece 102′ in the direction indicated by the arrow Ml, toward the neck space 1006. From there, the movable edible piece may be displaced toward the rigid stop 1025 below, adjacent above grip portion of the holding stick 901, passing over the second resilient bidirectional resilient retaining elements 1005, which, in turn, are depressed in the same way described above for the resilient retaining elements 1004.
  • In FIG. 10B is illustrated a top view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A, looking in the direction indicated by the arrow VII in said figure.
  • In FIG. 10C is shown a magnified axial section view of the same upper portion of the dancing toy lollipop illustrated in FIG. 10A, with the upper and lower, movable edible pieces 902 and 102′ in their respective final positions on the holding stick 901, after having been completed the assembling process, either by the user, or at the factory. In this enlarged view can be seen that, due to the configuration and size of the assembling cavity 108′ in the upper movable edible piece 902, both resilient retaining elements 1004 and 1005 are able to recover elastically their normally expanded position inside the assembling cavity of the movable edible pieces 902 and 102′, respectively. In that condition, the inner edge at the insertion throat 109′ inside the assembling cavity of the upper movable edible piece 902, is engaged at the narrow neck space 1006, while the normally expanded resilient retaining elements 1004, impede said upper movable edible piece 902 to move up and go out easily of the holding stick 901. At the same time, said upper movable edible piece 902 is also prevented to slip down by the lower bi-directional resilient retaining elements 1005 or by the lower movable edible piece 102′, located below and previously assembled to the holding stick 901. This lower movable edible piece 102′, in turn, is prevented to slip down further and out from the holding stick 901, by the rigid stop 1025, which is slightly larger than the diameter of the insertion throat 109′ in said movable edible piece 102′. The assembling cavities 108′ of both movable edible pieces 902 and 102′, are substantially wider than the retaining elements and, at the same time, the diameters of the insertion throats 109′ inside the assembling cavities 108′ of both movable edible pieces 902 and 102′, are slightly larger than the section of the holding stick 901 at the neck space 1006 and than the cylindrical body of said holding stick 901. Therefore both movable edible pieces 902 and 102′, though reliably retained in axial position, are free to be swung, rocked, swiveled and/or rotated in relation to said holding stick 901, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • Depending upon the friction between the movable edible pieces and the way in which the lollipop is moved by the user′ hand, the movements of said movable edible pieces vary greatly, in random patterns and combinations that, eventually, resemble funny and pleasant dancing movements. The movable edible pieces of the present invention also increase the user's pleasure due to the multiple possible movements when said edible pieces are sucked or licked inside the user's mouth, almost as freely as common candies, without rigidly inserted sticks typical in known lollipops.
  • When the upper movable edible piece 902 is worn out, the user may consume the lower movable edible piece 102′ in its low position or, optionally, may displace it upward to the neck space 1006 to the position previously occupied by the worn out movable edible piece 902, passing over the bidirectional resilient retaining elements 1005, whose shape allows the displacement of the movable edible piece 102′ in both axial directions, when the user, with little effort, moves it toward the desired position.
  • FIGS. 11A to 11C illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, comprising a cylindrical holding stick combined with a single spherical movable edible piece.
  • In FIG. 11A is shown an axial section view illustrating, at rest or central position, an alternate embodiment of the invention, with a single spherical movable edible piece 902, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A, assembled to a possible embodiment of the holding stick 1101, with the configuration of its upper tip, almost like that previously described in FIG. 10A, but with a slight difference due to the missing rigid lower stop shown in said figure. The arrow M3 indicates the possible rocking or swinging motion of the movable edible piece 902 in relation to the holding stick 1101 when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 11B is shown an axial section view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 11A, illustrating the movable edible piece 902 rocked or swung to the left, as indicated by the arrow M6.
  • In FIG. 11C is shown an axial section view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 11A and 11B, illustrating the movable edible piece 902 rocked or swung to the right, as indicated by the arrow M8.
  • FIGS. 12A and 12B illustrate other alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, combining three movable edible pieces with different geometrical configurations.
