US20050042343A1 - Age expedited alcoholic beverage - Google Patents

Age expedited alcoholic beverage Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050042343A1
US20050042343A1 US10/954,115 US95411504A US2005042343A1 US 20050042343 A1 US20050042343 A1 US 20050042343A1 US 95411504 A US95411504 A US 95411504A US 2005042343 A1 US2005042343 A1 US 2005042343A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
ethanolic
spirit
ethanolic spirit
aging
enhancers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/954,115
Inventor
Marcus Vickers
Original Assignee
Vickers Marcus Ladon
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US32577101P priority Critical
Priority to US10/059,581 priority patent/US6846503B2/en
Application filed by Vickers Marcus Ladon filed Critical Vickers Marcus Ladon
Priority to US10/954,115 priority patent/US20050042343A1/en
Publication of US20050042343A1 publication Critical patent/US20050042343A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12GWINE; PREPARATION THEREOF; ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; PREPARATION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NOT PROVIDED FOR IN SUBCLASSES C12C OR C12H
    • C12G3/00Preparation of other alcoholic beverages
    • C12G3/04Preparation of other alcoholic beverages by mixing, e.g. for preparation of liqueurs
    • C12G3/06Preparation of other alcoholic beverages by mixing, e.g. for preparation of liqueurs with flavouring ingredients

Abstract

An age expedited alcoholic beverage comprises an ethanolic spirit. Flavoring enhancers are deposited in the ethanolic spirit by adding one or more aging enhancers to at least a portion of the ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers comprising one or more sugar-rich syrups. The one or more aging enhancers are allowed to remain in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit, and the precipitate is separated from the ethanolic spirit after a period of time, any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after the precipitate has formed.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a Divisional Application of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/059,581, filed Jan. 29, 2002, entitled: Improved Method and Apparatus For Production of an Alcoholic Beverage which claims priority of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/325,771, filed Apr. 27, 2001, entitled: Method and Apparatus for Whiskey Distillation all in the name of the same Applicant. This Application is being filed on the same date as another Divisional Application (of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/059,581, filed Jan. 29, 2002) entitled: Apparatus For Production Of An Alcoholic Beverage also in the name of the same Applicant.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The invention relates generally to alcoholic beverages and, more particularly, to alcoholic beverages manufactured by a method and apparatus which produce age expedited alcoholic beverages.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Many alcoholic beverages are produced using multiple-step processes comprising one or more of the steps of (1) producing ethanol by fermentation of sugars, grains, juices, or other produce; (2) distilling the product of fermentation to produce ethanolic spirits; and (3) aging the ethanolic spirits until the beverage possesses desirable flavor, aroma, and color characteristics. Historically, this third step, the aging process, involved storing the ethanolic spirit in wooden casks or barrels. Changes in the flavor, aroma, and color of the ethanolic spirit during the aging process occur as a result of the chemical interaction of the ethanol, water, and essential oils in the spirit, with each other and with additional flavoring agents that are absorbed from the wood of the container. This process may take weeks, months, or years. Beverages produced in this manner include Scotch, Irish, bourbon, rye, Canadian, and Australian whiskeys, rum, brandy, armagnac, cognac, many wines, and the like.
  • Of particular interest are whiskeys, which require years of maturation to achieve desirable characteristics. Many attempts have been made to find a suitable way to reduce the aging time required to produce whiskey, without changing the characteristics of the final product. None of the methods yet attempted for reducing the aging time of whiskey have solved the problem without changing the composition of the final product by adding undesirable agents or removing desirable ones. Thus, there exists a continuing need to find an alternative to the historical aging technique, requiring a shorter time, yet producing a beverage with desirable flavor, aroma, and color characteristics.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention relates to age expedited beverages, comprising a distilled ethanolic spirit; and flavoring enhancers deposited in the ethanolic spirit by adding one or more aging enhancers to at least a portion of the ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers comprising one or more sugar-rich syrups, allowing the one or more aging enhancers to remain in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit, and separating the precipitate from the ethanolic spirit after a period of time, any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after the precipitate has formed
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a more complete understanding of the present invention and the advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a flow chart showing steps for producing an ethanolic beverage;
  • FIG. 2 is a flow chart showing steps for producing an ethanolic beverage;
  • FIG. 2A is a schematic diagram illustrating an apparatus for producing an ethanolic beverage;
  • FIG. 3 is a flow chart showing steps for adding aging enhancers to an ethanolic spirit; and
  • FIG. 4 is a flow chart showing steps for an aging process for an ethanolic spirit.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is a flow chart illustrating basic steps that may be performed to reduce the time necessary to produce an aged ethanolic spirit, such as whiskey, for example. In step 102, an ethanolic spirit is produced. In step 104, aging enhancers are introduced into the ethanolic spirit. As shown in step 106, the ethanolic spirit preferably remains in contact with the aging enhancers until a precipitate forms, which is expected to be within thirty to sixty days, typically. A substantial portion of the precipitate is separated from the ethanolic spirit after the precipitate has formed. However, it will be appreciated that such precipitation may result in other time frames, depending upon the type and concentration of ethanolic spirit, the composition and temperature of the aging enhancers, and other parameters. In step 108, the ethanolic spirit is preferably separated from the precipitate.
  • In step 110, the ethanolic spirit is preferably aged in a wooden container for approximately eighteen months to three years. After completing the aging process, the ethanolic spirit is preferably filtered in step 112 to remove solids introduced during the aging process. Finally, in step 114, the aged ethanolic spirit is preferably “cut” to the desired alcohol concentration by dilution with water. The final concentration of the ethanolic beverage is preferably between 80 and 90 proof (40 to 45% alcohol), although a higher or lower concentration may be used if desired.
  • FIG. 2 shows steps preferably performed in production of an ethanolic spirit, such as in step 102 of the process depicted in FIG. 1. While the present invention is preferably practiced using an ethanolic spirit produced according to the process shown in FIG. 2, any ethanol-rich spirit may be used that is safe for human consumption. Such ethanolic spirits include but are not limited to the ethanolic spirits used to make whiskeys, including Scotch, Irish, bourbon, rye, Canadian, and Australian whiskeys; rum; vodka; brandy; armagnac; cognac; wine; and the like.
  • In step 202, raw ingredients are mixed to form what is referred to in the art as the “mash.” The mash preferably comprises: a grain, preferably course ground corn; sugar, preferably cane sugar; water; and yeast, preferably FLEISCHMANN'S™ dry yeast, although other yeasts may be used and many are well-known in the prior art. The preferred ratio of ingredients is 1 lb corn and 2 lb sugar per gallon of water, and 1 tablespoon yeast for every 50 gallons of water.
  • In step 204, after the ingredients are mixed, the mash is allowed to ferment. To facilitate fermentation, the mash is preferably maintained at a temperature between approximately 90 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit for a period preferably between approximately five to seven days. During this time, the yeast converts the sugar to alcohol. In step 206, after substantially all of the sugar is consumed, the mash is preferably strained through a fine strainer. The strainer is used to remove solids from the mash.
  • In step 208, the ethanolic spirit is distilled from the mash. FIG. 2B depicts an apparatus that may be used in the distillation process of step 208. The strained mash (not shown) is heated in a cooker 252 until boiling, which should occur at a temperature between approximately 192 to 196 degrees Fahrenheit. The mash is heated, preferably using electric heating elements 254 positioned inside the cooker 252. Use of electric heating elements reduces the likelihood of scorching. However, any heating method may be used that is effective for heating the mash to a temperature of at least approximately 192 degrees Fahrenheit. The cooker 252 is preferably constructed of stainless steel. Stainless steel is easier to clean than copper, which has traditionally been used to make cookers.
  • Steam (not shown) exits the cooker 252 through an overhead conduit 256 leading to one or more distillation columns 258. The interior of the one or more distillation columns 258 preferably contains a corrosion-resistant packing 260, such as stainless steel wool, which collects entrained liquids (not shown) from the steam. The collected liquid exits the column 258 through a bottoms conduit 262 leading back to the cooker 252.
  • The top of the distillation column 264 is maintained at a temperature preferably between approximately 172 to 176 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature is preferably maintained by circulating cooling water (not shown) through a coil of metal tubing 266 positioned inside of the column 258, near its top 264. When the temperature at the top of the column is preferably maintained between 172 to 176 degrees Fahrenheit, much of the water vapor (not shown) present in the steam condenses into a water-rich liquid (not shown). The water-rich liquid passes through the bottoms conduit 262 to the cooker 252. The remaining steam then passes from the top of the column 258 to a condenser 268, where it is condensed into an ethanol-rich liquid (not shown). The alcohol content of the ethanol-rich liquid leaving the condenser 268 is preferably between approximately 160 and 185 proof (80 to 92.5% alcohol).
  • In step 209, the ethanol-rich liquid is preferably filtered to remove any impurities and the “moonshine” smell. A preferred filter is a charcoal filter, such as that found in a charcoal water purification system. However, any filter may be used which is effective for removing unwanted impurities while leaving a substantial portion of the necessary flavoring agents.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates steps that are preferably taken in step 104 of FIG. 1 to add the aging enhancers to the ethanolic spirit. In step 302, a portion of the ethanolic spirit is separated from the remainder of the ethanolic spirit. The aging enhancers are preferably added to only a portion of the ethanolic spirit, rather than the entire batch, because this will facilitate the subsequent separation of the precipitate from the ethanolic spirit, as described in step 108 of FIG. 1. The separated portion is preferably about 0.75 gal per 50 gallons total of ethanolic spirit. However, any size of separated portion may be used which is large enough to facilitate dilution of the aging enhancers in the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit. After the separated portion has been removed, the remaining ethanolic spirit may proceed to the aging process described in step 110 of FIG. 1.
  • The aging enhancers comprise one or a combination of a variety of sugar-rich syrups, such as natural or artificial honey; natural or artificial syrup, or the like. The aging enhancers preferably comprise flavor or aroma enhancing constituents that enhance the aged characteristics of the ethanolic spirit. The ethanolic spirit has an alcohol concentration of at least approximately 140 proof. Alternatively, the ethanolic spirit has an alcohol concentration of at least approximately 155 proof. The one or more aging enhancers comprise between approximately 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of approximately 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and between approximately 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of approximately 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit. Preferably, both honey and maple syrup are used as aging enhancers, and are added in relative amounts of about 6 to 18 oz. honey and about 2 to 6 oz. maple syrup per 50 gal. of 160 proof total ethanolic spirit, including any separated portion as well as the remainder of the ethanolic spirit. Most preferably, about 12 oz. honey and about 4 oz. maple syrup per 50 gal. total ethanolic spirit is used. The honey used is preferably pure honey, with substantially no wax, and may be selected from any type of honey, including sunflower honey, buckwheat honey, clover honey, and the like, as well as blends of these honeys. The syrup used is preferably pure maple syrup.
  • In step 304, the aging enhancers are preferably heated to a temperature near their boiling point before being introduced into the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit. Heating the aging enhancers is not required, but allows the aging enhancers to pour easier and mix more thoroughly into the ethanolic spirit. After heating, the aging enhancers are introduced into the separated portion of ethanolic spirit in step 306. In step 308, the aging enhancers and ethanolic spirit are then preferably stirred together until substantially completely dissolved in a solution. The aging enhancers are preferably added to ethanolic spirit that is at least about 140 proof (70 percent alcohol) and, more preferably, is at least about 160 proof (80 percent alcohol).
  • While the steps shown in FIG. 3 describe a convenient and effective way of introducing the aging enhancers into the ethanolic spirit, other methods may also be used. For example, the aging enhancers may be added directly into the entire batch of ethanolic spirit, rather than into a smaller, separated portion. However, if the aging enhancers are added directly into a wooden barrel, they may cause the barrel to leak. The aging enhancers may be added separately into the ethanolic spirit, or may be mixed together before introduction into the ethanolic spirit. Alternatively to heating the aging enhancers before introduction into the ethanolic spirit, the aging enhancers may be introduced without heating, or the ethanolic spirit may be heated, either before or after introduction of the aging enhancer. Generally, any method of introduction of the aging enhancers may be used; however, it is preferable to utilize a method that is effective for allowing substantially thorough contact between the aging enhancers and at least about one percent of the total ethanolic spirit, including any separated portions as well as the remainder.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, in step 106, the aging enhancers are preferably allowed to react with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the mixture. The precipitate may look powdery and be a grayish-white color. A period of about thirty to sixty days is generally required before the precipitate forms. Heating the aging enhancers before addition to the ethanolic spirit and stirring the mixture may result in faster reaction and a shorter necessary contact period.
  • In step 108, the ethanolic spirit is preferably separated from the precipitate. If the aging enhancers were added to a separated portion of the ethanolic spirit according to the steps shown in FIG. 3, then the separation may be easily accomplished by siphoning the ethanolic spirit from the container. In that case, the separated portion of ethanolic spirit is then added back into the remainder of the ethanolic spirit after separation from the precipitate. The ethanolic spirit may alternatively be separated from the precipitate by other separation methods, such as centrifugal separation, filtration, and the like. Generally, any method of separation may be used that is effective for separating the mixture into two or more portions, at least one of which contains substantially all of the ethanolic spirit and little or none of the precipitate. After the precipitate has been substantially separated from the ethanolic spirit, any sweetness added by the aging enhancers is reduced to a level virtually indiscernible to most consumers. Nevertheless, at least a portion of the flavor or aroma enhancing constituents of the aging enhancers remain in the ethanolic spirit. The ethanolic spirit finally produced will taste “smoother” and more “aged” than if the aging enhancers had not been added.
  • Although the aging enhancers will improve the flavor and aroma characteristics of the ethanolic spirit even without any further aging, further superior qualities will be obtained in the final product if the ethanolic spirit is aged for at least some additional period of time after the precipitate is removed. The ethanolic spirit is stored in a wooden container after separating a substantial portion of the precipitate from the ethanolic spirit. Therefore, in step 110 of FIG. 1, the ethanolic spirit is preferably aged in a wooden cask or barrel. The preferred method of aging is according to the steps shown in FIG. 4, discussed below. However, many aging methods are known in the art, and any method may be used in connection with the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a flow chart showing steps that are preferably performed in connection with the aging process of step 110 of FIG. 1. In step 402, preferably a new, wooden barrel is “charred,” preferably by slightly burning the inside surfaces of the barrel with a flame. This charring process is well known in the art. The barrel is preferably made of white oak. In step 404, the ethanolic spirit is added to the barrel.
  • Alternatively, an old charred barrel may be re-used, in which case the ethanolic spirit should be diluted with water to about 120 proof. In this case, it is preferable, though not required, to add about 5 lb of cured white oak chips per 50 gal. ethanolic spirit to the barrel. The process of producing the cured white oak chips is well known in the art.
  • In another embodiment of the invention, if the aging enhancers are introduced into only a portion of the ethanolic spirit, the remainder of the ethanolic spirit may be placed immediately into an aging barrel to begin aging. The separated portion of the ethanolic spirit is then added to the barrel later, after the undissolved portion of the aging enhancers has been removed. This allows a “head start” on the aging process, without affecting the desirable characteristics of the final product.
  • In step 406, the ethanolic spirit is allowed to age in the barrel for a period of time determined by the type of ethanolic spirit used and by individual taste. For an ethanolic spirit produced according to the steps shown in FIG. 2 or other similar ethanolic spirits, a preferred aging period is at least about one year, and more preferably is between about one and one-half to three years. A shorter aging period may be used, but may result in less favorable characteristics. Aging periods of more than three years may be used, and may result in further superior flavor, aroma, and appearance characteristics.
  • In step 408, when the ethanolic spirit has aged for about one month less than the desired total aging period, it is preferably removed from the wooden barrel, which is then filled with water. In step 410, the water is preferably allowed to sit in the barrel for about one week and is then removed from the barrel. In step 412, the ethanolic spirit is then placed back into the barrel, where it is preferably aged for an additional period of about one month. Alternatively to step 410, the ethanolic spirit may be transferred directly from its original barrel to a second barrel which has previously been similarly rinsed with water.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, the aged ethanolic spirit is preferably filtered in step 112 to remove substantially all of the cured white oak chips and substantially all of the char particles. This may be accomplished using a fine paper filter, or any other filter which is fine enough to filter out substantially all of the char and oak chips. In step 114, the filtered ethanolic spirit is cut to the desired strength by dilution with water. The alcohol concentration of the final product is preferably between about 80 to 90 proof (40 to 45% alcohol). Once cut to the desired concentration, the beverage is ready for packaging and consumption.
  • Having thus described the present invention by reference to certain of its preferred embodiments, it is noted that the embodiments disclosed are illustrative rather than limiting in nature and that a wide range of variations, modifications, changes, and substitutions are contemplated in the foregoing disclosure and, in some instances, some features of the present invention may be employed without a corresponding use of the other features.
  • Many such variations and modifications may be considered obvious and desirable by those skilled in the art based upon a review of the foregoing description of preferred embodiments. For instance, the preferred embodiment of the invention is described as a batch process resulting in at least one age expedited alcoholic beverage; however, it is recognized that the method of the present invention could easily be adapted to a continuous-flow process to produce age expedited alcoholic beverages. Accordingly, it is appropriate that the appended claims be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the scope of the invention.

Claims (26)

1. An ethanolic spirit beverage comprising, in combination:
an ethanolic spirit; and
at least one flavoring enhancer deposited in the ethanolic spirit by adding at least one aging enhancer to at least a portion of the ethanolic spirit, the at least one aging enhancer comprising at least one sugar-rich syrup, the at least one aging enhancer is in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit, the precipitate is removed from the ethanolic spirit after a period of time, to reduce sweetness of the beverage after the precipitate has formed.
2. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the at least one aging enhancer comprises maple syrup.
3. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the at least one aging enhancer comprises honey.
4. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the at least one aging enhancer comprises honey and maple syrup.
5. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the ethanolic spirit has an alcohol concentration of at least 140 proof.
6. The ethanolic beverage according to claim l wherein the ethanolic spirit has an alcohol concentration of at least 155 proof.
7. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 4 wherein the at least one aging enhancer comprises 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit.
8. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the ethanolic spirit comprises a whiskey.
9. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 6 wherein the ethanolic spirit comprises a whiskey.
10. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 7 wherein the ethanolic spirit comprises a whiskey.
11. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 1 wherein the period of time for forming a precipitate is thirty to sixty days.
12. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 11 wherein the period of time for forming a precipitate is shortened when the at least one aging enhancer is heated before addition to the ethanolic spirit and a mixture of the at least one aging enhancer and the ethanolic spirit is stirred.
13. An ethanolic spirit beverage comprising:
one or more aging enhancers added to at least a portion of an ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers remaining in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit, a portion of the precipitate being separated from the ethanolic spirit and any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers of the one or more aging enhancers being reduced after the precipitate has formed; and
the one or more aging enhancers comprising a sugar-rich syrup, the one or more aging enhancers comprising 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit.
14. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 13 wherein the ethanolic spirit is stored in a wooden container after separating a substantial portion of the precipitate from the ethanolic spirit.
15. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 14 wherein the ethanolic spirit is aged in the wooden container for a period of at least one year.
16. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 13 wherein the sugar-rich syrup comprises a flavor or aroma enhancing constituent.
17. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 13 wherein the sugar-rich syrup comprises a flavor or aroma enhancing constituent and wherein at least a portion of the flavor or aroma enhancing constituent remains in the ethanolic spirit after the precipitate is removed.
18. An ethanolic spirit beverage comprising:
a portion of an ethanolic spirit separated from a total quantity of ethanolic spirit to leave a remainder of the ethanolic spirit;
one or more aging enhancers added to the separated portion of the total quantity of ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers comprising a sugar-rich syrup, the one or more aging enhancers comprising 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit;
the one or more aging enhancers being allowed to remain in contact with the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit;
a portion of the precipitate being separated from the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit and any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after the precipitate has formed; and
the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit being combined with the remainder of the ethanolic spirit.
19. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 18 wherein the volume of the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit is sufficient to facilitate dilution of the one or more aging enhancers in the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit.
20. The ethanolic spirit beverage according to claim 18 wherein the separated portion of the ethanolic spirit is at least one percent of the total quantity of ethanolic spirit to be treated.
21. An ethanolic beverage comprising:
an ethanolic spirit distilled from fermentation of a mixture comprising corn, sugar, yeast, and water;
one or more aging enhancers added to at least a portion of the ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers selected from the group consisting of honey and maple syrup, the one or more aging enhancers comprising 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit;
the aging enhancers being allowed to remain in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the mixture; and
any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after the precipitate is separated from the ethanolic spirit.
22. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 21 wherein the ethanolic spirit is aged by storing it in a wooden container for a period of at least one year.
23. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 22 wherein the ethanolic spirit is aged for a period of at least one year but less than two years.
24. The ethanolic beverage according to claim 21 wherein the one or more aging enhancers comprise honey and maple syrup.
25. An ethanolic spirit beverage comprising:
one or more aging enhancers added to at least a portion of an ethanolic spirit having an alcohol concentration of at least 140 proof, the one or more aging enhancers comprising a sugar-rich syrup, the one or more aging enhancers comprising 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 oz. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit;
the one or more aging enhancers being allowed to remain in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit; and
a portion of the precipitate being separated and removed from the ethanolic spirit and any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after a precipitate has formed.
26. An ethanolic spirit beverage comprising:
one or more aging enhancers added to at least a portion of an ethanolic spirit, the one or more aging enhancers comprising maple syrup, the one or more aging enhancers comprising 6 to 18 oz. of honey per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit and 4 to 12 OZ. of maple syrup per 50 gallons total of 140 to 185 proof ethanolic spirit;
the one or more aging enhancers being allowed to remain in contact with the ethanolic spirit until a precipitate forms in the ethanolic spirit; and
a portion of the precipitate being separated and removed from the ethanolic spirit and any sweetness of the beverage added by the aging enhancers being reduced after a precipitate has formed.
US10/954,115 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Age expedited alcoholic beverage Abandoned US20050042343A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US32577101P true 2001-04-27 2001-04-27
US10/059,581 US6846503B2 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-01-29 Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage
US10/954,115 US20050042343A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Age expedited alcoholic beverage

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/954,115 US20050042343A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Age expedited alcoholic beverage

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/059,581 Division US6846503B2 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-01-29 Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050042343A1 true US20050042343A1 (en) 2005-02-24

Family

ID=26738934

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/059,581 Active US6846503B2 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-01-29 Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage
US10/953,947 Abandoned US20050048175A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage
US10/954,115 Abandoned US20050042343A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Age expedited alcoholic beverage

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/059,581 Active US6846503B2 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-01-29 Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage
US10/953,947 Abandoned US20050048175A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2004-09-29 Apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US6846503B2 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104232451A (en) * 2014-10-21 2014-12-24 李仪 Maple syrup wine
CN104619865A (en) * 2012-07-13 2015-05-13 Iaf科技控股有限公司 Solid maple syrup compositions

Families Citing this family (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6846503B2 (en) * 2001-04-27 2005-01-25 Vickers, Jr. Marcus Ladon Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage
US20050058746A1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2005-03-17 Harlen Wheatley Process for producing vodka
US20060216383A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2006-09-28 Kolodziejak Pawel J Method and apparatus for the production of distilled spirits
US20070248730A1 (en) * 2006-04-21 2007-10-25 Rick Wood Method and system for treating a distilled spirit
US20070284310A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Van Leeuwen Johannes Method and system for purifying ethanol
US20080089994A1 (en) * 2006-10-11 2008-04-17 Brown-Forman Corporation Process for whiskey recovery
US8087526B2 (en) * 2006-12-01 2012-01-03 Celdo Ltd. Knockdown storage vessel
DE102008011549B3 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-07-23 Hubert Calmer Producing alcoholic beverages, comprises producing preparation by mixing alcohol suitable for consumption with honey, adding raw potato pieces to the preparation, removing potato pieces from alcohol-honey mixture, and heating the mixture
US9637713B2 (en) 2014-01-10 2017-05-02 Lost Spirits Distillery, Llc Method for rapid maturation of distilled spirits using light and heat processes
US9637712B2 (en) 2014-01-10 2017-05-02 Lost Spirits Distillery, Llc Method for rapid maturation of distilled spirits using light and heat processes
US10508259B2 (en) 2014-01-10 2019-12-17 Lost Spirits Technology Llc Method for rapid maturation of distilled spirits using light, heat, and negative pressure processes

Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US205443A (en) * 1878-06-25 Improvement in processes for flavoring liquors
US273604A (en) * 1883-03-06 Adeietf ealu
US1037783A (en) * 1911-12-28 1912-09-03 Frederick A Lutters Mellowing compound for liquors.
US1981873A (en) * 1933-03-23 1934-11-27 Frankfort Distillery Method for aging and coloring whisky
US2061560A (en) * 1934-04-24 1936-11-24 Atlas Powder Co Manufacture of alcoholic beverages
US2104304A (en) * 1938-01-04 Manufacture of rock and rye
US2128760A (en) * 1937-07-01 1938-08-30 Shapiro Abraham Liqueur and method of making same
US2647078A (en) * 1949-12-17 1953-07-28 Stone & Webster Eng Corp Alcohol distillation process
US3598607A (en) * 1970-04-01 1971-08-10 Cornell Res Foundation Inc Method of making wine from honey
US3812272A (en) * 1972-09-01 1974-05-21 C Linville Preparation of an additive for alcoholic beverages
US3988204A (en) * 1974-10-31 1976-10-26 Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc. Production of glucoamylase for conversion of grain mashes in the production of grain spirits
US4001458A (en) * 1975-11-06 1977-01-04 Sabastiano Monte Fresh lemon-flavored alcohol beverage and method of preparation
US4327115A (en) * 1980-06-17 1982-04-27 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Clarification of fruit juice with honey
US4345972A (en) * 1980-07-01 1982-08-24 Hannebaum Tilda M Alcohol recovery process
US4414231A (en) * 1981-04-20 1983-11-08 Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc. Special natural wines simulative of liqueurs
US4440601A (en) * 1980-01-28 1984-04-03 Jerome Katz Method and apparatus for high volume fractional distillation of liquids
US4680179A (en) * 1984-07-20 1987-07-14 Lidman Leonida L M Coconut fruit(s) flavored brandy
US4738857A (en) * 1986-07-25 1988-04-19 Heublein, Inc. Shelf stable plastic packaged alcoholic beverage containing essential oils
US4887772A (en) * 1989-02-10 1989-12-19 Carthage Machine Co., Div. Of Industrial General Corp. Cassette knife for chipper
US4900564A (en) * 1987-07-01 1990-02-13 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Stabilization of wine with honey and SO2
US4929452A (en) * 1987-09-30 1990-05-29 University Of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Method for rapidly fermenting alcoholic beverages
US4956194A (en) * 1990-02-21 1990-09-11 Bart Gos Method for accelerating the aging of distillates
US5043284A (en) * 1987-11-10 1991-08-27 O. Salm & Company Gmbh Method for heating brewing mash
US5458739A (en) * 1994-02-04 1995-10-17 Vendome Copper & Brass Works Volatiles separator and concentrator
US5618573A (en) * 1995-11-20 1997-04-08 Rtd Corporation Production of vodka by supercooling technology
US6203836B1 (en) * 1993-06-28 2001-03-20 Kairos Corporation Method of treating wood and treated wood for use in flavoring aqueous food products and resulting products
US20020004094A1 (en) * 2000-07-03 2002-01-10 Rancier Rodolfo Minaya Process for coconut liquor
US6846503B2 (en) * 2001-04-27 2005-01-25 Vickers, Jr. Marcus Ladon Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage

Family Cites Families (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US754461A (en) 1903-04-06 1904-03-15 Anton V Kouba Process of fermenting honey.
US1153992A (en) 1910-11-03 1915-09-21 Adolph Woolner Jr Distillation.
US2132435A (en) 1934-06-06 1938-10-11 R G N Dev Corp Aging distilled alcoholic spirits
US2198221A (en) 1939-10-07 1940-04-23 Musher Foundation Inc Liquor preparation
US2559129A (en) 1946-02-21 1951-07-03 Girdler Corp Method and apparatus for removing gaseous and readily vaporizable materials from liquids
FI82483C (en) 1986-12-03 1991-03-11 Inst Biolog Morya Dalnevostoch Foerfarande foer framstaellning av en alkoholdryck.

