US20040232152A1 - Safety glass break-seal vessel - Google Patents

Safety glass break-seal vessel Download PDF

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Publication number
US20040232152A1
US20040232152A1 US10/442,823 US44282303A US2004232152A1 US 20040232152 A1 US20040232152 A1 US 20040232152A1 US 44282303 A US44282303 A US 44282303A US 2004232152 A1 US2004232152 A1 US 2004232152A1
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Prior art keywords
vessel
finger
structure
break
glass
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Abandoned
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US10/442,823
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Arndt Schimmelmann
Jon Fong
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Indiana University Research and Technology Corp
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Indiana University Research and Technology Corp
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Priority to US10/442,823 priority Critical patent/US20040232152A1/en
Assigned to ADVANCED RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY, INSTITUTE, INC. reassignment ADVANCED RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY, INSTITUTE, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: FONG, JON, SCHIMMELMANN, ARNDT
Publication of US20040232152A1 publication Critical patent/US20040232152A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/56Labware specially adapted for transferring fluids
    • B01L3/569Glassware
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J1/00Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes
    • A61J1/05Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes for collecting, storing or administering blood, plasma or medical fluids ; Infusion or perfusion containers
    • A61J1/06Ampoules or carpules
    • A61J1/065Rigid ampoules, e.g. glass ampoules
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2300/00Additional constructional details
    • B01L2300/08Geometry, shape and general structure
    • B01L2300/0832Geometry, shape and general structure cylindrical, tube shaped
    • B01L2300/0835Ampoules
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2400/00Moving or stopping fluids
    • B01L2400/06Valves, specific forms thereof
    • B01L2400/0677Valves, specific forms thereof phase change valves; Meltable, freezing, dissolvable plugs; Destructible barriers
    • B01L2400/0683Valves, specific forms thereof phase change valves; Meltable, freezing, dissolvable plugs; Destructible barriers mechanically breaking a wall or membrane within a channel or chamber

Abstract

Vessels formed to have a safety glass break-seal are described. The break-seal is formed as a hollow finger-like structure extending into the volume of the vessel which can be easily fractured by applying force to the inner surface of the structure. The break-seal design offers the advantage of being protected from external forces during shipment and handling of the vessel and the advantage of safety in that fracture of the break-seal structure does not leave sharp glass edges accessible to the hands of the user/operator. The safety glass break-seal vessel can be fitted with a secondary closure, such as an elastomeric septum, to provide protected access to the contained composition following fracture of the safety glass break-seal.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to glass containers. More particularly, this invention is directed to a vessel having a glass wall formed to allow the vessel to be opened by fracturing a portion of the vessel wall without producing exposed sharp edges. The vessel can be used for efficient transfer of fluid samples to a closed system. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Glass is proven material of choice for the packaging, storage and handling of chemicals, fluids, vapors, gases, solids or solutions, particularly where maintaining the stability and purity of the chemicals during shipping and storage is critical. The preference for use of glass for such applications derives principally from the fact that it is inert, and it exhibits low porosity making it impermeable to most compositions whether they be solids or fluids, including both gases and liquids. Hermetically sealed glass containers are often used for the packaging, handling and storage of small chemical compositions, most typically small samples of solid, liquid and gaseous chemical compositions destined for use in chemical research and development operations. Sealed glass vessels have also found use for the packaging and storage of pharmaceutical substances, typically in unit dosage form. The use of a sealed glass vessel for packaging and storage of most chemical substances prevents product loss and helps assure that the product is free from contaminants prior to the time it is removed from the container for use. [0002]
  • One serious disadvantage of conventionally sealed glass ampules or tubes for the packaging, storage and delivery of chemical compositions is the hazard associated with the opening of the vessel by breaking a glass appendage, typically a protruding glass seal. Such has, from time to time, resulted in catastrophic glass vessel failure resulting in loss of the contained composition and injury to the user. Moreover, such glass vessels typically present exposed sharp glass edges (at the point of glass fracture) after opening which constitutes a safety hazard. The present safety glass break-seal containers are formed to provide a safe alternative for opening the sealed glass containers, optionally without scoring, and without generating sharp, exposed glass edges, thereby minimizing safety concerns for use and disposal of such containers. [0003]
  • The safety glass break-seal vessels of the present invention are, in general, distinguished from other glass break-seal vessels in that the break-seal portion of the vessel designed to be broken off to open the vessel extends into the volume defined by the vessel walls as opposed to an externally extending glass appendix as is commonly found in traditional glass break-seal containers. Stated alternatively, perhaps in more common terms, the safety glass break-seal in the vessel of the present invention is internal in design as opposed to traditional glass break-seals that are external in design, which when broken off, invariably leaves behind an exposed sharp glass edge. The internal appendix design is such that the appendix, a hollow finger-like structure extending into the vessel, is protected from external forces during shipping and handling and when broken, for example, with a fracture element designed to engage the interior surface of the hollow finger-like structure and apply a glass fracturing force to the structure, will leave edges that are not accessible to the hands of the user/operator. [0004]
  • The vessel can optionally include a secondary sealing system such as a flexible septum or a crimp top. A user manipulable fracture element for engaging the interior surface of the hollow inwardly projecting appendix can be captured between the portion of the vessel wall including the safety glass break-seal and, for example, a flexible septum designed to engage and form a seal against the vessel walls proximal to the glass break seal. In that embodiment of the invention the contained composition can be hermetically sealed in the glass vessel for storage and shipment, and the glass seal is broken by the user only when the first portions of the contained compositions are needed for use. Thereafter the contained chemical composition can be accessed through the septum, for example, with a hypodermic needle from time to time after the safety glass seal is broken. [0005]
  • The present safety glass break-seal vessels are also designed to facilitate transfer of contained fluids to a closed system having a valved port. In one particular embodiment the vessels find use for delivering calibration samples to analytical instruments, for example, gas chromatographs or mass spectrometers. [0006]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B are partial cross-sectional views of break-seal vessels of the present invention. [0007]
  • FIGS. 2A-2D illustrate the steps for forming the break-seal structure on the vessels of the present invention using a heat source and a glass deformation element. [0008]
  • FIG. 3A illustrates a “C”-shaped deformation element, and FIG. 3B depicts a vessel with a curved safety break-seal formed using said element. [0009]
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a break-seal on a vessel of the present invention wherein the finger-like structure extending into the volume of the vessel is scored proximal to its base. [0010]
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B depict the positioning and use of a fracture element to open the safety break-seal vessels of the present invention. [0011]
  • FIG. 6 illustrates use of a blade-shaped fracture element to open a break-seal of this invention by axially applied force to the inner surface of the break-seal. [0012]
  • FIG. 7A is a cross-sectional view of a safety break-seal vessel of this invention wherein the finger-like structure was formed with a blade-shaped deformation element. FIG. 7B is another cross-sectional view of the vessel of FIG. 7A rotated 90° and illustrates the use of a blade-shaped fracture element to open a blade-shaped safety break-seal of the present invention with force applied by rotation of the fracture element. [0013]
  • FIGS. [0014] 8A-C are cross-sectional views of alternate embodiments of the safety break-seal vessel including a flexible septum for engaging the break-seal end of a vessel of the present invention and including a fracture element that can be manipulated by applying pressure to the flexible septum to fracture the break-seal to open the sealed vessel.
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the vessel of FIG. 8C. [0015]
  • FIG. 10 illustrates use of a safety break-seal vessel of the present invention to transfer a fluid sample to a closed system. [0016]
  • FIGS. 11A and 11B illustrate alternate embodiments of the safety break-seal vessel. [0017]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • A vessel [0018] 10 having safety break-seal 12 is provided for containing a composition 14 under hermetically sealed conditions. In one embodiment vessel 10 is of cylindrical cross-section and comprises a glass wall 16 which can be clear or tinted (for example, to provide protection of vessel contents from light) having an interior surface 20 defining a volume 22 for containment of the chemical 14 and an external surface 24. At least a portion of the glass wall 16, most typically an end wall 18 of vessel 10, is formed as a hollow finger-like structure 26 having a base 28 and a base-distal portion 30 extending into the volume 22 which structure forms safety break-seal 12. The hollow finger-like structure 26 has an exterior surface 32 which forms a portion of the interior surface 20 of the glass wall 16 and an interior surface 34 which forms a portion of the exterior surface 32 of the glass wall 16 of vessel 10. While the break-seal vessel can be of any cross-sectional shape, in one embodiment vessel 10 is of generally cylindrical cross-section and has a major axial dimension 36 and a minor lateral dimension 38 and end wall 18. In one embodiment end wall 18 includes the portion of the glass wall formed as a hollow finger-like structure 26 which can extend into volume 22 along an axis substantially parallel to the major axis of vessel 10 (FIG. 1A) or along an axis generally oblique to the major axis of vessel 10 (FIG. 1B). The hollow finger-like structure 26 can itself have a substantially linear axis (as illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 1B) or it can be formed to have curved or arcuate axis (FIG. 3B). In one embodiment vessel 10 is hermetically sealed and contains a gas at subambient to moderate pressure. Alternatively, the vessel can be use for packaging, shipment and storage of liquid or solid compositions such as chemical reagents or pharmaceutical compositions. Optionally the finger-like projection 26 extending into the volume 22 of the vessel 10 is scored, preferably proximal to the base 28.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a break-seal on vessel [0019] 10 wherein the hollow finger-like structure 26 has a score line 40 near its base 28. Score line 40 can be formed, for example, with a small abrasive wheel having a diameter approximating the diameter of base 28 at score line 40 or by using a carbide steel, a diamond, or other hard material, sharp tipped scoring tool. Score line 40 facilitates opening of the vessel and minimizes the production of glass shards during opening of the vessel by fracture of the safety glass break-seal 12.
  • With reference to FIGS. 2A-2D, the safety glass break-seal [0020] 12 on vessel 10 is formed by heating a portion of the wall 16, for example, an end wall 18, of an empty glass vessel with a flame 27 (FIG. 2B) to a temperature at which it is sufficiently softened to allow it to be deformed with a deformation element 29, for example a blunt graphite needle (for example, one having a slightly conical shaped tip), into the softened glass to form the inwardly extending hollow finger-like structure 26 from which it is immediately withdrawn leaving the finger-like structure 26 formed in end 18. Optionally the portion of the vessel 10 proximal to-the safety glass break-seal 12 formed in the wall of vessel 10 can be annealed to release mechanical strain in the safety glass break-seal structure by reheating the glass to temperatures just below the softening point of the glass followed by slow cooling. The finger-like structure 26 can be formed to have a substantially linear axis itself substantially parallel to the major axis of the vessel, or the deformation element can be used to form the finger-like projection to have an axis oblique to the major axis of the vessel (FIG. 1B). With reference of FIGS. 2 and 3, the shape of the finger-like structure is determined generally by the shape of the deformation element. For example, by using a “C”-shaped deformation element (FIG. 3A), the finger-like structure 26 forming break seal 112 can be formed to have an arcuate axis. Similarly, the cross-sectional shape of the hollow portion of the finger-like structure will be generally defined by the cross-sectional shape of the deformation element. Thus, the cross-sectional shape of the hollow portion of the finger-like structure can be generally circular, ovoid, square, rectangular, triangular or trapezoidal. In other words, the fracture element has to grip the inner surface of the break-seal when torque is applied.
  • The opening of vessel [0021] 10 incorporating the safety glass break-seal 12 of this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 5A and 5B. A fracture element 46, for example, a metal pin or nail, is inserted into the hollow finger-like structure 26 to contact its inner surface 34. Leveraged force is applied to inner surface 34 of hollow finger-like structure 26 by applying gradually increasing lateral force to fracture element 46 until the hollow finger-like structure 26 fractures to open vessel 10.
  • Fracture element [0022] 46 can also be used to apply an axial fracture force to the hollow finger-like structure 26. The application of axially (substantially parallel to the major axis of the vessel) oriented forces to fracture the finger-like structure 26 can be particularly effective where the finger-like structure has been formed to have an arcuate axis (FIG. 3B) or a linear axis oblique to the major axis of the vessel (FIG. 1B). With reference to FIG. 6 axially applied forces can also be effective to open the break-seal when they are applied using a fracture element 146 having a lateral dimension smaller than the lateral dimension of the hollow portion of the finger-like structure 26 at its base 28, but larger than the lateral dimension of the hollow portion of the finger-like structure 26 at its base distal end 30. As the fracture element 146 is pushed into the hollow portion of the finger-like structure 26, it contacts its inner surface 34 so that the axial force is translated into a break-seal fracturing force. In one preferred embodiment the fracture element used in this procedure is in cross-section a blade 31 or a star-shaped structure so that applied fracture forces are concentrated at two or more points on the inner surface 34 of the hollow finger-like structure 26. Alternatively the cross-sectional shape of the fracture element 46,146 and the hollow portion of finger-like structure 26 defined by its inner surface 34 can be selected so that a fracture force can be applied to inner surface 34 by rotation of the fracture element 146 after it is inserted into the hollow finger-like structure 26. Generally, the application of rotational force can be used to open the safety break-seal of this invention where the fracture element is sized to be inserted into the hollow portions of the finger-like structure and where at least one dimension of the cross-section of the break-seal contacting portion of the fracture element is greater than the minimum dimension of the cross-section of the hollow portion of the finger-like structure. Thus, if fracture element 46 and hollow finger-like structure 26 are, for example, each of rectangular cross-section (see FIGS. 7A/7B), rotation of fracture element 146 after it is inserted into the hollow finger-like structure 26 to contact its inner surface 34 works to fracture finger-like structure 26 and open break-seal 12. The cross-sectional shape of fracture element 46 (FIG. 5); 146 (FIG. 7) can be the same or different than the cross-sectional shape of the hollow portion defined by the inner wall 34 of the finger-like structure 26.
  • With reference to FIGS. 8A-8C, vessel [0023] 10 can be fitted with a secondary closure 42, for example, a flexible septum sized to frictionally engage end proximal wall portion 44 of vessel 10 to cap and define a supplemental volume 48 with the end wall 18 of vessel 10, including the portion of the vessel wall 16,18 formed as the hollow finger-like structure 26. In one embodiment fracture element 46 is positioned in contact with the inner surface 34 of the hollow finger-like structure 26 and extends into supplemental volume 48 defined by the secondary closure element 42 and the end wall 18 of vessel 10. Secondary closure 42 is typically in the form of a flexible hood or septum that is frictionally engaged with the end wall proximal portion 44 of the vessel 10 and is transparent or translucent to facilitate user manipulation of the fracture element 46 to open the break-seal 12 with the secondary closure 42 in place on vessel 10.
  • In one example of the use of vessel [0024] 10 having secondary closure 42 as illustrated in FIGS. 8A-8C, the supplemental volume 48 defined by the secondary closure 42 and end wall 18 of vessel 10 is preflushed with an inert gas, for example, helium or argon, before opening the vessel 10 by fracturing the safety break-seal. Volume 48 can be preflushed with an inert gas, for example, by inserting a needle (not shown) that both injects the gas and provides for a venting port or alternatively, one needle can be used for flushing gas input and another needle for venting the volume. After opening the vessel 10 by breaking safety glass seal 12 with secondary closure 42 in place, the user can safely draw small aliquots of gas or liquid out of the open vessel without introducing atmospheric contamination. In this embodiment of the invention the glass break-seal 12 will allow secure long-term storage, whereas the secondary closure 42, for example the flexible septum, will provide a secondary seal for providing at least short-term integrity of the sample after opening of the glass break-seal.
  • With reference particularly to FIG. 8C, there is illustrated an embodiment of the break-seal vessel [0025] 10 of this invention where the secondary closure 42 is formed from a segment of elastomer tubing, for example Tygon® tubing, which is friction-fitted to the end proximal wall portion 44 of vessel 10 and thereafter (or before it is fitted on vessel 10) the elastomer tubing is heat-sealed to complete formation of the secondary closure 42. Secondary closure 42 thus formed provides the function of a septum that can be pierced with a needle to access the contents of vessel 10 following fracture of safety glass break-seal 12. It is contemplated that vessel 10 fitted with secondary closure 42 can be opened without use of a separate fracture element 46 by first using a needle/needles to flush supplemental volume 48 with an inert gas, and thereafter extending the needle to contact the inner surface 34 of the hollow finger-like structure 26 of safety glass break-seal 12 to apply force sufficient to fracture the finger-like structure 26 to open the vessel and allow access and sample removal through the same needle.
  • The safety glass break-seal vessel [0026] 10 can be used to facilitate transfer of a fluid sample into a closed system. With reference to FIG. 1O there is illustrated use of a vessel 10 containing gas 15 for transfer of the gas to a closed system 50 having valved port 52. A section of flexible tubing 56 having a first end 58 and a second end 60 and an internal diameter sized to receive the end wall 18 of vessel 10, including safety glass break-seal 12, and to sealingly engage the end proximal wall portion 44 of vessel 10. First end 58 of the section of tubing is connected to valved port 52 of closed system 50. Fracture element 46 is positioned to contact the inner surface 34 of finger-like structure 26 of safety glass break-seal 12. The end wall 18 of vessel 10, including the safety glass break-seal 12 is inserted into second end 60 of the section of the tubing to form a gas-sealed connection between the vessel 10 and the valved port 52. Optionally valved port 52 is initially opened to evacuate the volume in the tubing between the end wall 18 of vessel 10 and valved port 52. Preferably with valve 54 in the port closed position, fracture element 46 is manipulated to break the finger-like structure 26 to allow the contained gas into the tubing. Valve 54 is thereafter opened to allow transfer of the gas from the vessel 10 and tubing 56 through port 52 and into closed system 50.
  • Vessel [0027] 10 formed to include the safety glass break-seal 12 of the present invention can be formed in a wide variety of shapes and volumes unique to the intended application. Typically the safety glass break-seal structure 12 is formed on empty vessels which are designed to be filled through a separate open, but sealable filling port. Thus, with reference to FIG. 11A, the safety glass break-seal 12 is formed in a closed end of a glass vessel 210 having an opposite open end 19 which can thereafter be connected to a sample filling system and thereafter hermetically sealed. In one embodiment of the invention (see FIG. 11B) safety glass break-seal 12 is formed in the wall of a standard glass ampule having, as well, a traditional external break-seal structure. Such modified ampules can be opened either in the traditional way, i.e., by snapping off the top structure, or by triggering the safety glass break-seal 12 formed in the wall of the ampule.
  • It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the above-illustrated embodiments are but examples of the invention and that other embodiments utilizing the safety glass break-seal structure detailed above are within the scope of the invention as claimed. [0028]

Claims (30)

What is claimed:
1. A vessel for containing a fluid, said vessel comprising a glass wall having an interior surface defining a volume, and an external surface, wherein at least a portion of said glass wall is formed as a hollow finger-like structure having a base and a base-distal portion extending into the volume, said hollow finger-like structure having an exterior surface forming a portion of the interior surface of the glass wall and an interior surface forming a portion of the exterior surface of the glass wall.
2. The vessel of claim 1 having a major axial dimension and a minor lateral dimension and an end wall.
3. The vessel of claim 2 wherein the end wall includes the glass wall formed as a hollow finger-like structure.
4. The vessel of claim 3 wherein the finger-like projection extends into the volume along an axis substantially parallel to the major axis of the vessel.
5. The vessel of claim 3 wherein the finger-like projection extends into the volume along an axis oblique to the major axis of the vessel.
6. The vessel of claim 1 wherein the finger-like structure has an arcuate axis.
7. The vessel of claim 2 wherein the vessel is sealed and contains a gas.
8. The vessel of claim 2 wherein the vessel is sealed and contains a liquid.
9. The vessel of claim 1 wherein the vessel is sealed and contains a gas.
10. The vessel of claim 1 wherein the vessel is sealed and contains a liquid.
11. The vessel of claim 3 wherein the surface of the finger-like projection is scored proximal to its base.
12. The vessel of claim 3 further comprising a flexible septum frictionally engaging an end proximal wall portion of the vessel and defining a supplemental volume with the end wall of the vessel including the portion of the vessel wall formed as the hollow finger-like structure.
13. The vessel of claim 11 further comprising a fracture element extending into the hollow finger-like projection and into the supplemental volume defined by the septum and the end wall of the vessel.
14. The vessel of claim 13 wherein the surface of the finger-like projection is scored proximal to its base.
15. The vessel of claim 1 wherein the surface of the finger-like projection is scored proximal to its base.
16. The vessel of claim 2 wherein the surface of the finger-like projection is scored proximal to its base.
17. The vessel of claim 6 wherein the surface of the finger-like structure is scored proximal to its base.
18. The vessel of claim 12 wherein the surface of the finger-like projection is scored proximal to its base.
19. The vessel of claim 13 wherein the flexible septum is substantially transparent or translucent to allow a user to position and manipulate the fracture element to break the finger-like projection by applying pressure to the flexible septum and the fracture element.
20. A method for transferring a fluid sample to a closed system having a valved port said method comprising the steps of
sealing said fluid in a vessel of claim 1;
selecting a flexible tube having first and second ends and an internal diameter sized to receive the end wall of the vessel, including the glass wall formed as a finger-like structure, and to sealingly engage the end proximal wall of the vessel and connecting one end of the tube to the valved port of the closed system;
inserting a fracture element into the finger-like projection extending into the vessel;
inserting the end wall of the vessel including the glass wall formed as a finger-like structure into the second end of the tube to form a gas sealed tube connection between the vessel and the valved port;
manipulating the fracture element to break the finger-like structure to allow the contained fluid into the tube; and
opening the valve to access the closed system and to transfer the fluid into the system.
21. A method for transferring a fluid sample to a closed system having a valved port said method comprising the steps of
sealing said fluid in a vessel of claim 3;
selecting a flexible tube having first and second ends and an internal diameter sized to receive the end wall of the vessel, including the glass wall formed as a finger-like structure, and to sealing engage the end proximal wall of the vessel and connecting one end of the tube to the valved port of the closed system;
inserting a fracture element into the finger-like projection extending into the vessel;
inserting the end wall of the vessel including the glass wall formed as a finger-like structure into the second end of the tube to form a gas sealed tube connection between the vessel and the valved port;
manipulating the fracture element to break the finger-like structure to allow the contained fluid into the tube; and
opening the valve to access the closed system and to transfer the fluid into the system.
22. The method of claim 19 further comprising the step of evacuating the tube connection between the vessel and the valved port before breaking the finger-like structure.
23. A method for manufacture of an internal break-seal on a glass vessel comprising the steps of heating a glass wall of the vessel to the glass softening point and deforming the glass to form a hollow finger-like structure having a base and a base distal portion extending into the vessel, said finger-like structure having an internal surface forming a portion of the exterior surface of the vessel and an external portion forming a portion of the interior surface of the vessel.
24. The method of claim 23 further comprising the step of scoring the internal surface of the finger-like structure at its base.
25. The method of claim 23 wherein the hollow finger-like structure is formed to have a substantially linear axis.
26. The method of claim 23 wherein the hollow finger-like structure is formed to have a substantially arcuate axis.
27. A method for opening a vessel of claim 1 comprising the steps of inserting a fracture element into the hollow finger-like structure to contact its interior surface and manipulating said fracture element to apply sufficient force to said surface to fracture the finger-like structure.
28. The method of claim 27 wherein the fracture element is manipulated by applying a lateral force to said element.
29. The method of claim 27 wherein the fracture element is manipulated by applying an axial force to said element.
30. The method of claim 27 wherein the fracture element is manipulated by applying a rotational force to said element.
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Cited By (3)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090326193A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2009-12-31 Aegis Therapeutics Llc Stabilizing alkylglycoside compositions and methods thereof
US20110020435A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2011-01-27 Aegis Therapeutics Llc Stabilizing alkylglycoside compositions and methods thereof
US9994371B2 (en) 2014-07-22 2018-06-12 Entegris, Inc. Molded fluoropolymer breakseal with compliant material

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