  • In FIG. 12A is shown an elevation view of an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop, comprising a holding stick 901, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 10A, to which are assembled three movable edible pieces, with different configurations and sizes, stacked one above the other on the upper portion of said holding stick 901 shown in FIG. 6B and others. In this case, the lower and larger movable edible piece 1202 has the shape of a flat cylinder; the intermediate movable edible piece 1202′, has the shape of a flat prism with square section and the upper and smaller movable edible piece 1202″ has the shape of a flat prism with triangular section. The arrow M10 indicates possible directions of rocking motion of the movable edible pieces when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 12B is shown a top view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 12A, in the direction of the arrow VIII. The arrow M11 indicates possible directions of rotational motion of the movable edible pieces that may be caused by the action of the user.
  • The assembling cavities of all three movable edible pieces, as shown in FIG. 8H, are randomly eccentrically located, what facilitates to impart rotation to said movable edible pieces when the user revolves the holding stick 901 in a planetary motion mode.
  • FIGS. 13A to 13C illustrate another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece conformed like a truncated cone, resembling a little bell.
  • In FIG. 13A is shown an elevation view, at rest or central position, of an alternate embodiment of the invention, with a single movable edible piece 102′ shaped like a truncated cone or little bell, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, in inverted position, assembled to the holding stick 1101, configured like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 11A. The arrow M5 indicates possible swinging motions of said movable edible piece in relation to the holding stick when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 13B is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 13A, wherein the bell shaped movable edible piece 102′ is swung to the left, as indicated by the arrow M7.
  • In FIG. 13C is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 13A and 13B, wherein the bell shaped movable edible piece 102′ is swung to the right, as indicated by the arrow M9.
  • FIGS. 14A to 14C illustrate an alternate embodiment of dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, provided with two movable edible pieces conformed like truncated cones, resembling little bells.
  • In FIG. 14A is shown an elevation view, at rest or central position, of another alternate embodiment of the present invention, comprising the holding stick 901, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A, and described in FIG. 10A, combined with two movable edible pieces 102′, stacked one above the other, both shaped like a truncated cone or little bell, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, in inverted position. In this embodiment, the upper movable edible piece has an optional candy plug 913 referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 10A, securely inserted to close the upper opening of said upper movable edible piece. The arrow M5 indicates the possible swinging motions of the movable edible pieces 102′ in relation to the holding stick 901, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 14B is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 14A, wherein both movable edible pieces 102′ are swung to the left, as indicated by the arrow M7.
  • In FIG. 14C is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 14A and 14B, wherein both movable edible pieces 102′ are swung to the right, as indicated by the arrow M9. [01391 FIGS. 15A to 15C illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece configured like an inverted truncated cone, resembling an inverted little bell or a stylized flower.
  • In FIG. 15A is shown an elevation view, at rest or central position, of an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a single movable edible piece 102′, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, configured as an inverted truncated cone resembling a little bell with its wider part upward, or like a stylized flower, assembled to the holding stick 1101, similar to the holding stick referred to for the first time in FIG. 11A. The arrow M3 indicates the possible rocking or tilting motion of the movable edible piece 102′ in relation to the holding stick 1101, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 15B is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 15A, wherein the movable edible piece 102′ is tilted to the left, as indicated by the arrow M6.
  • In FIG. 15C is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 15A and 15B, wherein the movable edible piece 102′ is tilted to the right, as indicated by the arrow M8.
  • FIGS. 16A to 16C illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with two movable edible pieces configured like inverted truncated cones, resembling little bells or stylized flowers.
  • In FIG. 16A is shown an elevation view, at rest or central position, of an alternate embodiment of the invention, comprising two movable edible pieces 102′, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, stacked one above the other, assembled to the holding stick 901, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 10A. The arrow M3 indicates the possible rocking motion of the movable edible pieces 102′ in relation to the holding stick 901 when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 16B is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 16A, wherein the movable edible pieces 102′ are tilted to the left, as indicated by the arrow M6.
  • In FIG. 16C is shown an elevation view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 16A and 16B, wherein the movable edible pieces 102′ are tilted to the right, as indicated by the arrow M8.
  • FIGS. 17A to 17C illustrate a relatively complex preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, combined with several movable edible pieces and inedible components, resembling a little dancing doll, standing on a rocking base.
  • In FIG. 17A is shown a perspective view of an assembly of dancing toy lollipop resembling a little dancing doll, at rest or central position, comprising six independent components: the holding stick 901, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 10A; two movable edible pieces, one on the top, resembling the head 902, with a candy plug 913 closing its upper opening, like those referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A, and the other, below, resembling the skirt 102′, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, in inverted position; an upper intermediate movable piece 1726 resembling the torso and arms of the little doll, which may be either edible or inedible, and is located between both movable edible pieces 902 and 102′; and the lower inedible piece 716′ resembling the legs of the little doll, which at the same time is a sliding retaining element like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 7G.
  • This alternate embodiment, as most of them, may be supported on a rocking base 1727, with its lower surface configured as a section of a sphere, in order to rock or swing over a suitable surface whenever it is moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 17B is shown a front view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 17A, illustrating an instant of a possible dancing like motion of the toy lollipop, in which the rocking base 1727, on a flat surface 1728, is rocked to the left moved by the user, while the arms 1726 are swung to the right, and the movable edible piece 902, resembling the head at the top with the plug 913 and the movable edible piece 102′ resembling the skirt below, are swung to the left, as indicated by the arrow M6.
  • In FIG. 17C is shown a front view of the same embodiment shown in FIGS. 17A and 17B, in an instant position of movement, in which the rocking base 1727 on a flat surface 1728, is rocked to the right, moved by the user, while the arms 1726 are swung to the left, and the movable edible piece 902, resembling the head at the top with the plug 913 and the movable edible piece 102′ resembling the skirt below, are swung to the right as indicated by the arrow M8.
  • Depending upon the way in which the dancing toy lollipop is shaken, flipped, revolved or rocked on the rocking base, or held on the user's hand, the movable pieces of the toy lollipop will oscillate to one side or the other, and/or rotate in many different possible motion combinations, producing amusing and entertaining dancing like motion effects. In all cases, said motions must be caused by the action of the user.
  • FIGS. 18A to 18D illustrate another alternate preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, resembling a little dancing doll, combining a specially configured holding stick with several movable edible pieces and inedible components, some of them similar to those previously shown and referred to for the first time in FIGS. 17A to 17C, and including an optional supporting base.
  • In FIG. 18A is shown an elevation view of another preferred embodiment of multi candy dancing toy lollipop resembling a little dancing doll 1800, standing on a static supporting base 1827. This alternate preferred embodiment comprises two movable edible pieces: one with spherical configuration on top, resembling the head of the doll 902, with a edible plug 913, securely inserted to close its outer opening, both pieces similar to those referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A, and below, the lower movable edible piece 1802, resembling the skirt of the little dancing doll, almost like the movable edible piece 1702 previously shown in FIG. 17A to 17C, but slightly different due to its outer curved lateral surface; both movable edible pieces are separated by an intermediate component 1726, exactly like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 17A, resembling the upper body and extended arms of the doll, which may be, either an edible piece or an inedible component made of plastic or any other suitable material. All those pieces, are assembled to the holding stick 1801, also made of plastic or any suitable material, and specially configured, such that its grip portion 1801 a resembles the legs of the dancing doll, while its lower end tip, not shown in this figure, is designed to be inserted into the optional static base 1827, which, in turn, is made of plastic or any other suitable material and is provided with a flat lower surface to keep the dancing toy lollipop vertically on any appropriate surface 1728, such as a table top, like that previously shown in FIG.17A.
  • In FIG. 18B is shown a top view of the same embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop shown in FIG. 18A.
  • In FIG. 18C is shown a front axial section view of the same embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop shown in FIGS. 18A and 18B. This view illustrates the interior configuration of the movable edible pieces 902 and 1802, and the intermediate movable piece 1726, all provided with assembling cavities 108′ and assembled to the holding stick 1801, in such a way, that said movable edible pieces 902 and 1802, and the intermediate movable piece 1726, although retained in axial position by the retaining means on the holding stick, are free to be swiveled or swung to any side in relation to said holding stick 1801, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently flipped, shaken or revolved by the user's hand. In this view is also shown the holding stick grip portion 1801 a resembling the legs of the doll, and its lower end tip 1829, inserted into the hole 1830, being said hole properly configured and dimensioned to securely fit into it the lower end tip 1829 of the holding stick 1801, and located at the center of the optional base 1827, in order to keep the lollipop in vertical position on a supporting surface 1728, when it is not being held by the user. In addition, the optional base 1827 is provided with an outer rim edge 1831 conveniently configured and dimensioned for a purpose that will be explained further in FIGS. 30A and 30B.