Patent Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US205443A (en) * 1878-06-25 Improvement in processes for flavoring liquors
US273604A (en) * 1883-03-06 Adeietf ealu
US2104304A (en) * 1938-01-04 Manufacture of rock and rye
US1037783A (en) * 1911-12-28 1912-09-03 Frederick A Lutters Mellowing compound for liquors.
US1981873A (en) * 1933-03-23 1934-11-27 Frankfort Distillery Method for aging and coloring whisky
US2061560A (en) * 1934-04-24 1936-11-24 Atlas Powder Co Manufacture of alcoholic beverages
US2128760A (en) * 1937-07-01 1938-08-30 Shapiro Abraham Liqueur and method of making same
US2647078A (en) * 1949-12-17 1953-07-28 Stone & Webster Eng Corp Alcohol distillation process
US3598607A (en) * 1970-04-01 1971-08-10 Cornell Res Foundation Inc Method of making wine from honey
US3812272A (en) * 1972-09-01 1974-05-21 C Linville Preparation of an additive for alcoholic beverages
US3988204A (en) * 1974-10-31 1976-10-26 Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc. Production of glucoamylase for conversion of grain mashes in the production of grain spirits
US4001458A (en) * 1975-11-06 1977-01-04 Sabastiano Monte Fresh lemon-flavored alcohol beverage and method of preparation
US4440601A (en) * 1980-01-28 1984-04-03 Jerome Katz Method and apparatus for high volume fractional distillation of liquids
US4327115A (en) * 1980-06-17 1982-04-27 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Clarification of fruit juice with honey
US4345972A (en) * 1980-07-01 1982-08-24 Hannebaum Tilda M Alcohol recovery process
US4414231A (en) * 1981-04-20 1983-11-08 Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc. Special natural wines simulative of liqueurs
US4680179A (en) * 1984-07-20 1987-07-14 Lidman Leonida L M Coconut fruit(s) flavored brandy
US4738857A (en) * 1986-07-25 1988-04-19 Heublein, Inc. Shelf stable plastic packaged alcoholic beverage containing essential oils
US4900564A (en) * 1987-07-01 1990-02-13 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Stabilization of wine with honey and SO2
US4929452A (en) * 1987-09-30 1990-05-29 University Of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. Method for rapidly fermenting alcoholic beverages
US5043284A (en) * 1987-11-10 1991-08-27 O. Salm & Company Gmbh Method for heating brewing mash
US4887772A (en) * 1989-02-10 1989-12-19 Carthage Machine Co., Div. Of Industrial General Corp. Cassette knife for chipper
US4956194A (en) * 1990-02-21 1990-09-11 Bart Gos Method for accelerating the aging of distillates
US6203836B1 (en) * 1993-06-28 2001-03-20 Kairos Corporation Method of treating wood and treated wood for use in flavoring aqueous food products and resulting products
US5458739A (en) * 1994-02-04 1995-10-17 Vendome Copper & Brass Works Volatiles separator and concentrator
US5618573A (en) * 1995-11-20 1997-04-08 Rtd Corporation Production of vodka by supercooling technology
US20020004094A1 (en) * 2000-07-03 2002-01-10 Rancier Rodolfo Minaya Process for coconut liquor
US6846503B2 (en) * 2001-04-27 2005-01-25 Vickers, Jr. Marcus Ladon Method and apparatus for production of an alcoholic beverage

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104619865A (en) * 2012-07-13 2015-05-13 Iaf科技控股有限公司 Solid maple syrup compositions
CN104232451A (en) * 2014-10-21 2014-12-24 李仪 Maple syrup wine

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20030035856A1 (en) 2003-02-20
US20050048175A1 (en) 2005-03-03
US6846503B2 (en) 2005-01-25

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Léauté Distillation in alambic
Pickering Low-and reduced-alcohol wine: a review
US4626437A (en) Method for the preparation of alcohol-free wine
CN101594791B (en) Bubble stabilizer and sparkling beverage containing the same
US8263165B2 (en) Production of consumable alcohols and components thereof
EP1423498B1 (en) Process for enhanced flavoring of alcoholic beverages
RU2217009C2 (en) Additive for beverage and beverage production method
US20170260487A1 (en) Beer or Cider Concentrate
US6203836B1 (en) Method of treating wood and treated wood for use in flavoring aqueous food products and resulting products
US8420149B2 (en) Fermented malt beverage
ES2284835T3 (en) Procedure to produce balmasic vinegar.
RU2173339C1 (en) Drink production process
US4532140A (en) Method of manufacturing and processing alcoholic beverages, and alcoholic liquids obtained by performing the method
Waterhouse et al. Oak lactone isomer ratio distinguishes between wine fermented in American and French oak barrels
JP5909050B2 (en) Alcoholic beverages including fruit juice-containing storage
US4812232A (en) Apparatus for decreasing the alcohol content of alcohol-containing beverages, particularly wine and sparkling wine
ES2201134T3 (en) Malta drinks with taste.
US6506430B1 (en) Oak aged alcoholic beverage extract and accelerated whisky maturation method
RU2652892C2 (en) Low alcohol or alcohol free fermented malt based beverage and method for producing it
JP4376256B2 (en) Honey liquor manufacturing method
KR20020064801A (en) All Natural Accelerated Aging of Distilled Spirits
US5356641A (en) Process for preparing an oak wood extract and distillate
CN101760378A (en) Method for producing compound rum from sugarcane juice and sugarcane molasses
TW393510B (en) Improving production of fermented liquid beverages by chilling treatment
JP2011030577A (en) Method for producing malt fermentation drink containing lactic fermentation fruit juice

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION