Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20040218747A1
US20040218747A1 US10860065 US86006504A US2004218747A1 US 20040218747 A1 US20040218747 A1 US 20040218747A1 US 10860065 US10860065 US 10860065 US 86006504 A US86006504 A US 86006504A US 2004218747 A1 US2004218747 A1 US 2004218747A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
internet
ip
address
telephone
ds
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10860065
Inventor
Douglas Ranalli
Thomas Sosnowski
David Peek
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
NetNumber Inc
Original Assignee
NetNumber Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M7/00Interconnection arrangements between switching centres
    • H04M7/006Networks other than PSTN/ISDN providing telephone service, e.g. Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), including next generation networks with a packet-switched transport layer
    • H04M7/0075Details of addressing, directories or routing tables
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S379/00Telephonic communications
    • Y10S379/90Internet, e.g. Internet phone, webphone, internet-based telephony
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S379/00Telephonic communications
    • Y10S379/908Multimedia

Abstract

A directory service, containing unique identifiers (e.g., telephone numbers) and related Internet address(es), accessible through the Internet. An Internet-enabled communication system, such as IP-PBX or voice mail system, accepts a telephone number as a destination address. It then contacts the directory service and requests the Internet address related to that telephone number. The communication system uses the Internet address to set up a delivery path via the Internet to the destination. Thus, all time-dependent charges normally associated with message delivery by the telephone network can be avoided.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 09/226,901, filed on Jan. 8, 1999, and a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 09/092,764, filed on Jun. 5, 1998, to which priority is claimed and which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to a directory service for enabling communications over a data network such as the Internet, and more particularly to the use of a unique identifier (for example, a PSTN telephone number) with this directory as a means for acquiring the associated data network address information for an intended recipient of a communication.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) is a well-known and pervasive communications network that utilizes unique telephone numbers for setting up telephone calls. Millions of users all over the world have been assigned unique telephone numbers; moreover, users understand how to set up telephone calls to desired destinations by dialing such numbers. Originally conceived to carry real-time voice communications, the role of the PSTN has expanded to include other types of communications as well, including data. Facsimile is a well-known example of data communication over the PSTN.
  • [0004]
    The Internet, a data network, has more recently become well-known and pervasive. Unlike the PSTN which utilizes circuit switched technology, the Internet utilizes a packet switched technology. Compared to circuit switched networks, packet switched networks are commonly acknowledged to be far more efficient for the transport of information. Generally, charges for use of the PSTN are time based (i.e., cents per minute of use) whereas charges for use of the Internet are usually flat monthly fees. Reflecting its increased efficiency, the cost for use of the Internet is less than that of the PSTN. As a further distinction between the two, the Internet utilizes an addressing structure completely different from the PSTN. It employs unique domain names (c.g., “xyz.com”) and associated, unique Internet Protocol (IP) addresses (e.g., “249.123.356.295”) for establishing packet based communications between systems. Note that, like the PSTN, the Internet can be used to carry voice communications; however, a PSTN telephone number cannot be used to set up a telephone call on the Internet.
  • [0005]
    In general, the lure of communication via the Internet, compared to communication via the PSTN, is lower cost to the end user. Thus, in order to reduce costs, individuals and businesses seek to shift more and more communications traffic from the PSTN to the Internet. Such “traffic” may include real-time voice, fax, voicemail, unified messaging, etc. Today, many “Internet enabled” communication systems exist which allow the transport of such traffic over the Internet. Normally, such systems accept a standard telephone number from a user to address a communication. They then consult either an internal directory or other local directory to translate the telephone number into the required Internet Protocol (IP) address of the destination system. Unfortunately, such internal or local directories (databases) are, by their nature, very restricted in scope. For example, they may meet the need for communications occurring within a company, but the IP addresses for systems outside the company (remote addresses) will likely exist only for a limited number of frequently dialed destinations. If an IP address is unavailable in the local database, the communication is typically handed off to the PSTN. An ancillary problem exists with purely local directories: it is difficult to maintain accurate information on remote addresses due to the frequent movement of individuals both within a given company and between different companies.
  • [0006]
    In summary, the restricted addressing capability of a local directory severely circumscribes the utility of these new IP-enabled communication systems. The limited information contained in such local directories results in many call diversions to the PSTN, and further, increased administration costs associated with maintaining local databases.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus designed to simplify communication between end users (source and destination) on a data network. More specifically, the invention provides a database on a data network to relate a unique identifier attached to a user, to a data network address by which the user may be reached. Presumably, the unique identifier is one readily available to those desiring to communicate with the user. For example, it may take the form of a telephone number by which the user is commonly reached. According to one aspect of the invention, a method is provided for registering a unique identifier and an associated Internet address with a directory service (DS) that is accessible on the Internet. The directory service can then be accessed with a request for resolution of the unique identifier to its associated Internet address, wherein the directory service resolves the associated Internet address in response to the request.
  • [0008]
    According to another aspect, an apparatus of the invention comprises a directory service (DS), accessible via a data network, of unique identifiers and associated data network addresses.
  • [0009]
    In a preferred embodiment, the unique identifier is a telephone number, as provided by the PSTN. The data network may take the form of the commonly available Internet. The directory service would thus provide resolution of the telephone number of an intended recipient, to an associated Internet address for the intended recipient. The directory may also contain other information which may be useful in setting up a communication link between users. Such other information may also include particular requirements of the destination system, for example, the required format of a communication.
  • [0010]
    By way of example illustrated in FIG. 1, a method is provided for contacting an end user on the Internet comprising the steps of:
  • [0011]
    a first communication system (CS-1) 2 serving a first end user (EU-1) 1 providing a telephone number of a second end user (EU-2) 3 to a directory service (DS) 12 accessible via the Internet 10, the DS comprising a compilation of telephone numbers and associated Internet addresses for end users;
  • [0012]
    searching the DS, based on the telephone number of EU-2, for an associated Internet address of a second communication system (CS-2) 4 serving EU-2; and
  • [0013]
    EU-1 contacting EU-2 via the Internet based on the associated Internet address of CS-2.
  • [0014]
    If an Internet address is not available, the call is completed via the PSTN 8.
  • [0015]
    The contacting step may comprise at least one of real-time voice, voicemail, unified messaging, fax, or remote printing. An Internet address is defined to include any one of a variety of addressing mechanisms used in the Internet space. These include the more commonly known Internet Protocol (IP) address generally associated with an individual piece of equipment (an IP enabled fax machine, for example), the Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) e-mail address, and the Voice Profile for Internet Mail (VPIM) voicemail system address. Thus, by way of example, the Internet address of the recipient may be an IP address of an IP-telephone of CS-2, an IP address of an IP-mobile phone of CS-2, an IP address of an IP-PBX of CS-2, a VPIM address of a voicemail system of CS-2, an SMTP address of a unified messaging system of CS-2, an SMTP address of an e-mail system of CS-2, an IP address of a fax machine of CS-2, or an IP address of a printer of CS-2. For purposes of clarification, an IP-PBX is a Private Branch Exchange telephone switch which contains a connection to the Internet as well as traditional connections to the PSTN. Normally, a PBX is located on a customer premises.
  • [0016]
    The method and apparatus of the invention is provided to multiple end users, wherein each user may be charged a fee for being listed (registered) in the directory service (DS) or a fee for utilizing the DS. This fee may be for example a fixed fee, either on a one-time basis or periodic, or a fee based on the amount of usage of the DS. According to another aspect of the invention, a method is provided comprising free registration of end users in the DS and a fixed fee is billed only to those users who are determined to be “active users” of the DS. In one embodiment, an active-user is defined as a user record that is requested by a communications device in a predetermined period of time, e.g., at least once per month. Further alternatives are no fee for registration or usage, but a fee to advertisers for including advertisements with the service.
  • [0017]
    According to another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided comprising:
  • [0018]
    an external directory service (DS) accessible via the Internet;
  • [0019]
    the DS comprising registered unique identifiers and associated Internet addresses; and
  • [0020]
    an interface to the DS for multiple Internet-enabled communication systems.
  • [0021]
    The multiple communication systems may include, for example, Internet enabled PBX, voicemail, fax, unified messaging, and remote printing systems. Each of these systems may contact the directory service using one or more different protocols, such as Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) or Domain Name System (DNS), to resolve the registered unique identifier to an associated Internet address.
  • [0022]
    According to another aspect of the invention, a method and apparatus are provided for associating more than one Internet address with a single unique identifier. In this case, each Internet address would relate to a different type of communications system. The directory service would use information contained within the request to determine which Internet address is the proper one for a given system. In a preferred embodiment, a single telephone number can be related to: an Internet address for a real-time voice communications system (for example an IP-PBX, IP telephone or IP wireless telephone); an Internet address for a voice messaging communications system (for example a VPIM enabled voicemail system); an Internet address for a unified-messaging system; an Internet address for an e-mail system; and an Internet address for a fax machine or a network printer.
  • [0023]
    According to another aspect of the invention, a method and apparatus are provided for registering end users with the directory service. The end user registry may be based upon a unique identifier, e.g., a telephone number, and associated Internet address. A single end user, or an administrator for a group of end users, may contact the directory service via a web browser and utilize Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) to access the registration service.
  • [0024]
    These and other features of the present invention will be more particularly described with respect to the following detailed description.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of two alternative communication networks, the PSTN and the Internet; it shows the Internet accessibility of the directory service (DS) of this invention and the Internet connectivity between the sending (source) and the receiving (destination) communication systems.
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 2 is an example of a directory service (DS) record for an end user showing various types of information that the DS may contain.
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the components of the DS and its interface with an IP-PBX sending system and an IP-PBX receiving system.
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of certain physical components of one embodiment of the DS.
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of the interaction of various communication systems with the DS.
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 6 is a flow diagram of the sequence of events which occur in one embodiment when an IP-PBX requests resolution of a unique identifier.
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 7 is a flow diagram of the sequence of events which occur in one embodiment when a voicemail system requests resolution of a unique identifier.
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 8 is a flow diagram of the sequence of events which occur in one embodiment when an administrator bulk loads information into the DS database.
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 9 is a flow diagram of the sequence of events which occur in one embodiment when an individual user modifies information in the DS database.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0034]
    The Directory Service
  • [0035]
    A “data network” is defined as a network designed for the efficient transport of data and which carries that data in a digital form in packets or cells. This is contrasted with the circuit switched network structures used by the world-wide Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).
  • [0036]
    An internet is one type of data network. Physically, an internet is a collection of packet switching networks interconnected by gateways along with the protocols that allow them to function logically as a single, large, virtual network. When written in upper case, Internet refers to the collection of networks and gateways that use the TCP/IP protocol suite and function as a single, cooperative virtual network. The Internet provides universal connectivity and three levels of network services; unreliable, connectionless packet delivery; reliable, full duplex stream delivery; and application level services like electronic mail that build on the first two. See D. Comer, Internetworking With TCP/IP, vol. 1, p. 492-493, Prentice-Hall Inc. (1991). Most of the written information about TCP/IP and the Internet, including its architecture, protocols, and history can be found in a series of reports known as “Requests For Comments” or RFCs. RFCs are available electronically from the Internet Network Information Center (NIC) at service@nic.ddn.mil. See D. Comer at pp. 447-475 for a list of RFCs arranged by topic.
  • [0037]
    A “network address” designates, in general, a destination address on a data network. It includes an “Internet address” wherein Internet address includes Internet Protocol (IP) Address, SMTP e-mail address, VPIM address, or any one of a variety of other address protocols used on the Internet. The term Internet address may also include any additional information which may be required by communication systems to establish communication links over the Internet.
  • [0038]
    An Internet protocol (IP) address is a 32-bit address assigned to hosts that want to participate in a TCP/IP internet. IP addresses are the abstraction of physical hardware addresses just as an internet is an abstraction of physical networks. An IP address consists of a network portion and a host portion. This partition enables efficient routing of packets.
  • [0039]
    To further define terms which may be unfamiliar, a PBX is a Private Branch Exchange telephone switch; it is normally installed at a customer site and is used to provide telephone service internal to the site as well as service to the outside world via the PSTN. An IP-PBX is a similar device which contains a connection to the Internet as well as the traditional connections to the PSTN; it is thus capable of connecting calls, either via the Internet or the PSTN. A Centrex system performs a service similar to a PBX; in this case, however, the equipment performing the switching function is located with the local telephone service provider. Centrex service provides a customer with “PBX-like” capabilities but on a fully outsourced basis. An IP-Centrex system also contains a connection to the Internet; it is thus capable of connecting calls, either via the Internet or the PSTN. In the provision of telephone service, all telephones and PBX's within a local area are connected to a central switching facility called a Central Office (CO). The CO provides connectivity for telephones within the local area; it also connects calls to areas beyond the local area via the PSTN. An IP-CO is connected to the Internet as well as the PSTN, allowing it to complete calls beyond the local area by either type of network. An IP-CO may be utilized by a local phone company or by an alternative network carrier like a cable TV company to provide IP based communication services.
  • [0040]
    The “directory service” (DS) is a directory that resides on a data network such as the Internet. It converts “unique identifiers” (for example, standard telephone numbers) into corresponding network addresses (for example, IP addresses). The service allows a communication system (for example, an IP-PBX) to utilize the Internet as a communication carrier alternative to the PSTN, while allowing end users to utilize non-Internet related unique identifiers (e.g., telephone numbers) as a common addressing scheme. The location of the physical directory may be centralized or distributed on the data network according to the needs of the users, the provider of the DS (e.g., a commercial entity that maintains and bills for registration and/or access to the DS), or the technology employed.
  • [0041]
    Examples of communication systems that could utilize the DS to convert a unique identifier into an Internet Address include, among others:
  • [0042]
    IP enabled PBX systems
  • [0043]
    IP enabled Centrex systems
  • [0044]
    IP enabled Central Office systems
  • [0045]
    IP enabled telephones
  • [0046]
    IP enabled wireless phones (mobile phone or cell phone)
  • [0047]
    IP enabled voicemail systems
  • [0048]
    IP enabled fax machines
  • [0049]
    Unified messaging systems
  • [0050]
    Remote printing systems
  • [0051]
    Examples of unique identifiers that communication systems might use to identify a station set, person, place or organization include, among others:
  • [0052]
    Telephone numbers
  • [0053]
    Random unique numbers
  • [0054]
    Personal identity codes
  • [0055]
    Social Security Numbers
  • [0056]
    Recorded spoken name
  • [0057]
    Voice prints
  • [0058]
    Finger prints
  • [0059]
    Retina scans
  • [0060]
    In various DS embodiments, one or more of these identifiers are used to search the DS database and locate an associated network address.
  • [0061]
    Examples of data network address information that could be stored in the DS and utilized by various communication systems include, among others:
  • [0062]
    IP (Internet Protocol) addresses
  • [0063]
    SMTP/MIME (Simple Mail Transport Protocol/Multiple Purpose Internet Mail Extension) addresses
  • [0064]
    VPIM (Voice Profile for Internet Mail) addresses
  • [0065]
    A variety of other information may be included in the DS database, such as the following exemplary record of one end user:
  • [0066]
    Full Name
  • [0067]
    Title {Dr., Miss, Mr., Mrs., Ms.}
  • [0068]
    First
  • [0069]
    Middle
  • [0070]
    Last
  • [0071]
    Suffix {I, II, III, Jr., Sr.}
  • [0072]
    Nickname
  • [0073]
    Spoken Name
  • [0074]
    Personal
  • [0075]
    Birthday
  • [0076]
    Spouse's Name
  • [0077]
    Anniversary
  • [0078]
    Photo
  • [0079]
    Company
  • [0080]
    Job Title
  • [0081]
    Employee Type
  • [0082]
    Employee Identifier
  • [0083]
    Department
  • [0084]
    Group
  • [0085]
    Profession
  • [0086]
    Manager
  • [0087]
    Assistant
  • [0088]
    Photo
  • [0089]
    User Name
  • [0090]
    Business Address
  • [0091]
    Street
  • [0092]
    City
  • [0093]
    State/Province
  • [0094]
    Zip/Postal code
  • [0095]
    Country/Region
  • [0096]
    Mail Stop
  • [0097]
    Building/Floor
  • [0098]
    Office Number
  • [0099]
    Home Address
  • [0100]
    Street
  • [0101]
    City
  • [0102]
    State/Province
  • [0103]
    Zip/Postal code
  • [0104]
    Country/Region
  • [0105]
    Other Address
  • [0106]
    Street
  • [0107]
    City
  • [0108]
    State/Province
  • [0109]
    Zip/Postal code
  • [0110]
    Country/Region
  • [0111]
    Business Phone
  • [0112]
    Business Mobile
  • [0113]
    Business Fax
  • [0114]
    Business Pager
  • [0115]
    Home Phone
  • [0116]
    Home Mobile
  • [0117]
    Home Fax
  • [0118]
    E-mail Address
  • [0119]
    Web Address
  • [0120]
    VPIM Address
  • [0121]
    VoIP Address
  • [0122]
    Certificates/Digital ID's
  • [0123]
    [0123]FIG. 2 illustrates an example of such a record stored in the directory service. The information in each record would be indexed (mapped) to enable searching and resolution of requests based on various combinations of inputs/outputs.
  • [0124]
    The DS database may also contain information related to the destination (addressed) communication systems or devices. For example, the unique identifier (telephone number) may correspond to an IP enabled fax machine. In this case, the database would, in responding to the inquiry, include information indicating the nature of the destination machine and the required format of the communication (i.e., TIFF). As another example, the unique identifier may correspond to a networked printer. In this case, the database response would include the proper printer format for the communication. More generally, each type of communication system may have a unique formatting requirement for the communication it receives. The DS, in responding to an inquiry, will so notify the inquirer (source) to be sure the communication is properly formatted for the receiving system.
  • [0125]
    [0125]FIG. 3 is a diagram of one embodiment of the directory service (DS) 12 comprising a computer that contains a database 19 (of records 24) and associated interface modules including HTTP module 13, LDAP module 15, and DNS module 17. The interface modules contain programs for accessing the database and interfacing with various communication applications that utilize the directory service. In this regard, HTTP stands for Hypertext Transport Protocol, LDAP stands for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, and DNS stands for Domain Name System. All of these well-known communication protocols enable communication systems to contact the DS; this will be described in greater detail below in regard to FIG. 5.
  • [0126]
    Two end users in FIG. 3 are represented schematically as a source communication application IP-PBX A (26), and a destination IP-PBX B (an IP-PBX is a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) containing a connection to the Internet). The source A and destination B are connected to one another through the Internet 10. Dashed lines 29 denote that each IP-PBX 26 and 28 is a Private Branch Exchange residing on a customer premises, as opposed to being a part of the public Internet 10. An IP-PBX is just one example of a communication system that may access the DS to resolve a destination telephone number into an associated Internet address. The DS may return different address information for the same unique identifier based on the type of communication application accessing the service, the contents of the request, and/or the information contained in the directory for a particular end user. FIG. 5 illustrates various such communication systems including PBX system 50, voicemail system 52, unified messaging system 54, and remote printing system 56. In addition, end user 58, singly and/or as an administrator 60 of a group of end users, has access to the DS to enable registration and updating of records 24 in database 19.
  • [0127]
    Thus, the DS accepts a standard telephone number and returns an Internet address for a destination communication system or device, along with other pertinent destination information if available. The directory service supports a variety of applications and/or services including those described in summary form below; additional details are provided later in this specification.
  • [0128]
    Voice Messaging Application
  • [0129]
    Sending a Voicemail Message Via A Data Network
  • [0130]
    User A at Company A desires to send a voicemail message to User B at Company B. User A accesses his voice mail system (VMS) and via a telephone keypad, enters a unique identifier (for example, a telephone number) corresponding to the recipient, User B, and records a message. The VMS A at Company A must now arrange for the transport of the message to VMS B at Company B. VMS A first reviews its internal database to determine if it contains an Internet address (for example, a VPIM address) corresponding to the unique identifier entered by User A. If it does not, it contacts the DS via the Internet for the information. Using the Internet address obtained from the DS, VMS A sends the recorded message via the Internet to the recipient, User B, at VMS B. Note that the PSTN is nowhere engaged in this transaction, thus all time dependent telecommunication charges normally associated with placing a telephone call are avoided.
  • [0131]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. A voice mail system, by design serving a limited constituency, likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the VPIM addresses it requires to complete calls. The DS, accessible through the Internet, contains a comprehensive database of such addresses and makes them available to all registered users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a VPIM address. The DS thus allows communication links to be established over the Internet between disparate communication systems while allowing end users to utilize unique identifiers such as PSTN telephone numbers as an addressing mechanism.
  • [0132]
    Forwarding, Broadcasting or Replying to a Voicemail Message Over a Data Network
  • [0133]
    Just as in the previous example of “sending a voicemail message”, all forms of voice messaging over the Internet require that a VMS convert a unique identifier like a telephone number into an appropriate Internet address. In all voice messaging applications, the DS invention solves an addressing problem of converting a unique identifier into the Internet address necessary to support the voice messaging application. In these examples, the DS, accessible through the Internet, contains a comprehensive database of VPIM addresses and makes them available to all registered users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a VPIM address.
  • [0134]
    IP-PBX Application
  • [0135]
    An IP-PBX is an Internet Protocol enabled Private Branch Exchange telephone system that is capable of setting up telephone calls either over the Internet using IP technology or over the Public Switched Telephone Network using circuit switched technology. Alternatively, an IP-telephone is a telephone device that is also capable of sending and receiving telephone calls using the Internet or the PSTN.
  • [0136]
    User A, connected to an IP-PBX phone system, dials a telephone number for a destination party located outside of User A's IP-PBX phone system. The IP-PBX first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding IP address is available for the destination IP-telephone or IP-PBX. Finding none, it then consults the DS via the Internet for the required information. Other supporting information may also be requested including: a list of relevant communication protocols, spoken name of the destination party, etc. If the IP address is available, the Internet is used to connect the call, bypassing the PSTN and its associated time dependent costs.
  • [0137]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. An IP-PBX, by design serving a limited constituency, likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the IP addresses it requires to complete calls. The DS, accessible through the Internet, will contain a comprehensive database of IP addresses and make them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a IP address.
  • [0138]
    IP-Centrex Application
  • [0139]
    An IP-Centrex system is capable of setting up telephone calls either over the Internet using IP technology or over the Public Switched Telephone Network using circuit switched technology.
  • [0140]
    User A, connected to an IP-Centrex phone system, dials a telephone number for a destination party located outside of User A's IP-Centrex phone system. The IP-Centrex system first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding IP address is available for an IP-enabled telephone system at the destination. Finding none, it then consults the DS via the Internet for the required information. Other supporting information may also be requested from the DS including: a list of relevant communication protocols supported by the destination, spoken name of the destination party, etc. If an IP address is available, the Internet is used to connect the call, bypassing the PSTN and its associated time dependent costs.
  • [0141]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. An IP-Centrex system by design, serving a limited constituency, likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the IP addresses it requires to complete calls. The DS, accessible through the Internet, will contain a comprehensive database of IP addresses and make them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a IP address. The DS thus allows communication links to be established over the Internet between disparate communication systems while allowing end users to utilize unique identifiers such as PSTN telephone numbers as an addressing mechanism.
  • [0142]
    IP Central Office (IP-CO) Application
  • [0143]
    An IP-CO is an Internet Protocol enabled Central Office telephone system that is capable of setting up telephone calls either over the Internet using IP technology or over the Public Switched Telephone Network using circuit switched technology.
  • [0144]
    User A, connected to an IP-CO telephone switch, dials a telephone number for a destination party located outside of User A's IP-CO local calling area. The IP-CO first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding IP-address is available for an IP-enabled telephone system at the destination. Finding none, the IP-CO then consults the DS via the Internet for the required information. Other supporting information may also be requested including: a list of relevant communication protocols, spoken name of the destination party, etc. If an IP-address is available, the Internet is used to connect the call, bypassing the PSTN and its associated time dependent costs.
  • [0145]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. An IP-CO, by design, serving a limited constituency, likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the IP addresses it requires to complete calls. The DS, accessible through the Internet, will contain a comprehensive database of IP addresses and make them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a IP address. The DS thus allows communication links to be established over the Internet between disparate communication systems while allowing end users to utilize unique identifiers such as PSTN telephone numbers as an addressing mechanism.
  • [0146]
    IP-Telephone Application
  • [0147]
    An IP-telephone is a telephone device that is capable of sending and receiving communications using the Internet or the PSTN for connectivity to other systems. The IP-telephone may be either a wireline or a wireless variety.
  • [0148]
    Using a standard PSTN number, User A dials a telephone number for a destination party. The IP-telephone first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding IP-address is available for the destination system. Finding none, it then consults the DS via the Internet for the required information. Other information required to complete the communication may also be requested at this time (i.e., a list of relevant communications protocols supported by the receiver). If the IP address is available, the Internet is used to connect the call, bypassing the PSTN and its associated time dependent costs.
  • [0149]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. An IP-telephone likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the IP addresses it requires to complete calls. The DS, accessible through the Internet, will contain a comprehensive database of IP addresses and make them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into a IP address.
  • [0150]
    Unified-Messaging Application
  • [0151]
    A unified messaging application is a communication system that allows end-users to access multiple forms of messages through either a common PC interface or a common telephone interface. Some of the more prevalent features of unified messaging applications are the ability to retrieve both e-mail and voicemail messages over the phone and the ability to send both e-mail and voicemail messages to destinations over the Internet in an e-mail format. Spoken e-mail is a term that refers to a voice message that is sent to a destination in an e-mail format—hence “spoken” e-mail.
  • [0152]
    User A accesses a unified-messaging system or application to send, forward or broadcast a spoken e-mail message to a destination party(s), User B. User A records a voice message and enters a telephone number to identify User B. The unified-messaging application first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding Internet e-mail address is available for the destination telephone number(s) entered by User A. Finding none, the unified-messaging system accesses the DS via the Internet to determine if an e-mail address corresponding to the telephone number(s) is available for the destination party. At the same time, the unified-messaging system may request message format options acceptable to the destination communication system. If an e-mail address is available, the unified-messaging system formats the spoken e-mail message in a format that is acceptable to the destination e-mail system and sends the message via a data network to the destination e-mail address.
  • [0153]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. A unified-messaging application likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the world's Internet e-mail addresses it requires to complete message transmissions. The DS, accessible through the Internet, contains a comprehensive database of such addresses and makes them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number into an e-mail address.
  • [0154]
    Remote Printing Application
  • [0155]
    This application allows a document transmitted over the Internet to appear in printed form at the destination location. This contrasts with another well-known messaging application, e-mail, in which the message appears at the destination in electronic format and is viewed on a display device such as a CRT or LCD display. In this latter case, a printed version of the document requires discrete action on the part of the receiver. Several alternative versions of this application are possible:
  • [0156]
    A user inserts a document into a standalone networked scanning device (for example, a Hewlett-Packard Digital Sender) and keys in a destination telephone number. The scanner first accesses its internal directory to determine if a corresponding Internet address is available for a destination printer assigned to the telephone number entered by the user. Finding none, it then consults the DS via the Internet for the IP address of a printer associated with the keyed-in telephone number. At the same time it may request the requisite printer driver information for the destination printer. The device then scans the document, formats it properly, and sends it via the Internet to the destination printer. The printer prints the document. At no time does the document reside at the destination in electronic format.
  • [0157]
    Alternative 1. The destination telephone number is that of a network enabled fax machine. When contacted, the DS relays this fact as well as the requisite IP address to the scanner. The scanner formats the document as a fax (for example, as a TIFF file) and sends it via the Internet to the destination fax machine. At no time is the PSTN utilized in the transaction; thus all associated time-dependent telephone charges are avoided.
  • [0158]
    Alternative 2. The source of the document is a PC. The document may be in any electronic format (e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel or image format such as TIFF or a bitmap). An application on the PC allows the user to request that the document be printed at the destination rather than appear in electronic format such as e-mail. The user inputs a unique identifier (for example, a telephone number) corresponding to the individual who is destined to receive the document. Using the Internet, the application on the PC relays the unique identifier to the DS along with a request for printer information. The DS responds with the IP address and related driver information of a printer proximate to the person owning the unique identifier. The PC application properly formats the document and sends it via the Internet to the destination printer. In addition, it may create a cover sheet for the document and include the name of the recipient, the number of pages in the document, a short message and other relevant information. The destination output device in this alternative may also be a fax machine, as described above.
  • [0159]
    The DS invention solves an addressing problem in this application. A remote printing application likely contains in its memory only a small fraction of the addresses it requires to complete message transmissions. The DS, accessible through the Internet, contains a comprehensive database of such addresses and makes them available to all users of the service. Moreover, it is capable of translating any unique identifier into an address format specific to the needs of the receiving machine—in this case, translating a telephone number or e-mail address into the IP address required to access the destination printer. Further, the DS provides to the sender the appropriate printer drivers required by the destination printer.
  • [0160]
    Web Registration/Administration
  • [0161]
    A variety of mechanisms are available to accomplish the registration and administration of end user telephone numbers, IP addresses and other information within the directory. Two registration modes will be considered—bulk and individual. Bulk registration of telephone numbers and associated information provides the ability to supply the directory service with potentially large quantities of data. The information is first transformed into one of the supported directory service file formats (comma delimitated, LDIF); it is then transferred to the DS using either File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or specially designed capabilities on the DS Web site. Registration and administration of individual users is accomplished by commonly accepted means from a DS Web site.
  • [0162]
    Resolving Telephone Numbers to IP Addresses
  • [0163]
    In one embodiment of the invention, the unique identifier submitted to the directory service is a PSTN telephone number; this is resolved (translated) by the system into a related Internet address. Fortunately, the format of telephone numbers worldwide adhere to a standard controlled by International Telecommunications Union (ITU) standard E.164. This standard helps make the DS resolution (translation) task predictable and thus minimizes its complexity. For example, an E.164 telephone number has a hierarchical structure, arranged in terms of country code which is 1 to 3 digits long, followed by a national designation. The national designation is defined by the particular country's numbering plan.
  • [0164]
    Earlier, a DNS interface to the DS was discussed as a viable access mechanism. However, a tractable system to enable translation of an E.164 telephone number with DS software requires the creation of a new name space or domain on the Internet. Ideally this would be a new generic top-level domain called “.tel” (i.e., the equivalent of .com or .gov). The Internet Corporation for Assignment of Names and Numbers (ICANN) controls the assignment of Root Domain Servers and the Generic Top Level Domains. Existing Generic Top Level Domains include:
    .com commercial business
    .org non-profit organizations
    .net networks
    .edu educational institutions
    .gov government bodies
    .mil military
  • [0165]
    ICANN, accessible via the Internet at www.icann.org, can be petitioned to adopt tel as an additional generic top level domain. As an alternative, the DNS component of the DS can be implemented by using a sub-domain within one of the existing Generic Top Level Domains with no approval required by ICANN.
  • [0166]
    The format of a standard E.164 telephone number can be modified for use by DNS software. By reversing the order of the elements, the DS will resolve from the most specific to the most general. By separating each digit in the national designation, one may construct an appropriate protocol without regard to or knowledge of nationally specific numbering plans. For example, in one system to translate the telephone number 1-800-555-1212 into an address, the software reverses the E.164 elements (i.e., country code, area code, local exchange and extension) and appends the “.tel” generic top level domain identifier. The resulting DS domain name address becomes: “2.1.2.1.5.5.5.0.0.8.1.tel”. Alternatively, the DS would also accept the format: “8005551212.1.tel”.
  • [0167]
    A directory interface based upon LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) provides another mechanism for efficient resolution of a telephone number into an Internet address. LDAP systems are typically used where quick responses to requests and retrieval of relatively small amounts of information are required. Additionally, the information is expected to change very little over time (i.e., the information is static). By way of example, in a private corporate network, LDAP has been used for accessing a database of employee information—e.g., a first user enters a coworker's name; the LDAP directory responds by providing information such as the email address of the coworker, his/her office location, a picture of the coworker, how many years the coworker has been employed by the corporation, etc.
  • [0168]
    To resolve a telephone number into an Internet address, the LDAP software will also reverse the E.164 elements, but in this case, it need not append the “.tel” generic top level domain. In the above example the LDAP address will have the form: CC=1, ED=8, ED=0, ED=0, ED=5, ED=5, ED=5, ED=1, ED=2, ED=1, ED=2, where ED=E.164 digit and CC=country code. LDAP would also accept the format: CC=1, NSP=8005551212 where NSP=Nationally Significant Part.
  • [0169]
    Implementation
  • [0170]
    The DS can be configured to run under Sun Cluster 2.1 Software on a group of Sun Enterprise Class Computer Servers using RAID (redundant array of independent discs) based storage devices (available from Sun Microsystems, Inc., 901 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto, Calif. 94303 USA). These systems may be housed in an Internet Data Center with fully redundant subsystems, such as multiple fiber trunks coming from multiple sources, redundant power supplies, and backup power generators. The DS site may also utilize firewall technology to securely protect the information stored in the DS. Such systems are commonly used in application such as those described herein. Many variations will be apparent to those skilled in this art.
  • [0171]
    By way of example, FIG. 4 shows two Sun Enterprise 4500 computer servers, each having 4-400 Mhz processors, 4 gigabytes (GB) of memory and 18 GB of internal disk/storage. These are connected through a Cisco Catalyst 5000 switch (available from Cisco Systems, Inc., San Jose, Calif. USA) to various Sun 420R devices, each having 2-450 Mhz processors, 2 GB of memory, and 18 GB of internal disk/storage. Two of these 420R devices are used for each of the DNS, LDAP, and HTTP software. A Cisco Local Director 38 is connected to the switch 34, and a Sun storage array 5200, having 200 GB internal disk is connected to each of the Sun computer servers 30, 32. This selection and arrangement of hardware and software for implementing the directory service is given by way of example only and not intended to limit the scope of the present invention.
  • [0172]
    Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) provides efficient transport in packet-based networks. LDAP software components are available off-the-shelf from a variety of sources. A recent release of LDAP, known as Oracle Internet Directory (OID) version 3 compatible LDAP directory, is a super-scalable version which permits a very large number of database entries (available from Oracle, 500 Oracle Parkway, Redwood City, Calif. 94065, USA). Any of the IP-PBX, voice mail, unified messaging and remote printing applications may contact the directory service using LDAP. The application accesses the directory service by making a function call to an external LDAP directory.
  • [0173]
    These same applications can also update the directory service with an up-to-date list of phone numbers and associated IP address information via an LDAP interface. This LDAP directory update software can be used to perform routine add/change/delete updates with the directory service.
  • [0174]
    To enable easy access to the information in the directory, one needs to know the structure of the directory database. The following resources can be used for designing an interface which accepts LDAP queries to the directory service: Java Server Pager (JSP); Java Servlet, Apache Web Server; Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI).
  • [0175]
    Sequence Diagrams Illustrating Access to Directory Service
  • [0176]
    [0176]FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of various communications applications, e.g., IP-PBX 50, voicemail 52, unified messages 54, and remote printing 56, along with end user 58 and administrator 60, each of which can access DS 12 by one or more Internet communication protocols including DNS, LDAP, and HTTP. In this embodiment, the DS 12 includes a name service module 62, accessible on line 51 with DNS messages from IP-PBX 50. It further includes LDAP service module 66 connected by each of lines 49, 53, 55 and 57 to each of IP-PBX 50, voicemail 52, unified messaging 54 and remote printing 56. It further includes web service module 72 accessible on each of lines 59 and 61 with HTTP messages from end user 58 and administrator 60. Within DS 12, web service 72 sends LDAP messages on line 73 to LDAP service module 66. A synchronization utility module 64 synchronizes the address information in each of name service 62 and LDAP service 66. Billing module 68 sends/receives LDAP messages on line 67 to/from LDAP service module 66. A bulk load utility module 70, used for registering large numbers of telephone numbers and associated Internet addresses into the database, receives various electronic messages from web service module 72 on line 71, and sends LDIF data on line 69 to LDAP service module 66. The database 19, of registered telephone numbers and associated Internet addresses, sends and receives messages on line 75 to and from LDAP service 66.
  • [0177]
    The flow charts of FIGS. 6-9 will be used to illustrate the sequence of operations and functionality of the various aforementioned components of DS 12.
  • [0178]
    IP-PBX Performs Destination IP Address Lookup
  • [0179]
    As illustrated in FIG. 6, the IP-PBX (50 in FIG. 5) connects to a top-level domain name system (DNS) service (62 in FIG. 5) to obtain the IP address of the LDAP service (66 in FIG. 5) based on a dialed telephone number. The dialed telephone number is supplied by an end user connected to the IP-PBX 50. The DNS service 62 returns the associated IP address of LDAP service 66 and logs the activity. Once IP-PBX 50 has successfully retrieved the IP address of the LDAP directory, it closes the connection to the DNS server 62 and opens a connection to the LDAP service 66. It then sends a request to resolve the telephone number of the destination IP-PBX to its associated IP address, by querying the LDAP service. The LDAP service retrieves the destination IP-PBX address from database 1.9, and logs the activity. The source IP-PBX 50 then closes the connection to DS 12 and continues to process a call to destination IP-PBX with the associated IP address.
  • [0180]
    Voicemail Performs Destination VPIM Address Lookup
  • [0181]
    In the flow chart of FIG. 7, a source voicemail system accesses the DNS service, similar to the process described with respect to the source IP-PBX system in FIG. 6. Although this connection is not illustrated in FIG. 5, it will be otherwise described with regard to the flow chart of FIG. 7.
  • [0182]
    The voicemail system (52 of FIG. 5) connects to the top level DNS server 62 to obtain the IP address of the LDAP service 66 based on a dialed telephone number—this is the same procedure as described with respect to FIG. 6. The DNS service returns the IP address and logs the activity. Once the voicemail system has successfully retrieved the IP address of the LDAP directory, it closes the connection to the DNS service and opens a connection to the LDAP service 66. It then sends a request to resolve a telephone number to the VPIM address of the destination mailbox by querying the LDAP service 66. VPIM is a standard protocol, Voice Profile for Internet Mail (VPIM), developed by the Electronic Messaging Association (EMA), a group of independent voicemail and e-mail manufacturers. VPIM allows different voicemail systems to transfer messages to one another, even if each VMS is made by a different manufacturer with its own proprietary protocol. VPIM is built on top of the enhanced Simple Mail Transport Protocol/Multiple Purpose Internet Mail Extension (SMTP/MIME) that allows each VMS to send and receive messages, such as voice messages, to one another over the Internet. The LDAP service 66 retrieves the destination VPIM address from database 19, and logs the activity. The voicemail system 52 closes the connection and continues processing the voicemail message for transmission on the Internet to the destination voicemail system.
  • [0183]
    Although not explicitly described herein, the unified messaging system 54 and remote printing system 56 can utilize similar flow sequences for resolving destination telephone numbers to destination Internet addresses.
  • [0184]
    Administrator Bulk Loads Entries to DS Database
  • [0185]
    [0185]FIG. 8 is a flow sequence which illustrates the steps which occur when an administrator (60 in FIG. 5) registers a large number of telephone numbers and associated Internet addresses, into database 19.
  • [0186]
    Administrator 60 accesses DS 12 via the web service 72. The administrator provides a user name and password via a secure connection to web service 72. The user name and password are authenticated by LDAP service 66 and the web service then creates a session for the user. Next, the web service retrieves a user entry form from the LDAP service 66 and displays it back to the administrator. The administrator now uploads a bulk user entry file to the web service. The web service 72 inserts the file into the bulk load utilities module 70 for batch processing. The web service then displays to the administrator a job number and indication that the administrator will be notified when processing is complete. The bulk load utility 70 begins processing the entry by reformatting the file into LDIF format and verifying its contents. The data is then loaded into the LDAP service 66 and notification sent to the administrator when complete.
  • [0187]
    In the embodiment of FIG. 5, the bulk load utility 70 receives a file from web service 72, determines the format, and converts it to an LDIF format; it then sends the LDIF data to LDAP service 66. In an alternative embodiment, an administrator 60 may send an LDIF file directly to web service 72, in which case conversion is not required. As a further alternative, in cases where it is only required to update a few records in DS 12, an end user or administrator may send LDAP requests directly to the LDAP service 66.
  • [0188]
    End User Updates A User Entry
  • [0189]
    [0189]FIG. 9 illustrates a flow sequence for an end user updating a user entry via a web interface.
  • [0190]
    An end user (58 in FIG. 5) accesses the DS 12 via web service 72 and provides a user name and password via a secure connection. The user name and password are authenticated by the LDAP service 66 and the web service 72 creates a session for the user. Next, the web service retrieves a user entry (record) from the LDAP service 66 and displays it back to the user. The user now modifies the contents of the entry and submits the changes back to the web service. The web service validates the contents of the entry and updates the LDAP service. The web service displays a successful completion of the update. The end user then logs off the web service, the web service ends the session and displays to the end user the successful log-off operation. In the above embodiment, the source communication application can send either a DNS or an LDAP request message to the DS 12. Two sources of data are maintained in the DS 12, namely data in name service 62 and data in LDAP service 66. Synchronization of the data is achieved by the synchronization utility 64. This is accomplished by translating LDAP database entries to Bind 8 DNS zone files. In an alternative embodiment, the DS may have only one source of data. In this alternative example, the DNS request would be translated to an LDAP request and forwarded to the LDAP service 66, while the DNS service 62 waited for a response. The billing module 68 (see FIG. 5) accesses the LDAP service 66 for a log of activity, e.g., number of each users requests for resolution over a given time period. The billing module 68 may then send each user a bill based on the amount of their access. In an alternative embodiment, a monthly registration fee may be charged to a user. Other aspects, advantages, and modifications are also within the scope of the following claims.
  • [0191]
    For example, a computer system provides a directory service over a public computer network, the system including a computer connected to the public computer network which performs the following functions:
  • [0192]
    a) receiving an electronic transmission with at least one telephone number and associated public network address from one or more users;
  • [0193]
    b) entering in a database that is accessible to users via the public computer network, the at least one telephone number and associated public network address; and
  • [0194]
    c) maintaining the database for a predetermined time period during which users may submit requests for resolution of the telephone number to the associated public network address.
  • [0195]
    The computer may be a computer server, and the public computer network may be the Internet. A user may access entries from the database. The computer may include at least one interface for receiving electronic transmissions from multiple communication systems, including two or more of IP-PBX, IP-CO, IP-Centrex, IP-telephone, IP-wireless phone, IP-voicemail, IP-fax, unified messaging and remote printing systems. The computer may also include a web site which provides information on the database to users.
  • [0196]
    In another embodiment, a computer apparatus for a directory service resolves a telephone number to an associated Internet address. The apparatus includes a computer having a CPU and a memory operatively connected to the CPU. The apparatus also includes at least one interface process, adapted for communicating with the computer, for transmitting to the computer a request for resolution of a telephone number to an associated Internet address. The memory in the computer contains a program, adapted to be executed by the CPU, for resolving the request. The computer receives the request from the interface process and resolves the request.
  • [0197]
    In yet another embodiment, a method provides a directory service for resolving a telephone number to an Internet address, including the steps of:
  • [0198]
    inputting to a computer via a communication system, a request for resolution of a telephone number to an associated Internet address;
  • [0199]
    executing a program on the computer to resolve the request; and
  • [0200]
    outputting the resolved Internet address from the computer to the communication system.
  • [0201]
    In yet another embodiment, a system provides a directory service and includes:
  • [0202]
    establishing by a customer an account with a provider of the directory service (DS);
  • [0203]
    registering telephone numbers and associated Internet addresses in the DS;
  • [0204]
    accessing the DS for resolution of a registered telephone number to an associated Internet address; and
  • [0205]
    billing customers for accessibility to the DS.
  • [0206]
    In yet another embodiment, a method comprises:
  • [0207]
    registering a unique identifier and associated network address with a directory service (DS), the DS being accessible via a public data network; and
  • [0208]
    accessing the DS via the public data network with a request for resolution of the unique identifier to the associated network address, wherein the DS resolves the associated network address.
  • [0209]
    In yet another embodiment, a system comprises:
  • [0210]
    an external directory service (DS) accessible via a public data network;
  • [0211]
    the DS comprising registered unique identifiers and associated data network addresses; and
  • [0212]
    an interface for the DS allowing multiple communication systems to access the DS.
  • [0213]
    In yet another embodiment, a computer system provides a DS over a public data network and includes a computer connected to the public data network which performs the following functions:
  • [0214]
    a) receiving an electronic message with at least one unique identifier and associated network address from one or more users;
  • [0215]
    b) entering in a database that is accessible to users via the public data network, the electronic message, and
  • [0216]
    c) maintaining the database for a predetermined time period during which users may submit requests for resolution of the unique identifier to the associated network address.
  • [0217]
    Other aspects, advantages, and modifications are also within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (16)

1. A system comprising:
a directory service (DS), accessible via the Internet, containing unique identifiers and associated Internet addresses.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the unique identifiers are telephone numbers.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein the DS is accessible to multiple communication systems including two or more of IP-PBX, IP-CO, IP-Centrex, IP-telephone, IP-wireless phone, IP-voicemail, IP-fax, unified messaging, and remote printing systems.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the Internet address is for at least one of a telephone, voice mailbox, fax machine, printer, and unified messaging mailbox.
5. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes a first Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) PBX system for a first end user and a second IP-enabled PBX system for a second end user.
6. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes a first Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) voicemail system for a first end user and a second IP-enabled voicemail system for a second end user.
7. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes an Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) remote printing system for a first end user and at least one of an IP-enabled fax machine and IP-enabled printer for a second user.
8. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes a first Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) unified messaging system for a first end user and at least one of an IP enabled e-mail system of an IP-enabled unified messaging system for a second end user.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes a first Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) Centrex system for a first end user and a second IP-enabled Centrex system for a second end user.
10. The system of claim 1, wherein the system includes a first Internet Protocol enabled (IP-enabled) CO system for a first end user and a second IP-enabled CO system for a second end user.
11-21. (Canceled)
22. A method comprising:
registering a telephone number and associated Internet address with a directory service (DS), the DS being accessible via the Internet; and
accessing the DS via the Internet with a request for resolution of the telephone number to an associated Internet address, wherein the DS resolves the associated Internet address.
23. The method of claim 22, wherein more than one Internet address is associated with a single telephone number and the request for resolution includes identifying the type of application requesting Internet address information.
24. The method of claim 22, wherein the method is provided to multiple users, allowing users to register with the DS at no cost, but requiring users that access the DS with requests for resolution to pay a fee.
25-56. (Canceled)
57 A method enabling communications between end users, the end users having access to Internet-enabled communications systems, at least one destination end user having a non-Internet related unique identifier associated with multiple Internet addresses for different Internet-enabled communications systems and the method including the steps of:
providing a directory service (DS), residing on a data network, containing the unique identifiers and associated Internet addresses; and
one of the end users causing a communications application to send to the DS a request for resolution containing the one unique identifier for the destination end user;
the DS resolving the one unique identifier to one of the multiple Internet addresses based on information contained within the request to determine which one Internet address is associated with a given communications system; and
wherein end users are charged for registering with the DS.
US10860065 1998-06-05 2004-06-04 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet Abandoned US20040218747A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09092764 US6292799B1 (en) 1998-06-05 1998-06-05 Method and apparatus to automatically address a voice mail reply to a voice mail message
US22690199 true 1999-01-08 1999-01-08
US09456646 US6539077B1 (en) 1998-06-05 1999-12-08 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US10302882 US6748057B2 (en) 1998-06-05 2002-11-25 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US10860065 US20040218747A1 (en) 1998-06-05 2004-06-04 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10860065 US20040218747A1 (en) 1998-06-05 2004-06-04 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10302882 Continuation US6748057B2 (en) 1998-06-05 2002-11-25 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20040218747A1 true true US20040218747A1 (en) 2004-11-04

Family

ID=46279544

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09456646 Active US6539077B1 (en) 1998-06-05 1999-12-08 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US10302882 Active US6748057B2 (en) 1998-06-05 2002-11-25 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US10860065 Abandoned US20040218747A1 (en) 1998-06-05 2004-06-04 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09456646 Active US6539077B1 (en) 1998-06-05 1999-12-08 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US10302882 Active US6748057B2 (en) 1998-06-05 2002-11-25 Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US6539077B1 (en)

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030016661A1 (en) * 2001-07-18 2003-01-23 Emerson Harry E. Telephone switching system for integrating the internet with the public switched telephone network
US20060256789A1 (en) * 2006-08-17 2006-11-16 Fonality, Inc. Mobile use of a PBX system
US20070217437A1 (en) * 1999-06-14 2007-09-20 Forte Stephen P Method and apparatus for communicating with one of plural devices associated with a single telephone number during a disaster and disaster recovery
US20080037756A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2008-02-14 Christine Baumeister Enhanced directory assistance system with voice over IP call handling
US20080222656A1 (en) * 2007-03-09 2008-09-11 Lyman Christopher M System and method for event driven browser launch
US20090037471A1 (en) * 2005-09-28 2009-02-05 One Smart Star Limited Communicating with business customers
US20100146394A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Morris Robert P Methods, Systems, And Computer Program Products For Browsing Using A Geospatial Map Metaphor
US20100174807A1 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-07-08 Fonality, Inc. System and method for providing configuration synchronicity
US20100232585A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Lyman Christopher M System and Method for Utilizing Customer Data in a Communication System
US20100232433A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Morris Robert P Methods And Systems For Resolving A First Node Identifier In A First Identifier Domain Space To A Second Node Identifier In A Second Identifier Domain Space
WO2011003632A1 (en) * 2009-07-08 2011-01-13 Onering S.R.L. Device for collecting and managing documents and for controlling viewing thereof and method for using the device
US20110043867A1 (en) * 2009-02-05 2011-02-24 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Facsimile machine, control method therefor, and control program therefor
US8379832B1 (en) 2007-05-03 2013-02-19 Fonality, Inc. Universal queuing for inbound communications
WO2013142531A1 (en) * 2012-03-20 2013-09-26 Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. Method for converging telephone number and ip address
US8976952B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2015-03-10 Fonality, Inc. Intelligent presence management in a communication routing system

Families Citing this family (209)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6154445A (en) 1996-04-18 2000-11-28 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Telephony communication via varied redundant networks
US6069890A (en) * 1996-06-26 2000-05-30 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Internet telephone service
US9134398B2 (en) 1996-09-09 2015-09-15 Tracbeam Llc Wireless location using network centric location estimators
US9538493B2 (en) 2010-08-23 2017-01-03 Finetrak, Llc Locating a mobile station and applications therefor
US7764231B1 (en) 1996-09-09 2010-07-27 Tracbeam Llc Wireless location using multiple mobile station location techniques
US6236365B1 (en) 1996-09-09 2001-05-22 Tracbeam, Llc Location of a mobile station using a plurality of commercial wireless infrastructures
US6618366B1 (en) * 1997-12-05 2003-09-09 The Distribution Systems Research Institute Integrated information communication system
US6078582A (en) 1996-12-18 2000-06-20 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Internet long distance telephone service
US6574216B1 (en) * 1997-03-11 2003-06-03 Verizon Services Corp. Packet data network voice call quality monitoring
US6870827B1 (en) 1997-03-19 2005-03-22 Verizon Services Corp. Voice call alternative routing through PSTN and internet networks
US9875492B2 (en) * 2001-05-22 2018-01-23 Dennis J. Dupray Real estate transaction system
US6137869A (en) 1997-09-16 2000-10-24 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Network session management
US6539077B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2003-03-25 Netnumber.Com, Inc. Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet
US7522931B2 (en) * 1998-06-05 2009-04-21 Netnumber, Inc. Method and apparatus for accessing a network computer to establish a push-to-talk session
US7277424B1 (en) * 1998-07-21 2007-10-02 Dowling Eric M Method and apparatus for co-socket telephony
FR2788917B1 (en) * 1999-01-22 2001-03-02 Sagem Method for establishment of a communication, through a computer network of the type of the Internet, between two information transmission devices
US6981023B1 (en) 1999-03-09 2005-12-27 Michael Hamilton Message routing
US7002970B1 (en) * 1999-05-19 2006-02-21 Edge Access, Inc. Private dialing plan for voice on a packet-based network
GB2368692B (en) * 1999-06-25 2003-02-12 Jacobs Rimell Ltd Automated provisioning system
US7099301B1 (en) * 1999-07-13 2006-08-29 Innomedia, Inc. Voice over internet protocol proxy gateway
US7092380B1 (en) * 1999-10-22 2006-08-15 Cisco Technology, Inc. Method and system for providing voice communication over data networks
US7716055B1 (en) * 2001-11-01 2010-05-11 West Corporation Apparatus and method for verifying transactions using voice print
US6853713B1 (en) * 1999-12-17 2005-02-08 Nortel Networks Limited Client-server network for managing internet protocol voice packets
JP3420150B2 (en) * 1999-12-27 2003-06-23 エヌイーシーインフロンティア株式会社 Capable of communicating via the Internet telephone communication device and the main telephone controller
US7023572B2 (en) * 2000-02-02 2006-04-04 Raja Singh Tuli Portable high speed internet access device
US20020030843A1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2002-03-14 Tuli Raja Singh Portable high speed internet access device
US6633314B1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2003-10-14 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet device integrating cellular telephone and palm top computer
US7068381B1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2006-06-27 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet access device
US6874009B1 (en) * 2000-02-16 2005-03-29 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet device with user fees
US6731630B1 (en) * 2000-02-29 2004-05-04 3Com Corporation Flexible dial plan for a data network telephony system
US6721790B1 (en) * 2000-03-09 2004-04-13 Avinta Communications, Inc User settable unified workstation identification system
US7301952B2 (en) * 2000-04-06 2007-11-27 The Distribution Systems Research Institute Terminal-to-terminal communication connection control method using IP transfer network
US7200634B2 (en) * 2000-05-10 2007-04-03 Chikka Pte Ltd. Instant messaging account system
KR20030024678A (en) * 2000-05-22 2003-03-26 뉴.넷,아이엔씨. Systems and methods of accessing network resources
US6704304B1 (en) * 2000-06-06 2004-03-09 Lucent Technologies Inc. Selective establishment of telecommunications connections over packet and circuit switched networks
JP3733375B2 (en) * 2000-06-29 2006-01-11 株式会社沖データ Image communication apparatus, an image communication system and image communication method
US6795430B1 (en) * 2000-07-14 2004-09-21 Nortel Networks Limited Service-related signaling between voice over internet protocol servers
US6671355B1 (en) 2000-07-31 2003-12-30 Cisco Technology, Inc. Arrangement for common-format notification delivery messages based on notification device type in an IP-based notification architecture
US6665378B1 (en) * 2000-07-31 2003-12-16 Brenda Gates Spielman IP-based notification architecture for unified messaging
WO2002019652A3 (en) * 2000-08-28 2003-01-16 Ramesh Venkataramaiah System and method for transmitting and retrieving data via a distributed persistence framework
EP1184797A3 (en) * 2000-08-28 2003-11-05 ViaGold Direct Network Limited Network dial-up access servo-system and method
JP3555568B2 (en) * 2000-09-04 2004-08-18 日本電気株式会社 Ip telephone recording system
US20020193096A1 (en) * 2000-09-08 2002-12-19 Dwyer Christopher Brian System and method for permitting maintenance of privacy of main number assigned to wireless device
US20020031115A1 (en) * 2000-09-11 2002-03-14 Petryna Brian J. System and method for automatically establishing a telephone call over a computer network
JP2002101198A (en) * 2000-09-26 2002-04-05 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Internet telephone system
US7191211B2 (en) * 2000-10-03 2007-03-13 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet access device priority protocol
JP3581311B2 (en) * 2000-12-01 2004-10-27 パナソニック コミュニケーションズ株式会社 A transmission control method of a server device and an e-mail
US7212516B1 (en) * 2000-12-22 2007-05-01 Nortel Networks Limited Network spanning heterogeneous call center and method of operation
JP2002215490A (en) * 2001-01-15 2002-08-02 J Data:Kk Address conversion system and address conversion method
US20020115477A1 (en) * 2001-02-13 2002-08-22 Raja Singh Portable high speed internet access device with scrolling
US7328271B2 (en) * 2001-03-05 2008-02-05 Mitel Networks Corporation Method of controlling telephone connections for internet protocol communications
JP4113336B2 (en) * 2001-03-15 2008-07-09 富士通株式会社 Call service providing system
US20020172206A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2002-11-21 Vaman Dhadesugoor R. Method for providing domain name services for heterogeneous transport networks
US20020176611A1 (en) * 2001-05-23 2002-11-28 Dong Mimi C. Fingerprint addressing system and method
US6785686B2 (en) 2001-05-29 2004-08-31 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Method and system for creating and utilizing managed roles in a directory system
US6700884B2 (en) * 2001-06-28 2004-03-02 Emerson, Iii Harry E. Integrating the Internet with the public switched telephone network
US6704305B2 (en) * 2001-06-28 2004-03-09 Emerson, Iii Harry E. Integrated device for integrating the internet with the public switched telephone network
US6928070B2 (en) * 2001-06-28 2005-08-09 Emerson, Iii Harry E. Integrating the internet with the public switched telephone network
US7359987B2 (en) * 2001-07-05 2008-04-15 Enom, Inc. Method and system for providing static addresses for Internet connected devices even if the underlying address is dynamic
US20030014386A1 (en) * 2001-07-16 2003-01-16 Jurado Anthony J. Account management module database interface
US8098651B1 (en) 2001-07-27 2012-01-17 Rockstar Bidco, LP Integrating multimedia capabilities with circuit-switched calls
US6724869B2 (en) * 2001-07-31 2004-04-20 International Business Machines Corporation Multimodal telephone numbers
US7328210B2 (en) * 2001-08-01 2008-02-05 At&T Mobility Ii Llc Attribute rule enforcer for a directory
US7536450B2 (en) * 2001-09-17 2009-05-19 Ricoh Company, Ltd. System, method, and computer program product for sending remote device configuration information to a monitor using e-mail
US7769865B1 (en) 2001-10-16 2010-08-03 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Configuring computer network communications in response to detected firewalls
US7058689B2 (en) 2001-10-16 2006-06-06 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Sharing of still images within a video telephony call
US7046269B2 (en) * 2001-10-16 2006-05-16 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Sharing of prerecorded motion video over an internetwork
US7385621B2 (en) * 2001-10-16 2008-06-10 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Private sharing of computer resources over an internetwork
US7099288B1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2006-08-29 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Telephonic addressing for establishing simultaneous voice and computer network connections
US8868467B2 (en) 2002-10-23 2014-10-21 Oleg Serebrennikov Method for performing transactional communication using a universal transaction account identifier assigned to a customer
US20030108032A1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-12 Noriyasu Kato Line switching method and apparatus, and network device
US7443834B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2008-10-28 Nortel Networks Limited Combining multimedia services with traditional telephony
US7274683B2 (en) * 2002-01-07 2007-09-25 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for a telecommunications network to communicate using an internet protocol
US6947528B1 (en) * 2002-01-29 2005-09-20 Cisco Technology, Inc. Arrangement for local recording of a voice message for delivery to destination messaging system via an IP network
US6920208B1 (en) * 2002-05-03 2005-07-19 At&T Corp. Call tracker
US7320026B2 (en) * 2002-06-27 2008-01-15 At&T Bls Intellectual Property, Inc. Intersystem messaging using ENUM standard
US7646761B2 (en) * 2002-10-01 2010-01-12 Nortel Networks Limited Integrating multimedia capabilities with legacy networks
US7050565B2 (en) * 2002-10-01 2006-05-23 Nortel Networks Limited Multimedia augmented call coverage
US7920546B2 (en) * 2002-10-01 2011-04-05 Nortel Networks Limited Automated attendant multimedia session
JP2004129106A (en) * 2002-10-07 2004-04-22 Murata Mach Ltd E-mail system and its program
JP3976669B2 (en) * 2002-11-28 2007-09-19 Necインフロンティア株式会社 Mobile phones and premises ip phone also serves as adapter
US8176428B2 (en) * 2002-12-03 2012-05-08 Datawind Net Access Corporation Portable internet access device back page cache
KR100475188B1 (en) * 2002-12-13 2005-03-10 삼성전자주식회사 Call control Apparatus in Private Branch eXchange and method therof
US20040125396A1 (en) * 2002-12-19 2004-07-01 James Burke System and method for routing voice/video/fax mail
US7339707B2 (en) * 2002-12-19 2008-03-04 James Burke Method and system for viewing a fax document
JP2006515728A (en) * 2002-12-19 2006-06-01 バーク, ジェイムズBURKE、James Voice mail, and routing the video mail and / or fax mail, a system and method for viewing a fax document
US7283515B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2007-10-16 Managed Inventions, Llc Internet telephony network and methods for using the same
US7406501B2 (en) * 2003-03-24 2008-07-29 Yahoo! Inc. System and method for instant messaging using an e-mail protocol
JP3826107B2 (en) * 2003-04-01 2006-09-27 キヤノン株式会社 Image communication apparatus and a control method thereof, program, and storage medium
JP2004320593A (en) * 2003-04-18 2004-11-11 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc Communication management system and method
JP4480351B2 (en) * 2003-06-12 2010-06-16 Necインフロンティア株式会社 Ip-pbx failure corresponding method of backup system and the same system
CN102509031B (en) * 2003-06-23 2014-12-24 索尼电影娱乐公司 Method for identifying media source, device and system of fingerprint addition
US7548989B2 (en) * 2003-07-01 2009-06-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for maintaining consistency during multi-threaded processing of LDIF data
US7333806B2 (en) * 2003-07-23 2008-02-19 Midland Radio Corporation System and method for enabling two-way radio communications over a computer network
US7529200B2 (en) * 2003-07-24 2009-05-05 3E Technologies International, Inc. Method and system for fast setup of group voice over IP communications
US8103873B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2012-01-24 Emc Corporation Method and system for processing auditory communications
US7499531B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2009-03-03 Emc Corporation Method and system for information lifecycle management
US7444287B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2008-10-28 Emc Corporation Efficient monitoring system and method
US7707037B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2010-04-27 Emc Corporation Archiving of surveillance data
US8229904B2 (en) 2004-07-01 2012-07-24 Emc Corporation Storage pools for information management
US8626514B2 (en) * 2004-08-31 2014-01-07 Emc Corporation Interface for management of multiple auditory communications
US9268780B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2016-02-23 Emc Corporation Content-driven information lifecycle management
US7457396B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2008-11-25 Emc Corporation Automated call management
US8209185B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2012-06-26 Emc Corporation Interface for management of auditory communications
US8180742B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2012-05-15 Emc Corporation Policy-based information management
US20060004579A1 (en) * 2004-07-01 2006-01-05 Claudatos Christopher H Flexible video surveillance
US8244542B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2012-08-14 Emc Corporation Video surveillance
US8180743B2 (en) 2004-07-01 2012-05-15 Emc Corporation Information management
US20050069104A1 (en) * 2003-09-30 2005-03-31 Hanson Karrie J. Call management service
US20050074109A1 (en) * 2003-10-01 2005-04-07 Hanson Karrie J. Integrated personal call management system
US7417981B2 (en) * 2003-10-15 2008-08-26 Vonage Holdings Corp. Method and apparatus for enhanced Internet Telephony
KR100547148B1 (en) * 2003-10-18 2006-01-26 삼성전자주식회사 Communication terminal device adapted to physical characteristics of telecommunications network and method for adapting communication terminal device to physical characteristics of telecommunications network
US7599356B1 (en) 2003-11-03 2009-10-06 At&T Intellectual Property Ii, L.P. System and method of providing a high-quality voice network architecture over IP Centrex
GB0327544D0 (en) * 2003-11-27 2003-12-31 Sharp Kk Remote access system and method
US7356475B2 (en) * 2004-01-05 2008-04-08 Sbc Knowledge Ventures, L.P. System and method for providing access to an interactive service offering
US7617457B2 (en) * 2004-01-07 2009-11-10 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. System and method for collaborative call management
WO2005069538A1 (en) * 2004-01-07 2005-07-28 Deltel, Inc./Pbnext Method and apparatus for telecommunication system
KR100602638B1 (en) * 2004-01-20 2006-07-19 삼성전자주식회사 The method for VoIP-UMS system access
US7353047B2 (en) * 2004-01-26 2008-04-01 Sbc Knowledge Ventures, L.P. Integrated mobile phone ring scheduler
US7852997B2 (en) * 2004-01-28 2010-12-14 Managed Inventions, Llc Internet telephony communications adapter for web browsers
US7386111B2 (en) * 2004-02-10 2008-06-10 Vonage Network Inc. Method and apparatus for placing a long distance call based on a virtual phone number
US20050182718A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-08-18 Sbc Knowledge Ventures, L.P. Intra-call display of billing rate information
CN1655574B (en) 2004-02-12 2010-11-17 喻坦 A multimedia communication system and communication method
JP4377741B2 (en) * 2004-04-30 2009-12-02 パナソニック株式会社 Ip phone system, ip telephone device and call METHOD
US7450696B2 (en) * 2004-05-11 2008-11-11 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Knowledge management, capture and modeling tool for multi-modal communications
US7573988B2 (en) * 2004-06-02 2009-08-11 Dynalab Inc. System and method for providing customized voice connection services via gatekeeper
US20060003770A1 (en) * 2004-06-14 2006-01-05 Seyong Park Virtual phone service over wireless systems
GB0413294D0 (en) * 2004-06-15 2004-07-14 Beer Julie De Telephone system
JP4328266B2 (en) * 2004-06-28 2009-09-09 パナソニック株式会社 Enum server, ip phone system and ip telephone system
US20060007912A1 (en) * 2004-07-06 2006-01-12 Heng-Chien Chen Ip-based pbx system and connecting method thereof
JP4445421B2 (en) * 2004-08-26 2010-04-07 パナソニック株式会社 Ip telephone equipment, enum server and ip phone system
JP4127839B2 (en) * 2004-09-17 2008-07-30 株式会社リコー Communication system, search system, a communication apparatus, and communication method
US20060064502A1 (en) * 2004-09-22 2006-03-23 Transaxtions Llc Using Popular IDs To Sign On Creating A Single ID for Access
US7962484B2 (en) * 2004-12-03 2011-06-14 Oracle International Corporation LDAP bulk append
US20060173853A1 (en) * 2005-01-31 2006-08-03 Morris Robert P Method and system for locating information on local networks
US7852831B2 (en) 2005-02-22 2010-12-14 Akbar Imran M Method and system for providing private virtual secure Voice over Internet Protocol communications
US20060210036A1 (en) 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Jeffrey Citron System for effecting a telephone call over a computer network without alphanumeric keypad operation
US8683044B2 (en) * 2005-03-16 2014-03-25 Vonage Network Llc Third party call control application program interface
US20060210040A1 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Jeffrey Citron Transfer identification software enabling electronic communication system
US7260207B2 (en) * 2005-04-15 2007-08-21 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer program products for providing presence-qualified E.164 number mapping (ENUM) service in a communications network
US8379837B2 (en) * 2005-05-06 2013-02-19 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for providing and managing public telephone directory service
EP1750416A1 (en) * 2005-08-01 2007-02-07 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Notification service for subscribers not registered in ENUM
US20070043829A1 (en) * 2005-08-17 2007-02-22 Robin Dua Method and system for accessing a storage or computing device via the Internet
US20070253413A1 (en) * 2005-10-13 2007-11-01 Jeffrey Citron Method and system for detecting a change in device attachment
US20070086432A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-04-19 Marco Schneider Methods and apparatus for automated provisioning of voice over internet protocol gateways
US8238327B2 (en) * 2005-10-19 2012-08-07 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Apparatus and methods for subscriber and enterprise assignments and resource sharing
US20070116234A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-05-24 Marco Schneider Methods and apparatus for preserving access information during call transfers
US7839988B2 (en) 2005-10-19 2010-11-23 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Methods and apparatus for data structure driven authorization and/or routing of outdial communication services
US7924987B2 (en) * 2005-10-19 2011-04-12 At&T Intellectual Property I., L.P. Methods, apparatus and data structures for managing distributed communication systems
US20070086433A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-04-19 Cunetto Philip C Methods and apparatus for allocating shared communication resources to outdial communication services
US7643472B2 (en) 2005-10-19 2010-01-05 At&T Intellectual Property I, Lp Methods and apparatus for authorizing and allocating outdial communication services
EP1949660A4 (en) 2005-11-09 2010-10-13 Vonage Holdings Corp Method and system for customized caller identification
US7843911B2 (en) * 2005-11-15 2010-11-30 Nominum, Inc. Data grouping approach to telephone number management in domain name systems
US20070110051A1 (en) * 2005-11-15 2007-05-17 Nominum, Inc. Numeric approach to telephone number management in domain name systems
US20070110049A1 (en) * 2005-11-15 2007-05-17 Nominum, Inc. Data compression approach to telephone number management in domain name systems
US7889716B2 (en) * 2005-12-01 2011-02-15 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer program products for using an E.164 number (ENUM) database for message service message routing resolution among 2G and subsequent generation network systems
US7924820B2 (en) * 2005-12-07 2011-04-12 Marron Interconnect Llc Method and system for facilitating communications
US8566342B2 (en) * 2005-12-07 2013-10-22 Berm Logic Llc In-memory data optimization system
US7529231B2 (en) * 2006-01-13 2009-05-05 At&T Intellectual Property L.L.P. Routing methods and systems using ENUM servers internal and external to a service provider network
US7624417B2 (en) 2006-01-27 2009-11-24 Robin Dua Method and system for accessing media content via the internet
CN101385317A (en) * 2006-02-01 2009-03-11 沃纳格控股公司 Method and apparatus for communicating a status of a device in a packet-based communication network
CA2640745C (en) 2006-02-27 2015-05-19 Vonage Holdings Corp. Method and system for bidirectional data transfer
US8391447B2 (en) 2006-05-02 2013-03-05 Smith Micro Software, Inc Visual voice messaging state synchronization
US20070274465A1 (en) * 2006-05-02 2007-11-29 Core Mobility, Inc. Providing unified access to voice messages from disparate systems
US8184798B2 (en) * 2006-06-13 2012-05-22 Tekelec Methods, systems and computer program products for accessing number portability (NP) and E.164 number (ENUM) data using a common NP/ENUM data locator structure
US8400947B2 (en) * 2006-07-20 2013-03-19 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer program products for specifying a particular ENUM service type in a communications network that utilizes a plurality of different ENUM service types
US7787445B2 (en) 2006-07-20 2010-08-31 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer program products for routing and processing ENUM queries
US7831034B2 (en) * 2006-07-20 2010-11-09 Microsoft Corporation Management of telephone call routing using a directory services schema
US8254551B2 (en) * 2006-12-07 2012-08-28 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer program products for providing quality of service using E.164 number mapping (ENUM) data in a communications network
GB0625439D0 (en) * 2006-12-20 2007-01-31 Skype Ltd Communication system and method
US20080151873A1 (en) * 2006-12-21 2008-06-26 Mike Borsetti Virtual internet protocol interconnection service
US9537816B2 (en) * 2007-01-23 2017-01-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc API for representing a mailbox in a message system
US20090019115A1 (en) * 2007-02-01 2009-01-15 Microsoft Corporation Communications server objects for configuration information access
US20080189177A1 (en) * 2007-02-02 2008-08-07 Anderton Jared M Systems and methods for providing advertisements
US8917717B2 (en) * 2007-02-13 2014-12-23 Vonage Network Llc Method and system for multi-modal communications
US7996541B2 (en) * 2007-06-15 2011-08-09 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer program products for identifying a serving home subscriber server (HSS) in a communications network
US9137093B1 (en) * 2007-07-02 2015-09-15 Comscore, Inc. Analyzing requests for data made by users that subscribe to a provider of network connectivity
US8331358B2 (en) 2007-07-25 2012-12-11 Actiontec Electronics, Inc. Systems and methods for connecting a packet-based call to a conventional telephone network
US8538000B2 (en) * 2007-08-10 2013-09-17 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer program products for performing message deposit transaction screening
US20090049087A1 (en) * 2007-08-17 2009-02-19 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer program products for providing a universal uniform resource identifier (UURI)
US8750490B2 (en) * 2007-08-22 2014-06-10 Citrix Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for establishing a communication session among end-points
US9137377B2 (en) * 2007-08-22 2015-09-15 Citrix Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for at least partially releasing an appliance from a private branch exchange
US8239422B2 (en) 2007-10-18 2012-08-07 At&T Intellectual Property I, Lp Methods and apparatus to provision network resource records
US20090119315A1 (en) * 2007-11-02 2009-05-07 Kasbarian Raymond P System and method for pairing identification data
WO2009066295A3 (en) * 2007-11-22 2010-03-11 Changenetics Llc Communication systems and methods
US8594679B2 (en) * 2008-03-07 2013-11-26 Tekelec Global, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for routing a message service message through a communications network
WO2009129266A3 (en) * 2008-04-14 2013-04-04 Worldrelay, Inc Numeric based addressing for enhanced telephony and multimedia services
WO2010060087A3 (en) 2008-11-24 2010-08-12 Tekelec Systems, methods, and computer readable media for location-sensitive called-party number translation in a telecommunications network
US20100241668A1 (en) * 2009-03-17 2010-09-23 Microsoft Corporation Local Computer Account Management at Domain Level
WO2010132436A3 (en) * 2009-05-11 2011-02-03 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing scalable number portability (np) home location register (hlr)
WO2011035050A3 (en) * 2009-09-16 2011-08-04 Tekelec Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing foreign routing address information to a telecommunications network gateway
EP3264686A1 (en) 2009-10-16 2018-01-03 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing diameter signaling router with integrated monitoring and/or firewall functionality
US8750126B2 (en) * 2009-10-16 2014-06-10 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for multi-interface monitoring and correlation of diameter signaling information
US9313759B2 (en) 2009-10-16 2016-04-12 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing triggerless equipment identity register (EIR) service in a diameter network
US9100415B2 (en) * 2009-12-17 2015-08-04 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. On-net direct access to voicemail
US8970880B2 (en) 2010-12-10 2015-03-03 Open Text S.A. System, method and computer program product for multi-tenant facsimile server
US8970881B1 (en) 2010-12-10 2015-03-03 Open Text S.A. System and method for handling multi-function printers and applications at a facsimile server
WO2012129171A3 (en) 2011-03-18 2013-03-14 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for configurable diameter address resolution
US8995025B2 (en) * 2011-06-27 2015-03-31 Open Text S.A. System and method for sending, delivery and receiving of faxes through computer based networks with a publicly switched telephone network as a backup
US8265083B1 (en) * 2011-07-27 2012-09-11 Vonage Network, Llc Systems and methods of providing communications services
US20130121214A1 (en) 2011-07-27 2013-05-16 Vonage Network, Llc Systems and methods of providing communications services
US9262606B2 (en) 2011-10-03 2016-02-16 Zypline Services, Inc. Systems and methods for pairing identification data to a network-based service
US20130182974A1 (en) * 2012-01-13 2013-07-18 Honeywell International, Inc. doing business as (d.b.a.) Honeywell Scanning & Mobility System and method for obtaining and routing electronic copies of documents
US8937736B2 (en) 2012-05-01 2015-01-20 Open Text S.A. System and method for sending, delivery and receiving of faxes
US9699127B2 (en) 2012-06-26 2017-07-04 Open Text Sa Ulc System and method for sending, delivery and receiving of digital content
RU2509360C1 (en) * 2012-08-24 2014-03-10 Олег Александрович Серебренников Method of creating payment system
US9143942B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-09-22 Tekelec Global, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing a multi-network equipment identity register
US9635526B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-04-25 Tekelec, Inc. Methods, systems, and computer readable media for utilizing a diameter proxy agent to communicate short message service (SMS) messages
US9496951B2 (en) * 2013-08-08 2016-11-15 Mark E. Boduch Method and apparatus for performing path protection for rate-adaptive optics

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5677955A (en) * 1995-04-07 1997-10-14 Financial Services Technology Consortium Electronic funds transfer instruments
US6216110B1 (en) * 1998-02-27 2001-04-10 Microsoft Corporation System and method for publishing calendar information to a publicly accessible location
US6374302B1 (en) * 1998-03-31 2002-04-16 At&T Corp. Method and system to provide an action control point master gatekeeper
US6529483B1 (en) * 1997-05-14 2003-03-04 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) Communication system, method and processing means for switching calls via a transmission network disposed between two local networks
US6711551B1 (en) * 1996-06-05 2004-03-23 Netzero, Inc. Information provider, terminal and system and recording medium for the terminal
US6712702B2 (en) * 1996-01-19 2004-03-30 Sheldon F. Goldberg Method and system for playing games on a network
US6731625B1 (en) * 1997-02-10 2004-05-04 Mci Communications Corporation System, method and article of manufacture for a call back architecture in a hybrid network with support for internet telephony
US6829236B1 (en) * 1997-12-10 2004-12-07 Mci Communications Corporation System and method for providing automated directory assistance via the internet and corresponding call completion within a telecommunications system

Family Cites Families (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4850007A (en) * 1987-06-25 1989-07-18 American Telephone And Telegraph Company Telephone toll service with advertising
US4924496A (en) 1988-05-12 1990-05-08 Romek Figa D/B/A Abraham & Sons Automatic incoming telephone call originating number and party display system
US5046088A (en) 1989-10-31 1991-09-03 Dialogic Corporation Converter for in-band routing and/or origination information
US5646839A (en) 1990-05-29 1997-07-08 Mcic Communications Corporation Telephone-based personnel tracking system
JPH04269049A (en) 1991-02-25 1992-09-25 Hitachi Ltd Address management system and communication
WO1994006236A3 (en) 1992-08-26 1994-07-07 Bellsouth Corp Personal number communications system
US5594784A (en) 1993-04-27 1997-01-14 Southwestern Bell Technology Resources, Inc. Apparatus and method for transparent telephony utilizing speech-based signaling for initiating and handling calls
DE4436175B4 (en) 1993-10-12 2005-02-24 Intel Corporation, Santa Clara Apparatus for remotely accessing a computer from a telephone handset
FR2711872B1 (en) 1993-10-21 1996-02-09 Jean Pierre Talvard Portable device independent forming and directory telephone dialer.
DE4401518A1 (en) 1994-01-20 1995-07-27 Telefonbau & Normalzeit Gmbh A method of operating an automatic ordering system in communication exchanges
US5608784A (en) 1994-01-24 1997-03-04 Miller; Joel F. Method of personnel verification using voice recognition
US5799061A (en) 1994-04-26 1998-08-25 Greater Harris County 9-1-1 Emergency Network Computer integrated telephony system for the processing of 9-1-1 calls for service
US5483586A (en) * 1994-07-18 1996-01-09 Sussman; Lester Electronic on-line subscriber telephone directory
US5621727A (en) 1994-09-16 1997-04-15 Octel Communications Corporation System and method for private addressing plans using community addressing
CA2203993C (en) 1994-10-31 2009-10-06 Paul F. Finnigan Telephonic voice message transmission control method
US6215858B1 (en) * 1994-12-05 2001-04-10 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Analog terminal internet access
CA2139081C (en) 1994-12-23 1999-02-02 Alastair Gordon Unified messaging system and method
US5684862A (en) 1995-05-24 1997-11-04 Advance Systems Development Company, L.C. Telephone voice message store and forward method
US6108704A (en) * 1995-09-25 2000-08-22 Netspeak Corporation Point-to-point internet protocol
US5862325A (en) * 1996-02-29 1999-01-19 Intermind Corporation Computer-based communication system and method using metadata defining a control structure
US6324264B1 (en) * 1996-03-15 2001-11-27 Telstra Corporation Limited Method of establishing a communications call
US6125113A (en) * 1996-04-18 2000-09-26 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Internet telephone service
US5850433A (en) * 1996-05-01 1998-12-15 Sprint Communication Co. L.P. System and method for providing an on-line directory service
US5896444A (en) * 1996-06-03 1999-04-20 Webtv Networks, Inc. Method and apparatus for managing communications between a client and a server in a network
US6069890A (en) * 1996-06-26 2000-05-30 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Internet telephone service
US6065016A (en) * 1996-08-06 2000-05-16 At&T Corporation Universal directory service
US6449344B1 (en) * 1996-10-06 2002-09-10 Aol Acquisition Corporation Communication system
US6064666A (en) * 1996-11-15 2000-05-16 International Business Machines Corporation Cross service common user image association
US6205139B1 (en) 1997-03-06 2001-03-20 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Automatic called party locator over internet
US6222520B1 (en) * 1997-12-31 2001-04-24 At&T Corp. Information display for a visual communication device
US6539077B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2003-03-25 Netnumber.Com, Inc. Method and apparatus for correlating a unique identifier, such as a PSTN telephone number, to an internet address to enable communications over the internet

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5677955A (en) * 1995-04-07 1997-10-14 Financial Services Technology Consortium Electronic funds transfer instruments
US6712702B2 (en) * 1996-01-19 2004-03-30 Sheldon F. Goldberg Method and system for playing games on a network
US6711551B1 (en) * 1996-06-05 2004-03-23 Netzero, Inc. Information provider, terminal and system and recording medium for the terminal
US6731625B1 (en) * 1997-02-10 2004-05-04 Mci Communications Corporation System, method and article of manufacture for a call back architecture in a hybrid network with support for internet telephony
US6529483B1 (en) * 1997-05-14 2003-03-04 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) Communication system, method and processing means for switching calls via a transmission network disposed between two local networks
US6829236B1 (en) * 1997-12-10 2004-12-07 Mci Communications Corporation System and method for providing automated directory assistance via the internet and corresponding call completion within a telecommunications system
US6216110B1 (en) * 1998-02-27 2001-04-10 Microsoft Corporation System and method for publishing calendar information to a publicly accessible location
US6374302B1 (en) * 1998-03-31 2002-04-16 At&T Corp. Method and system to provide an action control point master gatekeeper

Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8135410B2 (en) * 1999-06-14 2012-03-13 Ascendent Telecommunications, Inc. Method and apparatus for communicating with one of plural devices associated with a single telephone number during a disaster and disaster recovery
US20070217437A1 (en) * 1999-06-14 2007-09-20 Forte Stephen P Method and apparatus for communicating with one of plural devices associated with a single telephone number during a disaster and disaster recovery
US20030016661A1 (en) * 2001-07-18 2003-01-23 Emerson Harry E. Telephone switching system for integrating the internet with the public switched telephone network
US8705516B2 (en) 2004-12-30 2014-04-22 Grape Technology Group, Inc. Enhanced directory assistance system with voice over IP call handling
US20080037756A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2008-02-14 Christine Baumeister Enhanced directory assistance system with voice over IP call handling
US8027336B2 (en) * 2004-12-30 2011-09-27 Grape Technology Group, Inc. Enhanced directory assistance system with voice over IP call handling
US20090037471A1 (en) * 2005-09-28 2009-02-05 One Smart Star Limited Communicating with business customers
US9762475B2 (en) * 2005-09-28 2017-09-12 One Smart Star Limited Communicating with business customers
US8780925B2 (en) * 2006-08-17 2014-07-15 Fonality, Inc. Mobile use of a PBX system
US20060256789A1 (en) * 2006-08-17 2006-11-16 Fonality, Inc. Mobile use of a PBX system
US8693659B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2014-04-08 Fonality, Inc. System and method for centralized presence management of local and remote users
US8976952B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2015-03-10 Fonality, Inc. Intelligent presence management in a communication routing system
US8832717B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2014-09-09 Fonality, Inc. System and method for event driven browser launch
US8787548B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2014-07-22 Fonality, Inc. System and method for distributed communication control within an enterprise
US8499246B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2013-07-30 Fonality, Inc. System and method for providing single click enterprise communication
US9395873B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2016-07-19 Fonality, Inc. System and method for providing single click enterprise communication
US8341535B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2012-12-25 Fonality, Inc. System and method for distributed communication control within an enterprise
US20080222656A1 (en) * 2007-03-09 2008-09-11 Lyman Christopher M System and method for event driven browser launch
US8495653B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2013-07-23 Fonality, Inc. System and method for event driven browser launch
US9001993B2 (en) 2007-05-03 2015-04-07 Fonality, Inc. Universal queuing for inbound communications
US8571202B2 (en) 2007-05-03 2013-10-29 Fonality, Inc. Universal queuing for inbound communications
US8379832B1 (en) 2007-05-03 2013-02-19 Fonality, Inc. Universal queuing for inbound communications
US20100146394A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Morris Robert P Methods, Systems, And Computer Program Products For Browsing Using A Geospatial Map Metaphor
US8719386B2 (en) 2009-01-08 2014-05-06 Fonality, Inc. System and method for providing configuration synchronicity
US20100174807A1 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-07-08 Fonality, Inc. System and method for providing configuration synchronicity
US20110043867A1 (en) * 2009-02-05 2011-02-24 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Facsimile machine, control method therefor, and control program therefor
US8724144B2 (en) * 2009-02-05 2014-05-13 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Facsimile machine, control method therefor, and control program therefor
US7933272B2 (en) * 2009-03-11 2011-04-26 Deep River Systems, Llc Methods and systems for resolving a first node identifier in a first identifier domain space to a second node identifier in a second identifier domain space
US20100232433A1 (en) * 2009-03-11 2010-09-16 Morris Robert P Methods And Systems For Resolving A First Node Identifier In A First Identifier Domain Space To A Second Node Identifier In A Second Identifier Domain Space
US9443244B2 (en) 2009-03-16 2016-09-13 Fonality, Inc. System and method for utilizing customer data in a communication system
US20100232585A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Lyman Christopher M System and Method for Utilizing Customer Data in a Communication System
US20110010404A1 (en) * 2009-07-08 2011-01-13 Onering S.R.L. Device for collecting and managing documents and for controlling viewing thereof and method for using the device
WO2011003632A1 (en) * 2009-07-08 2011-01-13 Onering S.R.L. Device for collecting and managing documents and for controlling viewing thereof and method for using the device
WO2013142531A1 (en) * 2012-03-20 2013-09-26 Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. Method for converging telephone number and ip address

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20030076933A1 (en) 2003-04-24 application
US6748057B2 (en) 2004-06-08 grant
US6539077B1 (en) 2003-03-25 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6640242B1 (en) Voice access through a data-centric network to an integrated message storage and retrieval system
US6134316A (en) Telecommunications network with relocateability of subscriber number
US6266405B1 (en) Extended number portability database services
US6014711A (en) Apparatus and method for providing electronic mail relay translation services
US6393017B1 (en) Virtual PBX system
US6731927B1 (en) System and method for context association
US7340048B2 (en) System and method for directory services and e-commerce across multi-provider networks
US5940478A (en) Method and system for extended addressing plans
US6888936B1 (en) User controlled location sharing during a communication
US6298128B1 (en) Unified directory for caller ID and electronic mail addresses
US7031438B1 (en) System for obtaining forwarding information for electronic system using speech recognition
US6324264B1 (en) Method of establishing a communications call
US6882708B1 (en) Region-wide messaging system and methods including validation of transactions
US6374246B1 (en) Message service system that provides flexible route control and user interface adaption
US6480484B2 (en) Internet-intranet greeting service
US6347085B2 (en) Method and apparatus for establishing communications between packet-switched and circuit-switched networks
US6529501B1 (en) Method and apparatus for internet telephony
US6697474B1 (en) Systems and methods for receiving telephone calls via instant messaging
US6026441A (en) Method for establishing communication on the internet with a client having a dynamically assigned IP address
US6717938B1 (en) System controlling use of a communication channel
US6912545B1 (en) Location-code system for location-based services
US7092998B2 (en) Software architecture for wireless data and method of operation thereof
US6694375B1 (en) Communications network and method having accessible directory of user profile data
US6104711A (en) Enhanced internet domain name server
US6185565B1 (en) System and method for communication session disposition responsive to events in a telecommunications network and the internet

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ENTERPRISE BANK, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NETNUMBER, INC;REEL/FRAME:035202/0478

Effective date: 20150317