US20050060792A1 - Article of clothing providing increased air circulation - Google Patents

Article of clothing providing increased air circulation Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050060792A1
US20050060792A1 US10988630 US98863004A US2005060792A1 US 20050060792 A1 US20050060792 A1 US 20050060792A1 US 10988630 US10988630 US 10988630 US 98863004 A US98863004 A US 98863004A US 2005060792 A1 US2005060792 A1 US 2005060792A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
panels
article
garment
material
clothing
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10988630
Inventor
Kishor Desai
Original Assignee
Desai Kishor C.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41BSHIRTS; UNDERWEAR; BABY LINEN; HANDKERCHIEFS
    • A41B9/00Undergarments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41BSHIRTS; UNDERWEAR; BABY LINEN; HANDKERCHIEFS
    • A41B17/00Selection of special materials for underwear
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/28Means for ventilation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D7/00Bathing gowns; Swim-suits, drawers, or trunks; Beach suits
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41BSHIRTS; UNDERWEAR; BABY LINEN; HANDKERCHIEFS
    • A41B2400/00Functions or special features of underwear, baby linen or handkerchiefs
    • A41B2400/20Air permeability; Ventilation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D2400/00Functions or special features of garments
    • A41D2400/20Air permeability; Ventilation

Abstract

The article of clothing providing increased air circulation is a garment to which numerous panels are attached. In some embodiments the article of clothing is made from a wide gauge mesh material having modesty panels incorporated therein, or a liner beneath the mesh material. In other embodiments, the article of clothing is formed from a plurality of straps joined together to form a garment framework having first strips of hook and loop material attached to the outward facing surface of the straps, and a plurality of fabric panels having mating second strips of hook and loop material affixed to the peripheral border of the inward facing surface of the panels, so that panels can be added or removed as desired. In another embodiment, the article of clothing is formed from a garment body having strips of wide gauge mesh material defining openings in the garment at desired locations.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/304,027, filed on Nov. 26, 2002.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to clothing and apparel, and particularly to garments providing increased air circulation due to removable panels or mesh fabric.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • It is generally recognized that optimum personal health is best maintained by avoiding temperature extremes, among other factors. This can be difficult in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, and even in more temperate climates during the summer months. One of the major problems in such war weather is the evaporation of perspiration during and after exertion. The moisture remaining on the body due to perspiration after exertion provides an ideal environment for various microorganisms which can lead to odors, skin rashes and other irritations and diseases, etc.
  • It is of course conventional, where custom permits and the wearer is comfortable with the clothing, to wear relatively few and/or abbreviated garments when exercising, swimming, etc. This results in a minimal amount of fabric to absorb moisture, thereby allowing perspiration or moisture on the wearer's body to evaporate more readily, and minimizing the above noted problems. However, the relatively close weave of the generally opaque fabrics used for such apparel, and the lack of absorbency of stretch synthetic materials which are commonly used in such apparel, generally make it difficult for perspiration and moisture to evaporate from the body of the person wearing such apparel, particularly in those areas covered by the apparel.
  • This can be uncomfortable at best, and may lead to various undesirable conditions, such as odors, skin rashes, etc., as noted further above. While these conditions may be more readily encountered during heavy exertion and/or in water sports or activities, the difficulty in achieving the evaporation of perspiration may be encountered in other environments as well. This is particularly true in tropical climes where high heat and humidity are common, so that a person wearing conventional street attire cannot rid himself or herself of perspiration buildup due to the lack of evaporation caused by the high humidity.
  • The present invention responds to this problem by providing a number of different configurations or embodiments of apparel that provide for increased air circulation over the body of the person wearing the apparel. The present apparel may be configured for wear as men's' or women's' undergarments. A discussion of the related art of which the present inventor is aware, and its differences and distinctions from the present invention, is provided below.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 1,840,937, issued on Jan. 12, 1932 to Ewen C. Duff, titled “Apparel Garment,” describes a combination girdle and brassiere garment, with the two components being joined only by a single front panel that extends over the stomach and midriff of the wearer. The front panel is described as being formed of a stretch material, but the weave is sufficiently fine (i.e., “glovesilk,” per column 2, line 78 of the disclosure) that it is essentially opaque and does not provide the “breathability” or open mesh configuration of the present invention, to allow good air circulation. In fact, the form retaining characteristics of at least the girdle portion of the Duff garment teach away from any relatively open mesh or net construction, due to the requirement for increased support.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 1,911,227, issued on May 30, 1933 to James J. Galligan et al., titled “Crinkled Rubber Bathing Suit,” describes a women's swimsuit that is formed of a rubberized material, as the title of the Galligan et al. U.S. Patent indicates. The Galligan et al. material comprises two finely ribbed plies of thin rubber sheet material laminated together. The use of such material teaches away from the present invention, as such rubberized material does not allow the skin beneath the material to breathe, nor does it allow moisture to evaporate from the body where covered by such material.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 2,249,198, issued on Jul. 15, 1941 to Horace A. Carter, titled “Garment Construction,” describes the construction of an undergarment formed of a tubular knit fabric material. The knit material is formed of both elastic and inelastic yarns, with the elastic yarns running in a straight pattern about the fabric and the inelastic yarns being knitted together to provide resilience, as is conventional in such fabrics. The knit weave of the Carter material is relatively fine, as is evidenced from the garment illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the disclosure. No widely spaced net mesh nor optional removable or permanent inner liner are disclosed by Carter in his garment construction.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 2,250,506, issued on Jul. 29, 1941 to Paul Snyder, titled “Undergarment,” describes the construction of a pair of undershorts or briefs. The undergarment appears to be intended as men's wear, but Snyder does not make this clear in his disclosure. The Snyder undergarment is constructed of a series of relatively finely woven fabric panels, and includes various elastic panels therein to allow the structure to give when the wearer bends and moves. No relatively open mesh or large scale gauge net material is disclosed by Snyder in his undergarment construction, nor is any means of using such an undergarment as outerwear (swimwear, etc.) by means of appropriate modesty panels or inner liners, as provided by various embodiments of the present clothing articles.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,333,589, issued on Aug. 1, 1967 to Albert M. Cohen et al., titled “Swim Garment With Built-In Control Support,” describes conventional loose fitting, boxer type swim trunks incorporating a form fitting inner liner permanently installed within the shorts or trunks. Cohen et al. describe the front and back panels of the liner material as being of “power net construction” (col. 2, lines 32-33), but the illustration of this material in FIG. 3 of the Cohen et al. U.S. Patent is of a non-woven latticework pattern, rather than being a woven or knit material. In any event, the Cohen et al. suit construction teaches away from the configuration of the present garments, in that Cohen et al. provide an outer garment formed of a relatively tightly woven fabric material, rather than forming the outer garment of an open mesh or wide gauge net material, as in the present garments.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,479,844, issued on Nov. 25, 1969 to Andre H. Silvain, titled “Form-Fitting Seamless Garment And Method,” describes various embodiments of a women's undergarment that may cover substantially the entire torso, or only the area between waist and thighs. The lower portion of the garment is formed of a tightly knit yarn, and is intended to provide control in the manner of a girdle or the like. Silvain does not disclose the use of a widely spaced mesh or net material for his garment construction, and in fact such material would not be suitable for the purposes of the Silvain undergarment, with its function as a control garment or girdle.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,556,106, issued on Jan. 19, 1971 to Leonard A. Rosner, titled “Combination Undergarment,” describes an upper brassiere and lower slip or girdle, with the upper and lower garments being joined partially about their mutual circumferences. They are separated from one another at the back, allowing the brassiere portion to be adjusted as desired, and facilitating donning the undergarment. Rosner is silent regarding the specific fabrics used, but the drawings appear to show a conventional finely woven fabric material for all portions of the undergarment. Such material does not provide the ventilation and “breathability” of the widely spaced mesh or net material of which the present articles of clothing are formed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,476,895, issued on Oct. 16, 1984 to Masaru Shibusawa, titled “Short Girdle,” describes a specific construction for a generally panty-configured undergarment formed of closely woven resilient materials that provide control for the wearer. As noted above, this material does not provide the ventilation of a relatively open mesh or net material. No disclosure is made of any form of widely spaced mesh or net material for the construction of the Shibusawa garment.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,920,769, issued on May 1, 1990 to Peter Rickerl, titled “Warp Knitted V-Shaped Briefs,” describes the construction of a high-cut pattern or design, particularly for women's underwear. The material used is relatively finely knit, in comparison to the relatively large gauge, open mesh net of which the present garments are formed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,983,140, issued on Jan. 8, 1991 to Richard Gimble, titled “Backless, Strapless Ladies' Body Briefer,” describes a woman's undergarment in which the required rigidity for the garment is provided by a series of bones or stays installed therein. Such construction teaches away from the flaccid, wide mesh net material of which the present garments are constructed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,023,957, issued on Jun. 18, 1991 to Mary A. Harvey, titled “Panty Hose For Wearing Under An Abbreviated Outer Garment,” describes a panty hose combination having a relatively low waistline and narrow crotch, so as to conceal the waistline and crotch beneath a G-string or similar abbreviated garment. The construction of panty hose, wherein the fabric material extends completely down the legs of the wearer, teaches away from the present articles of apparel, which teach that it is desirable to reduce the amount of fabric in contact with the wearer's body in order to provide optimum ventilation and air circulation. The relatively fine mesh weave of the Harvey panty hose material, does not provide this benefit.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,120,264, issued on Jun. 9, 1992 to Pearl E. Van Engel, titled “Women's Bra And Panty Underwear,” describes a combination garment which is formed “of denier 30” (col. 2, line 27) or “a lightweight denier 10 knit/mesh fabric” (col. 2, line 32). Such yarn is used for nylon stockings and the like, and is much too light to provide the required structural strength of the relatively wide gauge net of which the present garments are constructed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,143,092, issued on Sep. 1, 1992 to Vivian D. Flowers, titled “Flexible Abdominal Flattener,” describes a relatively wide and flat band of material that extends around the waist and hips, with a second similar band of material extending from front to back through the crotch. The material is a woven elastic webbing (per the abstract) that is relatively heavy and thick in comparison to conventional clothing fabrics. Such material does not provide the desired ventilation and air circulation provided by the wide mesh net material of which the present articles of apparel are constructed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,237,706, issued on Aug. 24, 1993 to Robert M. Nalbandian, titled “Male Garment With Scrotal Pouch,” describes a male undergarment which loosely resembles the conventional athletic supporter, but which includes a genitalia pocket defined by two panels. The material of which the Nalbandian undergarment is formed comprises relatively narrow bands. As such, they must be formed of relatively closely woven material in order to provide the required strength. Nalbandian does not disclose the use of a relatively large gauge or wide mesh material for his undergarment.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,363,511, issued on Nov. 15, 1994 to Christine G. Brewer, titled “Panties And A Method Of Fabricating The Same,” describes panty construction wherein the front panel is relatively narrow, and is twisted across the front. The crotch panel extends from the conventional back to join the narrow twisted front panel. Brewer is silent as to the material used, but no wide mesh net material is apparent in the disclosure.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,528,775, issued on Jun. 25, 1996 to Madonna A. Marenda, titled “Women's Abdominal Support Garment,” describes an undergarment having an elastic control panel with a waistband disposed over the upper portion of the control panel.
  • This construction, as well as the control panel itself, comprises a laminated composite of two sheets or layers of closely woven fabric material. Such construction teaches away from the wide gauge net material of which the apparel of the present invention is constructed, with its ability to allow greater air circulation and ventilation for the body of the wearer.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,243,880, issued on Jun. 12, 2001 to Robert M. Lyden, titled “Athletic Shorts,” describes an undergarment construction for wear by male or female athletes, beneath conventional athletic shorts or the like. While the construction differs between the two types of garments due to the anatomical differences between male and female wearers, the material remains the same for both types, i.e., resilient or non-stretch natural or synthetic fibers, spandex, etc., as described in column 7, lines 11-49. All of the materials of this relatively exhaustive list, comprise relatively fine weaves which do not provide the air circulation and ventilation of the relatively large gauge mesh or net of which the present articles of clothing are constructed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,263,511, issued on Jul. 24, 2001 to Mario P. Moretti, titled “Breathable Garment To Be Worn To Improve The Comfort Of The Human Body,” describes a relatively heavy, multiple layer outer garment which provides thermal insulation for the wearer. While the Moretti garment includes means for air circulation and ventilation, it teaches away from the wide gauge mesh net material of which the present garments are made. The Moretti garment is not suitable for wear in hot and humid conditions, as are the present articles of clothing.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,401,250, issued on Jun. 11, 2002 to Mark J. McNabb, titled “Ventilated Athletic Support Garment,” describes a garment formed primarily of spandex material or the like, with a ventilated crotch gusset. The crotch gusset is formed of “an open mesh” (col. 4, line 12), but McNabb continues by stating that “The mesh is formed with between 75 and 125 openings per square inch in the relaxed state,” (col. 4, line 18-19), with a lesser number when the fabric is stretched. Moreover, McNabb states that the fabric material that he uses has “between about 55 and 75 threads per square inch” (col. 4, line 21). This does not at all compare with the {fraction (3/4)} inch to two inch gauge of the net material of which the present garments ar formed.
  • U.S. Patent Publication No. 2002/92,084, published on Jul. 18, 2002, titled “Clothing Waist Portion Structure,” describes multiple ply, absorbent waistband for installation in conventional garments. The material is closely woven, and does not compare with the wide gauge net of the present garments.
  • French Patent Publication No. 2,653,976, published on May 10, 1991 to Claude Vernay, titled “Undergarment Which Is Unrolled,” describes (according to the drawings and English abstract) a device for assisting in fitting an undergarment, by unrolling the undergarment from a rolled state. A separate strip surrounds the top of the body, to which a three-piece article (slip, pant, etc.) is attached. No disclosure is made of any specific type of fabric material for the assembly, and no wide gauge net or mesh material is apparent.
  • Finally, British Patent Publication No. 2,366,988, published on Mar. 27, 2002 to Paul Brady, titled “Male Undergarment,” describes a pair of briefs or shorts having short leg lengths, but also including a frontal pouch for the male genitalia. The external appearance is much like that of the athletic shorts of the Lyden '880 U.S. Patent, discussed further above. As in the case of the Lyden shorts and other shorts, briefs, and garments discussed further above, the undergarment of the Brady '988 British Patent Publication is constructed of a relatively finely woven elastic fabric material. Such material cannot provide the ventilation and air circulation provided by the relatively large gauge mesh or net material of which the present articles of apparel are constructed.
  • None of the above inventions and patents, taken either singly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed. Thus articles of clothing providing increased air circulation solving the aforementioned problems is desired.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention comprises a series of different embodiments of clothing or articles of apparel formed of a relatively wide gauge mesh or net material, and providing increased air circulation adjacent to the body of the wearer. The present clothing is particularly suitable for wear in very warm and humid climates, and allows perspiration to evaporate from the wearer much more readily than conventional clothing.
  • The present apparel may be constructed as underwear or outerwear for both men and women, as desired. Panels of more finely woven fabric may be installed in certain critical areas (i.e., male genitalia and women's breast areas) for support in the case of underwear, and/or as modesty panels where the present garments are constructed as outerwear (swimsuits, athletic and dance wear, etc.). Alternatively, inner liners of a thin, but opaque, finely woven fabric may be removably or permanently installed within the present garments when worn as outer wear, to provide the coverage required by convention and law in most areas. The liners may be provided in a wide range of different colors, in order to match the skin tones of purchasers or wearers, or to contrast with those skin tones and/or with the color of the net or mesh of the apparel, as desired. Also, different gauges of mesh or net material may be combined in different areas of the same garment, and/or decorative panels or openings having different shapes than the mesh pattern used for the majority of the garment may be formed in the apparel, as desired.
  • In an alternate embodiment, the article of clothing is formed from a frame and panels of material removably attached to the frame by hook and loop fastening material. In one embodiment, the garment is a pair of shorts or underwear to which numerous leg panels are attached. A crotch panel may additionally be affixed to the shorts or underwear. The frame of the shorts or underwear is lined with a first hook and loop fastening material, and the leg and crotch panels having mating strips of hook and loop fastening material about their border on the panels' interior surfaces. The leg and crotch panels may therefore be held to the frame of the shorts or underwear by joining the first and second hook and loop fastening materials.
  • The leg or crotch panels may be removed in case of injury or merely to provide greater air circulation. One or all of the panels may be removed. Entertainers may remove the panels as part of their performance. The crotch panel may be removed to provide easy access for a wearer to use the restroom.
  • In a further embodiment, the article of clothing is a brassiere. The bra has bra cup frames, which are lined with a first hook and loop fastening material, and bra cups, which have a mating second strip of hook and loop fastening material about the periphery of their interior surfaces. The bra cups may be attached to the bra cup frames by joining the first and second hook and loop fastening materials to each other.
  • Accordingly, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a series of embodiments of articles of clothing formed of a wide mesh net fabric material, and providing increased air circulation adjacent the body of the wearer.
  • It is another object of the invention to provide a garment that allows for easy removal of various panels for increased air circulation or easy access to injured body parts.
  • It is another object of the invention to provide such articles of apparel constructed for both men and women, and which may be adapted or modified for use as underwear or as outerwear.
  • It is a further object of the invention to provide such clothing to include one or more panels of finely woven opaque fabric material at critical areas thereof, to provide additional support where required and/or to serve as modesty panels where the present apparel is worn as outerwear.
  • Still another object of the invention is to provide removable or permanently installed liners for the present apparel, with the liners being formed of thin, but opaque, finely woven fabric to provide coverage as required when the present apparel is worn as outerwear.
  • It is an object of the invention to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof for the purposes described which is inexpensive, dependable and fully effective in accomplishing its intended purposes.
  • These and other objects of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of both a man's and a woman's swimwear formed of a wide gauge net material and providing increased air circulation according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a rear perspective view of the man's and woman's swimwear of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of another garment embodiment of the present invention, suitable for wear as trunks or pants by a man or woman, showing the addition of a liner thereto.
  • FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of a one-piece woman's garment, showing the addition of a liner thereto.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an abbreviated top or bra portion of two-piece woman's apparel according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an abbreviated bottom or pants portion of two-piece woman's apparel according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a woman's full brassiere embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 8A, 8B and 8C are environmental front, rear and side views of a pair of pants according to another embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view of a pair of shorts according to another embodiment of the present invention having a frame and detachable panels.
  • FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of a pair of shorts similar to FIG. 9 with the addition of a removable crotch panel.
  • FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view of a brassier embodiment of the present invention having a frame and detachable bra cups.
  • Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention comprises a series of embodiments of articles of clothing formed of a relatively wide gauge or open mesh net construction, to provide superior ventilation and air circulation adjacent the body of the wearer. The present articles of clothing may be constructed in men's or women's fashions and styles, as single or multiple piece garments, and/or for use as outerwear (e.g., swimwear, athletic wear, etc.), underwear, or sleepwear. A modesty and/or support panel(s) may be removably or permanently installed with the present articles of apparel, where required for public use as outerwear and/or to provide support to certain areas of the body, as needed.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings respectively provide front and rear perspective views of first embodiments of the present apparel, illustrating its adaption as men's outerwear and women's outerwear. The men's outerwear garment 10, illustrated on the left in FIG. 1 and on the right in FIG. 2, comprises a pair of closely fitting swimming trunks or the like, with the majority of the garment being formed of a relatively wide gauge net or mesh fabric material 12. A number of different fabrics may be used to form any of the embodiments of the present article of apparel, including natural fibers (cotton, etc.) and synthetic fibers (nylon, etc.), and/or a blend of the two. Both non-elastic and elastic (spandex, etc.) materials may be used in the construction of the various embodiments of the present apparel, either exclusively or in combination with one another, as desired.
  • While various knit fabrics have been used in the past in the construction and fabrication of garments and apparel, the knit materials used have always been of a relatively small or fine gauge or weave, to the knowledge of the present inventor. The present invention departs from this convention, by constructing the various articles of apparel of a relatively wide or open mesh or net material, having an appearance similar to that of a conventional hammock, or perhaps a tennis net or the like. Such net materials have a relatively open mesh or net structure, which provides transparency for all practical purposes. The present articles of apparel have a similar construction, using a gauge having openings on the order of between three quarters of an inch minimum and two inches maximum, between adjacent parallel strands or cords.
  • This considerably wider or greater gauge of the net or mesh material of the present invention than has been used in prior art garments in the past provides numerous advantages in comfort for the wearer thereof. In very warm and humid climates, any perspiration or other moisture accumulating on the body does not readily evaporate when conventional clothing having a relatively tight weave, is worn. While abbreviated swimwear is intended to provide freedom of movement for the wearer and avoid the weight and discomfort associated with wet garments, the relatively closely woven fabrics, of which such swimwear is conventionally constructed, still result in the same problem of the difficulty of evaporation of moisture from the suit or swimwear after swimming. This is particularly a problem for women's single piece swimsuits.
  • The present articles of apparel minimize this problem, by minimizing the fabric material used in the construction of the apparel. Where the present apparel is used as outerwear in public, additional modesty panels, e.g., the front panel 14 of the men's swimming trunks 10 of FIG. 1, may be added to conceal the genital and/or other areas as required according to local standards, custom, and law. These modesty panels 14 may also serve as support panels for certain portions of the body where required or desired, in order to retain more flaccid portions of the anatomy (e.g., men's genitalia and women's breasts) where desired. The modesty and support panel 14 of the men's outerwear 10 of FIG. 1 may comprise a front panel, as shown, with a separate rear panel 16 covering and concealing the perianal area, generally as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings.
  • These modesty and support panels 14 and 16 are formed of relatively small panels of a relatively closely woven, opaque fabric material for support and concealment, and may comprise separate panels sewn together at the crotch area, or may be cut from a single sheet of material, as desired. The modesty and support panels 14 and 16 may be sewn into a corresponding open area within the net or mesh 12 of the garment 10, or alternatively the net or mesh 12 may be constructed as a complete garment covering the pubic area when worn, with the modesty and support panels 14 and 16 sewn or otherwise secured either inside or outside the net or mesh material 12, as desired.
  • The women's outerwear garment 18 of FIGS. 1 and 2 is formed of essentially identical material 12 to that used for the men's swimsuit 10 shown in the same drawing Figs. The outerwear or swimsuit 18 of FIGS. 1 and 2 comprises a one-piece suit, extending upwardly from the upper thighs or hips to above the chest or breasts, and supported at the top by shoulder straps. The women's suit 18 may also include a series of modesty panels formed of essentially the same type of relatively finely woven, opaque fabric material from which the modesty and support panel(s) 14 and/or 16 of the men's suit 10 is or are formed. The women's suit 18 may include a lower front modesty panel 20, a corresponding lower rear panel 22 (FIG. 2) formed with the front panel 20 as a single piece or formed separately and attached thereto, and a pair of breast panels 24 and 26. The breast panels illustrated for the women's swimwear 18 of FIG. 1 are relatively small, and only serve to conceal the nipples of the breasts. These panels 24 and 26 may be enlarged to cover a greater area, where the wearer deems it desirable and/or where such additional coverage may be required.
  • It will be noted that in the two embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, no specific seams are illustrated. Each of the present articles of apparel may be constructed as a single, continuous net structure, if so desired, with the only seams being along areas where any modesty panels are attached to the net structure. Alternatively, the apparel may be constructed conventionally of front and rear panels sewn together along lateral seams, if so desired.
  • FIG. 3 provides an exploded view of another embodiment of the present invention, comprising a pair of shorts, trunks, or panties 28. The garment 28 is constructed or formed of the same type of widely spaced mesh or net material 12 as the other embodiments of the present invention, e.g., the swimwear 10 an 18 illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. A waistband 30 and leg bands 32 and 34 may be installed about the peripheries of the garment 28, to provide a more conventional fit for the closely fitting garment 28 and to stabilize the open net edges of the material 12 of which the garment 28 is constructed. Similar bands, not specifically indicated, may be installed about the peripheral openings in the swimwear garments 10 and 18 of FIGS. 1 and 2, and other garments constructed according to the present invention, as required.
  • However, the shorts or panties 28 do not include a smaller modesty or support panel therewith. Rather, an inner liner 36 is provided for use with the garment 28 of FIG. 3. The liner 36 is preferably formed of finely woven, opaque fabric material to provide concealment. The liner 36 is congruent with the garment 28, with a waistband 38 and left and right leg openings 40 and 42, so that it does not extend beyond the waistband 30 and leg openings 32 and 34 of the garment 28. The liner 36 may be installed separately within the garment 28, i.e., donned before donning the garment 28. Alternatively, the liner 36 may be conventionally sewn or otherwise permanently installed within the shorts or panties 28 by securing the waistbands 30, 38, and the respective leg openings 32, 40 and 34, 42 of the two components 28 and 36 together.
  • The shorts, trunks, or panties 28 of FIG. 3, perhaps with their liner 36, are suitable for wear by both men and women, perhaps with some relatively minor tailoring for fit. However, women's garments require some form of support and/or coverage for the breasts. The women's garment 44 of FIG. 4 comprises a one-piece suit that provides such coverage. The women's garment 44 of FIG. 4 is a one piece suit, extending upwardly from the upper thighs or hips to above the chest or breasts, and supported at the top by shoulder straps, generally along the lines of the women's outerwear or swimsuit 18 of FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • However, the garment 44 of FIG. 4 does not include any smaller modesty or support panel(s) therewith, as it is suitable for use as an undergarment, sleepwear, etc., as desired. Rather, an inner liner 46 is provided for the women's garment 44 of FIG. 4. The use of such a liner 46 with the otherwise open mesh of the suit 44, may allow such a garment 44 to be worn as beachwear or other public wear, if desired. The liner 46 may be formed of the same general type of closely woven, opaque material used for the liners and modesty panels of other embodiments. The liner 46 is congruent with the garment 44 in order to fit properly therein, and does not extend beyond the waistband and leg openings of the garment 44. The liner 46 may be installed separately within the garment 44, i.e., donned before donning the garment 44. Alternatively, the liner 46 may be conventionally sewn or otherwise permanently installed within the garment 44 by securing the waistband and respective leg openings of the two components 44 and 46 together.
  • FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a further embodiment of women's wear, comprising a bra portion 48 (FIG. 5) and lower garment 50 (FIG. 6). As in the case of the shorts or trunks 28 of FIG. 3, no modesty and/or support panel(s) is/are integrated with the bra 48 and shorts or panties 50 of FIGS. 5 and 6. However, a liner may be provided for the shorts or panties 50, somewhat on the order of the liner 36 provided for the shorts or panties 28 of the embodiment of FIG. 3. Similar liner material may also be provided for the cups of the bra 48, if so desired. It will be noted that the shorts or panties 50 of FIG. 6 differ somewhat from the comparable garment 28 illustrated in FIG. 3, with the garment 50 of FIG. 6 being cut somewhat lower, i.e., with a shorter distance between the waistband 52 and the two leg openings 54 and 56, as in a “bikini” style garment. The bra portion 48 of FIG. 5 is also minimized, with a relatively thin back strap 58 and shoulder straps 60 and 62.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates another bra embodiment 64, with the bra 64 of FIG. 7 providing some additional support in comparison to the bra 48 of FIG. 5. The bra 64 of FIG. 7 includes a relatively wide front panel or band 66, which continues about the garment to a wide back panel 68. Both the front and back panels 66 and 68, as well as the cups 70 and 72, are formed of a relatively wide gauge mesh material 12, in keeping with the theme of the present invention disclosed herein. While the shoulder straps 74 and 76 are shown as relatively thin straps, it will be seen that they may also be formed of the same mesh material as the rest of the garment, if so desired.
  • The bra 64 of FIG. 7 may serve as an undergarment providing relatively good support, for use when jogging or during other relatively strenuous athletic activities. The bra 64 may also serve as outerwear, with appropriate modesty panels installed. Such modesty panels are shown as relatively small panels 78 and 80, covering and concealing only the nipples of the breasts for the bra 64. However, they may be formed to cover a larger area, if so desired.
  • FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C show another embodiment of the articles of clothing that provides increased air circulation. FIG. 8A shows a front view of a pair of pants 80 made of a solid material, such as spandex or cotton. The pants 80 have a layer of wide gauge net or mesh fabric material 82 sewn into the waist portion of the pants 80. The mesh material 82 allows for air to circulate within the pants 80. FIG. 8B shows a rear view of the pants 80 with several strips of the mesh material 82 sewn int the pants 80. The mesh material 82 is sewn into the pant around the waist, on the hips and on the undersides of the knees, all providing increased air circulation. FIG. 8C shows side view of the pants 80. The mesh material 82 is sewn around the waist and down the sides of the pants 80.
  • Although FIGS. 8A 8B and 8C show the garment comprising pair of pants, it will be understood that the article of clothing may comprise men's' shirts, blouses, jackets, or any other type of garment, whether outerwear or underwear, and that the mesh openings for air circulation may be placed in any desired location, and may be either symmetrically or symmetrically disposed on any given side of the garment. It will further be understood that the garment may be made from any desired material, whether elastic (including spandex or blend thereof as used in sportswear) or inelastic, natural (including leather) or synthetic, woven or nonwoven, etc.
  • FIG. 9 shows an exploded perspective view of a pair of shorts or trunks 90 that includes a frame 92 with removable front 94 and rear 96 panels. The frame 92 of the shorts 90 may be made from numerous materials, chosen to suit the activity in which the user plans to engage. The frame 92 may be constructed from clear, soft plastic strips or any other suitable material forming the basic outline or framework of the waist, leg openings, crotch, and what corresponds to the inseam and outer leg seam. The outer surface of the frame 92 of the shorts 90 has strips of hook and loop fastening material 98 adhered or otherwise secured thereto. The four panels 94 and 96 are adapted to attach to the frame 92 of the shorts 90, with the front panels 94 attaching to the front of the shorts 90 and the rear panels 96 attaching to the back of the shorts 90. The two rear panels 96 attached to the back of the shorts 90 are slightly larger than the front panels 96 so that the rear panels 96 may comfortably accommodate the user's rear. The inner surface of each of the panels 94 and 96 have strips of hook and loop fastening material secured to their periphery or border that mate with the hook and loop strips 98 of the frame 92.
  • The panels 94 and 96 are placed over the frame 92 of the shorts 90, and the hook and loop fastening material 100 fastens to the hook and loop fastening material 98, securing the panels 94 and 96 to the frame 92 of the shorts 90. As the panels 94 and 96 are secured with the hook and loop fastening material 98 and 100, each of the panels 94 and 96 may be peeled off away from the frame 92 of the shorts 90.
  • The panels 94 and 96 are made from spandex or any other flexible material suitable for sportswear use.
  • FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of a pair of men's underwear 110. The underwear 110 has a frame 112 with front 114 and rear 116 detachable panels. Additionally, a detachable crotch panel 118 is attached to the underwear 110. The underwear 110 is made from cotton or any other material suitable to be used as an undergarment. The front 114 and rear 116 detachable panels are designed to affix to the frame 112 of the underwear 110. The rear panels 116 are slightly larger than the front panels 114 in order to accommodate a user's rear. The crotch panel 118 is designed to fit over the crotch area of the user.
  • As in the embodiment of FIG. 9, the outer surface of the frame 112 has strips of hook and loop fastening material 120 affixed thereto. The peripheral border of the inner surfaces of the front 114 and rear 116 panels has mating strips of hook and loop fastening material 122 attached thereto. The peripheral border of the inner surface of the crotch panel 118 also has mating strips of hook and loop fastening material 122 attached thereto. The front 114, rear 116 and crotch 118 panels are all placed on the frame 112 of the underwear 110. The hook and loop fastening material 120 on the panels 114, 116, and 118 fastens to the hook and loop fastening material 120 on the frame, attaching the panels 114, 116, and 118 to the frame 112.
  • FIG. 11 shows an exploded perspective view of a brassiere 130 with removable cups 132. The bra 130 has a pair of cup frames 134 and detachable bra cups 132 removably attach to the frames 134. The bra 130 includes a strap 136 that connects the cup frames 134 and is adapted to fit around a user's body. The cups 132 each have a body portion 138 with an open end 140 and a closed end 142 and a lip 144 disposed around the open end 140 of the body portion 138. The strap 136 may be made from a clear plastic or other transparent material or may be skin-colored.
  • Strips of hook and loop fastening material 146 are affixed to the outward-facing surface of the cup frames 134. Mating strips of hook and loop fastening material 148 are attached to the lips 144 of the bra cups 132. The bra cups 132 attach onto the bra frames 134 and are held in place when the hook and loop fastening material 148 mates with hook and loop fastening material 146. The bra cups 132 may therefore be attached or detached at the user's preference.
  • The cup frames 134 and the bra cups 132 each have a fastener 150 that allows the cup frames 134 and the cups 132 to be adjusted to fit various breast sizes. The frames 134 and the cups 132 may be tightened or loosened at the user's preference. The strap 136 has a strap fastener 152 that allows the strap 136 to be held around the user's body.
  • It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (14)

  1. 1. An article of clothing providing increased air circulation for a wearer thereof, comprising:
    a frame having first strips of hook and loop fastening material disposed on an outer surface of the frame; and
    a plurality of detachable fabric panels attached to the frame, the panels each having second strips of hook and loop fastening material disposed around a peripheral border of an inner surface of each panel, the second strips of hook and loop fastening material mating with the first hook and loop fastening material to attach the panels to the frame.
  2. 2. The article of clothing according to claim 1, wherein said frame comprises a plurality of foundation strips defining a waist, leg openings, a crotch, and connecting strips corresponding to seams joining the waist, leg openings and crotch, whereby the frame defines a framework for a garment selected from the group consisting of shorts, panties, and swim trunks.
  3. 3. The article of clothing according to claim 2, wherein said plurality of panels comprises front and rear leg panels.
  4. 4. The article of clothing according to claim 3, wherein said panels are made from spandex.
  5. 5. The article of clothing according to claim 4, wherein said plurality of panels further comprises a crotch panel removably attached to the frame.
  6. 6. The article of clothing according to claim 1, wherein said frame comprises:
    a strap dimensioned and configured for encircling a torso;
    fasteners attached to opposing ends of the strap; and
    a pair of bra cup frames attached to the strap, the first strips of hook and loop fastening material being attached to the bra cup frames.
  7. 7. The article of clothing according to claim 6, further comprising means for adjusting the bra cup frames to a desired size.
  8. 8. The article of clothing according to claim 6, wherein said bra cup frames are circular.
  9. 9. The article of clothing according to claim 6, wherein said panels comprise a pair of bra cups each of the bra cups having defining an opening dimensioned for receiving a breast into the cups and a lip disposed around the opening, the second strips of hook and loop material being affixed to the lips around the bra cup openings.
  10. 10. An providing increased air circulation for a wearer thereof, comprising a garment body having a wide gauge net fabric material defining a plurality of openings within the garment body.
  11. 11. The article of clothing according to claim 10, wherein said garment body comprises a pair of pants.
  12. 12. The article of clothing according to claim 10, wherein said wide gauge net fabric material defines openings of between three quarters of an inch and two inches between adjacent parallel strands or cords.
  13. 13. The article of clothing according to claim 10, wherein said garment body comprises an outerwear garment.
  14. 14. The article of clothing according to claim 10, wherein said garment body comprises an underwear garment.
US10988630 2002-11-26 2004-11-16 Article of clothing providing increased air circulation Abandoned US20050060792A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10304027 US6817030B2 (en) 2002-11-26 2002-11-26 Articles of clothing providing increased air circulation
US10988630 US20050060792A1 (en) 2002-11-26 2004-11-16 Article of clothing providing increased air circulation

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10988630 US20050060792A1 (en) 2002-11-26 2004-11-16 Article of clothing providing increased air circulation

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10304027 Continuation-In-Part US6817030B2 (en) 2002-11-26 2002-11-26 Articles of clothing providing increased air circulation

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050060792A1 true true US20050060792A1 (en) 2005-03-24

Family

ID=46303323

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10988630 Abandoned US20050060792A1 (en) 2002-11-26 2004-11-16 Article of clothing providing increased air circulation

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20050060792A1 (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040199980A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-10-14 Safety-Short Workwair Inc. Ventilated saftey outerwear
US20100005559A1 (en) * 2008-07-04 2010-01-14 Eddie Majerfeld Protective garment
US20120053553A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-03-01 Michell Renae Griggs Adaptive clothing boxer short undergarment
US20130084777A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Naked Sports Gear, Inc. Tan-through sports brassiere
US20150013042A1 (en) * 2013-07-09 2015-01-15 Jeffrey Russ Two-part undergarment
USD733997S1 (en) * 2013-05-24 2015-07-14 Orlebar Brown Limited Bikini bottom
US20160157547A1 (en) * 2013-07-18 2016-06-09 Seft Development Laboratory Co., Ltd. Ventilating device in helmet
US20160338435A1 (en) * 2015-05-22 2016-11-24 Nike, Inc. Lower body article of apparel having dynamic vent-slit structure
WO2016200875A1 (en) * 2015-06-10 2016-12-15 Nike Innovate C.V. Support garment with lock down support
US20170164668A1 (en) * 2015-12-11 2017-06-15 Joanne Chan Bersamin All-in-one water apparel
US9706799B1 (en) * 2016-04-13 2017-07-18 Mylitta Butler Swimwear apparatus

Citations (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1840937A (en) * 1929-09-05 1932-01-12 Kops Bros Inc Apparel garment
US1861383A (en) * 1930-06-04 1932-05-31 Ficcio Maria Trousers
US1911227A (en) * 1932-09-01 1933-05-30 Revere Rubber Co Crinkled rubber bathing suit
US2249198A (en) * 1938-08-01 1941-07-15 Carter William Co Garment construction
US2250506A (en) * 1939-07-14 1941-07-29 Snyder Paul Undergarment
US2391535A (en) * 1944-10-27 1945-12-25 Zelano Joseph Ventilated clothing
US3333589A (en) * 1965-07-01 1967-08-01 Philtex Mfg Co Swim garment with built-in control support
US3479844A (en) * 1967-07-06 1969-11-25 Pilot Res Corp Form-fitting seamless garment and method
US3556106A (en) * 1968-11-25 1971-01-19 Leonard A Rosner Combination undergarment
US4145763A (en) * 1976-12-07 1979-03-27 Abrams Joe L Separable medical undergarment
US4476895A (en) * 1982-08-17 1984-10-16 Wacoal Corp. Short girdle
US4920769A (en) * 1987-02-18 1990-05-01 Muller Textil GmbH Warp knitted V-shaped briefs
US4951321A (en) * 1989-04-25 1990-08-28 Mortensen James D Novelty undergarment
US4961234A (en) * 1989-03-24 1990-10-09 Leibman Faith H Outergarment with detachable crotch piece
US4983140A (en) * 1990-02-05 1991-01-08 Va Bien Ltd., Inc. Backless, strapless ladies' body briefer
US5023957A (en) * 1990-12-20 1991-06-18 Harvey Mary A Panty hose for wearing under an abbreviated outer garment
US5120264A (en) * 1991-02-06 1992-06-09 Engel Pearl E Van Women's bra and panty underwear
US5143092A (en) * 1991-04-12 1992-09-01 Flowers Vivian D Flexible abdominal flattener
US5237706A (en) * 1992-07-01 1993-08-24 Nalbandian Robert M Male garment with scrotal pouch
US5269720A (en) * 1991-11-12 1993-12-14 Moretz Herbert L Moisture managing brassiere
US5363511A (en) * 1993-09-16 1994-11-15 Brewer Christine G Panties and a method of fabricating the same
US5528775A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-06-25 Marenda; Madonna A. Women's abdominal support garment
US5794267A (en) * 1994-12-06 1998-08-18 Wallace; Richard D. Interactive articles of apparel with removable and interchangeable panels
US6243880B1 (en) * 1999-12-29 2001-06-12 Robert M. Lyden Athletic shorts
US6263511B1 (en) * 1999-07-06 2001-07-24 Nottington Holding B.V. Breathable garment to be worn to improve the comfort of the human body
US6315765B1 (en) * 1997-01-17 2001-11-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Elasticized absorbent pad
US6319092B1 (en) * 2000-09-27 2001-11-20 Polly A. Leyhe Nursing bra with removable/replaceable cups
US6401250B1 (en) * 2001-01-24 2002-06-11 Mcnabb Mark J. Ventilated athletic support garment
US20020092084A1 (en) * 1999-12-29 2002-07-18 Kohji Takayama Clothing waist portion structure
US6611964B2 (en) * 2001-05-31 2003-09-02 Charles River Apparel, Inc. Selective pants and bands for customized assembly

Patent Citations (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1840937A (en) * 1929-09-05 1932-01-12 Kops Bros Inc Apparel garment
US1861383A (en) * 1930-06-04 1932-05-31 Ficcio Maria Trousers
US1911227A (en) * 1932-09-01 1933-05-30 Revere Rubber Co Crinkled rubber bathing suit
US2249198A (en) * 1938-08-01 1941-07-15 Carter William Co Garment construction
US2250506A (en) * 1939-07-14 1941-07-29 Snyder Paul Undergarment
US2391535A (en) * 1944-10-27 1945-12-25 Zelano Joseph Ventilated clothing
US3333589A (en) * 1965-07-01 1967-08-01 Philtex Mfg Co Swim garment with built-in control support
US3479844A (en) * 1967-07-06 1969-11-25 Pilot Res Corp Form-fitting seamless garment and method
US3556106A (en) * 1968-11-25 1971-01-19 Leonard A Rosner Combination undergarment
US4145763A (en) * 1976-12-07 1979-03-27 Abrams Joe L Separable medical undergarment
US4476895A (en) * 1982-08-17 1984-10-16 Wacoal Corp. Short girdle
US4920769A (en) * 1987-02-18 1990-05-01 Muller Textil GmbH Warp knitted V-shaped briefs
US4961234A (en) * 1989-03-24 1990-10-09 Leibman Faith H Outergarment with detachable crotch piece
US4951321A (en) * 1989-04-25 1990-08-28 Mortensen James D Novelty undergarment
US4983140A (en) * 1990-02-05 1991-01-08 Va Bien Ltd., Inc. Backless, strapless ladies' body briefer
US5023957A (en) * 1990-12-20 1991-06-18 Harvey Mary A Panty hose for wearing under an abbreviated outer garment
US5120264A (en) * 1991-02-06 1992-06-09 Engel Pearl E Van Women's bra and panty underwear
US5143092A (en) * 1991-04-12 1992-09-01 Flowers Vivian D Flexible abdominal flattener
US5269720A (en) * 1991-11-12 1993-12-14 Moretz Herbert L Moisture managing brassiere
US5237706A (en) * 1992-07-01 1993-08-24 Nalbandian Robert M Male garment with scrotal pouch
US5363511A (en) * 1993-09-16 1994-11-15 Brewer Christine G Panties and a method of fabricating the same
US5528775A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-06-25 Marenda; Madonna A. Women's abdominal support garment
US5794267A (en) * 1994-12-06 1998-08-18 Wallace; Richard D. Interactive articles of apparel with removable and interchangeable panels
US6315765B1 (en) * 1997-01-17 2001-11-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Elasticized absorbent pad
US6263511B1 (en) * 1999-07-06 2001-07-24 Nottington Holding B.V. Breathable garment to be worn to improve the comfort of the human body
US6243880B1 (en) * 1999-12-29 2001-06-12 Robert M. Lyden Athletic shorts
US20020092084A1 (en) * 1999-12-29 2002-07-18 Kohji Takayama Clothing waist portion structure
US6319092B1 (en) * 2000-09-27 2001-11-20 Polly A. Leyhe Nursing bra with removable/replaceable cups
US6401250B1 (en) * 2001-01-24 2002-06-11 Mcnabb Mark J. Ventilated athletic support garment
US6611964B2 (en) * 2001-05-31 2003-09-02 Charles River Apparel, Inc. Selective pants and bands for customized assembly

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040199980A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-10-14 Safety-Short Workwair Inc. Ventilated saftey outerwear
US7181774B2 (en) * 2002-08-30 2007-02-27 Safety-Short Workwair Inc. Ventilated safety outerwear
US20100005559A1 (en) * 2008-07-04 2010-01-14 Eddie Majerfeld Protective garment
US20120053553A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-03-01 Michell Renae Griggs Adaptive clothing boxer short undergarment
US20130084777A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Naked Sports Gear, Inc. Tan-through sports brassiere
US9049890B2 (en) * 2011-10-04 2015-06-09 Naked Sports Gear, Inc. Tan-through sports brassiere
USD733997S1 (en) * 2013-05-24 2015-07-14 Orlebar Brown Limited Bikini bottom
US20150013042A1 (en) * 2013-07-09 2015-01-15 Jeffrey Russ Two-part undergarment
US20160157547A1 (en) * 2013-07-18 2016-06-09 Seft Development Laboratory Co., Ltd. Ventilating device in helmet
US20160338435A1 (en) * 2015-05-22 2016-11-24 Nike, Inc. Lower body article of apparel having dynamic vent-slit structure
WO2016200875A1 (en) * 2015-06-10 2016-12-15 Nike Innovate C.V. Support garment with lock down support
US20170164668A1 (en) * 2015-12-11 2017-06-15 Joanne Chan Bersamin All-in-one water apparel
US9706799B1 (en) * 2016-04-13 2017-07-18 Mylitta Butler Swimwear apparatus

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3517666A (en) Men's underwear
US3369256A (en) Hospital robe
US4916755A (en) Swimsuit
US6023789A (en) Sports short
US20020022433A1 (en) Dual-layered seamless sports bra and camisole
US5492496A (en) Abdominal support garment
US3787892A (en) Ice hockey garment
US5807299A (en) Male genitalia supporter
US6058514A (en) Buttocks support device
US4156294A (en) Baseball undergarment
US5873768A (en) Active-wear garment
US5136727A (en) Exercise shorts
US20080250551A1 (en) Sport Garment Having an Improved Comfortableness
US6704942B2 (en) Undergarment
US3508550A (en) Garment construction
US5608915A (en) Combination garment with detachable torso and leg enclosing components
US20050229293A1 (en) Athletic support garment
US20080244805A1 (en) Apparel with Built-in Undergarment
US5675842A (en) Pants with two waistbands
US6393611B1 (en) Women's under/outer garment
US20080172769A1 (en) Separate cylindrical detachable waistband device used to temporarily convert the use of regular clothes into maternity use
US7260961B1 (en) Circularly knit undergarment having knit-in support panels and derriere cup fullness
US6205585B1 (en) Adjustable garment
US4372320A (en) Article of clothing having built-in bust support
US5182815A (en) Athletic pants