US20050002741A1 - Apparatus and method for dock support or composite piling - Google Patents

Apparatus and method for dock support or composite piling Download PDF

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Publication number
US20050002741A1
US20050002741A1 US10/449,383 US44938303A US2005002741A1 US 20050002741 A1 US20050002741 A1 US 20050002741A1 US 44938303 A US44938303 A US 44938303A US 2005002741 A1 US2005002741 A1 US 2005002741A1
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Prior art keywords
piling
shell
core
foam
sealing
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US10/449,383
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Frank Brensinger
Jeffrey Kalat
Brenda Buck
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Spectrum Dock Systems Inc
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Spectrum Dock Systems Inc
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Priority to US10/449,383 priority Critical patent/US20050002741A1/en
Assigned to SPECTRUM DOCK SYSTEMS, INC. reassignment SPECTRUM DOCK SYSTEMS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BRENSINGER, FRANK J., BUCK, BRENDA, KALAT, JEFFREY M.
Publication of US20050002741A1 publication Critical patent/US20050002741A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B3/00Engineering works in connection with control or use of streams, rivers, coasts, or other marine sites; Sealings or joints for engineering works in general
    • E02B3/20Equipment for shipping on coasts, in harbours or on other fixed marine structures, e.g. bollards
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B3/00Engineering works in connection with control or use of streams, rivers, coasts, or other marine sites; Sealings or joints for engineering works in general
    • E02B3/04Structures or apparatus for, or methods of, protecting banks, coasts, or harbours
    • E02B3/06Moles; Piers; Quay walls; Groynes; Breakwaters Wave dissipating walls; Quay equipment
    • E02B3/068Landing stages for vessels

Abstract

A piling and method of making same for elevating or supporting a structure such as a dock in marine environments. An inner core structural support material is surrounded by an outer impact absorbing water impervious plastic shell with an impact absorbent fill between shell and inner core. The shell is sealed to the core.

Description

    I. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • A. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to apparatus and methods for supporting or elevating a structure, and in particular, a support such as a piling or dock support for elevating a dock or other structure in a marine environment.
  • B. Problems in the Art
  • Pilings or elongated supports are needed to support structures that extend into the water. The supports must extend into the floor of the body of water until they hit bed rock or other sufficient underlying support material. Alternatively or in addition, footings can be constructed to assist in providing a foundation for the support. The top of the piling or support usually extends above water level.
  • These types of pilings or supports are widely used, especially in lakes and coastal areas where commercial and recreational water activity is most prominent.
  • Many factors are relevant to selection of these pilings. Durability is almost universally desirable. However, especially for individuals, cost is very important. For example, the owner of a small waterfront vacation property cannot afford expensive commercial-grade pilings to support a dock.
  • Maneuverability is also important, especially for those lacking industrial equipment, such as “do-it-yourselfers”.
  • Environmental issues are also important, and increasingly so.
  • Traditionally, natural wood has been used as pilings. However, as is widely known, even wood that is naturally resistant to the effects of water degrades over time. They also tend to be heavy because they are usually solid. Their relatively low cost, along with the ability to manufacture them a variety of lengths without substantial cost, has made them a conventional choice over the years.
  • Although the effective life of such pilings can still be years, the fact that they are susceptible to degradation by the elements and wood attacking organisms can greatly reduce their effective life. The expense and resources required to replace them is substantial.
  • Many attempts have been made to improve upon untreated wood pilings for marine use. Treated wood (chemicals and/or pressure) can slow down decay. However, wood remains susceptible, over time, to degradation. Additionally such chemicals and treatments can involve environmentally adverse substances. Therefore, the increase in effective life by such treatments may not be a good trade off.
  • Non-wood materials such as concrete, metal, and even solid plastic have been attempted. Reinforced concrete is capable of excellent support in compression. However, like wood, over a large span of time it is susceptible to degradation. The cement can erode, chip, or crack. The reinforcing re-bar can rust and structural integrity of the concrete piling can fail. This is especially true in marine conditions where the water freezes and thaws. Additionally, concrete is very heavy and thus difficult to maneuver. It also is unforgiving in terms of impact and damage when boats come into abutment with it.
  • Tubular steel and aluminum pilings are lighter and more maneuverable. However, over long periods of time, especially in salt water environments, metals can degrade. Such degradation and deterioration can release substances into the water that are not environmentally friendly and can cause pollution. Metals are also unforgiving relative to impact.
  • Solid plastic pilings have been proposed. They tend to have less structural robustness and higher weight because they are solid.
  • Several attempts have been made to create a shell to place around the structural support to try to protect it. These tend to be temporary fixes as it is difficult to get good, waterproof, long-lasting fit and attachment.
  • Despite all of the activity in developing different types of pilings of this nature, there remains room for improvement in the art.
  • II. BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is therefore a primary object, feature, aspect or advantage of the present invention to provide a dock support or piling which improves or solves problems and deficiencies in the art.
