US20050066609A1 - Preassembled roof and floor deck panel system - Google Patents

Preassembled roof and floor deck panel system Download PDF

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US20050066609A1
US20050066609A1 US10/674,097 US67409703A US2005066609A1 US 20050066609 A1 US20050066609 A1 US 20050066609A1 US 67409703 A US67409703 A US 67409703A US 2005066609 A1 US2005066609 A1 US 2005066609A1
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members
frame
assembly
panel
roof
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US10/674,097
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Timothy Olah
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Kansas City Structural Steel Co
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Kansas City Structural Steel Co
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Priority to US10/674,097 priority Critical patent/US20050066609A1/en
Assigned to KANSAS CITY STRUCTURAL STEEL, INC. reassignment KANSAS CITY STRUCTURAL STEEL, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: OLAH, TIMOTHY J.
Publication of US20050066609A1 publication Critical patent/US20050066609A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/02Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units
    • E04B5/14Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units with beams or girders laid in two directions
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/16Load-carrying floor structures wholly or partly cast or similarly formed in situ
    • E04B5/17Floor structures partly formed in situ
    • E04B5/23Floor structures partly formed in situ with stiffening ribs or other beam-like formations wholly or partly prefabricated
    • E04B5/29Floor structures partly formed in situ with stiffening ribs or other beam-like formations wholly or partly prefabricated the prefabricated parts of the beams consisting wholly of metal
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/16Load-carrying floor structures wholly or partly cast or similarly formed in situ
    • E04B5/32Floor structures wholly cast in situ with or without form units or reinforcements
    • E04B5/36Floor structures wholly cast in situ with or without form units or reinforcements with form units as part of the floor
    • E04B5/38Floor structures wholly cast in situ with or without form units or reinforcements with form units as part of the floor with slab-shaped form units acting simultaneously as reinforcement; Form slabs with reinforcements extending laterally outside the element
    • E04B5/40Floor structures wholly cast in situ with or without form units or reinforcements with form units as part of the floor with slab-shaped form units acting simultaneously as reinforcement; Form slabs with reinforcements extending laterally outside the element with metal form-slabs

Abstract

An improved roof and floor deck system uses conventional steel shapes and sizes to form a preassembled panel that can be installed and fastened in place without the need for welding or other fastening from above. The roof and floor panel assembly has a frame of generally C-shaped structural members, including a pair of side members and a pair of end members. Each member has a substantially planar outer perimeter surface for coupling with an adjacent panel frame member. A deck is secured to enclose the top side of the frame. The panels are prefabricated, hoisted into place on existing supporting girders, connected together and secured to the girders by workers positioned below the panel assembly.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is broadly concerned with an improved commercial roof and deck system. More particularly, it is concerned with a modular deck system having prefabricated panels that can be fastened to primary support members from below without the need for field-welding.
  • A portion of a structure erected using conventional commercial building construction practice is depicted in FIG. 1 and employs a framework of columns or bearing walls, girders, and open web steel joists to support steel decking. In the case of a floor system, the joists are topped with cast-in-place concrete. This manner of construction is favored because it provides large interior clear spans that allow flexible configuration of the interior space. In practice, open web joists are designed and fabricated for the structure based on approved shop drawings. The fabrication process typically requires a lead time of about four weeks for joist shop drawing submissions and approval and additional joist fabrication time of four to six weeks to delivery of the finished open web joists.
  • A supporting structure is set by installing horizontal steel beams or girders (A) on columns (B) or bearing walls. A series of open web steel joists (C) are rigged, hoisted and set between the beams. Bar joists, each having a top chord joist (D) and a bottom chord joist (E) with an intermediate open web (F) are depicted in FIG. 1 and are commonly employed for this purpose. Generally the top chord joist is somewhat longer than the bottom chord joist to form a bearing end, and the joist is installed so that each of the bearing ends rests on an underlying support beam or girder and is welded to the upper surface. Bracing (G) is bolted to the perimeter of the bar joists and interior cross bracing (H) is bolted or welded in place. Horizontal bracing (I) is next bolted or welded in place between the parallel bar joists, and deck bearing angle (J) is installed around the perimeter. A bundle of decking is then hoisted to the area and “shaken out” by a worker by hand. The decking is laid out to cover the bar joists and is welded down. Screws are installed at each overlap between adjacent decking panels. These operations are necessary steps in conventional building construction and are labor-intensive, time consuming and dangerous. They require an erection crew to work on top of the decking, often at great heights. Field-welding of the bar joists to the support beams is particularly hazardous because the workers gain access by walking along the bar joists before they are welded in place on the underlying support structure. The welding operation is performed from above the panel. In the past, such commercial construction practices have been associated with injuries and fatalities.
  • In order to reduce the incidence of such accidents, the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration has established steel erection standards for the construction industry. These standards require those engaged in structural steel assembly to adopt specific work practices. Notably, they require that workers be protected with fall arrest or restraint equipment when working at heights greater than fifteen feet or two stories. They also specify that hoisting cables may not be released until structural members have been secured in place. While these steel erection standards serve to enhance the safety of workers involved in commercial structural steel assembly, the additional labor and compliance activities required by these standards also serve to increase the cost of commercial construction.
  • Conventional bar joist construction methods are also costly because they incorporate wasted space which is attributable to the height of the open web that extends between the top and bottom chord joists. This so-called “above ceiling” interference requires augmentation of floor-to-ceiling dimensions in order to accommodate-mechanical, electrical and plumbing rough-in items such as ductwork and piping, and also makes the installation of such items more difficult. The depth of the bar joists may also cause problems in correspondence of the dimensions where the construction involves addition of new space to an existing older structure having limited floor-to-ceiling clearances and a requirement for matching existing multi-floor elevations.
  • Conventional construction methods also require custom installation of roof penetrations and their associated structural reinforcement members, and on-site installation of hatches and other roof accessories.
  • Previous attempts to fabricate roof and floor deck assemblies in the shop have utilized open web bar joists with steel decking as the top chord of the joist. Such systems do not address most of the problems previously described, in that they still require the erection crew to field-weld above the decking and do not reduce the depth of the exterior perimeter wall height attributable to the depth of the bar joists or the required interior floor-to-ceiling clearances. Accordingly, there is a need for a prefabricated roof and floor panel system that is economical, adaptable and provides a reduced-depth panel that can be installed quickly and safely, without the need for field-welding from a position above the support structure.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an improved roof and floor deck system using conventional steel shapes and sizes to form a preassembled panel that can be installed and fastened in place without the need for performing welding or other fastening operations from a position above the deck. The roof and floor panel assembly has a rectangular frame of structural members, including a pair of side members and a pair of end members. Each member has a substantially planar outer perimeter surface for fastening to an adjacent panel frame member, as by sets of bolts and nuts, rivets, or the like. A deck is secured to enclose the top side of the frame. The panels are prefabricated, hoisted into place on existing supporting girders; joined together and connected to the girders by workers positioned below the panel assembly.
  • The preassembled deck panels are formed of a length equal approximately to the span between the girders which will support them. Generally, when supported by exterior girders, a panel is sized so that the end extends flush with the edge of the upper flange of the supporting girder. For an interior girder, the end of the panel extends halfway across the upper flange of the girder so that the girder can also support another panel butted against the first. The end members of abutting panels supported by a common girder are connected by fasteners, similar to the side members of the panels.
  • Objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein are set forth, by way of illustration and example, certain embodiments of this invention. The drawings constitute a part of this specification and include exemplary embodiments of the present invention and illustrate various objects and features thereof.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a prior art bar joist roofing system with parts broken away for clarity and taken from a position below the prior art system.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a roof or deck panel constructed in accordance with the present invention and taken from a position below the panel.
  • FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of a roof or deck system constructed in accordance with the present invention with parts broken away for clarity, and taken from a position below the system.
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of a roof or deck system similar to that shown in FIG. 3, showing two panels joined end-to-end and secured to an underlying support girder.
  • FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along Line 5-5 of FIG. 4 and showing side and end member joint construction details.
  • FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of an end panel in accordance with the present invention and showing connection of the panel to a support girder.
  • FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of a first alternate; perimeter panel having a box-shaped end member.
  • FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of a second alternate perimeter panel having a rectangular-shaped end member.
  • FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of a floor deck system constructed in accordance with the present invention, showing two panels fastened end-to-end and secured to a support girder, with a concrete floor poured atop the decking.
  • FIG. 10 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary elevational view of a perimeter panel of the system shown in FIG. 9.
  • FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a roof deck system similar to that shown in FIG. 3, including a roof top unit frame, and with the decking removed for clarity.
  • FIG. 12 is an exploded fragmentary bottom elevational view of a portion of the roof deck system shown in FIG. 11, showing openings framed in the decking to accommodate a roof top unit.
  • FIG. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of an alternate method of connecting a roof deck panel to the side of a support girder by a flange.
  • FIG. 14 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along Line 14-14 of FIG. 13 showing details of connecting the flange to the end of the panel frame.
  • FIG. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view similar to that shown in FIG. 13 but adapted for use as a floor deck.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • As required, detailed embodiments of the present invention are disclosed herein; however, it is to be understood that the disclosed embodiments are merely exemplary of the invention; which may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for the claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to variously employ the present invention in virtually any appropriately detailed structure.
  • A commercial roof and floor deck system in accordance with the present invention is generally designated by the reference numeral 10 and is illustrated in FIG. 3 in an exemplary installation in association with a support structure 12. The support structure 12 includes a plurality of vertical columns 14 supporting a plurality of primary horizontal support members or girders 16, each having a top flange 18, bottom flange 20 and an interconnecting web 22. While the drawing figures depict a framework constructed of wide flange columns and American Standard I-beams, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the inventive roof and deck system may be employed in association with any suitable support structure, including, for example, bearing walls supporting horizontal girders which in turn support a plurality of lighter weight horizontal beams.
  • As shown in FIGS. 2, 3, 11 and 12, the system 10 broadly includes a plurality of generally rectangular panels 24, each having an open frame 26 including a pair of side beam members 28 orthogonally joined with a pair of end beam members 30. Each of the illustrated support members 28 and 30 is an elongated, generally C-shaped structural steel member such as an American Standard channel, having a top flange 32 (FIG. 4), a bottom flange 34 and a web 36 therebetween. The ends of the support members 28 and 30 are orthogonally connected by welding or other suitable means to form the panel frame 26. The supports 28 and 30 are oriented so that the top and bottom flanges 32 and 34 extend inwardly and the unflanged sides of the webs 36 face outwardly so that the panel frame 26 has a substantially planar outer perimeter surface 38. The ends of the illustrated members 28 and 30 are mitered so that the webs 36 of the joined members form the outer perimeter surface 38. The upward and downward-facing surfaces of the top and bottom flanges 32 and 34 cooperatively form respective top and bottom perimeter surfaces or sides 40 and 42 of the panel frame 26. The top surface 40 supports a metal deck member 44. The deck 44 is secured to the top surface 40 by welding or the use of fasteners (not shown) to enclose the frame 26. The illustrated deck member 44 includes a series of parallel corrugations 45 and is preferably installed so that the corrugations 45 run perpendicular to the elongated side support members 28. This construction stiffens the panel 24 and obviates the need for additional lateral support members. While the panels 24 are generally rectangular in shape when installed in the interior or field of a roof or deck, it is foreseen that they may also be equilateral or square in shape. Panels 24 used at the perimeter of a roof or deck may be constructed to have irregular quadrilateral or multilateral shapes in accordance with the specific architectural design features of the perimeter of the structure.
  • Advantageously, the prefabricated panels 24 may be employed to form both roof and floor deck structures. When the prefabricated panels are used as roof deck panels 24, a roof 46 is installed in covering relationship over the decking 44 (FIG. 4). As best shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, when employed as roof deck panels 24, they may be prefabricated to include additional framing or support members 47 defining apertures or roof penetrations 48 enabling Roof Top Units (RTU's) such as heating and air conditioning units (not shown) to be supported by an adjacent girder 16. The illustrated support members 47 are constructed of elongated structural steel angle stock, such as 4″ by 4″ equal-leg angle stock, which is joined with respective side or end support members 28 or 30 by welding. Alternatively, other types of steel stock could be employed for the support members 47.
  • When the prefabricated panels are used as floor deck panels 24, a layer of concrete 49 is poured over the deck 44 to form a floor structure 50 as shown in FIG. 9. A lighter gauge decking is generally employed for floor applications and a heavier gauge decking is employed for roof applications.
  • As shown in FIGS. 10 and 15, preselected floor deck panels 24 are constructed to include a perimeter support member 52 joined with the top flanges 32 of preselected side and end support members 28 and 30 which will form the perimeter of the finished floor 50. The support member 52 is constructed of structural steel angle stock, having a pair of generally perpendicular legs 54. Equal-leg angle stock is preferred, although unequal-leg angle stock or any other suitable steel support may also be employed.
  • In use, the system 10 can be quickly designed in accordance with structural requirements of the job and the panels 24 quickly fabricated in a shop using standard steel stock. Because their generally planar or flat profile permits stacking, the prefabricated panels 24 can be cost-effectively transported to a job site in quantity by rail or by truck. Once delivered to a job site, the preassembled panels 24 are rigged and hoisted into place on a support structure 12 using a crane or the like.
  • As shown in FIGS. 3, 11 and 12, the panels 24 are installed with their respective planar perimeter surfaces 38 in side-by-side or end-to-end adjacent relationship and the webs 36 connected with fasteners 56, such as sets of bolts and nuts. In this manner, the outward-facing webs 36 of adjacent C-channel support members 28 or 30 are connected together to form an intermediate structural member that is similar in cross section to the American Standard I-beam. The bolts 56 are generally installed in a staggered pattern, with a pair of bolts vertically aligned adjacent each end of the side support member 28. The webs 36 of the end support members 30 of corresponding panels 24 are bolted together using a pair vertically aligned bolts 56 adjacent each end. All of the fasteners 56 can be installed by workers from a position below the panels 24, so that fall arrest or restraint equipment is not required, and it is not necessary to install erection bridging between panels or beams. Holes for the fasteners 56 can be drilled on site or, preferably, are predrilled during assembly of the panels 24.
  • As shown in FIGS. 4 and 9, pairs of roof and floor deck panels 24 may be installed so that the end support members 30 of adjacent panels 24 rest on the top flange 18 of a girder 16. Each support member bottom flange 34 is secured to a portion of the girder top flange 18 with bolts 56. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 10, perimeter roof and floor panels 24 may be installed in covering relationship to the girder top flange 18. The support member bottom flange 34 is installed on the outward-facing portion of the girder top flange 18. Interior girders 16 (FIGS. 4 and 9) thus provide underlying support for pairs of intercoupled end support members 30, while perimeter girders 16 (FIG. 10) provide underlying support for end support members 30 which are coupled in flush relation over the perimeter edge of the top flange 18 of the girder 16.
  • Alternatively, as shown in FIGS. 13, 14 and 15, perimeter roof and floor panels 24 may be installed in a flush relationship between the girder top flanges 18 and the top flange 32 of the panel side or end support member 28 or 30 aligned. The panels 24 are connected with a generally T-shaped member or bracket 58 having a web 60 welded to the I-beam girder (FIG. 14) and a pair of outstanding flanges 62 parallel to the girder web 22. The webs 36 of a pair of adjacent end support members 28 or 30 are bolted to the flanges 62 by a pair of vertically aligned fasteners 56. Where the panels 24 are to be used as roof panels, an angle support 52 may be installed on the girder top flange 18, and concrete 48 may be poured over the deck 44 to form a floor 50 as is shown in FIG. 15.
  • A first alternate embodiment of a roof or floor deck system 100 is depicted in FIG. 7 to be of substantially similar construction to that previously described. The system 100 includes a plurality of panels 124 (a portion of one panel is shown), each having a frame 126 formed by side and end support members 128 and 130. While the side support members 128 include generally C-shaped channel construction including top and bottom flanges 132 and 134 with a web 136 therebetween, the end support members 130 are of tubular steel or box-type construction, having a generally square cross section. The end support members include a top wall, 136, bottom wall 138 and a pair of sidewalls 140, all of generally equal length. An end support member 152 is provided, having a pair of generally perpendicular legs 154. The installation of these panels 124 is similar to that previously described, except that the end support members are fastened to the outwardly extending portion of the girder top flange 118 by welding from below. One leg 154 of the support member 152 is fastened to the inwardly extending portion of the girder top flange 118 by means of a fastener 156. The other, upstanding leg 154 of the support member 152 is fastened to the interior sidewall 140 of the end support member 130 by welding or other suitable means.
  • A second alternate embodiment of a roof or floor deck system 200 is depicted in FIG. 8 and is also substantially similar to that previously described. The system 200 also includes a plurality of panels 224 (a portion of one panel is shown), with a frame 226 formed by side and end support members 228 and 230. The side support members 228 are of generally C-shaped channel construction and the end support members 230 are of tubular steel having a generally rectangular cross section. The end support members have top and bottom walls 236 and 238 and a pair of sidewalls 240. The length of the sidewalls 240 exceeds the length of the top and bottom walls 236 and 238. An end support member 252 is provided, having a pair of generally perpendicular legs 154. The installation of these panels 124 is similar to that previously described, with the end support members fastened to the outwardly extending portion of the girder top flange 218 by welding from below. One leg 254 of the support member 252 is fastened to the inwardly extending portion of the girder top flange 218 by means of a fastener 256. The remaining, upstanding leg 254 of the support member 252 is fastened to the interior sidewall 240 of the end support member 230 by welding or other suitable means.
  • It is to be understood that while certain forms of the present invention have been illustrated and described herein, it is not to be limited to the specific forms or arrangement of parts described and shown.

Claims (26)

1. A modular roof and floor panel assembly for connection with and spanning a pair of horizontally extending girders and comprising:
(a) a plurality of structural members including a pair of elongated frame side members and a pair of elongated frame end members, each of said members having a planar side surface;
(b) said side members and said end members being joined at their ends to form a rectangular panel frame having substantially planar outer perimeter surfaces formed by said planar side surfaces of said members, said panel frame having a top side and a bottom side; and;
(c) a deck member secured to said top side and enclosing said frame.
2. The modular roof and panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, and including:
(a) fasteners enabling attachment of said frame end members to said girders.
3. The modular roof and panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, and including:
(a) a bracket member connecting an end member of said panel frame to one of said girders.
4. The modular roof and panel assembly as set forth in claim 1 and including:
(a) a T-shaped bracket formed by a bracket web having a first end and a second end and a pair of bracket flanges extend from said first end of said bracket web;
(b) said bracket having said second end of said bracket web joined to one of said girders; and
(c) said bracket flanges being fastened to one of said end members of said panel frame to thereby join said end member to one of said girders.
5. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, wherein:
(a) said frame end members are adapted to enable connection with said girders; and
(b) said frame side members are adapted to enable connection with frame side members of additional panel assemblies.
6. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1 wherein:
(a) said frame end members are adapted to enable connection with said girders; and
(b) said frame end members are further adapted to enable connection with frame end members of additional panel assemblies.
7. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, wherein:
(a) said frame structural members have a generally C-shaped cross section, including an upper flange and a lower flange joined by a closed web; and
(b) each of said structural members is oriented and positioned on said frame to enable said web to form a portion of said substantially planar outer perimeter surface of said frame.
8. The modular roof and floor; panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, wherein:
(a) at least one of said frame structural members of a panel assembly has a tubular, rectangular cross section, including an upper wall and a lower wall jointed by a pair of spaced apart side walls.
9. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, wherein:
(a) a plurality of said panels are joined together in side-by-side relation.
10. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1 wherein:
(a) a plurality of said panels are joined together in end-to-end relation.
11. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1 wherein:
(a) a plurality of said panels are joined together in side-to-side and end-to-end relation.
12. The modular roof and floor panel assembly as set forth in claim 1, wherein:
(a) a generally rectangular framework is connected with a plurality of said side members in spanning relationship for supporting a roof top unit.
13. Modular roof and floor panel assemblies for connection with and spanning a pair of parallel, horizontally extending girders, each assembly comprising:
(a) a plurality of structural members including a pair of elongated frame side members and a pair of elongated frame end members, each of said members having a planar side surface;
(b) said panel frame side members and said end members being joined at their ends tor form a rectangular panel frame having substantially planar outer perimeter surfaces formed by said planar side surfaces of said members, said panel frames each having a top side and a bottom side; and
(c) a deck member secured to each of said top sides and enclosing each of said frames.
14. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) said panel assemblies are connected together in side-by-side and end-to-end relationship.
15. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) said frame end members further include structure enabling attachment to said girders.
16. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) said frame end members are adapted to enable connection with said girders; and
(c) said frame side members are adapted to enable connection with frame side members of adjacent panel assemblies.
17. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) said frame structural members have a generally C-shaped cross section, including ah upper flange and a lower flange joined by a web; and
(b) said webs are positioned on said frames to form said substantially planar outer perimeter surfaces of said frames.
18. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) at least one of said frame structural members have a tubular, rectangular cross section, including an upper wall and a lower wall jointed by a pair of spaced apart, side walls.
19. The assemblies as set forth in claim 13, wherein:
(a) a generally rectangular framework is connected with a plurality of said side members in spanning relationship for supporting a roof top unit.
20. A modular roof and floor panel system for connection with and spanning a pair of parallel, horizontally extending girders and comprising:
(a) a plurality of rectangular panel frames, each frame including:
(1) a plurality of structural members including a pair of elongated frame side members and a pair of elongated frame end members, each of said members having a planar side surface;
(2) said side members and said end members being joined at their ends to form a rectangular panel frame having substantially planar outer perimeter surfaces formed by said planar side surfaces of said members, said panel frame having a top side and a bottom side;
(b) a deck member secured to said top side and enclosing said frame;
(c) said panels being joined to said girders by connection of end members of each panel respectively to said girders; and
(d) said panels being joined in side-by-side relation by mutual connection of facing side members of adjacent panels.
21. The assemblies as set forth in claim 20, wherein:
(a) said frame structural members have a generally C-shaped cross section, including an upper flange and a lower flange joined by a closed web; and
(b) each of said structural members is oriented and positioned on said frames to enable the webs of said structural members to form said substantially planar outer perimeter surface of each of said frames.
22. A method of assembling a roof and floor deck on a pair of parallel, horizontally extending girders and comprising the steps of:
(a) providing a plurality of prefabricated roof and floor panel assemblies, each assembly including:
(1) a plurality of structural members including a pair of elongated frame side members and a pair of elongated frame end members, each of said members having a planar side surface;
(2) said side members and said end members being joined at their ends to form a rectangular panel assembly having substantially planar outer perimeter surfaces formed by said planar side surfaces of said members, said assembly having a top side and a bottom side; and
(3) a deck member secured to said top side and enclosing said assembly;
(b) lifting each prefabricated roof and floor deck assembly onto said pair of girder and positioning said assembly in spanning relation between said girders,
(c) connecting end members of each assembly with a respective one of said girders;
(d) positioning adjacent assemblies in side-by-side relation; and
(e) interconnecting facing side members of adjacent assemblies.
23. The method of assembly as set forth in claim 22, wherein:
(a) said step of coupling said assembly end members is performed from a position below said roof and deck assembly.
24. A method of assembling a roof and floor deck using a plurality of prefabricated roof and floor deck assemblies, comprising the steps of:
(a) providing a plurality of prefabricated roof and floor panel assemblies, each assembly including a rectangular frame of elongated structural members, said frame including a pair of side members and a pair of end members and having a top side and a bottom side; said frame side members and end members each including a substantially planar outer perimeter surface; and a deck member secured to said top side and enclosing said frame;
(b) lifting and positioning a first prefabricated roof and floor deck assembly on and spanning between a pair of existing girders;
(c) fastening each of said first assembly end members to a respective one of said pair of girders;
(d) lifting and positioning a second prefabricated roof and floor deck assembly on and spanning between said pair of existing girders in side-by-side relationship with said first assembly;
(e) fastening each of said second assembly end members with a respective one of said girders; and
(f) fastening one of said first assembly side members with an adjacent one of said second assembly frame side members.
25. The method of assembly as set forth in claim 24, wherein:
(a) said fastening steps of said first and second assembly end members and side members are performed from a position below said roof and deck assembly.
26. The method of assembly as set forth in claim 24, wherein said step of lifting and positioning further includes:
(a) positioning a second prefabricated roof and floor deck assembly on and spanning between said pair of existing girders in end-to end relationship with said first assembly.
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
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US7540123B1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2009-06-02 Thomas Middleton Semmes Base for rooftop air conditioning units
US20090277122A1 (en) * 2008-05-08 2009-11-12 Howery Jr Douglas J No-Through-Metal Structural Panelized Housing System for Buildings and Enclosures and Economical Process for Manufacture of Same
ES2371704A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2012-01-09 Advanced Simulation Technologies S.L. Lightweight technical forged component. (Machine-translation by Google Translate, not legally binding)
US20140158649A1 (en) * 2012-10-01 2014-06-12 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar Panel Truss Mounting Systems And Methods
US20150240493A1 (en) * 2011-11-08 2015-08-27 Sejong R&D Co., Ltd. Shear reinforcement for reinforced concrete structure
EP2245239A4 (en) * 2008-01-24 2015-10-14 Cons Systems Inc Panelization system and method
US9970193B1 (en) * 2016-04-28 2018-05-15 Boxer Anaya, LLC System and method for the construction of dwellings
CN110230364A (en) * 2019-06-24 2019-09-13 华新顿现代钢结构制造有限公司 A kind of structural form of light gauge cold-formed steel shape house load bearing wall and superstructure

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US20070262040A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2007-11-15 Mifsud Vincent D Overhead gantry for use in building panel construction
US20070265724A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2007-11-15 Mifsud Vincent D Information technology process for prefabricated building panel assembly
US20070264107A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2007-11-15 Mifsud Vincent D Material transport system for building panel assembly
US20070271073A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2007-11-22 Mifsud Vincent D Tools and methods for designing a structure using prefabricated panels
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EP2245239A4 (en) * 2008-01-24 2015-10-14 Cons Systems Inc Panelization system and method
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US20090277122A1 (en) * 2008-05-08 2009-11-12 Howery Jr Douglas J No-Through-Metal Structural Panelized Housing System for Buildings and Enclosures and Economical Process for Manufacture of Same
ES2371704A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2012-01-09 Advanced Simulation Technologies S.L. Lightweight technical forged component. (Machine-translation by Google Translate, not legally binding)
US20150240493A1 (en) * 2011-11-08 2015-08-27 Sejong R&D Co., Ltd. Shear reinforcement for reinforced concrete structure
US9163861B2 (en) * 2012-10-01 2015-10-20 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods
US20140158649A1 (en) * 2012-10-01 2014-06-12 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar Panel Truss Mounting Systems And Methods
US9379660B2 (en) 2012-10-01 2016-06-28 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods
US9882524B2 (en) 2012-10-01 2018-01-30 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods
US10396704B2 (en) 2012-10-01 2019-08-27 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods
USD852736S1 (en) 2012-10-01 2019-07-02 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Support member ends for solar panel truss mounting systems
US9970193B1 (en) * 2016-04-28 2018-05-15 Boxer Anaya, LLC System and method for the construction of dwellings
CN110230364A (en) * 2019-06-24 2019-09-13 华新顿现代钢结构制造有限公司 A kind of structural form of light gauge cold-formed steel shape house load bearing wall and superstructure

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