US20040222117A1 - Packaged charcoal briquet product - Google Patents

Packaged charcoal briquet product Download PDF

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Publication number
US20040222117A1
US20040222117A1 US10/858,224 US85822404A US2004222117A1 US 20040222117 A1 US20040222117 A1 US 20040222117A1 US 85822404 A US85822404 A US 85822404A US 2004222117 A1 US2004222117 A1 US 2004222117A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
charcoal
briquet
briquets
generally
inner container
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US10/858,224
Inventor
Craig Saunders
Lindsey Tufts
David Boll
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Creative Spark LLC
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Nottingham Spirk Design Associates
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/172,549 priority Critical patent/US6790244B2/en
Application filed by Nottingham Spirk Design Associates filed Critical Nottingham Spirk Design Associates
Priority to US10/858,224 priority patent/US20040222117A1/en
Assigned to NOTTINGHAM-SPIRK DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC. reassignment NOTTINGHAM-SPIRK DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BOLL, DAVID J., SAUNDERS, CRAIG M., TUFTS, JR., LINDSEY
Priority claimed from CA 2484577 external-priority patent/CA2484577A1/en
Publication of US20040222117A1 publication Critical patent/US20040222117A1/en
Priority claimed from US11/054,242 external-priority patent/US7575609B2/en
Assigned to CREATIVE SPARK, LLC reassignment CREATIVE SPARK, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: NOTTINGHAM-SPIRK DESIGN ASSOCIATES
Assigned to CREATIVE SPARK, LLC reassignment CREATIVE SPARK, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: NOTTINGHAM-SPIRK DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10LFUELS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; NATURAL GAS; SYNTHETIC NATURAL GAS OBTAINED BY PROCESSES NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C10G, C10K; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS; ADDING MATERIALS TO FUELS OR FIRES TO REDUCE SMOKE OR UNDESIRABLE DEPOSITS OR TO FACILITATE SOOT REMOVAL; FIRELIGHTERS
    • C10L5/00Solid fuels
    • C10L5/02Solid fuels such as briquettes consisting mainly of carbonaceous materials of mineral or non-mineral origin
    • C10L5/34Other details of the shaped fuels, e.g. briquettes
    • C10L5/36Shape
    • C10L5/368Shaped fuels bundled or contained in a bag or other container
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10LFUELS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; NATURAL GAS; SYNTHETIC NATURAL GAS OBTAINED BY PROCESSES NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C10G, C10K; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS; ADDING MATERIALS TO FUELS OR FIRES TO REDUCE SMOKE OR UNDESIRABLE DEPOSITS OR TO FACILITATE SOOT REMOVAL; FIRELIGHTERS
    • C10L5/00Solid fuels
    • C10L5/02Solid fuels such as briquettes consisting mainly of carbonaceous materials of mineral or non-mineral origin
    • C10L5/34Other details of the shaped fuels, e.g. briquettes
    • C10L5/36Shape
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10LFUELS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; NATURAL GAS; SYNTHETIC NATURAL GAS OBTAINED BY PROCESSES NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C10G, C10K; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS; ADDING MATERIALS TO FUELS OR FIRES TO REDUCE SMOKE OR UNDESIRABLE DEPOSITS OR TO FACILITATE SOOT REMOVAL; FIRELIGHTERS
    • C10L5/00Solid fuels
    • C10L5/02Solid fuels such as briquettes consisting mainly of carbonaceous materials of mineral or non-mineral origin
    • C10L5/34Other details of the shaped fuels, e.g. briquettes
    • C10L5/36Shape
    • C10L5/361Briquettes

Abstract

An improved charcoal briquet having combustion aiding surfaces is packaged in a compact boxed package. A charcoal briquet having improved burning characteristics and also improved shipping and retailing characteristics is thereby provided. An improved packaged charcoal product including a flat sided box adapted to hold randomly oriented briquets and be split open at its bottom corners for use in igniting the briquets and a grooved pillow shaped briquet are also disclosed.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to the field of charcoal briquets for use in home barbequing and the like, and particularly to an improved shape for the briquet, package for the briquet, and method of burning the briquets in home barbequing. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Charcoal briquets are widely used by consumers in cooking and barbequing in outdoor grills, grates, and other locations. Conventional charcoal briquets are pillow-shaped and sold in multi-pound paper bag containers. The briquets are contained somewhat loosely in the paper bag container. Because of the random loose pack, abrasion between adjacent briquets in the bag is common, creating dust which often leaks out of the bag. Thus, a dusty, messy environment is created in shipping and retailing these packages. Additionally, the bags themselves are not a convenient shape for stacking or palletizing. This makes the products difficult to handle in shipping and also in retailing. The bags often weigh 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20 pounds. Because of their shape and charcoal dusty condition, they are inconvenient for consumers to handle when shopping, transporting, or storing. [0002]
  • Charcoal briquets are mainly used to prepare barbequed or grilled food items. One mechanism of use is to pile charcoal briquets in the center of a grill, apply an ignition fluid to the piled briquets, and ignite the ignition fluid. An ignition fluid is required, as conventional charcoal briquets are slow to ignite. The burn time of the ignition fluid ignites the surface of the charcoal briquets in the pile. After a sufficient burn time, the charcoal briquets in the pile are ignited. This becomes apparent to the user when a gray ash layer forms on the surface of the briquets. When the ash layer is observed, the briquets are spread out in the grill bottom and are ready for use in cooking. [0003]
  • Charcoal briquets are conventionally fabricated from base fuels such as charred wood, coal, charred agricultural waste, and similar products. Conventional briquets also use a binder which can be a vegetable starch or other conventional binder material. Some conventional charcoal briquets also include ignition aids which are materials which ignite more quickly than the base fuel and help in ignition of the charcoal briquet. This invention is not concerned with the composition of the charcoal briquet, but rather the shape and packaging of the charcoal briquet that is useable with any charcoal briquet materials and composition. Conventional materials and compositions are well known in the art and described in, for instance, U.S. Pat. No. 5,762,656 to Burke, et al. [0004]
  • While charcoal briquets are widely used for cooking on grills and in barbeque pits, numerous problems exist with this fuel source. Conventional charcoal briquets are often hard to ignite and require the use of an auxiliary ignition fluid. Charcoal briquets are conventionally marketed in large bags which are difficult to handle in shipping, retailing and by the consumer. Such bags are not easily stacked, and cannot be conveniently displayed in an upright position in retail stores. Conventional charcoal briquets are normally packaged in large bags, from which a consumer must pour out the desired amount, measuring informally and often using less or more than is appropriate for the meal to be cooked. The remaining charcoal briquets in the bag must be stored in an open bag, which is messy, and often leaks carbon dust. The burn characteristics of conventional charcoal are also less than ideal with too much time being spent in the ignition phase prior to the cooking phase in which food is actually cooked over the ignited briquets. [0005]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, an improved charcoal briquet and package for multiple briquets is provided which overcomes the above referred to problems and others and is more conveniently marketed to consumers and used by consumers in grilling and barbequing. [0006]
  • In accordance with the present invention, a charcoal briquet is provided having a generally convex top surface, a generally concave bottom surface adapted to engage and rest upon a top surface of an adjacent briquet, and a generally rectangular periphery. [0007]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the briquet is provided with a central hole through from the bottom surface to the top surface. [0008]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, a commercial package of briquets is provided in which a measured quantity of briquets is stacked one upon the other and contained in a cardboard box relatively tightly, confining the charcoal briquets in the stack and sealing the top and bottom of the stack. [0009]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the cardboard box containing the briquets is preferably coated or impregnated with wax or a similar substance, whereby the dust associated with the briquets is contained in the package, and the package acts as an integral ignition aid. [0010]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, a one-stack package is sized to hold an appropriate number of charcoal briquets for a single barbeque or grilling event. [0011]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, a commercial multi-pack product is comprised of several single stack packages fixed to or packed with one another into a multi-pack, multi-pound unit bearing a universal product code appropriate for the number of units being sold. [0012]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the charcoal briquets comprise four interconnected side walls of generally identical cross section forming a rectangle with each side wall having a volume surrounded by a generally flat, horizontal bottom surface; an upwardly and inwardly extending lower surface; and, an upwardly and inwardly extending upper surface generally parallel to the lower surface. The briquets also have a inner surface extending from the lower surface to the upper surface and surrounding a central hole. The bottom surface of the lowest briquet in the stack is adapted to rest upon a horizontal surface. The lower surface of briquets other than the bottom briquet is adapted to rest upon the upper surface of the next lower briquet around their entire periphery, thereby forming a generally stable and compact arrangement. [0013]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the lower surface of the briquet is gently curved in its convexity, but generally slopes upwardly and inwardly at an angle of about 30° to the horizontal. [0014]
  • Yet further in accordance with the invention, the upper surface of the briquet is somewhat curved in its convexity, but generally extends upwardly at an angle of about 30° or slightly greater than 30° to the horizontal. [0015]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the briquets are generally square in shape, having gently rounded outer peripheral edges interconnected by sharply rounded corners. [0016]
  • Still further in accordance with the present invention, the briquets are packaged in a tightly fitting cardboard box surrounding the periphery of the briquets, with the cardboard preferably coated or impregnated with wax or a similar substance. [0017]
  • Still further in accordance with the present invention, the briquets can be used to create grilling combustion by merely placing the single-stack container into a grill, igniting the outer package, allowing the ignition of the outer package to ignite the periphery of the briquets, and thereupon spreading the briquets into a charcoal bed. [0018]
  • In accordance with another aspect of the invention, pillow shaped charcoal briquets having upper and lower surfaces are provided with transverse grooves across both the upper and lower surfaces and the briquets are packaged in a rectilinear combustible box adapted to split at the corners to form an easily ignitable pile of briquets covered by the combustible box. [0019]
  • Still further in accordance with the invention, the briquet package comprises an inner container having four side walls interconnected at four corners, the four corners being weakened in their lower portions, a removable outer wrap surrounding at least a portion of the four walls including the weakened portion of the four corners. [0020]
  • Yet further in accordance with the invention, the inner container has short interior walls preventing the briquets from all spilling out of a split open package. [0021]
  • Yet further in accordance with the invention, the combustible box has a flat bottom and a flat top and a foldable handle extending from the top, the handle adapted to either lie against the top or extend upwardly from the top. [0022]
  • It is a principal object of the present invention to provide a charcoal briquet product having increased surface area for improved burn characteristics and an improved compact package for this product. [0023]
  • It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an improved package for a charcoal briquet in which the charcoal briquets are tightly contained whereby abrasion between adjacent briquets is minimized, thereby reducing the creation of waste dust. [0024]
  • It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an improved package for charcoal briquets in which charcoal briquets are stacked in a compact form, minimizing the space occupied by the package during shipping, handling, retail display, transporting, and storage. [0025]
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a packaged charcoal briquet product in which generally rectangular charcoal briquets are stacked creating a rectangular solid box which is easily stacked, displayed, palletized, and merchandised. [0026]
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a packaged charcoal briquet product in a solid rectangular box which is less likely to leak charcoal dust than conventional bags. [0027]
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a rectangular charcoal briquet product which is easily handled by the consumer and used by the consumer in initiating a barbeque. [0028]
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a charcoal briquet product comprised of a number of single-use size charcoal briquet packages which can be easily separated and used by the consumer. [0029]
  • It is another object of the invention to provide a packaged charcoal briquet product in a box having a handle which can be folded flat against the top of the package or upwardly for use as a handle. [0030]
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a packaged charcoal briquet package which has a flat bottom, a flat top and four perpendicular flat walls and, which is therefore easily stacked for storage or display, and which can be easily opened by the consumer by means of vertical compression and is easy to ignite. [0031]
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a packaged charcoal briquet product which is inexpensive to manufacture, has superior merchandising characteristics and is easy to use for the consumer. [0032]
  • These and other objects of the present invention will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiment of the invention, taken together with the accompanying drawings.[0033]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention may take physical form in certain parts and arrangements of parts, a preferred embodiment of which will be described in detail and which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof and wherein: [0034]
  • FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a charcoal briquet in accordance with the present invention; [0035]
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of the charcoal briquet of FIG. 1; [0036]
  • FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the charcoal briquet of FIGS. 1 and 2; [0037]
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the charcoal briquet of FIGS. 1 and 2 taken along line [0038] 4-4 of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the charcoal briquet of FIGS. 1-4; [0039]
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a stack of charcoal briquets within a cardboard retailing container with the top removed; [0040]
  • FIG. 7 is a side view of the stack of briquets in the box of FIG. 6 with the closest side wall removed; [0041]
  • FIG. 8 is a cross section of a stack of briquets in the box seen in FIG. 7 taken along line [0042] 8-8 of FIG. 7;
  • FIG. 9 is a top plan view similar to FIG. 6 showing a larger package of briquets using six adjacent vertical stacks; [0043]
  • FIG. 10 is a side view of the package of briquets of FIG. 9 with the side wall of the box closest to the viewer removed; [0044]
  • FIG. 11 is a cross section of the package of briquets seen in FIGS. 9 and 10 taken along line [0045] 11-11 in FIG. 10;
  • FIG. 12 is a top plan view of several individual use packages of briquets as seen in FIGS. 6-8 combined into a multiple unit product; [0046]
  • FIG. 13 is a side view of the multiple unit product of FIG. 12; [0047]
  • FIG. 14 is a graph showing a comparison of combustion temperature versus time for the briquets of the present invention and conventional standard briquets; [0048]
  • FIG. 15 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the packaged charcoal product in the complete packaged configuration with the handle upstanding; [0049]
  • FIG. 16 is a plan view of a coated paperboard blank used in forming the inner container of the packaged charcoal product of FIG. 15; [0050]
  • FIG. 17 is a plan view of a blank for an outer wrap used in the packaged product of FIG. 15; [0051]
  • FIG. 18 is a perspective view of the interior walls used in the product of FIG. 15; [0052]
  • FIG. 19 is a perspective view of the match package used in the packaged product of FIG. 15; [0053]
  • FIG. 20 is a perspective view of the inner container blank of FIG. 16 partially assembled; [0054]
  • FIG. 21 is a perspective view of a charcoal briquet as packaged into the package of FIG. 15; [0055]
  • FIG. 22 is a top plan view of the charcoal briquet of FIG. 21; [0056]
  • FIG. 23 is a front view of the charcoal briquet of FIG. 21; [0057]
  • FIG. 24 is a side view of the charcoal briquet seen in FIGS. 21-23; [0058]
  • FIG. 25 is a view similar to FIG. 15 showing the packaged charcoal briquet product partially opened in preparation for use by the consumer; [0059]
  • FIG. 26 is a view of the packaged charcoal product of FIGS. 15-25 fully opened just prior to ignition by the consumer; [0060]
  • FIG. 27 is a perspective view of still another embodiment of the packaged charcoal product in the complete packaged configuration; [0061]
  • FIG. 28 is a plan view of a coated paperboard blank used in forming the inner container of the packaged charcoal product of FIG. 27; [0062]
  • FIG. 29 is a plan view of a blank for an outer wrap used in the packaged product of FIG. 27; [0063]
  • FIG. 30 is a perspective view of another embodiment of a charcoal briquet as packaged into the package of FIG. 27; [0064]
  • FIG. 31 is a top plan view of the charcoal briquet of FIG. 30; [0065]
  • FIG. 32 is a side view of the charcoal briquet of FIG. 30; [0066]
  • FIG. 33 is a front view of the charcoal briquet seen in FIGS. 30-32; [0067]
  • FIG. 34 is a view similar to FIG. 27 showing the packaged charcoal product partially opened in preparation for use by the consumer; and, [0068]
  • FIG. 35 is a perspective view of the packaged charcoal product of FIGS. 27-34 fully opened just prior to ignition by the consumer.[0069]
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for the purpose of illustrating preferred embodiments of the invention only and not for the purpose of limiting same, FIG. 1 shows a charcoal briquet [0070] 10 in plan view. Charcoal briquet 10 has a generally square periphery with four sides 12, 14, 16, and 18. Each side has an outer peripheral edge 20 which is gently bowed outwardly towards its center, but relatively straight. The four edges 20 are interconnected by corners 22 with a radius of curvature significantly smaller than the radius of curvature of the gently bowed edges 20. A hole 26 is located in the central area of the briquet 10 between the sides 12, 14, 16, 18.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4, one sees the charcoal briquet of FIG. 1 in cross section. The charcoal briquet [0071] 10 has an upper surface which is generally convex with a hole 26 in the center. The lower surface of the charcoal briquet 10 is generally concave. The briquet back side 12 is bounded by a generally planar horizontal bottom surface 30, a rounded outer peripheral edge 32, an upwardly and inwardly extending lower surface 34, an upwardly and inwardly extending upper surface 36 and a vertically extending inner surface 38 extending between the lower surface 34 and upper surface 36. The lower surface 34 is gently concave but overall extends inwardly and upwardly at an angle of about 30° from the horizontal. The upper surface 36 is gently convex and extends inwardly and upwardly at an angle of about or slightly greater than 30°. The lower surface and upper surface are generally parallel to one another. However, a slight divergence away from one another as one moves towards the center of the briquet may be used.
  • The front side of the briquet [0072] 16 is the mirror image of the back side of the briquet 12. That is, the briquet 10 is symmetrical about its central axis as viewed in the cross section shown in FIG. 4. Moreover, if one rotates the briquet by 90°, one still sees the cross section seen in FIG. 4. That is, the briquet 10 is symmetrical with respect to the side walls 14 and 18, as well as with respect to the side walls 12 and 16, and all the side walls 12, 14, 16, 18 have identical cross sections at their centers and curve identically towards the corners 22.
  • The central portion of the charcoal briquet [0073] 10 is occupied by a hole 26 bounded by the vertically extending inner surface 38 of each of the sides 12, 14, 16, 18. As can be seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, the side walls are interconnected by curved hole corners 42. Of course, the hole 26 could have a circular periphery rather than the rounded square periphery illustrated in the figures. Additionally, a briquet having a rectangular outline in the horizontal plane rather than a square outline accomplishes many of the objects of the present invention.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the briquet is approximately 2.39 inches wide when measured from the center of the outer periphery of one edge to the opposite edge. Thus, the width dimension from the center of the right side [0074] 14 to the center of the left side 18 is approximately 2.39 inches. Similarly, the dimension from the center of the front side 16 to the center of the back side 12 is approximately 2.39 inches. The overall height of the briquet from the bottom of the bottom surface 30 to the periphery of the hole 26 is approximately 0.8 inches. The thickness of the sides 12, 14, 16, 18 measured from the inner surface 34 to the outer surface 36 is approximately 0.42 inches. The width of the hole 26 measured diametrically at its narrowest portion is 0.42 inches. This gives an overall volume of the briquet of 2.16 cubic inches, with an approximate weight of 0.056 pound. The surface area of the briquet is about 13.7 square inches. This compares to a standard pillow shaped briquet as is commercially available having a volume of 2.12 cubic inches, an approximate weight of 0.055 pound, a surface area of 8.98 square inches. Thus, the briquet of the present invention having an approximately equal weight is provided with 150% of the surface area of the standard briquet. All of the above figures are approximate, as individual briquets vary considerably.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 6-8, one sees a stack of 19 identical briquets contained within a close fitting cardboard box. The box [0075] 50 has a back side 52, a right side 54, a front side 56, and a left side 58. The box is created from a single sheet of cardboard with an extension of the left side 58 being creased and then overlaying a portion of the front side 56 and adhered, as by gluing, to the front side 56. Thus, a sealed square container containing a stack of briquets 10 is illustrated. The box 50 is approximately 2.53 inches wide (outside) in both the right to left and front to back dimensions. This provides inside dimensions snugly accommodating the stack of charcoal briquets 10. Preferably, the box is made from cardboard coated with wax or a similar coating.
  • As can be seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, extensions are provided on the box side walls [0076] 52, 54, 56, 58 forming flaps which are folded and glued or otherwise interconnected forming a box bottom 62 and a box top 64. The flaps connected to the box side walls are conventional and glued together or fastened together in conventional ways.
  • As can be seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, the bottommost charcoal briquet [0077] 10 a rests upon the bottom 62 of the box 50. The bottom surface 30 of the bottommost briquet 10 a rests upon the cardboard bottom 62 around its entire periphery. A substantial bearing area is provided between the bottom 30 of the briquet 10 a and the bottom of the box 62. The second lowest briquet 10 b rests upon the lower briquet 10 a with the lower surface 34 of each of the sides 12, 14, 16, 18 of the second briquet 10 b resting on the upper surface 36 of the sides 12, 14, 16, 18 of the bottom briquet 10 a. As can thus be seen in FIG. 8, the briquets engage one another over a substantial portion of the upper surface 36 of one briquet and lower surface 34 of the next higher briquet.
  • The briquets are substantially rectangular or square in outer peripheral shape. The downwardly facing lower surfaces [0078] 34 create a somewhat segmented downwardly facing concavity 70 having four separate continuous distinct surfaces on the four sides 12, 14, 16, 18. In the preferred embodiment, the concavity is not a surface of rotation resembling a cone. However, such a shape could be used in implementing the invention. The downwardly facing concavity 70 mates with an upwardly facing convexity 72 formed by the upper surfaces 36 of the four sides 12, 14, 16, 18. The mating of the concavity 70 and the convexity 72 as shown in the stack of FIG. 8 is self-centering. The most compact and stable disposition of the stack is with each of the briquets 10 centered and in full contact with the next lower briquet as illustrated in the figures.
  • The box [0079] 50 containing the single stack of charcoal briquets 10 is a stand alone retail package. Box 50 is printed with appropriate merchandising information, including a universal product code, and is shipped and sold as-is. The box 50 is rectilinear and therefore easily packed into cartons and palletized for handling and distribution. The box 50 is rectilinear and therefore easily stocked onto shelves, into end caps, or center-of-aisle displays at the retailer. The box 50 is sealed and therefore less likely to become contaminated with charcoal dust. The box 50 contains briquets 10 which are stacked in a stable, tight manner minimizing extra air space as well as friction and the creation of charcoal dust. The box 50 is easily purchased by the consumer, as its overall dimensions are approximately 2½×2½inches by 10⅔. This box weighs approximately one pound and is very easily picked up, placed into a shopping cart, taken home for use, easily stored at home, and easily and cleanly transported in a consumer's vehicle for use at a park or picnic.
  • In use, the consumer can simply place the box as-is in a grill bed. The wax coated box [0080] 50 is ignited and as the box 50 burns, it in turn ignites the periphery 32 of the contained charcoal briquets 10. As can be best seen in FIG. 8, the peripheral portions 32 are spaced from one another when compactly packed, with air gaps 76 provided between the briquet peripheries within the box to promote air flow as the box 50 burns, encouraging ignition of the briquet peripheral edges 32. After the briquets are ignited, the stack is broken up by use of a poker or other appropriate implement. Thereupon, a jumbled random bed of briquets is provided which has a greater surface area per unit mass than conventional briquets. The greater surface area encourages quick combustion to the ready-to-cook state. Moreover, the holes 26 in the centers of the briquets 10 provide an air flow passage causing a vortex action of air passing through the briquets 10, further encouraging combustion to the ready-to-cook temperature.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 9-11, a different method of packing the briquets [0081] 10 of the present invention is disclosed. FIGS. 9-11 illustrate a box of five pounds of identical briquets 10. The five-pound box contains six stacks of briquets disposed in two rows of three. Each of the six stacks comprises an identical number (15) of briquets and the briquets are tightly contained in a rectangular box 80 having four sides 82, 84, 86, 88. The box is constructed from a single sheet of wax-coated paper or cardboard with the sheet of cardboard having a tab extending slightly beyond the end of one of the sides 82 into an overlapping relationship with a second side 88 to which it is adhered. Flaps extend from the sides 82, 84, 86, 88 forming a box bottom 92 and a box top 94. The flaps are engaged as is conventional, forming a completely closed container. This five-pound box 80 of briquets is much more compact, easily handled, and less subject to damage than equivalent bags of briquets. The five-pound boxes are rectilinear, easing stacking and palletization. This greatly eases shipping of the product and prevents damage to the product in shipment. The rectangular boxes are easily stacked onto shelves, displayed as aisle end caps or otherwise displayed at the retailer for purchase by consumers. Moreover, the packages are fabricated from linear cardboard stock, and are therefore easily printed with merchandising information prior to forming into the box. The sealed boxes are relatively easy for consumers to handle, use and store. Optionally, the box is provided with an attached handle by fixing a plastic (or similar material) strap to the top or two opposite sides. The briquets in the box 80 stack in a self-centering manner identical to that seen in the box 50 of FIG. 6. A stable, compact mass of charcoal briquets is thereby provided.
  • In use, the consumer can either use the entire five-pound box in a manner similar to the one-pound box described above, or open the top of the five-pound box and pour a desired amount of briquets into a pile at the center of a grill. The pile of briquets can then be ignited as conventional. Such a pile of briquets has more favorable ignition characteristics when compared to conventional briquets because of the large surface area-to-mass provided by the briquet shape, and because of the vortex air flow created by the holes [0082] 26 in the middles of the briquets in the stack.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates the progression from initial ignition (0 minutes) to the ready-to-cook condition of the charcoal briquets of the present invention, as compared to conventional standard charcoal briquets. Line [0083] 110 connects data points for the temperature of briquets in accordance with the invention. Line 112 connects data points for standard briquets. It can be seen that the charcoal briquets of the present invention reach a temperature in excess of 1000° approximately 15 minutes after initial ignition, whereas such a temperature is not reached for conventional briquets for approximately 25 minutes. Moreover, the briquets of the present invention hold their ready-to-cook temperature of about 1000° reasonably constantly thereafter. Temperature readings for tests conducted comparing the temperature at 5-minute intervals after initial ignition for the briquets of the present invention when compared to conventional briquets is set forth in Table 1 below. TABLE 1 MINUTES INVENTION CONVENTIONAL 5 478 346 10 883 327 15 1187 433 20 1104 591 25 997 1067 30 929 1032
  • As can be seen with reference to the above table and the accompanying FIG. 14, obtaining appropriate cooking temperature is hastened, and maintenance of that temperature is greatly improved. [0084]
  • An alternative arrangement for packing multiple-pound units of briquets is shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. In FIG. 12, one sees a top view of eight boxes [0085] 50 identical in all respects to the package seen in FIGS. 6-8. The eight boxes 50 are held together by an outer wrapper 100 surrounding the sides 52, 54, 56, 58 of the closely-packed boxes 50. The outer wrapper 100 lays closely against boxes 50. The outer wrapper 100 is shown slightly spaced from the boxes 50 in the drawings for purposes of clarity only. The outer wrapper 100 is a wrap, such as a wide plastic wrap, which tightly binds the individual boxes 50 together into a single commercial product bearing its own universal product code 102 and marketing information. The outer wrapper 100 obscures the universal product code of the individual boxes 50 and allows the retailer to sell multiple units as a single package to consumers requiring or desiring more than a single pound of product. The consumer can easily handle the compact package, take it home, and remove separable one-pound boxes as desired. Moreover, the retailer can sell multi-unit packages in outer wrappers 100 or remove the outer wrapper 100 and sell individual one-pound packages 50 bearing their own marketing information. An outer box or similar container can be used in place of the wrapper 100.
  • Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 15-26. FIG. 15 illustrates a packaged charcoal product [0086] 200. The product 200 is shaped like a conventional box in that it has a flat bottom 202 a flat top 204 and four flat side walls (only two of which are visible) 206, 208. While all of the top, bottom and side walls are generally flat, flaps, creases and joints which vary from absolute flatness do exist in most of these surfaces. The top 204 includes a handle 216 which can be upstanding as shown in FIG. 15 for use by the consumer in carrying the packaged charcoal product 200 or can lay flat against the top 204 as illustrated in FIG. 25. Thus, the packaged charcoal product 200 is generally a rectangular box which is easily stacked, palitized, and displayed on conventional retail shelves and the like. Moreover, the package has large flat surfaces available for merchandising information such as product directions, identifying trademarks and universal product codes. Thus, the product is easy to ship and merchandise and easy for the consumer to handle.
  • The product of FIG. 15 is comprised of several elements. These elements include an inner container fabricated from a sheet material blank shown in FIG. 16, an outer wrap fabricated from a blank seen in FIG. 17, inner divider walls as seen in FIG. 18, a match book shown in FIG. 19 and a number of charcoal briquets illustrated in FIGS. 21-24. [0087]
  • The inner container blank [0088] 220 is fabricated from stiff paperboard or the like coated on one side with paraffin. The paraffin coated side will be the inside of the inner container when it is assembled. The side of the blank which will face outwardly can optionally be coated with paraffin and may be printed upon with product instructions or the like. The inner container blank 220 is scored or creased vertically to divide the blank into a first side region 222, a second side region 224, a third side region 226, a fourth side region 228, and an overlap region 230. The creases separating the four side regions are straight, vertical and extend for the entire height of the blank 220 and will ultimately form the first corner 242, second corner 244, third corner 246 and fourth corner 248 of the inner container. The blank 220 is also scored or creased horizontally to create a top region 234, a side wall region 236 and a bottom region 238. A top crease 252 extends horizontally across the entire width of the blank 220 and separates the top region 234 and the side wall region 236. A bottom crease 254 extends horizontally across the entire width of the inner container blank 220 and separates a side wall region 236 and the bottom region 238. A top margin score or crease 256 separates the top region 234 from a top margin region 258. A bottom margin score or crease 262 extends horizontally across the entire width of the blank 220 and separates the bottom region 238 from a bottom margin region 264.
  • A lower opening score line or crease [0089] 272 extends horizontally across the entire blank 220 near the bottom of the side wall region 236. A first intermediate opening crease 274 extends horizontally across the blank and is spaced above the lower opening crease 272. A second intermediate opening crease 276 is spaced above the first intermediate opening crease 274 parallel to it. An upper opening crease 278 is spaced above the second intermediate opening crease 276 and parallel to it. All four opening crease lines are in the lower portion of the side wall region 236.
  • The intersection of the various horizontal and vertical regions described above create a number of subregions. The second side region [0090] 224 intersecting the top region 234 creates a second side top region 280. The second side top region 280 is approximately twice as wide as it is high. The second side top region is provided with oblique creases 282, 284 extending from the lower corners of the second side top region 280 to the center of the top of the second side top region 280. The oblique creases 282, 284 are at angles of 45 degrees with respect to the top crease 252 and the top margin crease 246. The oblique creases 282, 284 divide the second side top region 280 into three right isosceles triangles. The fourth side top region 290, the second side bottom region 292 and the fourth side bottom region 294 all contain oblique creases 296 identical to those in the second side top region 280 and have width and height dimensions identical to the second side top region 280.
  • The second side top margin region [0091] 302 is provided with a vertical crease 304 at its center. The vertical crease 304 extends from the intersection of the oblique angles 282, 284 in the second side top region 280 to the top edge of the blank 220. Identical vertical creases 306 are provided in the fourth side top margin region 308, second side bottom margin region 310 and fourth side bottom margin region 312. Identical handle extensions 314 having apertures 316 extend from the tops of the first side top margin region 318 and the third side top margin region 320. The apertures 316 are sized to allow one to pass one's fingers through the apertures in carrying the packaged charcoal product 200.
  • The four corners [0092] 242, 244, 246 and 248 are significantly weakened between the lower opening crease 272 and the upper opening crease 278. In the preferred embodiment the four corners are slit completely through in this region. This provides four parallel slits 322 in the lower portions of the four corners 242, 244, 246, 248.
  • All of the scores, creases, slits and apertures described above are easily created in a die cutting operation on a web press which may also apply printing to one or both sides of the blank [0093] 220.
  • The inner container blank [0094] 220 is folded along the four corners 242, 244, 246, 248 and the overlap region 230 is fixed to the first side region 222 by adhesive or similar means. One of the flat bottom 202 or the flat top 204 is then closed. If the bottom is selected for closure, the bottom region 238 is folded such that the second side bottom margin region 310 and the fourth side bottom margin region 312 fold inwardly around the vertical creases 306 and the first side bottom margin region 324 and the third side bottom margin region 326 are drawn together. The second side bottom region 292 and fourth side bottom region 294 also fold along oblique crease lines 296. This creates a bottom having a resemblance to a conventional milk carton. However, because the second side bottom region 292 and fourth side bottom region 294 are both about twice as wide as they are tall, the folded portions of the bottom regions lie against one another and the bottom is flat. The four bottom margin regions 324, 310, 326, 312 all lie against one another and the bottom margin is folded over and adhered to the flat bottom 202. If the second side bottom region and fourth side bottom region had width which were other than twice their heights, then the oblique creases 296 would be other than 45 degrees and the familiar tent shape of a milk carton would be created rather than a flat bottom. The first side bottom region and third side bottom region can depart from this relationship of width twice the height without interfering with the flat bottom described above.
  • FIG. 17 shows an outer wrap blank [0095] 350 which is created from sheet stocks such as paper board and is generally rectangular. The outer wrap blank 350 is divided into a first side region 352, a second side region 354, a third side region 356, a fourth side region 358 and an overlap region 360 by vertical creases. The vertical creases form a first corner 362, a second corner 364, a third corner 366, and a fourth corner 368 when the outer wrap blank 350 is wrapped about the inner container 350 to form the outer wrap 370. The outer wrap blank 350 is also provided with a bottom perforation line 372 and a top perforation line 374. A pull tab 376 extends from the side edge of the overlap region 360. As can be seen in FIGS. 25 and 15, the outer wrap blank 350 is folded along the four corners 362, 364, 366, 368 and applied around the inner container 340 with the overlap region overlaying the first side region 352. The outer wrap blank 350 is fixed to the inner container 340 by adhesive applied below the bottom perforation line 372 and above the top perforation line 374. Adhesive is not applied to the portions of the outer wrap blank 350 between the bottom perforation line 372 and top perforation line 374. The book of matches 342 is contained between the outer wrap 370 and the inner container 340.
  • FIG. 18 shows a component disposed within which the inner container blank [0096] 220 after final assembly. Divider walls 330 comprises two rectangular pieces of corrugated cardboard 332, 334 which are heavily coated with paraffin. The two pieces of cardboard 332, 334 are joined at their centers as by vertically cutting for half their height and interengaging. The length of the cardboard pieces 332, 334 can be identical to the interior diagonals between the corners 242-246 and 244-248 respectively. The divider walls 332 are received and retained within the inner container 340 at its bottom.
  • FIG. 19 shows a book of matches [0097] 342. The book of matches is a conventional book of several paper matches in a book form carrying a striker on the outer surface.
  • A selected weight of charcoal briquets are contained within the inner container [0098] 340. The charcoal briquets are generally identical to one another and have a pillow shape. One of the briquets is seen in FIGS. 21-24. A typical charcoal briquet 380 is pillow shaped with an elliptical periphery 382 when viewed from the top. As seen in FIG. 23, the briquet 380 has a convex curved top surface 384 with three deep grooves 386, 388, 390 extending across the short dimension of the top surface 384. The briquets 380 is symmetrical with respect to a horizontal plane passing through its center. Thus, the bottom surface 392 is also convex and there are three deep grooves 396, 398, 400 in the bottom surface 392. At their deepest points, the individual grooves have a depth dimension of about 25% of the maximum depth dimension of the briquet. As seen in FIG. 23, the top center groove 388 and the bottom center groove 398, together occupy about 50% of the height of the briquet 380. The grooves are about as wide as their maximum depth. A quantity of briquets, typically about 2½ pounds is filled in to the inner container 340 before it is completely closed. After inclusion of the briquets 380, the top regions 234, top margin region 258 and handle extensions 314 are brought together in a manner similar to that described for the bottom region 238. The two handle extensions 314 form the handle 216 which can extend above the flat top 204 or be folded down to lay against the flat top 204. This completed product configuration, as seen in FIG. 15, is box-like, easily stacked and palletized, and is dust tight. The four slits 322 in the four corners 242, 244, 246 and 248 of the inner container 340 are held closed and sealed by the outer wrap 370. Thus, an easily shipped, stored and merchandised commercial product is presented.
  • FIG. 25 shows the first step in use of the product [0099] 200 by the ultimate consumer. After purchasing the product, the consumer takes the packaged charcoal product 200 to the place of intended use, typically a backyard grill or barbeque. The product is placed in the bed of the charcoal grill or similar device and the outer wrap 370 is removed by grasping the pull tab 376 an pulling it away from the inner container 340. The outer wrap 370 separates along the perforation lines 372, 374 releasing the book of matches 342. The outer wrap 370 may be placed under or near the inner container 340 or discarded. The inner container 340 is then vertically compressed as seen in FIG. 26. The vertical compression causes the four side regions 222, 224, 226, 228 to bulge outwardly between the bottom crease 254 and the top crease 252. This opens the four corner slits 322 allowing some of the charcoal briquets 380 to spill out of the split corners. However, the interior divider walls 330 retain many of the charcoal briquets 380 within the inner container 340. The consumer can then use the matches in the book of matches 342 to ignite one or more of the side regions 222, 224, 226, 228.
  • Importantly, the top half [0100] 410 of the inner container 340 is not split and remains intact as a cap over the center of the pile of charcoal briquets 380. The top half 410 retains heat within the pile of briquets aiding ignition of all the briquets 380. Also, the deep grooves 386, 388, 390, 396, 398, 400 aid combustion by providing air circulation within the pile of briquets 380 while still allowing close contact between adjacent briquets for the spreading of combustion. Air flow between the four corner slits 322 supports combustion while the closed top half 410 prevents the rapid escape of hot products of combustion from the top of the pile of briquets 380. This aids in the ignition of the briquets.
  • The wax coated divider walls [0101] 330 provide fuel for initiating combustion of the briquets as does the wax coated on the inside of the inner container 340. Moreover, this configuration and wax coating prevents the inner container from burning too quickly thus providing a cover over the center of the pile of briquets during the critical initial ignition phase. Once the charcoal briquets are all ignited, the inner container burns away and the consumer is left with an ignited body of briquets appropriate for cooking.
  • Yet another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 27-35. FIG. 27 illustrates a packaged charcoal product [0102] 500. The product 500 is shaped like a conventional box in that it has a flat bottom 502 a flat top 504 and four flat side walls (only two of which are visible) 506, 508. While all of the top, bottom and side walls are generally flat, flaps, creases and joints which vary from absolute flatness do exist in most of these surfaces. Thus, the packaged charcoal product 500 is generally a rectangular box which is easily stacked, palitized, and displayed on conventional retail shelves and the like. Moreover, the package has large flat surfaces available for merchandising information such as product directions, identifying trademarks and universal product codes. Thus, the product is easy to ship and merchandise and easy for the consumer to handle.
  • The product of FIG. 27 can be comprised of several elements. These elements include an inner container [0103] 520 fabricated from a sheet material blank shown in FIG. 28, an outer wrap 670 fabricated from a blank 650 seen in FIG. 29, inner divider walls as seen in FIG. 18, and a number of charcoal briquets illustrated in FIGS. 30-33.
  • The inner container blank [0104] 520 is fabricated from stiff paperboard or the like coated on one side with paraffin. The paraffin coated side will be the inside of the inner container when it is assembled. The side of the blank which will face outwardly can optionally be coated with paraffin and may be printed upon with product instructions or the like. The inner container blank 520 is scored or creased vertically to divide the blank into a first side region 522, a second side region 524, a third side region 526, a fourth side region 528, and an overlap region 530. The creases separating the four side regions are straight, vertical and extend for the entire height of the blank 520 and will ultimately form the first corner 542, second corner 544, third corner 546 and fourth corner 548 of the inner container. The blank 520 is also scored or creased horizontally to create a top region 534, a side wall region 536 and a bottom region 538. A top crease 552 extends horizontally across the entire width of the blank 520 and separates the top region 534 and the side wall region 536. A bottom crease 554 extends horizontally across the entire width of the inner container blank 520 and separates the side wall region 536 and the bottom region 538.
  • A lower score line or crease [0105] 572 extends horizontally across the entire blank 520 near the bottom of the side wall region 536. An intermediate score line or crease 574 extends horizontally across the blank and is spaced above the lower crease 572. An upper score line or crease 578 is spaced above the intermediate crease 574 and parallel to it. All three crease lines are in a lower portion 537 of the side wall region 536.
  • The intersection of the various horizontal and vertical regions described above create a number of subregions. The first side region [0106] 522 intersecting the top region 534 creates a first side top region 580. The first side top region 580 is approximately twice as wide as it is high. The first side top region 580 is provided with oblique creases 596 extending from the lower corners of the first side top region 580 to the proximal center of the top of the first side top region 580. The oblique creases 596 are at angles of approximately 45 degrees with respect to the top crease 552 and the top margin crease 556. The oblique creases 596 divide the first side top region 580 into three right isosceles triangles. The third side top region 590, the first side bottom region 592 and the third side bottom region 594 all contain oblique creases 596 identical to those in the first side top region 580 and have width and height dimensions identical to the first side top region 580.
  • A second side top region [0107] 618 is provided with a second side top margin region 619. A fourth side top region 620, a second side bottom region 622, and a fourth side bottom region 624 are provided with side margin regions 621, 623, 625.
  • The four corners [0108] 542, 544, 546 and 548 are significantly weakened between the lower crease 572 and the upper crease 578. In one embodiment the four corners are slit completely through in this region. This provides four parallel slits 632 in the lower portion 537 of the side wall region 536 along the four corners 542, 544, 546, 548.
  • All of the scores, creases, slits and apertures described above are easily created in a die cutting operation on a web press which may also apply printing to one or both sides of the blank [0109] 520.
  • The inner container blank [0110] 520 is folded along the four corners 542, 544, 546, 548 and the overlap region 530 is fixed to the first side region 522 by adhesive or similar means. One of the bottom region 538 or the top region 534 is then closed. If the bottom is selected for closure, the bottom region 538 is folded such that the first side bottom region 592 and the third side bottom region 594 fold inwardly around the bottom crease 554 and the second side bottom margin region 623 and the fourth side bottom margin region 625 are drawn together. The first side bottom region 592 and third side bottom region 594 also fold along oblique crease lines 596. However, because the first side bottom region 592 and third side bottom region 594 are both about twice as wide as they are tall, the folded portions of the bottom regions lie against one another and the bottom is flat. The two side bottom margin regions 623, 625 lie against one another and the bottom margin is folded over.
  • FIG. 29 shows an outer wrap blank [0111] 650 which is created from sheet stocks such as paper board and is generally rectangular. The outer wrap blank 650 is divided into a first side region 652, a second side region 654, a third side region 656, a fourth side region 658 and an overlap region 660 by vertical creases. The vertical creases form a first corner 662, a second corner 664, a third corner 666, and a fourth corner 668 when the outer wrap blank 650 is wrapped about the inner container 520 to form the outer wrap 670. The outer wrap blank 650 is also provided with a bottom perforation line 672 and a top perforation line 674. A perforated generally vertically oriented or V-shaped line 676 extends between the bottom perforation line 672 and the top perforation line 674. As can be seen in FIGS. 34 and 27, the outer wrap blank 650 is folded along the four corners 662, 664, 666, 668 and applied around the inner container 520 with the overlap region 660 underlying the first side region 652. The outer wrap blank 650 is also scored or creased horizontally to create a top region 680, a side wall region 682, and a bottom region 684. A top crease 686 extends horizontally across the entire width of the blank 650 and separates the top region 680 and the side wall region 682. A bottom crease 688 extends horizontally across the entire width of the outer blank 650 and separates the side wall region 682 and the bottom region 684. It is to be appreciated that horizontal score lines 672, 674 and vertically oriented score line 676 define a selectively removable band or band portion 690 of the side wall region 682.
  • The intersection of the various horizontal and vertical regions described above create a number of subregions. The first side region [0112] 652 intersecting the top region 680 and the bottom region 684 creates a first side top region 653 and a first side bottom region 663. Similarly, side regions 654, 656, and 658, in conjunction with the top region 680 and the bottom region 684, create side top regions 655, 657, and 659 and side bottom regions 665, 667, and 669. The outer wrap 670 completely encapsulates inner container 520 in the assembled product 500 (FIG. 27). The outer wrap 670 provides another barrier thereby preventing inadvertent escape of charcoal briquet residue.
  • A selected weight of charcoal briquets are contained within the inner container [0113] 520. The charcoal briquets are generally identical to one another and have a pillow shape. Another embodiment of the briquet is seen in FIGS. 30-33. A typical charcoal briquet 780 is pillow shaped with an elliptical periphery 782 when viewed from the top. As seen in FIG. 32, the briquet 780 has a convex curved top surface 784 with two grooves 786, 788 extending across the long dimension or major axis of the top surface 784. The briquet 780 is symmetrical with respect to a horizontal plane passing through its center. Thus, the bottom surface 792 is also convex and there are two grooves 796, 798 in the bottom surface 792. The grooves can have a width about as wide as their maximum depth. A quantity of briquets, typically about 2½ pounds is filled in to the inner container 520 before it is completely closed. After inclusion of the briquets 780, the top region 534 and the top margin region 558 are brought together in a manner similar to that described for the bottom region 538. The inner container 520 is then wrapped with outer wrap blank 650. This completed product configuration, as seen in FIG. 27, is box-like, easily stacked and palletized, and is dust tight. The four slits 632 in the four corners 542, 544, 546 and 548 of the inner container 520 are held closed and sealed by the outer wrap 670. Thus, an easily shipped, stored and merchandised commercial product is presented.
  • FIG. 34 shows the first step in use of the product [0114] 500 by the ultimate consumer. After purchasing the product, the consumer takes the packaged charcoal product 500 to the place of intended use, typically a backyard grill or barbeque. The product is placed in the bed of the charcoal grill or similar device and the band portion 690 of the outer wrap 670 is removed by separating perforated line 676 and pulling band portion 690 away from the inner container 520. The band portion 690 separates along the perforation lines 672, 674 while an upper portion 692 and a lower portion 694, of the outer wrap 670, remain intact. The band portion 690 of the outer wrap 670 may be placed under or near the inner container 520 or discarded. The inner container 520 is then vertically compressed as seen in FIG. 35. The vertical compression causes the four side regions 522, 524, 526, 528 to bulge outwardly between the bottom crease 572 and the top crease 578. This expands the four corner slits 632 allowing some of the charcoal briquets to spill out of the split corners (not illustrated). However, the interior divider walls 330 retain many of the charcoal briquets 780 within the inner container 520. The consumer can then use a match, or similar, to ignite one or more of the side regions 522, 524, 526, 528.
  • Importantly, the top half (not illustrated) of the inner container [0115] 520 is not split and remains intact as a cap over the center of the pile of charcoal briquets 780. The top half retains heat within the pile of briquets aiding ignition of all the briquets 780. Also, the grooves 786, 788, 796, 798 aid combustion by providing air circulation within the pile of briquets 780 while still allowing close contact between adjacent briquets for the spreading of combustion. Air flow between the expanded four corner slits 632 supports combustion while the closed top half prevents the rapid escape of hot products of combustion from the top of the pile of briquets 780. This aids in the ignition and combustion of the briquets.
  • The wax coated divider walls [0116] 330 provide fuel for initiating combustion of the briquets as does the wax coated on the inside of the inner container 520. Moreover, this configuration and wax coating prevents the inner container from burning too quickly thus providing a cover over the center of the pile of briquets during the critical initial ignition phase. Once the charcoal briquets are all ignited, the inner container burns away and the consumer is left with an ignited body of briquets appropriate for cooking.
  • The specific top configuration and bottom configuration described provides advantages; however, one can practice the invention using other top and bottom configurations as the top and bottom of the container need never be opened after the charcoal briquets are filled into the inner container. Thus, alternative designs in which flat rectangular panels form the top and bottom are appropriate so long as they provide a good seal. An outer wrap leaving portions of the side walls exposed but covering and sealing the slits [0117] 322, 632 would obtain the advantages of the invention.
  • The invention has been described with respect to preferred embodiments. Modifications and alterations of these preferred embodiments will occur to others upon the reading and understanding of the specification. It is our intention to include all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the appended claims or the equivalents thereof. [0118]

Claims (132)

Having thus described there invention, it is claimed:
1. A charcoal briquet comprising four side walls of generally identical cross section interconnected to form a rectangle, each said side wall comprising a volume surrounded by a bottom surface, an upwardly and inwardly extending lower surface and an upwardly and inwardly extending upper surface generally parallel to said lower surface, said side wall lower surfaces together forming a downwardly facing concavity and said sidewall upper surfaces together forming an upwardly facing convexity.
2. The charcoal briquet of claim 1, wherein said side walls additionally comprise an inner surface extending from said lower surface to said upper surface, said inner surface surrounding a central hole.
3. The charcoal briquet of claim 2, wherein said lower surface of each said side is generally parallel to the upper surface of said side.
4. The charcoal briquet of claim 3, wherein said lower surfaces and said upper surfaces are generally disposed at an angle of about 30° to horizontal.
5. The charcoal briquet of claim 4, wherein said lower surface of each said side diverges slightly from said upper surface of said side toward said hole.
6. The charcoal briquet of claim 5, wherein said briquet is generally square in shape.
7. The charcoal briquet of claim 6, wherein said briquet has a width and a height and said width is at least twice said height but not more than four times said height.
8. The charcoal briquet of claim 7, wherein said briquet width is approximately three times said height.
9. The charcoal briquet of claim 1, wherein said four side wall lower surfaces together form a downwardly facing concavity and said four side wall upper surfaces together form an upwardly facing convexity, said concavity being adapted to snugly engage the convexity of an identical briquet when stacked.
10. The charcoal briquet of claim 9, wherein said side walls additionally comprise an inner surface extending from said lower surface to said upper surface, said inner surface surrounding a central hole.
11. A charcoal briquet comprising:
a generally convex upper surface;
a generally concave lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of an identical briquet;
a generally rectangular periphery;
whereby said briquet may be stacked on an identical briquet forming a compact stable stack.
12. The charcoal briquet of claim 11, wherein said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
13. The charcoal briquet of claim 12, wherein said narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
14. The charcoal briquet of claim 11, wherein said generally concave lower surface comprises four generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to said periphery and said generally convex upper surface comprises four generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said upper side surfaces and said lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
15. The charcoal briquet of claim 14, wherein said central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
16. The charcoal briquet of claim 14, wherein said lower side surfaces and said upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
17. The charcoal briquet of claim 16, wherein said briquet is generally square.
18. A package of charcoal briquets comprising at least one stack of generally identical charcoal briquets, each charcoal briquet comprising:
a generally convex upper surface;
a generally concave lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of an identical briquet;
a generally rectangular periphery;
each said briquet except at least one bottom briquet being stacked on another briquet with said concave lower surface resting on the convex upper surface of the next lower briquet;
said at least one stack of charcoal briquets being contained in a cardboard box having four flat side walls, a generally flat bottom wall and a generally flat top wall creating a stackable rectangular box.
19. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 18, wherein each said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
20. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 19, wherein said briquet narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
21. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 18, wherein said generally concave lower surface of each of said briquets comprises four generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to said periphery and said generally convex upper surface of each of said briquets comprises four generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said briquet upper side surfaces and said briquet lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
22. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 21, wherein said briquet central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
23. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 21, wherein said briquet lower side surfaces and said briquet upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
24. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 23, wherein each said briquet is generally square.
25. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 18, wherein each said stack of generally identical charcoal briquets is contained in a single stack cardboard box and several of said cardboard boxes of briquets are bound together to form a commercial product.
26. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 25, wherein said single stack boxes are bound together by an outer wrapper.
27. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 18, wherein said cardboard box is wax coated.
28. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 27, wherein air spaces exist between the peripheries of adjacent briquets in said stack.
29. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 18, wherein said box is adapted to act as an ignition aid for said charcoal briquet.
30. A charcoal briquet comprising:
a generally convex upper surface;
a generally concave lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of an identical briquet;
a periphery;
whereby said briquet may be stacked on an identical briquet forming a compact stable stack.
31. The charcoal briquet of claim 30, wherein said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
32. The charcoal briquet of claim 31, wherein said narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
33. The charcoal briquet of claim 30, wherein said generally concave lower surface comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to said periphery and said generally convex upper surface comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said upper side surfaces and said lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
34. The charcoal briquet of claim 33, wherein said central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
35. The charcoal briquet of claim 33, wherein said lower side surfaces and said upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
36. The charcoal briquet of claim 35, wherein said briquet has four sides and said periphery is generally square.
37. A package of charcoal briquets comprising at least one stack of generally identical charcoal briquets, each charcoal briquet comprising:
a generally convex upper surface;
a generally concave lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of an identical briquet;
a periphery;
each said briquet except at least one bottom briquet being stacked on another briquet with said concave lower surface resting on the convex upper surface of the next lower briquet;
said at least one stack of charcoal briquets being contained in a cardboard box having at least one side wall, a generally flat bottom wall and a generally flat top wall creating a box.
38. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 37, wherein each said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
39. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 38, wherein said briquet narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
40. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 37, wherein said generally concave lower surface of each of said briquets comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to said periphery and said generally convex upper surface of each of said briquets comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said briquet upper side surfaces and said briquet lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
41. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 40, wherein said briquet central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
42. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 40, wherein said briquet lower side surfaces and said briquet upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
43. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 42, wherein each said briquet has four sides and said periphery is generally square.
44. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 37, wherein each said stack of generally identical charcoal briquets is contained in a single stack cardboard box and several of said cardboard boxes of briquets are bound together to form a commercial product.
45. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 44, wherein said single stack boxes are bound together by an outer wrapper.
46. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 37, wherein said cardboard box is wax coated.
47. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 46, wherein air spaces exist between the peripheries of adjacent briquets in said stack.
48. A package of charcoal briquets comprising at least one stack of generally identical charcoal briquets, each charcoal briquet comprising: an upper surface; a lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of a generally identical briquet over a substantial portion of said identical briquet upper surface; and, a briquet periphery; said at least one stack of charcoal briquets being contained in a cardboard box having at least one side wall, a generally flat bottom wall and a generally flat top wall, said at least one side wall engaging at least a portion of said periphery of said briquets.
49. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 48, wherein each said briquet has a surface area and a volume and said surface area in square inches is at least five times said volume in cubic inches.
50. The package of charcoal briquets of claim 49, wherein said surface area in square inches is at least six times said volume in cubic inches.
51. A charcoal briquet having a total surface area measurable in square inches and a total volume measurable in cubic inches, the ratio of said total surface area to said total volume being about 13.7 to about 2.16.
52. The charcoal briquet of claim 51, wherein said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
53. The charcoal briquet of claim 52, wherein said narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
54. The charcoal briquet of claim 51, having a generally concave lower surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to a periphery and a generally convex upper surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said upper side surfaces and said lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
55. The charcoal briquet of claim 54, wherein said central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
56. The charcoal briquet of claim 54, wherein said lower side surfaces and said upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
57. The charcoal briquet of claim 56, wherein said briquet has four sides and said periphery is generally square.
58. A charcoal briquet having a total surface area measurable in square inches and a weight measurable in pounds, the ratio of said total surface area in square inches to said weight in pounds being about 13.7 to about 0.056.
59. The charcoal briquet of claim 58, wherein said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
60. The charcoal briquet of claim 59, wherein said narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
61. The charcoal briquet of claim 58, having a generally concave lower surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to a periphery and a generally convex upper surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said upper side surfaces and said lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
62. The charcoal briquet of claim 61, wherein said central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
63. The charcoal briquet of claim 61, wherein said lower side surfaces and said upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
64. The charcoal briquet of claim 63, wherein said briquet has four sides and said periphery is generally square.
65. A selected number of substantially identical charcoal briquets sold as a packaged unit adapted for ignition in a home cooking appliance, said selected number of briquets achieving a cooking temperature of about 1000 degrees about fifteen minutes after ignition and holding said temperature for at least fifteen minutes thereafter.
66. The charcoal briquets of claim 65, each having a generally concave lower surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to a periphery and a generally convex upper surface comprising multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said upper side surfaces and said lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
67. The charcoal briquets of claim 66, wherein said central portions contain a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
68. The charcoal briquets of claim 66, wherein said lower side surfaces and said upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
69. The charcoal briquets of claim 67, wherein said briquets have four sides and said peripheries are generally square.
70. A packaged charcoal briquet products comprising a selected number of charcoal briquets and a container for said selected number of charcoal briquets having a generally flat bottom and generally flat sides, said briquets being shaped such that adjacent briquets may lie closely adjacent one another covering substantially all said container bottom.
71. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 70 wherein each said briquet product of claim 70 wherein each said briquet covering said container bottom is the lowermost in a stack of several vertically aligned charcoal briquets.
72. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 71 wherein each charcoal briquet comprises:
a generally convex upper surface;
a generally concave lower surface adapted to engage the upper surface of an identical briquet; and,
a periphery.
73. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 72, wherein each said briquet has an overall height and a narrowest width, said narrowest width being at least twice said overall height and not greater than four times said overall height.
74. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 73, wherein said briquet narrowest width is approximately three times said overall height.
75. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 72, wherein said generally concave lower surface of each of said briquets comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending lower side surfaces extending from a briquet central portion to said periphery and said generally convex upper surface of each of said briquets comprises multiple generally planar downwardly and outwardly extending upper side surfaces extending from said briquet central portion to said periphery, said briquet upper side surfaces and said briquet lower side surfaces being generally parallel on each side.
76. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 75, wherein said briquet central portion contains a hole extending from said concave lower surface to said convex upper surface.
77. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 75, wherein said briquet lower side surfaces and said briquet upper side surfaces are disposed at an angle of about 30° with respect to horizontal.
78. The packaged charcoal briquet product of claim 77, wherein each said briquet has four sides and said periphery is generally square.
79. A packaged charcoal product comprising:
an inner container fabricated from combustible sheet material comprising a continuous bottom wall, a plurality of side walls and a closed top, said side walls interconnected at creased corners, said creased corners having weakened lower portions;
a removable outer wrap surrounding at least a portion of said side walls including said corner weakened lower portions in a continuous band, said inner container and said outer wrap forming a completely closed container when said outer wrap forms said continuous band;
a quantity of charcoal briquets contained in said inner container;
said corner weakened lower portions adapted to open when said outer wrap is removed and said inner container is vertically compressed.
80. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 where said band formed by said outer wrap is combustible paperboard.
81. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said inner container has four planar side walls.
82. The packaged charcoal product of claim 81 further comprising vertical internal walls extending diagonally across the interior of said inner container, said internal wall having a heights substantially less than the height of said inner container.
83. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said sidewalls have horizontal scored lines allowing said side walls to bulge outwardly in a controlled manner when said inner container is vertically compressed.
84. The packaged charcoal product of claim 80 wherein said outer wrap is a band of combustible paperboard having a first end and a second end, said first end overlaying said second end when said band surrounds said inner container, said packaged charcoal product further comprising at least one ignitor fixed between said band and said inner container.
85. The packaged charcoal product of claim 84 wherein said at least one ignitor is a book of matches.
86. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said weakened lower portions of said inner container corners are vertical slits.
87. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said inner container corners extend above said weakened portions, whereby an upper portion of said inner container remains intact upon application of vertical compression to said inner container, said intact inner container upper portion forming a heat retaining cap over said quantity of charcoal.
88. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 further comprising a carrying handle attached to said top.
89. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached pillow shaped briquets having grooves in their surfaces.
90. The packaged charcoal product of claim 79 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached briquets having a convex upper surface having an elliptical periphery and a plurality of grooves; and, a convex lower surface having an elliptical periphery identical to the periphery of said upper surface and a plurality of grooves, said upper surface joined to said lower surface at said peripheries.
91. A packaged charcoal product comprising:
an inner container fabricated from a combustible sheet material comprising a flat rectangular flat bottom wall, four flat side walls interconnected at four right angular corners, said four side walls all being perpendicular to said bottom wall, a generally flat top generally parallel to said bottom wall, said four corners having weakened lower portions adapted to split open when said inner container is vertically compressed;
a quantity of charcoal briquets contained in said inner container; and,
a removable outer wrap surrounding at least a portion of said four side walls in a continuous band adapted to restrain said side walls and prevent said corners from splitting.
92. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 further comprising vertical internal walls extending diagonally across the interior of said inner container, said internal walls having a heights substantially less than the height of said inner container.
93. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said sidewalls have horizontal scored lines allowing said side walls to bulge outwardly in a controlled manner when said inner container is vertically compressed.
94. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said outer wrap is a band of combustible paperboard having a first end and a second end, said first end overlaying said second end when said band surrounds said inner container, said packaged charcoal product further comprising at least one ignitor fixed between said band and said inner container.
95. The packaged charcoal product of claim 94 wherein said at least one ignitor is a book of matches.
96. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said weakened lower portions of said inner container corners are vertical slits.
97. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said inner container corners extend above said weakened portions, whereby an upper portion of said inner container remains intact upon application of vertical compression to said inner container, said intact inner container upper portion forming a heat retaining cap over said quantity of charcoal.
98. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 further comprising a carrying handle attached to said top.
99. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached pillow shaped briquets having grooves in their surfaces.
100. The packaged charcoal product of claim 91 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached briquets having a convex upper surface having an elliptical periphery and a plurality of grooves; and, a convex lower surface having an elliptical periphery identical to the periphery of said upper surface and a plurality of grooves, said upper surface joined to said lower surface at said peripheries.
101. A packaged charcoal product comprising:
an inner container fabricated from a combustible sheet material comprising a flat bottom wall, four rectangular flat side walls interconnected at four right angular corners, said four side walls all being perpendicular to said bottom wall, four rectangular top panels extending from said four side walls, at least two of said top panels being selected top panels having a selected width and a selected height, said top panel selected height being about one half said top panel selected width, said select top panels being folded into a first isosceles triangular portion, a second isosceles triangular portion and a third isosceles triangular portion, said first isosceles triangular portion having abase adjoining said side wall, said base being equal in length to said selected width, said first triangular portion having a height about equal to said selected height, said second and third isosceles triangles flanking said first isosceles triangle and occupying the remaining portions of said selected top panels; four top panel extensions extending from said four top panels, said four top panel extensions being fixed together thereby closing said inner container;
a quantity of charcoal briquets contained in said inner container, and
a removable outer wrap surrounding at least a portion of said side walls in a continuous band adapted to restrain said sidewalls and prevent said corners from splitting.
102. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 further comprising vertical internal walls extending diagonally across the interior of said inner container, said internal wall having a heights substantially less than the height of said inner container.
103. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said sidewalls have horizontal scored lines allowing said side walls to bulge outwardly in a controlled manner when said inner container is vertically compressed.
104. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said outer wrap is a band of combustible paperboard having a first end and a second end, said first end overlaying said second end when said band surrounds said inner container, said packaged charcoal product further comprising at least one ignitor fixed between said band and said inner container.
105. The packaged charcoal product of claim 104 wherein said at least one ignitor is a book of matches.
106. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said weakened lower portions of said inner container corners are vertical slits.
107. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said inner container corners extend above said weakened portions, whereby an upper portion of said inner container remains intact upon application of vertical compression to said inner container, said intact inner container upper portion forming a heat retaining cap over said quantity of charcoal.
108. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 further comprising a carrying handle attached to said top.
109. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached pillow shaped briquets having grooves in their surfaces.
110. The packaged charcoal product of claim 101 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached briquets having a convex upper surface having an elliptical periphery and a plurality of grooves; and, a convex lower surface having an elliptical periphery identical to the periphery of said upper surface and a plurality of grooves, said upper surface joined to said lower surface at said peripheries.
111. A charcoal briquet having a convex upper surface, a convex lower surface and a periphery, said upper surface having a plurality of parallel grooves and said lower surface having a plurality of parallel grooves.
112. The charcoal briquet of claim 111 wherein said periphery is an ellipse having a minor axis.
113. The charcoal briquet of claim 112 wherein said grooves are parallel to said minor axis.
114. The charcoal briquet of claim 113 wherein said briquet has three grooves in said upper surface and three grooves in said lower surface.
115. The charcoal briquet of claim 111 wherein said grooves have a maximum depth and said briquet has a maximum height dimension, said maximum depth being about one fourth said maximum height dimension.
116. The charcoal briquet of claim 115 wherein said grooves have a maximum width, said maximum width being approximately equal to said groove maximum depth.
117. A charcoal briquet having a convex upper surface, a convex lower surface and a periphery, said upper surface having a plurality of parallel grooves and said lower surface having a plurality of parallel grooves;
said periphery is an ellipse having a major axis; and
said grooves are parallel to said major axis.
118. The charcoal briquet of claim 117 wherein said briquet has two grooves in said upper surface and two grooves in said lower surface.
119. The charcoal briquet of claim 117 wherein said grooves have a maximum depth and a maximum width, said groove maximum depth being approximately equal to said groove maximum width.
120. A packaged charcoal product comprising:
an inner container fabricated from combustible sheet material comprising a continuous bottom wall, a plurality of side walls and a closed top, said side walls interconnected at creased corners, said creased corners having weakened lower portions;
an outer wrap including a selectively removable band portion surrounding at least a portion of said side walls including said corner weakened lower portions in a continuous band, said inner container and said outer wrap forming a completely closed container;
a quantity of charcoal briquets contained in said container; and,
said corner weakened lower portions adapted to open when said band portion of said outer wrap is removed and said inner container is vertically compressed.
121. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 where said outer wrap is combustible paperboard.
122. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said inner container has four planar side walls.
123. The packaged charcoal product of claim 122 further comprising vertical internal walls extending diagonally across the interior of said inner container, said internal wall having a heights substantially less than the height of said inner container.
124. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said sidewalls have horizontal scored lines allowing said side walls to bulge outwardly in a controlled manner when said inner container is vertically compressed.
125. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said band portion of said outer wrap includes upper and lower perforated horizontal lines.
126. The packaged charcoal product of claim 125 wherein said band portion of said outer wrap further includes a vertically oriented perforated line connecting said upper and said lower perforated lines, wherein said vertically oriented perforated line can be separated for grasping and separating said band portion from said outer wrap.
127. The packaged charcoal product of claim 126 wherein said separating being along said upper and said lower perforated lines, whereby an upper portion of said outer container remains intact.
128. The packaged charcoal product of claim 126 wherein said separating being along said upper and lower perforated lines, whereby a lower portion of said outer container remains intact.
129. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said weakened lower portions of said inner container corners are vertical slits.
130. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said inner container corners extend above said weakened portions, whereby an upper portion of said inner container remains intact upon application of vertical compression to said inner container, said intact inner container upper portion forming a heat retaining cap over said quantity of charcoal.
131. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached pillow shaped briquets having grooves in their surfaces.
132. The packaged charcoal product of claim 120 wherein said quantity of charcoal briquets comprises a plurality of unattached briquets having a convex upper surface having an elliptical periphery and a plurality of grooves; and, a convex lower surface having an elliptical periphery identical to the periphery of said upper surface and a plurality of grooves, said upper surface joined to said lower surface at said peripheries.
US10/858,224 2002-08-07 2004-06-01 Packaged charcoal briquet product Abandoned US20040222117A1 (en)

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US11/054,242 US7575609B2 (en) 2002-08-07 2005-02-09 Packaged charcoal briquet product
US11/651,056 US8118887B2 (en) 2002-08-07 2007-01-08 Packaged charcoal briquet product
US13/098,335 US9131803B2 (en) 2002-08-07 2011-04-29 Charcoal briquet and packaged charcoal briquet product
US14/281,751 US20150017301A1 (en) 2002-08-07 2014-05-19 Methods for burning charcoal briquets

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US8118887B2 (en) 2002-08-07 2012-02-21 Creative Sparks, LLC Packaged charcoal briquet product
US9131803B2 (en) 2002-08-07 2015-09-15 Creative Spark Llc Charcoal briquet and packaged charcoal briquet product
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US20110049138A1 (en) * 2009-09-01 2011-03-03 Lisa Korczak Apparatus for Holding, Storing and Protecting Charcoal Briquettes and Methods of Using the Same
US10258075B2 (en) 2015-03-14 2019-04-16 Carbopol Janusz Grzyb Charcoal fuel article

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