  • Additional objects, features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention include a dock piling or support which:
      • a) provide impact absorption and resistance properties;
      • b) provide an outer interface that is less likely to provide damage to the exterior of boats and other watercraft if they come into abutment with it;
      • c) promotes durability and long effective life, including resistance to environmental factors;
      • d) is environmentally friendly;
      • e) enhances safety;
      • f) is easy to handle and manipulate;
      • g) is easy to install and maintain;
      • h) is easy and economical to manufacture and assemble;
      • i) can be customized and adapted to a variety of needs;
      • j) is adaptable to different decorative appearances and configurations;
      • k) can be retrofitted or originally manufactured; and
      • l) can be applied in a variety of different configurations.
  • A still further object, feature, aspect or advantage of the present invention relates to a method of supporting a dock or other structure.
  • A still further object, feature, aspect or advantage of the present invention involves a method of manufacturing a dock support or piling.
  • These and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent with reference to the accompanying specification and claims.
  • An apparatus according to the invention includes an inner core made of structural support material. An outer plastic shell is adapted to surround a portion of the inner core with space inbetween. An impact absorbent intermediate material fills the space between inner core and outer shell. A sealing member deters entry of water or substances into the space between inner core and outer shell.
  • In another aspect of the invention, a method of making a piling or support comprises selecting a length of core or structural material, placing a plastic outer shell surrounding and spaced from a selected portion of the core filling at least a portion of the space with impact absorbing material, and sealing the space from the environment.
  • One aspect of the invention involves utilizing pelletized material as the impact absorbent material. It is placed between the core and shell and packed or tamped in a manner to spread it uniformly across the cross-section of the composite structure.
  • In another aspect, the composite structure can be assembled by placing a first layer of impact absorbent substance near the bottom of the core and shell and compacting it, then placing as many succeeding layers as are needed to reach the top of the space between core and shell. Optionally, blocks or gaskets can be placed between layers.
  • III. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line 1-1 of FIG. 2A, illustrating one embodiment of a piling for a dock support according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 2A is a simplified perspective view of a dock supported by a plurality of pilings of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 2B is a side elevation of FIG. 2A.
  • FIG. 3 is a simplified view of one complete piling of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 5 is an isolated enlarged view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 6 is similar to FIG. 1 showing an alternative exemplary embodiment according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of an alternative embodiment according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 8 is a sectional view of a still further alternative embodiment of the present invention.
  • IV. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT A. Overview
  • The invention can take many forms and embodiments. In order to provide a better understanding of the invention, several exemplary embodiments will now be described in detail.
  • Frequent reference will be taken to the accompanying drawings. Reference numbers will be used to indicate certain parts and locations in the drawings. The same reference numbers will be used to indicate the same parts and locations throughout the drawings, unless otherwise indicated.
  • B. Environment
  • The exemplary embodiments will be described in the context of dock supports or pilings used to support the structure needed to support a marine dock. In particular, the exemplary embodiments will be described in association with docks for residential waterfront properties for sunbathing, fishing, and boarding and unboarding recreational watercraft. Such docks usually extend anywhere from 10 feet to 100 feet from the shoreline. Normally, the water level to floor of the body of water rarely exceeds 20 or 30 feet deep. Of course, different dock lengths and water depths are possible.
  • In particular, this description will assume docks are placed in salt water along a coastal area.
  • C. Exemplary Structure One
  • FIGS. 1-6 illustrate a piling 2 (this particular embodiment indicated sometimes by reference numeral 2A) used to support a dock deck 48 above water level. A plurality of pilings 2 are positioned in pairs on opposite sides along the length of deck 48. Stringers 44 are bolted to pilings 2 by bolts 46. Optionally a sea wall cap 50 can be attached at the distal end of deck 48 (see FIG. 2A).
  • As can be seen in FIG. 2A, conventionally, top ends of pilings 2 extend above the level of water 42. They may or may not extend above the level of deck 48, but conventional marine grade bolts 46 are inserted through drilled aligned apertures in opposite sides of each piling 2 and then secured to stringers 44.
  • As indicated at FIG. 2B, the lower ends of pilings 2 are conventionally buried into the sea bed 40 and supported in a manner such as are known in the art. Further discussion of the same will therefore not be given here. FIG. 2B gives examples of the size of stringers 44 for one embodiment, as well as deck 48. The FIGS. 2A and 2B are not drawn to scale, of course, but are diagrammatic in the sense of simply illustrating the finction of pilings 2 relative to a dock.
  • The length of pilings 2 is usually anywhere from 8 feet to 40 feet depending on depth of the water and the distance pilings 2 that must be inserted below sea bed level. Average insertion depth below sea bed 40 is around 4 feet. Spacing between pilings 2 is usually between 4 feet and 6 feet for these types of docks.
  • FIG. 1 provides details regarding the composite structure of piling 2A. An inner core 10 has an open bottom end 12 and an open top end 14 between a hollow intermediate portion 16. Piling 2A is tubular (e.g. round in cross-section) steel, 6 to 20 inch O.D. tubing. It could also be aluminum, or fiberglass or other tubular material. As stated, its length can be as desired. Usually it is between 8 feet and 20 feet in length (dimensions A+B in FIG. 1). The tubing wall can be ⅛ inch and greater thick. The wall thickness of the tubing materials, including but not limited to steel, aluminum and fiberglass, will be determined by use of safe load data for tubing used as columns. Example: The live load in lbs/ft2 for both steel and aluminum was taken from Ryerson Data Book, such as is well known and available. For example, a 6 inch diameter steel tube with a ⅛ inch wall thickness and 20 feet long will support 31 KIPS or 31,000 lbs. concentrated load. Such material is “structural” for this capacity, meaning that it is adequate for the various forces that will be placed on it in normal use as a dock support. Such material is also readily available in a variety of lengths from a variety of commercial vendors and manufacturers. It is relatively inexpensive. It is also relatively light-weight and manipulatable, even by an individual.
  • An outer shell 20 has an open bottom end 22, open top end 24, and a hollow intermediate section 26. It has a 10 to 24 inch O.D. and a ¼ inch and greater wall thickness. One material it could be made from is high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in a round-in-cross-section tube of a length that is on the same order of the length as inner core 10. It is adapted to concentrically surround a substantial portion of the length of inner core 10 such that there is a space (e.g. approximately 2 inches) between the outside of inner core 10 and the inside of shell 20.
  • A steel ring 28 having a center aperture of slightly larger than 8 inches diameter is welded (see welds 29 in FIG. 1) towards bottom end 12 of inner core 10. As indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2B, some length of bottom 12 of inner core 10 can be exposed and not covered by shell 20. For example, approximately 3 feet can be exposed as it is not needed for protection against water or will be set into a concrete footing or other footing. However, shell 20 can extend essentially to the bottom of end 12 of inner core 10, if desired.
  • Ring 28 would therefore form a rigid lower stop for shell 20. The outside diameter of ring 28 would be approximately 8-24 inches such that shell 20 could be slid concentrically over inner core 10 and down into abutment with ring 28. Before seating shell 20 on top of ring 28, a rubber washer seal 32 could be slid down inner core 10 into abutment on the top of ring 28. Seal 32 could be elastomeric and have an inner aperture less than 8 inches diameter and a cross-sectional diameter of more than the space between inner core 10 and shell 20 when positioned as in FIG. 1. The elastomeric nature of seal 32 would allow it to be stretched over and slid down into core 10 into the position of FIG. 1. It would serve to space the bottom 22 of shell 20 concentrically about inner core 10 and frictionally hold it against upward longitudinal movement.
  • A fill material 30 is placed in the space between core 10 and shell 20. In this exemplary embodiment, fill 30 is a pelletized rubber with the average diameter of the pellets being less than the cross-sectional thickness of space between core 10 and shell 20. As illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, pelletized recycled rubber 30 would substantially fill up the space.
  • A top seal 34 (here in the nature of an elastomeric O-ring) could optionally be positioned as shown in FIG. 1. O-ring 34 would deter movement of the rubber pellets 30 out of the space.
  • A piling cap 38 could be fit over the top of piling 2. As indicated at reference numerals 39, a seal (e.g. silicone or other caulking) could seal cap 38 to shell 30 and prevent water from entering into the tops 14 or 24 of inner core 10 or outer shell 20. As shown in FIG. 1, inner core 10 can extend slightly (e.g. one inch) above shell 20 and serve as a stop against downward movement of cap 38 when installed, or as a forgiving surface for installation hammering. Cap 38 can be metal, plastic, or other materials. These types of caps are available from conventional marine supply stores.
  • An example of a manufacturing/assembly process for this embodiment is set forth at SDS Manufacturing procedure #102, later in this description.
  • Piling 2A of FIG. 1 therefore is a composite structure in the sense it combines a structural material core 10, an outer shell 20 of impact absorbing, impact resistant material, and an intermediate layer of impact absorbing material. Any boat or watercraft that impacts the exterior of piling 2A would at least come against a relatively nonabrasive, somewhat flexible outer shell of impact absorbent material 20. Any substantial impact would be partially absorbed and partially transferred to thicker impact absorbent layer 30. The inner structural core 10 is substantially rigid and therefore layers 20 and 30 are intended to shield core 10 from as much impact as possible.
  • But further, composite piling 2 is economical to manufacture and therefore can be sold at a relatively low price. By reference to FIG. 1, as well as FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, a method of assembling piling 2A will now be described.
  • As previously discussed, the length of inner core 10 would be selected. Obviously, a standardized or set of standardized lengths of cores 10 could be selected and an inventory built up for those standardized lengths for manufacturing or purchasing economies. Corresponding shells 20 of lengths less than those of core 10 can be manufactured by conventional molding or extrusion processes (or cutting from stock) to create the tubular shells 10 of the desired materials. One advantage of using HDPE is it could be made of recycled plastic, making it more economical and better for the general environment. Plastic can be engineered to have desired properties (impact resistance, impact absorbability, UV resistance, fluid impermeability, etc.). The inside diameters of the shell can also be engineered to choice leaving a space of desired volume when concentrically positioned over core 10.