  • In FIG. 18D is shown the embodiment of the holding stick 1801 for the preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop shown in FIGS. 18A to 18C, illustrating its main parts: the top resilient retaining elements 1004 located near the top end 1003; the neck space 1006; the lower bidirectional resilient retaining elements 1005, all said three parts like those referred to for the first time in FIG. 10A; the grip portion 1801 a, resembling the doll legs and, at the same time, acting as lower rigid stop for the movable pieces above. This holding stick is provided with a lower end tip 1829, to insert the holding stick into the optional base 1827, as shown in FIG. 18C.
  • In FIG. 19 is shown an elevation view of another embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, in which the holding stick 1901 resembles a ramified plant stem with one main and central holding stick 1901, and two lateral branches 1901 a, all provided with decorative elements 1932 resembling leaves, while to each of the three tips of said ramified holding stick, is assembled a movable edible piece 1902, resembling small fruits, all of them with optional candy plugs 913, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A, closing their outer openings.
  • In FIG. 20 is shown an elevation view of another embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, in which the holding stick 1901 has the same configuration referred to for the first time in FIG. 19, but in this alternate possible embodiment the movable edible pieces 2002 assembled to each end tip, resemble little flowers.
  • These, and in general almost all possible embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, may be provided with an optional base, as shown in FIGS. 17A to 17C and 18A to 18C, to hold the dancing toy lollipop in a vertical position on any appropriate surface, when the lollipop is not being held by the user.
  • In FIG. 21 is shown an elevation view of another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, in which the holding stick 2101 is also ramified in three smooth holding sticks, each with a movable edible piece 102′, resembling an inverted little bell or stylized flower, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E.
  • In FIG. 22 is shown an elevation view of another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, illustrating a holding stick 2201 with the configuration of a trident, provided with holding attachments 101 a, similar to that referred to for the first time in. FIG. 1A, on each tip end, while to each of them is assembled a movable edible piece 102, like that referred to for the first time in said figure.
  • In FIG. 23 is shown an elevation view of an embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, comprising a holding stick 901, similar to that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 10A, combined with several movable edible pieces 2302, like those previously shown in FIG. 8G, stacked one above the other, configured like little spheres resembling segments of a caterpillar with lateral protuberances 2333. In this, as in all embodiments provided with multiple movable edible pieces, when the top candy is consumed, the user may displace upward the remaining movable edible pieces, until the upper one reaches the top of the holding stick and is axially retained by retaining means like those previously shown in FIGS. 6A to 61, or by any other suitable retaining elements.
  • In FIG. 24 is shown an elevation view of another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, wherein the holding stick 901, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 9A and described in FIG. 1A, has assembled on its top end, a movable edible piece 2402, configured like a hollow semi sphere resembling a stylized flower, similar to that previously shown in FIG. 8D, but in inverted position. Below said movable edible piece, retaining it in its axial position, is attached an inedible spacer piece 2434, consisting in a tubular body 2435 with protuberances 1932 resembling stylized leaves, like those referred to for the first time in FIG. 19, and said spacer is widened at its base to form a sort of flange 2436, with the function of finger guard, being said spacer 2434, in turn, retained in axial position by retaining elements, not visible, similar to those previously shown in FIG. 6B, located above the grip portion of the holding stick 901.
  • FIGS. 25A and 25B illustrate in axial section views another alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, provided with several stacked movable edible pieces retained in the desired axial position by a sliding retaining element, which allows the manual upward displacement by the user of the remaining movable edible pieces when the top one has been consumed.
  • In FIG. 25A is shown an axial section view of an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, with a rack like type holding stick 701, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 7A, provided with a series of notches 715 along its upper portion and with a rigid spherical stop at its top end 303, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 3A, where is assembled to said holding stick one movable edible piece 2502, like that previously shown in FIG. 8E, with the shape of a small sphere, and below, are also assembled, stacked one above the other, several other movable edible pieces 2502′, in this case four shaped like biconvex lenses, or stylized rattlesnake tail disks, like that previously shown in FIG. 8F and others, while under the lower one is a attached a sliding retaining element 716 like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 7D, provided with a locking element 719 which engages to a matching notch 715 on the holding stick 701, to keep all the movable edible pieces above retained in the desired axial position.
  • In FIG. 25B is shown a second view of the same possible embodiment shown in FIG. 25A, wherein the four movable edible pieces 2502′ have been displaced upward, as indicated by the arrow M12, after having been consumed the top movable edible piece 2502. To accomplish this displacement, the user manually pushes upward the sliding retaining element 716 until its locking element 719 engages to another notch 715 nearer to the top end 303 of the holding stick 701.
  • In this particular possible embodiment, as in some others, the rounded lower end 207, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 2A, is the entry end for the assembly to the holding stick 701 of all the movable edible pieces 2502 and 2502′, as well as for the sliding retaining element 716.
  • As was explained in FIG. 7D to 7F, the sliding retaining element 716 may be removed to replace the consumed movable edible pieces, or to assemble different combinations of the dancing toy lollipop.
  • In FIG. 26 is shown an elevation view of other possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, similar to that previously shown in FIGS. 25A and 25B, at rest or central position designated by the arrow IX, from where the holding stick 701 may be laterally bent as indicated by the arrow M13, to make it oscillate or vibrate between extreme lateral positions illustrated by dashed line contours, designated by the arrows X and XI, respectively. In this alternate embodiment, the holding stick 701 is of the rack type like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 7A, being said holding stick made of a suitable resilient material. At the top position is assembled a movable edible piece 2502, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 25A with the shape of a small sphere, and below are assembled other movable edible pieces 2502′, in this case seven, stacked one above the other, shaped like biconvex lenses or stylized rattlesnake tail disks, like those referred to for the first time also in FIG. 25A. All the eight movable edible pieces are prevented from going up and out of the holding stick 701 by the top end stop 303, previously shown in FIG. 10A and others, and are prevented from slipping down by the sliding retaining element 716, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 7D. This embodiment allows the user to make the holding stick elastically oscillate laterally, as indicated by the arrow M13, like a sort of edible rattle toy, when it is conveniently moved by the user's hand.
  • In this embodiment, as in all provided with multiple movable edible pieces, the user may displace progressively upward the remaining lower movable edible pieces, as the top one is consumed, keeping all the movable edible pieces retained in the desired axial position on the holding stick 701, in this case by means of the sliding retaining element 716 provided with an appropriate locking element, previously shown in FIGS. 7D to 7F, which engages to the rack notches of the holding stick 701, previously shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B.
  • In addition, as in other embodiments previously described, the sliding retaining element 716 also accomplishes the function of fingers guard preventing the direct contact of the user's fingers with the movable edible pieces 2502′ above.
  • In FIG. 27 is shown an elevation view of another possible embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, similar to that previously shown in FIG. 26, but wherein the lower end of the holding stick 701 is securely inserted into a grip portion attachment 2701 a made of flexible moldable material, resembling a little stylized rattlesnake body. In this alternate embodiment the rattling tail is resembled by the group of movable edible pieces 2502 and 2502′ retained in position by the sliding retaining element 716, and assembled to the elastic holding stick 701, which can be made oscillate manually by the user, as indicated by the arrow M13, while the flexible body of the grip portion 2701 a has its lower free end 2737 resembling a stylized snake head, and may be wound in turns 2738 so that it may be placed in a standing position on a table or on any appropriate surface, or even may be embraced to any suitable support.
  • FIGS. 28A and 28B illustrate an alternate embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, in which a main or primary holding stick has several movable attachments, each provided with several secondary short holding sticks securely inserted and small movable edible pieces assembled to each short holding stick.
  • In FIG. 28A is shown an axial section view of an alternate embodiment, comprising a main or primary holding stick 2801 to which are assembled three movable attachments 2839, each of them with several short holding sticks 2801 a, six in this case, securely inserted, while to each of said short holding sticks, in turn, is assembled one movable edible piece 2802, with a shape similar to the movable edible piece 2502, referred to for the first time in FIG. 25, but substantially smaller. The movable attachments 2839 are provided with cavities similar to the cavities in the movable edible pieces previously described in other figures and thereof, said movable attachments may swing or swivel independently in relation to the main holding stick 2801, as indicated by the arrow M10, moving at the same time the short holding sticks 2801 a inserted into them, while each movable edible piece 2802, in turn, may move in diverse ways in relation to its corresponding short holding stick 2801 a, oscillating as indicated by the arrow M3; turning as indicated by the arrow M11, and/or sliding out and in as indicated by the arrow M14, being all said kind of motions manually caused when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
  • In FIG. 28B is shown a top view of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 28A, wherein the arrow M15 indicates that each group of movable edible pieces assembled to the short holding sticks of each movable attachment, may rotate randomly in any direction, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user. The movable attachments, as well as the short sticks, may be either inedible or edible, and in this, as in all possible embodiments of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, the movable edible pieces may be combined in different sizes, shapes, colors and flavors.
  • FIGS. 29A to 29C illustrate sequential views of a possible procedure for the assembling by the user of a simple embodiment of dancing toy lollipop, and for the unwrapping of a movable edible piece after the assembling.
  • FIG. 29A is an exploded view of a simple embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention, showing below a holding stick 1101, like that referred for the first time in FIG. 11A, provided with resilient retaining elements at its top end 1003, like those referred for the first time in FIG. 10A. Separated, above said holding stick, there is a movable edible piece 102′, like that referred to for the first time in FIG. 1E, covered with an appropriate wrapping 2940, before the assembling of both components by the user, who may insert the holding stick 1101 into the movable edible piece 102′, by moving them in opposite directions toward each other, as indicated by the arrows M1 and M16, respectively. During the assembling operation, the movable edible piece 102′ may remain hygienically covered with the appropriate wrapping 2940.
  • In FIG. 29B is shown an elevation view of the same dancing toy lollipop shown exploded in FIG. 29A, already assembled by the user, with the movable edible piece 102′ assembled to the holding stick 1101, but with said movable edible piece still covered by the protection wrapping 2940, with its bottom pierced as shown in the sectioned portion designated by the arrow XII.
  • In FIG. 29C is shown another elevation view of the same embodiment, illustrating a possible procedure for the user to remove the protection wrapping 2940, pulling it to a side, as indicated by the arrow M17, after the completion of the assembling of the dancing toy lollipop.
  • This process may vary according to the embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop and the type of wrapping used.
  • FIGS. 30A and 30B illustrate a possible protecting transparent case for a preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop resembling a little dancing doll.
  • In FIG. 30A is shown a frontal view of the assembly 1800 of the alternate preferred embodiment of the dancing toy lollipop previously shown in FIG. 18A, resembling a little dancing doll, standing on an optional base 1827 also previously shown in said figure, under a transparent cover 3041 conveniently fitted to the outer rim 1831 of said base to protect the dancing toy lollipop from undesirable contact with insects, dust, etc., when it is not being used.
  • In FIG. 30B is shown an elevation view of the transparent cover 3041 whose body consists in a cylindrical wall 3042 with a semispherical closed top 3043. This cover can be made of a very thin transparent plastic, using the same manufacturing process used for the manufacturing of soda containers. Its thickened lower edge 3044 is configured and dimensioned to fit at the outer edge of the rim 1831 of the base 1827.
  • The above description with reference to the figures is considered illustrative and not restrictive. The true scope and spirit of the invention resides in the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than in the given examples. Modifications and variations on the embodiments described, or known to those skilled in the art, may be made within the scope of the dancing toy lollipop object of the present invention.

Claims (17)

1. A dancing toy lollipop comprising, like current lollipops, at least one edible piece made of candy or any suitable confectionery, attached to the top end portion of a holding stick, made, in turn, of any suitable material, wherein, in order to add an amusing effect to the candy, the union between said edible piece and the holding stick is loose and movable, instead of tight and rigid as in known lollipops, therefore converting said edible piece into a movable edible piece, which is provided with an assembling cavity, having said cavity at least one outer opening and a narrow throat, and being said cavity properly configured to insert through said throat and allocate inside said assembling cavity, the top end of the holding stick, which, in turn, is provided with appropriately configured and dimensioned retaining means, such that said retaining means are able to expand inside said assembling cavity in said movable edible piece, to reliably retain said movable edible piece assembled to said holding stick in the desired position, but, at the same time, allowing a substantial clearance between the inserted portion of said holding stick and said assembling cavity, in such a manner, that said movable edible piece is free to rock, swing, swivel, rotate, slide or perform combined motions relative to said holding stick, in a sort of dancing like random movements, when the holding stick of the dancing toy lollipop is held and is flipped, shaken, revolved or conveniently moved in diverse ways by the user's hand or by the action of the user's tongue, when the movable edible piece of the dancing toy lollipop is licked, sucked or bitten by the user, for his/her amusement and entertainment.
2. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein said movable edible piece is made in one or more parts properly joined together by any convenient means, such as, but not limited to, any convenient available edible sugar base adhesives.
3-4. (canceled)
5. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein, optionally, multiple movable pieces are assembled to, or stacked one above the other on one same holding stick, being said movable pieces edible, such as hard candies or any other kind of confectioneries, including confectioneries for medical purposes.
6. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 5, wherein, one or more of said movable pieces are inedible and, like the movable edible pieces, are provided with an assembling cavity with one or more outer openings and an insertion throat, so that said movable inedible pieces are assembled to the holding stick in the same way that the movable edible pieces, and are free to move in relation to said holding stick, performing random dancing like movements, when the dancing like lollipop is conveniently moved by the user, but, at the same time, said movable inedible pieces are used for diverse purposes, such as, but not limited to, decorative purposes, spacing between movable edible and/or inedible pieces, as well as hygienic purposes, as finger guards, preventing the contact between the user's fingers and the edible pieces, or combinations of any of said purposes, being said movable inedible pieces manufactured of any suitable non toxic material and by any appropriate manufacturing process.
7. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein, to increase the variety of combinations, in order to improve the user's amusement, the movable edible pieces are made in different sizes, colors, flavors and shapes, having all said movable edible pieces in common the interior assembling cavities for their assembling to the holding stick.
8. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein the assembling cavity in said movable edible pieces is provided with openings to opposite sides, and the upper outer opening of the cavity in the uppermost movable edible piece is closed by an optional edible plug securely fixed by any appropriate procedure, such as, but not limited to, tight fit or any edible adhesive, and said plug is made in many different configurations, colors, and flavors, contributing to the decorative and pleasure features of the dancing toy lollipop.
9. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein the holding stick has a lower grip portion to be held by the user's hand, and at least one top end to be inserted into the assembling cavity of the movable edible pieces, and said holding stick comprises one or more fixed or movable parts, made of suitable inedible or edible materials with appropriate chemical and physical properties, including, but not limited to, non toxicity and resiliency and/or flexibility, being said holding stick configured to any convenient geometrical cross-section, size and shape, including ramified configurations with multiple top ends, being each top end, in turn, provided with retaining elements for the assembling of one or more movable edible pieces to said holding stick.
10. (canceled)
11. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 9, wherein the holding stick is provided with a top end attachment, forming a tiny universal joint with the end opposite to the grip portion of said holding stick, as a movable top end attachment of said holding stick, and a movable edible piece is then tightly molded or fixed by any suitable procedure to said attachment, so that said movable edible piece fixed to the movable top end attachment, is free to rock, swing, rotate or perform random combined movements, in relation to the grip portion of the holding stick, when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
12-13. (canceled)
14. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein the retaining means are attached or integrated to the holding stick, and have diverse configurations and working principles, such as, but not limited to, flexible or articulated elements, which momentarily bend or collapse inwards to let the assembling portion of said holding stick pass through the insertion throat in the assembling cavity of the movable edible piece and then, spring open, expanding in said assembling cavity inside said movable edible piece, being said retaining elements conveniently configured, dimensioned and positioned, to provide a movable union between one or more movable edible pieces and said holding stick, while said movable edible pieces are reliably retained in the desired position, but, at the same time, are free to perform random motions, such as rocking, swinging, swiveling, rotating, sliding, or any combination of movements, in relation to said holding stick when the dancing toy lollipop is conveniently moved by the user.
15. (canceled)
16. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein the function of retaining means is performed by a sliding retaining element, made of any suitable material, and provided with a properly configured central hole through which is inserted the holding stick, and said sliding retaining element is locked to said holding stick at any desired axial position by means of a simple self locking resilient or articulated element or by elastic tight fit, in such a way, that when said locking element is released by the user, said sliding retaining element is free to be manually displaced by the user along the holding stick, to adjust the axial position of said sliding retaining element on the holding stick, in order to keep one or more equal or different movable edible pieces assembled to said holding stick in the desired-position.
17-19. (canceled)
20. A dancing toy lollipop as set forth in claim 1, wherein the holding stick and any inedible elements are washable and reusable, and the retaining means are properly configured to allow the user to replace the consumed movable edible pieces with new ones, and to create different combinations of movable edible and inedible pieces, with a great variety of configurations, flavors and colors, increasing the user's amusement.
21-23. (canceled)
US10/698,231 2003-11-01 2003-11-01 Dancing toy lollipop Abandoned US20050095949A1 (en)

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US20050142252A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-06-30 Brown Matthew P.D. Drinking straw with beverage additive
US20050153621A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2005-07-14 Kami Gillmour-Bryant Lighted ring toy with consumable portion
US20060081561A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2006-04-20 Lydia Lopez-Ethnasois Lighted clip-on toy with consumable portion
US20060083285A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2006-04-20 Lydia Lopez-Ethnasois Lighted necklace toy with consumable portion
US20070172562A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2007-07-26 Nestec S.A. Rotatable frozen confection and support
US20070202274A1 (en) * 2006-02-24 2007-08-30 Millie Chan Figurine ornament
US20080233247A1 (en) * 2007-03-19 2008-09-25 Rodolfo Fernandez Assemblable swinging lollypop
US20080248166A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2008-10-09 Nalley Sharon D Dessert decoration system and method
US20110151203A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2011-06-23 Nalley Sharon D Dessert decoration system and method
US7789727B2 (en) * 2007-07-10 2010-09-07 Chernick Mark J Novelty device having elastomeric protrusions with sound producing terminations
US20090068924A1 (en) * 2007-07-10 2009-03-12 Chernick Mark J Novelty Device Having Elastomeric Protrusions with Sound Producing Terminations
US9781944B2 (en) 2008-10-31 2017-10-10 Sugar Factory, Llc Lollipop apparatus and method
US20110027430A1 (en) * 2008-10-31 2011-02-03 Sugar Factory, Llc Lollipop Apparatus and Method
US20100112148A1 (en) * 2008-10-31 2010-05-06 Steve Davidovici Lollipop Apparatus and Method
NL2002554C2 (en) * 2009-02-23 2010-08-24 Youssef El Kamouni Lolly, lolly holder and composition.
US20110151063A1 (en) * 2009-12-22 2011-06-23 Murray Joan Beverage container lid spill prevention device and method of use
USD668016S1 (en) * 2010-10-06 2012-10-02 Perfetti Van Melle S.P.A. Lollipop
US20140161941A1 (en) * 2012-12-08 2014-06-12 Brand Castle Llc Lights and sound enhancements for use with edible constructions
CN106165904A (en) * 2015-05-22 2016-11-30 弗兰卡技术和商标有限公司 Food skewer and food dip-coating method and device
US10292403B2 (en) * 2015-07-01 2019-05-21 Rodolfo Fernandez, Jr. Multiple stacked rotatable lollipop
RU168401U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-02-01 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
RU169258U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-03-13 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
RU169257U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-03-13 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
RU169260U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-03-13 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
RU168382U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-02-01 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
RU168400U1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2017-02-01 Денис Сергеевич Харлашкин Candy toy
KR200488001Y1 (en) 2017-07-18 2018-12-04 황덕형 Shaking type toy

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