  • A ring 28 can be welded or otherwise fixed at a desired position near the end 12 of core 10. The lower rubber washer seal 32 could be positioned as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3.
  • Piling 2A can be up to tens of feet long (e.g. 40 feet). Shell 20 would be positioned concentrically over core 10 and recycled rubber pellet fill 30 is poured into the space until it fills up approximately one foot above recycled rubber washer seal 32. Although not required, all the rubber components of the apparatus could be recycled rubber. Using a long tool, the pelletized rubber could be tamped down to compress it so the pellets are packed together as much as possible. A first recycled rubber gasket 36A can then be moved down the outside of core 10 over the first foot of pelletized fill 30 to retain that fill and to create a spacer to hold shell 20 concentrically from core 10. A next one to three feet of fill 30 could be poured in, tamped and covered with a succeeding gasket 36B (see FIG. 3). These steps could be repeated for each succeeding one to three feet until near the top of shell 20. The spacing of washers will be calculated by dividing the overall length into segments to provide uniformity. Whatever remaining distance exists, fill 30 can be poured in, tamped, and then topped by a top washer or O-ring 34 or other sealing mechanism.
  • As indicated at FIG. 6, in some cases it may be desirable to stack several top washers 34 (here 34A, B, C, and D) at the top of the space between core 10 and shell 20 to provide a more substantial block against movement of fill 30 upwardly and to have a more robust structure at that position. Once fill 30 has been completed, cap 38 can be attached and sealed. Piling 2A would then be completed and ready to install in the water. Cap 38 is, however, optional.
  • Even when assembled (shown diagrammatically at FIG. 3), piling 2A would still be relatively lightweight (at least compared to wood or concrete) and relatively easy to maneuver.
  • When installed, shell 20 shields inner core 10 from water or organisms that could try to attach or degrade core 10 by nature of the properties of the plastic. The composite structure presents a buffer between core 10 and watercraft.
  • Additionally, the relatively economical composite structure presents the ability for aesthetic or functional additions. Examples include color, indicia (e.g., designs, instructions or words or letters), and texturing.
  • Utilization of O-rings or washers 32, 36, and 34 is a relatively inexpensive way of assuring concentric positioning of shell 20 on core 10. Pelletized recycled rubber 30 is an inexpensive yet highly effective, long-lasting pile.
  • The composite structure also has no environmentally adverse substances inside the structure that could interface with the water.
  • The amount of tamping or compression of pellets 30, and their size, shape, and material, can be varied. The ability to vary these factors is improved because the fill 30 will basically be isolated or insulated from the water by shell 20 and sealing members such as O-rings 32, 34 and 36, and/or cap 38.
  • D. Exemplary Embodiment 2
  • FIG. 7 shows an alternative composite piling 2B according to the present invention. Piling 2B is similar to piling 2A in that it has an inner structural core lOB, an outer plastic shell 20 and an intermediate fill 31. The differences are that core lOB is a solid wood pole instead of a tubular metal core of FIG. 1. The wood is not pressure treated as it is encapsulated and not exposed to the environment. Additionally, fill 31 is expandable urethane foam, instead of pelletized material of FIG. 1. This combination provides similar advantages of insulating wood core lOB from water or degrading organisms and provides an impact-absorbing function by virtue of plastic HDPE 10 inch outside diameter shell 20 and expandable urethane fill 31 (one inch minimum).
  • The nature of foam 31 is that it could be economically injected into the space between core 10B and shell 20 along the length of structure 2B. Washers 32, 34, and/or 36 may or may not be needed. The shell 20 can be maintained concentric (see, e.g., manufacturing procedure SDS #101, described later), the washers may not be needed as the urethane foam, when set up, hardens to a relatively firm consistency yet retains impact absorbing ability and some resiliency.
  • E. Exemplary Embodiment 3
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a still further exemplary embodiment of a piling 2C. Piling 2C is similar to piling 2B of FIG. 7 except instead of a wood core, a fiberglass tube core lOC is utilized inside of expandable urethane foam filler 31 and HDPE tubing shell 20. The foam, once cured, can reinforce the tubular wall of the core.
  • F. Installation
  • Installation of any of the pilings 2 has been generally described above. The length of pilings 2 must be selected. The lengths can vary for pilings for each dock. Stringers 44 can be attached by bolts 46 by well-known methods which are well within the skill of those skilled in the art. Standard marine construction is bolted through. Preferably, only stainless steel bots, nuts, and washers are used. Necessary holes can be drilled relatively easily with commonly available tools.
  • Election of color, exterior texture, cap (or not), and other functional or decorative features can be possible with pilings 2.
  • Once installed with stringers 44, deck 48 can be added to stringers 44. If desired, sea wall cap 50 or other structures can also be added.
  • G. Options and Alternatives
  • The foregoing exemplary embodiments are intended to provide illustrations of just a few forms the invention can take and are not made by way of limitation. The scope and boundaries of the invention are defined solely by the claims.
  • Variations obvious to those skilled in the art will be included within the invention. For example, the exact dimensions, size and shape of the components can vary.
  • Additionally, the materials utilized can vary. Specific examples that could be used with the aforementioned embodiments are as follows. These are by example only and not by way of limitation.
  • Shell 20 can be HDPE with the following composition (and percentage by weight): low density polyethylene between 20% and 25%; high density polyethylene 35% to 45%; polypropylene 35% to 45%; additives—carbon black 2%, foaming agent, emulsifies and antioxidants, as required for suitable extrusion of plastic pipe for use in a marine environment. Alternatively, shell 20 could be vinyl.
  • Inner core 10 can be hot formed structural carbon steel (ASTM A 501); 58,000 psi tensile strength; 36,000 psi yield, Brinell hardness 121 on the (B scale), minimum wall thickness of one eighth inch and greater to suit application and loading. As stated earlier, the material and material dimensions and characteristics can be selected according to need or desire.
  • Alternatively, tubular core 10 could be made of marine grade 6061 aluminum conforming to federal specification QQ-A-250/11 (formally QQ-A-327). If fiberglass, tubular core 10 could be glass reinforced polyester continuous formed tubing having a high strength to weight ratio, a good dimensional stability and resistant to weather and chemical corrosion.
  • Other core shapes, materials, configurations, and characteristics are possible. For example, instead of a round-in-cross-section tubular or solid core, it can be made of other cross-section shapes (e.g. triangular, rectangular or square, other polygons). It could also be made of other structural shapes, such as an I-beam, H-beam, or other structural cross-section, especially with expandable foam embodiments. It is believed that round outside perimeter of the core is best for the embodiments using a pelletized fill between core and outer shell. Furthermore, it is believed the expanding foam embodiments are better suited for cores like wood or fiberglass than steel or aluminum. Also, rubber washers or O-Rings are probably not necessary with expanded foam embodiments.
  • Rubber pellet fill 30 could be recycled rubber pellets that ground up recycled rubber tires with mesh size of pellets to be altered to accommodate design requirements. Pellets will provide the filler and cushion between the recycled rubber washers or O-rings and the outer shell and core.
  • Washers or O-rings 32, 34, 36 can be recycled or vulcanized rubber with a durometer of 70 and approximately one-inch in cross-section. Preferably, but not required, parts 32, 34, and 36 are either all O-rings, or all washers. A ring washer 28 could be stamped from sheet material.
  • The exemplary embodiments have been described regarding a dock support or piling. Other support functions are possible including in non-marine environments where protection of the core from environmental conditions or some impact is desirable.
  • Plastic shell 20 can have texturing that simulates natural elements. The texturing could also be arbitrary or include thinner and thicker areas. It could also include molded end or extruded indicia such as numbers or letters. Plastic of shell 20 could also be colored to different colors.
  • For the embodiments utilizing an expandable foam filler, one option that could be used for both wood and fiberglass core pilings include Suremix 6000 or equal expandable foam urethane available from commercial sources. It has a working time of 10 minutes, handling strength in 10 minutes, and full cure time of one hour. When cured it has a tensile strength of 2,000 and an elongation of 10%. Another example would be rigid urethane foams of two component expanding system. These tend to be very strong and durable and can add structural strength and resist tearing and compression set. These types of foams are commercially available and can be formulated to add structural strength as an encapsulation material. They have double the working time and fully cure in about two hours compared to the previously described optional expandable foam. When cured, it has a strength similar to the first option expandable foam.
  • It can therefore be seen that different pilings 2 described above promote longer effective life of the pilings than traditional wooden, concrete, steel based pilings, are environmentally friendly, and are forgiving and impact absorbing for all watercraft and other water carrying objects. The plastic also resists attachment of marine organisms and animals as well as resists attachment of ice, which can cause damage by heaving.
  • Pilings 2 tend to be lighter weight, safer and easier to handle, install, maintain, and modify than traditional pilings, and in some embodiments use recycled plastic and rubber. The inner core can be selected for adequate structural integrity and robustness whereas the outer shell can be selected for aesthetic or decorative features.
  • Pilings 2 can be manufactured to length. Mounting holes for stringers or the like could be pre-manufactured or made during installation. The mounting bolts could have sealing gaskets or otherwise be sealed, but this may not be necessary because they are above normal water line. Caulking or sealing gaskets could be used on opposite sides of the bolt to prevent water from entering. The composite structures can be drilled or cut with conventional tools.
  • The outer plastic shell could include sizes bigger than 10 inches. Sizes up to 18 inches or more are included.
  • A typical small dock 8 feet wide by 25 feet long requires on the order of 12 pilings. Pilings 2 as above described are economical and therefore can multiply savings in cost not only for the original pilings, but increased durability would delay maintenance and replacement over the years.
  • Shell 20 could have other cross-sectional shapes such as square, 10 inch plastic tubing with one quarter inch wall thickness. Core 10 could also have different cross-sectional shapes.
  • When using expandable urethane foam, as is known in the art, when inserting the foam space for expansion must be left. The urethane will provide air and watertight seal and bond core 10 to shell 20 together as one-piece. The ends can be capped and sealed if desired. The composite piling 2 with expandable foam is indicated for pilings up to 24 inches in diameter.
  • Different manufacturing/assembly procedures for different embodiments can be used. Some examples, for illustration, are set forth below.
  • SDS Manufacturing Procedure #102.
  • 1.0 Purpose
      • Manufacturing procedure for (Steel and Aluminum core pilings).
      • This procedure shall establish guide lines for the manufacture of Steel and
      • Aluminum core marine pilings.
  • 2.0 Scope
      • 2.1 All Steel and Aluminum core, plastic H.D.P.E. or Vinyl encased marine pilings manufactured.
  • 3.0 Inspection procedure
      • 3.1 Inspection of exterior tubing shell (H.D.P.E. or Vinyl).
        • 3.1.1 Check O.D., I.D., and length to specification. Inspect O.D. for surface blemishes, cracking, and shipping damage.
      • 3.2 Inspection of Rubber O-Rings or recycled rubber gaskets.
        • 3.2.1 Check I.D., O.D., and cross-section to specification.
        • Visually inspect surfaces for blemishes, pinholes, or any defects that would prevent the gasket from creating a leak tight seal when assembled.)
      • 3.3 Inspection of Steel and Aluminum tubing (core material):
        • 3.3.1 Inspect for dimensional compliance to specification. The surface will be inspected for blemishes that would prevent a leak tight seal between core O.D. and the Gasket I.D. when assembled.
  • Check straightness over its length, and other defects that would affect structural integrity.
      • 4.0 Assembly Procedure
        • 4.1 The core tubing will be inserted into the outer shell, the bottom washer or O-Ring would be installed; this will center the core in the outer tubing. The pieces will then be stood on end and the top of the core centered to the outer shell and held in place with a clamp. The recycled rubber pellets will then be poured into the void in a pre-measured amount to provide designed spacing of washers or O-Rings. The next washer or O-Ring will be installed, this step is repeated up to 9 inches from the top, where the area will be filled with rubber washers. The assembly can then be laid down and the bottom cap installed, this will be accomplished by fusion welding or gluing it in place. The assembly should be visually inspected for appearance, and stored for shipment.
  • SDS Manufacturing Procedure #101.
  • 1.0 Purpose
      • Manufacturing procedure for (Wood, Fiberglass, Steel and Aluminum core pilings).
      • This procedure shall establish guide lines for the manufacture of Wood,
      • Fiberglass, Steel and Aluminum core marine pilings.
  • 2.0 Scope
      • 2.1 All Wood, Fiberglass, Steel and Aluminum core, and expandable foam encased core with a plastic H.D.P.E. or Vinyl shell marine pilings manufactured.
  • 3.0 Inspection Procedure
      • 3.1 Inspection of exterior tubing shell (H.D.P.E. or Vinyl).
        • 3.1.1 Check O.D., I.D., and length to specification. Inspect O.D. for surface blemishes, cracking, and shipping damage.
      • 3.2 Inspection of Wood, Fiberglass cores.
        • 3.2.1 Check I.D., O.D., and length to purchasing specification.
        • Visually inspect surfaces for blemishes, cracks, splits, or any defects that would reduce the structural integrity of wood or fiberglass core.
      • 3.3 Inspection of Steel and Aluminum tubing (core material):
        • 3.3.1 Inspect for dimensional compliance to specification. The surface will be inspected for blemishes, cracks, or shipping damage.
  • Check straightness over its length, (should not be bowed more than ¼ inch over its length). Inspect for any defects that would affect structural integrity.
  • 4.0 Assembly Procedure
      • 4.1 The core tubing will be inserted into the outer shell, the two components stood on end on a fixture that will center the core with the outer shell.
      • The top of the core will be moved and centered to the shell I.D. A clamp will hold its position during installation of the Urethane Foam.
      • The foam will be poured or injected into the void in a pre-measured amount to allow for expansion. The assembly should be allowed to cure for two to three hours. The assembly can then be laid down and the bottom cap installed by fusion welding or gluing it in place.
      • 4.2 The assembled piling will be identified by:
      • Manufacturer: SDSi.
      • Product I.D.:
        • Piling with aluminum core=PA
        • Piling with fiberglass core=PF
        • Piling with steel core=PS
        • Piling with wood core=PW
      • Date: [month/day/year]
      • Daily ascending Assembly Number: #XXX
      • Example: SDSi-PS-01/02/2004-#005.
  • 4.3 The assembly should be visually inspected for appearance, and stored for shipment.
  • 5.0 Optional Driving Tip.
  • 5.1 The Steel and Aluminum core pilings will be offered with a pointed tip (e.g. see ref. no. 3 at FIG. 2B) (when the site dictates the piles must be driven not jetted into place), the welded pointed tip will seal the pile. Alternatively, steel plates in an “x” pattern could be welded or attached to the bottom of the core to assist driving the piling into the sea bed.

Claims (74)

1. A piling for elevation or support of a structure comprising:
a) an inner core comprising structural support material elongated along a longitudinal axis and having a bottom end and a top end;
b) an outer impact resistant, non-abrasive plastic shell surrounding but spaced from a portion of the inner core;
c) an impact absorbing intermediate material generally filling space between inner core and outer shell; and
d) a sealing member to deter entry of fluid or particles into the space between inner core and oute shell.
2. The piling of claim 1 wherein the structure is related to marine functions.
3. The piling of claim 2 wherein the marine function is a dock.
4. The piling of claim 2 wherein the marine function is a sign or light.
5. The piling of claim 2 wherein the marine function is a sea wall.
6. The piling of claim 1 wherein the inner core is between 8 feet and 40 feet in length.
7. The piling of claim 1 wherein the structural support material comprises a tube.
8. The piling of claim 7 wherein the tube comprises metal.
9. The piling of claim 8 wherein the metal is steel.
10. The piling of claim 8 wherein the metal is aluminum.
11. The piling of claim 7 comprising of fiberglass.
12. The piling of claim 1 wherein the structural support comprises wood.
13. The piling of claim 12 wherein the wood is solid in cross section.
14. The piling of claim 12 wherein the wood is chemically treated.
15. The piling of claim 1 wherein the shell is from several feet long to several tens of feet long.
16. The piling of claim 1 wherein the shell is tubular.
17. The piling of claim 1 wherein the shell comprises plastic that includes some impact absorbent capability.
18. The piling of claim 17 wherein the plastic comprises high density polyethylene.
19. The piling of claim 17 wherein the plastic comprises vinyl.
20. The piling of claim 1 wherein the sheet is on the order of an inch or less thick.
21. The piling of claim 1 wherein the exterior of the shell is textured.
22. The piling of claim 1 wherein the exterior of the shell is colored.
23. The piling of claim 1 wherein the exterior of the shell includes indicia.
24. The piling of claim 1 wherein the shell is not as long along its longitudinal axis as the inner core.
25. The piling of claim 1 wherein the core extends above the top of the shell and below the bottom of the shell when assembled.
26. The piling of claim 1 wherein the intermediate material comprises a material having impact absorbing properties.
27. The piling of claim 26 wherein the intermediate material comprises pellets.
28. The piling of claim 27 wherein the pellets comprise rubber or recycled rubber.
29. The piling of claim 28 wherein the rubber is recycled at least in part.
30. The piling of claim 1 further comprising a retainer at the bottom of the shell.
31. The piling of claim 30 wherein the retainer comprises a ring attached around the exterior of core.
32. The piling of claim 31 wherein the ring is metal and welded to the core.
33. The piling of claim 31 wherein the ring has an outside diameter equal or greater to the inside diameter of the shell.
34. The piling of claim 30 wherein the retainer comprises an elastomeric member.
35. The piling of claim 34 wherein the elastomeric member is a ring positioned at or near the bottom of the shell.
36. The piling of claim 35 further comprising an additioral elastomeric ring at or near the top of the shell.
37. The piling of claim 36 further comprising one or more additional elastomeric rings positionable intermediate between the top and the bottom of the shell.
38. The piling of claim 30 comprising top, bottom and intermediate elastomeric rings placed between the inner core and the shell.
39. The piling of claim 34 wherein the sealing member comprises the elastomeric ring.
40. The piling of claim 34 further comprising a sealing member at the top and bottom of the shell.
41. The piling of claim 40 wherein the sealing ring seal and position the shell concentrically to the piling.
42. The piling of claim 1 wherein the intermediate material comprises a foam.
43. The piling of claim 42 wherein the foam is an expanding foam.
44. The piling of claim 43 wherein the expanding foam is an expanding urethane foam.
45. The piling of claim 1 wherein the sealing member comprises an elastomeric member.
46. The piling of claim 1 wherein the sealing member comprises foam.
47. The piling of claim 1 wherein the intermediate material and sealing member comprises foam which adheres between the core and shell.
48. The piling of claim 47 wherein the foam seals and provides shock absorbing capacity.
49. A method of making a piling comprising:
a) selecting a length of core of structural material;
b) placing impact resistant, non-abrasive a plastic outer shell surrounding and spaced from a selected part of the core;
c) filling at least a portion of space between core and shell with impact absorbent material; and
d) sealing the space.
50. The method of claim 49 wherein the material comprises pellets or discrete pieces of various sizes and shapes retained in the space.
51. The method of claim 50 wherein the pellets or pieces are retained by one or more spacers positioned between the core and the shell.
52. The method of claim 49 wherein the fill is inserted between the space between the core and shell near the bottom of the shell, compressed, and a spacer installed over an in abutnent with the compressed material.
53. The method of claim 52 further comprising filling a second part of the space between core and shell with fill, compressing and installing a spacer above it.
54. The method of claim 49 wherein the shock absorbent intermediate material is an expandable foam.
55. The method of claim 54 wherein the expandable foam is injected in the space between core and shell, leaving space for expansion of the foam.
56. The method of claim 49 wherein the core is tubular.
57. The method of claim 55 wherein the core is alumininum or steel.
58. The method of claim 49 wherein the fill is pelletized.
59. The method of claim 58 wherein the fill is rubber recycled pieces.
60. The method of claim 49 wherein the core is a solid material.
61. The method of claim 60 wherein the solid material is wood.
62. The method of claim 60 wherein the fill is expandable foam.
63. The method of claim 62 wherein the expandable foam is expandable urethane foam.
64. The method of claim 59 wherein the recycle pellets are various sizes and shapes.
65. The method of claim 49 further comprising capping the top of the inner core and shell.
66. The method of claim 65 firther comprising sealing the cap to the shell.
67. The method of claim 49 wherein the shell is one inch or less thickness.
68. The method of claim 49 wherein the shell is made of high density polyethylene.
69. A method of supporting a dock comprising:
a) surrounding a substantial portion of a piling with an impact resistant non-abrasive plastic shell and impact absorbing fill therebetween;
b) sealing the ends of the shell relative to the piling.
70. The method of claim 69 wherein the shell extends around the piling from above water level to below water floor level.
71. The method of claim 69 wherein shell is made of environmentally friendly material.
72. The method of claim 69 wherein the shell is made of marine grade material that is resistant to degradation by water, sun, or marine organisms.
73. The method of claim 69 flirther comprising selecting a plurality of pilings of claim 69 of selected lengths and installing lower ends below water floor level and attaching structure to upper ends.
74. The method of claim 69 wherein the piling has a selected color and texture.
US10/449,383 2003-05-30 2003-05-30 Apparatus and method for dock support or composite piling Abandoned US20050002741A1 (en)

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US7865424B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2011-01-04 Option It, Inc. Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US8301550B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2012-10-30 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods or services
US8620771B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2013-12-31 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US8650114B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2014-02-11 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods or services
US8930260B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-01-06 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
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US9026471B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-05-05 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US9047634B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-06-02 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US9064258B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-06-23 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US9070150B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-06-30 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for providing social and environmental performance based sustainable financial instruments
US9092813B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-07-28 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
JP2015232215A (en) * 2014-06-09 2015-12-24 西武ポリマ化成株式会社 Double pipe sealing material
CN108485017A (en) * 2018-04-04 2018-09-04 江蔓青 A kind of high-performance is given up rubber and plastic base pitch energy hole infiltrating irrigation and preparation method thereof
US20180266066A1 (en) * 2017-03-14 2018-09-20 Sean A. Barnes Pile guide
US20200063457A1 (en) * 2018-08-27 2020-02-27 Gaétan GENEST Adjustable cap for column foundation
USD899901S1 (en) 2019-07-24 2020-10-27 Sean A. Barnes Pile guide having an external stabilizer
US10822063B1 (en) 2020-01-30 2020-11-03 Sean A. Barnes Floating platform

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US8930260B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-01-06 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
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US9047634B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2015-06-02 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
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US8543450B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2013-09-24 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US8620771B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2013-12-31 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods and services
US8650114B2 (en) 2000-05-08 2014-02-11 Smart Options, Llc Method and system for reserving future purchases of goods or services
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AU2007264734B2 (en) * 2006-06-25 2019-06-20 Basem Hazzan Device and method for improved pile casting
US7892500B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2011-02-22 Carner William E Method and system for recycling plastics
US20100080738A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2010-04-01 Carner William E Method and System for Recycling Plastics
US20090036720A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Carner William E System and method for recycling plastics
JP2015232215A (en) * 2014-06-09 2015-12-24 西武ポリマ化成株式会社 Double pipe sealing material
US20180266066A1 (en) * 2017-03-14 2018-09-20 Sean A. Barnes Pile guide
US10267003B2 (en) * 2017-03-14 2019-04-23 Sean A. Barnes Pile guide
CN108485017A (en) * 2018-04-04 2018-09-04 江蔓青 A kind of high-performance is given up rubber and plastic base pitch energy hole infiltrating irrigation and preparation method thereof
US20200063457A1 (en) * 2018-08-27 2020-02-27 Gaétan GENEST Adjustable cap for column foundation
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Owner name: SPECTRUM DOCK SYSTEMS, INC., FLORIDA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BRENSINGER, FRANK J.;KALAT, JEFFREY M.;BUCK, BRENDA;REEL/FRAME:013880/0212

Effective date: 20030529

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION