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Pen projection display

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Publication number
US20040212553A1
US20040212553A1 US10849249 US84924904A US20040212553A1 US 20040212553 A1 US20040212553 A1 US 20040212553A1 US 10849249 US10849249 US 10849249 US 84924904 A US84924904 A US 84924904A US 20040212553 A1 US20040212553 A1 US 20040212553A1
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Prior art keywords
light
direction
display
unit
frequency
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US10849249
Inventor
Jian Wang
Chunhui Zhang
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Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC
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Microsoft Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B43WRITING OR DRAWING IMPLEMENTS; BUREAU ACCESSORIES
    • B43KIMPLEMENTS FOR WRITING OR DRAWING
    • B43K29/00Combinations of writing implements with other articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B43WRITING OR DRAWING IMPLEMENTS; BUREAU ACCESSORIES
    • B43KIMPLEMENTS FOR WRITING OR DRAWING
    • B43K29/00Combinations of writing implements with other articles
    • B43K29/10Combinations of writing implements with other articles with illuminating devices
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N9/00Details of colour television systems
    • H04N9/12Picture reproducers
    • H04N9/31Projection devices for colour picture display, e.g. using electronic spatial light modulators [ESLM]
    • H04N9/3129Projection devices for colour picture display, e.g. using electronic spatial light modulators [ESLM] scanning a light beam on the display screen

Abstract

The projection display includes a light projector unit for generating and projecting light, an oscillator unit for oscillating light projected from the light projector unit, and a frequency generation and modulation unit. The frequency generation and modulation unit drives the oscillator unit and modulates the light projected by the light projector unit. In turn, the oscillator unit oscillates the light projected by the light projector unit in two dimensions, so that the projected light scans an incident surface in a raster pattern. At the same time, the frequency generation and modulation unit modulates the light produced by the light projector unit in synchronization with the scanning process and image data supplied so that the projected light produces images corresponding to the image data over a scanned area.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a projection display. The invention has particular application to a projection display that can be incorporated into a hand-held writing device, such as an ink pen or computer stylus.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Computers have become ubiquitous in our society, and are used in every facet of daily life. While modern computers can provide information to a user audibly, the primary mode of conveying information for most computers is visual. That is, most computers will display information to a user visually on a monitor, such as a cathode ray tube monitor, a liquid crystal display monitor, or a plasma monitor. Accordingly, while the processing and memory components of a computer can be made very small, further reduction in the size of conventional computers is practically limited by the need to have a visible display monitor. Accordingly, there is a need for a small display monitor that can comfortably display information provided by a computer, but which does not occupy a large fixed area.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Advantageously, the invention is directed to a projection display that can display images, such as images corresponding to image information from a computer, onto an incident surface. While the images displayed by a projection display according to the invention can be sufficiently large to be easily read, the components of the projection display can be made small enough to fit inside of a handheld writing instrument, such as an ink pen or stylus for a digital tablet.
  • [0004]
    With a projection display according to the invention, an oscillator oscillates light projected by a light projector. More particularly, the oscillator simultaneously oscillates the projected light in a first direction and a second direction orthogonal to the first direction. For example, the oscillator may simultaneously oscillate the projected light in both an X-direction and a Y-direction. In this manner, the light produced by the light projector will scan an incident surface in a raster pattern. At the same time, the projected light is modulated in synchronization with the raster scanning process based upon image data. Thus, the projected light is modulated and oscillated so that it produces images corresponding to the image data over a scanned area.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0005]
    The foregoing summary of the invention, as well as the following detailed description of preferred embodiments, will be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • [0006]
    [0006]FIG. 1 shows a schematic diagram of a projection display according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0007]
    [0007]FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate the movement of an optical fiber in different modes of oscillation.
  • [0008]
    [0008]FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate the projection resolution obtained from different ratios of the line scanning direction oscillation frequency to the refresh oscillation frequency.
  • [0009]
    [0009]FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate how pixel information can be converted into binary image data.
  • [0010]
    [0010]FIG. 5 illustrates a pen projection display according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • [0011]
    [0011]FIG. 6 illustrates a light projector unit according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0012]
    Overview
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 1 illustrates a projection display 101 according to one embodiment of the invention. As seen in this figure, the projection display 101 includes a light projector unit 103 for generating and projecting light, an oscillator unit 105 for oscillating light projected from the light projector unit 103, and a frequency generation and modulation unit 107. The projection display 101 also includes an image data input unit 109 and a control unit 111. As will be explained in detail below, the frequency generation and modulation unit 107 drives the oscillator unit 105 and modulates the light projected by the light projector unit 103. In turn, the oscillator unit 105 oscillates the light projected by the light projector unit 103 in two dimensions.
  • [0014]
    More particularly, the oscillator unit 105 oscillates the light produced by the light projector unit 103 so that the projected light scans an incident surface in a raster pattern. At the same time, the frequency generation and modulation unit 107 modulates the light produced by the light projector unit 103 in synchronization with the scanning process and image data supplied by the image data input unit 109. In this manner, the projected light is modulated and oscillated so that it produces images corresponding to the image data over a scanned area. The control unit 111 then controls the operation of the frequency generation and modulation unit 107 and the image data input unit 109.
  • [0015]
    The Light Projector Unit
  • [0016]
    As seen in FIG. 1, the light projector unit 103 includes a light source 113 that generates light and a light transmission device 115 for transmitting the light from the light source 113. As will be explained in detail below, the light projected from the light source 113 is modulated to form individual pixels as it is scanned over an incident surface, such as a blank piece of paper, a whiteboard or even a desktop. Thus, a light source 113 that projects light in a narrow, focused beam provides a higher display resolution than a light source 113 that projects light in a wider, more dispersed beam. Accordingly, with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the light source 113 is a laser diode having a central wavelength of approximately 650 nm. As will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art, a laser diode advantageously projects a focused and coherent beam of light, which allows the projection display 101 to display individual pixels with a high resolution.
  • [0017]
    As seen in FIG. 5, the light transmission device 115 for the illustrated embodiment is a combination of an optical fiber 115A and lens 115B. The optical fiber 115A projects the light emitted from the laser diode 113 in the direction to which the optical fiber 115A is bent. That is, the optical fiber 115A allows the light emitted from the laser diode 113 to be projected in a variety of directions, without the orientation of the laser diode 113 itself actually moving. Instead, by simply bending the optical fiber 115A to point in a specific direction, the light emitted from light diode 113 will be projected in that direction. The lens 115B then maintains the narrowness of the beam of projected light transmitted by the optical fiber 115A. With the illustrated embodiment, the optical fiber 115A has a length of approximately 12 mm. As will be discussed in detail below, however, the length of the optical fiber 115A may vary depending upon the frequency at which the optical fiber 115A is to be oscillated.
  • [0018]
    It should also be noted that, with alternate embodiments of the invention, the light source 113 may be implemented using other types of structures. For example, the light source 113 may be implemented using a laser diode providing light at any suitable visible wavelength, or at multiple wavelengths. The light source 113 also may be implemented using another type of coherent light generating device, such as a gas laser or a solid-state laser. The light source 113 may even be implemented using a non-coherent light device, such as a conventional incandescent light, a fluorescent light, or a light-emitting diode (LED). As will be appreciated from the discussion of the operation of the invention above, the light source 113 need only be able to produce a sufficiently narrow beam of light so as to be able to project individual pixels with a desired resolution at a desired distance.
  • [0019]
    Similarly, the light transmission device 115 may also be implemented using alternate structures. For example, with some embodiments of the invention, the light transmission device 115 may be implemented using one or more lenses, and omit any use of an optical fiber 115A. The light transmission device 115 may even be omitted altogether. For example, as will be discussed in detail below, some embodiments of the invention may oscillate the light source 113 directly, rather than oscillating a light transmission device 115. With these embodiments, the light transmission device 115 may be unnecessary, and thus not provided with these embodiments of the invention.
  • [0020]
    If the projection display 101 is constructed in a portable configuration, the light from the light source 113 may be inadvertently projected into the eyes of a user or someone standing close to the user. Accordingly, the light source 113 may beneficially be implemented with a low-power source producing light that can be safely viewed by the human eye. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, the laser diode 113 projects light in the 650 nm wavelength, and has an operating current of less than 20 mA. After its projected light is transmitted by the optical fiber 115A and lens 115B, the output power of the projected light is approximately 1 mW. Of course, other low-power configurations can alternately be employed that will project light safe for the human eye.
  • [0021]
    The Oscillator Unit
  • [0022]
    Turning now to the oscillator unit 105, the oscillator unit includes an X-direction oscillator 117 and a Y-direction oscillator 119. A wave. generator 121 then produces a wave signal to drive the X-direction oscillator 117, while a wave generator 123 produces another wave signal to drive the Y-direction oscillator 119. The X-direction oscillator 117 is connected to the optical fiber 115A of the light transmission device 115 so that, when the X-direction oscillator 117 is activated, it oscillates the optical fiber 115A in the X-direction at a frequency corresponding to the signal wave provided by the wave generator 121. Similarly, the Y-direction oscillator 119 is connected to the optical fiber 115A of the light transmission device 115 so that, when the Y-direction oscillator 119 is operated, it oscillates the optical fiber 115A in the Y-direction at a frequency corresponding to the signal wave provided by the wave generator 123. Thus, when the X-direction oscillator 117 and the Y-direction oscillator 119 operate simultaneously, the optical fiber 115A of the light transmission device 115 oscillates in both the X-direction and the Y-direction at the same time.
  • [0023]
    By oscillating the optical fiber 115A in both the Y-direction and the X-direction simultaneously but at substantially different frequencies, the light transmitted by the optical fiber 115A will form a raster scan pattern on an incident surface. That is, if the optical fiber 115A is oscillated in one direction substantially faster than it is oscillated in the orthogonal direction, then the light transmitted by the optical fiber 115A will raster scan a surface onto which the light is projected. For example, if the optical fiber 115A is oscillated in the X-direction at a rate that is 100 times the rate at which the optical fiber 115A oscillates in the Y-direction, then the light transmitted by the optical fiber 115A will project approximately 50 parallel horizontal lines onto an incident surface for each half-oscillation it makes in the Y-direction. Similarly, if the optical fiber 115A oscillates in the Y-direction at a rate that is 100 times the rate at which it oscillates in the X-direction, then the light transmitted by the optical fiber 115A will project approximately 50 parallel vertical lines for each half-oscillation of the optical fiber 115A in the X-direction.
  • [0024]
    In the illustrated embodiment, both the X-direction oscillator 117 and the Y-direction oscillator 119 are ceramic piezoelectric oscillators. As well known to those of ordinary skill in the art, piezoelectric oscillators oscillate in proportion to the variation in an applied voltage. In the illustrated embodiment, a signal wave produced by the wave generator 121 drives the operation of the X-direction oscillator 117. Similarly, a signal wave produced by the wave generator 123 drives the operation of the. Y-direction oscillator 119. The signal waves from the wave generators 121 and 123 may be sinusoidal waves, triangular waves, or waves of any other suitable type of waveform. The frequency of the signal waves from the wave generators 121 and 123 in turn correspond to frequency signals provided by the frequency generation and modulation unit 107.
  • [0025]
    With alternate embodiments of the invention, the X-direction oscillator 117 and the Y-direction oscillator 119 can be implemented using a single piezoelectric oscillator, such as a ceramic piezoelectric oscillator, that oscillates in both the X-direction and the Y-direction. Still further, non-piezoelectric oscillators may also be used to oscillate the light projected from the light source 113. For example, induction motors or other types of oscillating motors can be used to oscillate the light projected from the light source 113. Also, while the oscillator 107 oscillates the optical fiber 115A in the illustrated embodiments, the light source 113 itself or the overall light projector unit 103 may be directly oscillated with alternate embodiments of the invention,. For example, the alternate embodiments of the invention may employ a rigid light transmission device 115 or omit a light transmission device 115 altogether. With these embodiments, the light source 113 may be directly moved in order to oscillate the projected light. One example of such an embodiment of the invention will be described in detail below.
  • [0026]
    It should also be noted that the terms “X-direction” and “Y-direction” used herein do not refer to specific directions, but instead are used simply to refer to the orientation of a first direction relative to a second direction. As will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art a scanning operation can be performed by simultaneously moving the projected light in any first direction and a second orthogonal to the first direction. For example, the projected light can even be oscillated by rotating the light projector 103 about an axis, while simultaneously oscillating the light projector 103 (that is, the light source 113, the transmission device 115, or both) toward and away from that axis. With these embodiments, the projected light will scan an incident surface in a pattern based upon polar coordinates, rather than upon Cartesian coordinates as with those embodiments of the invention that scan in an X-direction and a Y-direction.
  • [0027]
    The Frequency Generation And Modulation Unit
  • [0028]
    As seen in FIG. 1, the frequency generation and modulation unit 107 includes a frequency generator 125 that generates a base signal with a frequency f. A modulation frequency generator 127 then multiplies the frequency f of the base signal by a value m to produce a modulation signal with a modulation frequency fm. As will be discussed in more detail below, the modulation frequency fm determines how many pixels occur in each line scanned by the projected light from the light projector unit 103. Likewise, an X-oscillation frequency generator 129 multiplies the frequency f of the base signal by a value x to produce an X-oscillation signal with a modulation frequency fx, while a Y-oscillation frequency generator 131 multiplies the frequency f of the base signal by a value y to produce an Y-oscillation signal with a modulation frequency fy.
  • [0029]
    The X-oscillation signal is fed to the wave generator 121, in order to set the frequency of the wave signal for the X-oscillator unit 117 to the X-oscillation frequency fx. The Y-oscillation signal is similarly provided to the wave generator 123, to set the frequency of the wave signal for the Y-oscillator unit 119 to the Y-oscillation frequency fy. Thus, the X-oscillation unit 117 oscillates at the X-oscillation frequency fx generated by the X-oscillation frequency generator 129, while the Y-oscillation unit 119 oscillates at the Y-oscillation frequency fy generated by the Y-oscillation frequency generator 131. It should be noted, however, that with alternate embodiments of the invention, the modulation signals from the frequency generators 129 and 131 may be sufficiently powerful to drive the oscillator units 117 and 119 directly. These embodiments may thus omit the wave generators 121 and 123.
  • [0030]
    The X-oscillation signal, the Y-oscillation signal and the modulation signal are also provided to the synchronization control unit 133. As will be discussed in detail below, the synchronization control unit 133 synchronizes image data provided from the image data input unit 109 with the X-oscillation signal and the modulation signal, to ensure that the image data for each pixel position in a scanned line is used to modulate the projection of the corresponding pixel by the light projector unit 103. Similarly, the synchronization control unit 133 synchronizes image data provided from the image data input unit 109 with the Y-oscillation signal to ensure that the image data for each pixel position in a displayed screen is used to modulate the projection of the corresponding pixel by the light projector unit 103.
  • [0031]
    Determination Of The Oscillation And The Modulation Frequencies
  • [0032]
    To determine the X-oscillation frequency, the Y-oscillation frequency and the modulation frequency, the refresh frequency may first be established. As will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art, the human eye can detect flicker if the refresh rate of a displayed image is lower than 30 Hz. Accordingly, with various embodiments of the invention both the X-oscillation frequency and the Y-oscillation frequency will typically be higher than 30 Hz. In the illustrated embodiment, the projected light scans in lines parallel to the X-direction, and refresh of the raster scan pattern occurs by oscillation of the projected light in the Y-direction. The Y-oscillation frequency is thus set to approximately 80 Hz in the illustrated embodiment, to ensure that there is no flicker, particularly when the projection display 101 is employed in a handheld device and the user's hand quivers. Of course, with alternate embodiments of invention, the Y-oscillation frequency can be higher or lower than 80 Hz. Further, the Y-oscillation frequency may even be lower than 30 Hz, if the corresponding amount of flicker is acceptable for the intended use of the projection display 101.
  • [0033]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the projected light is oscillated by oscillating the optical fiber 115A of the light transmission device 115, as previously noted. Therefore, in order to determine the oscillation frequency for oscillating the projected light in the raster scanning direction, the oscillation frequency must be determined for the optical fiber 115A. With various embodiments of the invention, the optical fiber 115A is oscillated at a harmonic frequency, to reduce energy consumption and provide for consistent oscillation.
  • [0034]
    As known by those of ordinary skill in the art, the harmonic oscillation frequency for the 1st order mode oscillation, the 2nd order mode oscillation and higher order modes of oscillation of the optical fiber 115A in the raster scanning direction is related to the length of the optical fiber 115A. More particularly, the relationship of the 1st order mode and the 2nd order mode harmonic oscillation frequencies to the length of the optical fiber 115A for oscillating the optical fiber 115A in the raster scanning direction is
  • oα1/l2
  • [0035]
    where o is the harmonic oscillation frequency and l is the length of the optical fiber 115A during oscillation. That is, the length l is not the length of the optical fiber 115A before the oscillation begins. Instead, the length of the optical fiber 115A will stretch as the optical fiber 115A oscillates. Accordingly, the length l corresponds to the length of the optical fiber 115A during oscillation, after it has stretched to its full length. Accordingly, the X-direction oscillation frequency at a harmonic mode can be determined from a given length of the optical fiber 115A. Alternately, the length of the optical fiber 115A can be determined to match a desired X-direction harmonic oscillation frequency for a desired harmonic mode.
  • [0036]
    It should be noted that, while the optical fiber 115A can be oscillated in any harmonic mode, the length of the optical fiber 115 together with harmonic mode of oscillation determines the range of movement of the optical fiber 115A. This range of motion in turn determines the field of projection for the projection display 101. Referring to FIGS. 2A and 2B, for example, FIG. 2A illustrates the movement of an exemplary optical fiber 115A oscillating in the 1st order mode, while FIG. 2B illustrates the movement of that exemplary optical fiber 115A oscillating the 2nd order mode. Thus, although the optical fiber 115A can oscillate in either the 1st order mode or the 2nd order mode (and even higher order modes), depending upon the length of the optical fiber 115A and the oscillation frequency, oscillating the optical fiber 115A in the 2nd order mode may provide a wider field of projection than oscillating the optical fiber in the 1st order mode, and vice versa As will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art, the harmonic frequency for an optical fiber in the 2nd order mode is approximately six times that of the harmonic frequency in the 1st order mode. Accordingly, for a given frequency, the length of the optical fiber l should be much shorter for oscillation in the 1st order mode than the length l for oscillation in the 2nd order mode.
  • [0037]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the optical fiber 115A is oscillated in the 2nd order mode, in order to obtain a wider field of projection at an X-direction oscillation frequency of approximately 4.5 KHz to 5 KHz. Accordingly, the length l of the optical fiber 115A is approximately 12 mm. With alternate embodiments of the invention, however, the optical fiber 115A may be oscillated in the 1st order mode. With these embodiments, the length of the optical fiber 115A will be approximately 4 mm. Of course, both higher and lower harmonic frequencies and other optical fiber lengths may be employed by alternate embodiments of the invention.
  • [0038]
    Different scanning frequencies may alternately or additionally be employed by other embodiments of the invention. As will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art, a higher scanning direction oscillation frequency will increase the resolution of the projection display, while a lower scanning direction oscillation frequency will decrease the resolution of the projection display. For example, FIG. 3A illustrates the raster scanning pattern projected by the display 101 when the scanning direction oscillation frequency is only four times the refresh direction oscillation frequency, while FIG. 3B illustrates the raster scanning pattern projected by the display 101 when the scanning direction oscillation frequency is 150 times the reference direction oscillation frequency. As can be seen from these figures, the raster scanning pattern shown in FIG. 3B covers much more projection then area than the raster scanning pattern illustrated in FIG. 3A.
  • [0039]
    The Image Data Input Unit
  • [0040]
    Referring back now to FIG. 1, the image data that will be projected by the projection display 101 originates in the text buffer 137 and the graph buffer 139. More particularly, text information to be displayed by the projection display 101 is stored in the text buffer 137. Other types of image information, such as drawings, are stored in the graph buffer 139. The text information stored in the text buffer 137 may be in any conventional form, such as ASCII encoded data.
  • [0041]
    The text buffer 137 provides the text data to the translation unit 141. The translation unit 141 then determines the font for the text data, and obtains the corresponding font maps for the text data from the font library 141. Using this information, the translation unit 141 generates binary pixel data corresponding to the text data. More particularly, as shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B, the pixel map for the letter “A” in a specified font can be converted into rows of binary image data. Each row of pixels in the pixel map 401 is converted into a line 403 of binary image data, with each “empty” or “white” bit corresponding to the binary number “0” in the corresponding line 403 of image data, for example, and each “solid” or “dark” pixel corresponding to the binary number “1” in the corresponding line 403 of image data. Similarly, the image information stored and the graph buffer 139 is provided to the translation unit 141 and converted to lines of binary image data It should be noted, however, that while the illustrated example of the invention employs only a single bit to indicate the value of a pixel of text data or image information, alternate embodiments of the invention may employ any number of bits to indicate the value of a pixel. Thus, the projection display 101 can project images in shades of gray or even color, as will be discussed below.
  • [0042]
    The translated image data is stored in the display buffer 145, which is held until it can be used to control the modulation signal from the modulation unit 135. As previously noted, the modulation signal from the modulation unit 135 drives the laser diode 113. Moreover, the frequency fm of the modulation signal determines the number of pixels that can be projected along a single scanning line. For example, if each cycle of the modulation signal corresponds to the projection of a pixel in a scanning line, the total number of pixels in a single line will be one-half of the scanning line direction oscillation frequency (which, in the illustrated embodiment, is the X-oscillation frequency fx) divided by the modulation frequency fm. The value of each portion of the modulation signal corresponding to a pixel is then multiplied by the value for a corresponding pixel from the image data. As previously noted, the synchronization control unit 133 synchronizes the image data provided by the display buffer 145 with the modulation signal and the X-oscillation signal, so that the first pixel in a row image data corresponds to the projection of the first pixel by the light projector unit 103. Similarly, the SYNCHRONIZATION control unit 133 synchronizes the image data provided by the display buffer 145 with the the Y-oscillation signal, so that the first pixel in a single display screen of image data corresponds to the projection of the first pixel of a display screen by the light projector unit 103. In this manner, the image data from the display buffer 145 is projected as the raster display 147 onto an incident surface.
  • [0043]
    A Pen Projection Display
  • [0044]
    As will be appreciated from the foregoing description of a pen projection display 101 according to the invention, such a projection display 101 can be made a very small. For example, a pen projection display 101 as described above can be manufactured at a sufficiently small size to be implemented in a hand-held device, such as a writing device. Referring now to FIG. 5, this figure illustrates how various components of the rejection display according to the illustrated embodiment can be provided in a projection display body 501 of the same approximate size and shape as an ink pen, graphic tablet stylus, or pencil. Moreover, in addition to the projection display 101, the projection display body 501 may even include a writing instrument 503. The writing instrument 503 may be, for example, an ink pen, a graphic tablet stylus tip, or a pencil.
  • [0045]
    By providing a projection display 101 with a writing instrument 503, the projection display 101 can be conveniently carried by a user in almost all conditions. In order to view image data stored in the display offer 145, the user need simply to place the projection display body 501 at an appropriate distance from an incident surface, and activate the projection display 101. Thus, the projection display 101 according to the invention can be employed with a computer without requiring that the computer provide a large display screen.
  • [0046]
    With a handheld projection display 101 according to various embodiments of the invention, such as those described above, the display of information projected by the display 101 may be manually controlled by the user. For example, the projection display 101 may include one or more control buttons for selecting the image data to be displayed by the projection display 101. Thus, with some embodiments of the invention, the user may scroll forward and backward through pages of displayed information using a command button. Alternately, various embodiments of the invention may automatically display information based upon the position of the display 101. For example, the display 101 may project sequential screens of information as the display 101 is moved over an incident surface. Alternately, or additionally, the display 101 may display information corresponding to a particular location, such as a word printed on the incident surface, when the display 101 is positioned at that location. For these embodiments of the invention, the display 101 may determine its position using, for example, a gyroscopic position detection device. Alternately, the display 101 may determine its position using position-indicating markings on the incident surface.
  • [0047]
    Direct Oscillation Of The Light Source
  • [0048]
    As noted above, various embodiments of the invention may directly oscillate the light source 113 itself or the entire light projection unit 103. A light projector unit 103′ employed by one such embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 6. As seen in this figure, the light projector unit 103′ includes a light emitting diode serving as the light source 113. The light source 113 is mounted on a substrate 601. With the illustrated embodiment, the substrate 601 is formed of GaAs. With alternate embodiments of the invention, however, the substrate 601 may be any type of substrate having a suitable flexibility for oscillation in the desired direction.
  • [0049]
    More particularly, a non-conductive isolation layer 603 is formed on the substrate 601, and a first electrode 605 is then formed over the isolation layer 603. Thus, the isolation layer 603 electrically isolates the first electrode 605 from the substrate 601. The light source 113 is then mounted on the first electrode 605, so as to form an electrical connection between an control electrode of the light source 113 and the electrode 603. A second non-conductive isolation layer 607 is then formed over a portion of the first electrode 603, and a second electrode 609 is formed over a portion of the second isolation layer 607. Thus, the second isolation layer 607 electrically isolates the second electrode 609 from the first electrode 603. As seen in. FIG. 6, a second control electrode of the light source 113 is then electrically connected to the second electrode 609 through a wire connection 611.
  • [0050]
    The light source 113 thus can receive modulation signals for controlling the operation of the light source 113 through the first electrode 605 and the second electrode 609. Moreover, because the electrodes 605 and 609 and the isolation layers 603 and 607 are relatively thin, they will not prevent the substrate 601 from flexing. Accordingly, oscillators, such as the oscillators 117 and 119 described above, can be employed to oscillate the substrate 601 and thus the light source 113.
  • [0051]
    As will the previously described embodiments employing the optical fiber 115A, embodiments of the invention which direction oscillate the light source 113 or the light projector unit 103 may be made sufficiently small to be incorporated into a portable or handheld projection display 101. For example, with the embodiment of the light projector unit 103 illustrated in FIG. 6, the substrate 601 may be implemented with a length of 15 mm, a width of 200 μm and a height of 150 μm. With this implementation, a laser diode can be employed as the light source 113 with a length of 300 μm, a width of 300 μm, and a height of 100 μm.
  • [0052]
    Conclusion
  • [0053]
    Although various embodiments of the invention have been described above, these embodiments are exemplary in that the invention may include the elements and steps described herein in any combination or sub combination. Accordingly, there are any number of alternative combinations for defining the invention, which incorporate one or more elements from the specification, including the description, claims, and drawings, in various combinations or sub combinations.
  • [0054]
    For example, while the illustrated embodiments of the projection display 101 described above project images in one color, alternate embodiments of the invention may project images in multiple colors. The projection display 101 may, e.g., employ three separate light projector units 103, each of a complementary primary color such as red, green, and blue. The optical fibers 115A of each light projector unit 103 can then be oscillated together as a single unit. Thus, each optical fiber 115A would simultaneously project its color onto a single pixel. By modulating the operation of each of the light projector units 103 based upon corresponding color image data, the combination of light projector units 103 could project colored pixels and thus colored images. Moreover, a single oscillator 105 could be employed to simultaneously oscillate the light of projected from each of the light projector units 103. Still further, for handheld embodiments, the projection display 101 may include one or more anti-shaking devices, such as an X-direction and Y-direction deflection value controller to keep the projected image steady at a single location.
  • [0055]
    It will be apparent to those skilled in the relevant technology, in light of the present specification, that further alternate combinations of aspects of the invention, either alone or in combination with one or more features or steps defined herein, may be utilized as modifications or alterations of the invention or as part of the invention. It may be intended that the written description of the invention contained herein covers all such modifications and alterations. For instance, in various embodiments, a certain order to the data has been shown. However, any reordering of the data is encompassed by the present invention. Also, where certain units of properties such as size (e.g., in bytes or bits) are used, any other units are also envisioned.

Claims (7)

1-34. Cancelled.
35. A method of projecting an image, comprising:
projecting light from a light projector;
moving the projected light projected from the light projector; and
modulating the projected light in synchronism with the movement of the light projector.
36. The method of projecting an image recited in claim 35, further comprising moving the projected light in a first direction while moving the projected light in a second direction orthogonal to the first direction.
37. The method of projecting an image recited in claim 36, wherein moving the projected light includes oscillating the light projector in an X-direction while oscillating the light projector in a Y-direction.
38. The method of projecting an image recited in claim 36, wherein moving the projected light includes rotating the light projector about an axis while oscillating the light projector toward and away from the axis.
39. The method of projecting an image recited in claim 35, wherein modulating the projected light further comprises modulating generation of light by the light projector.
40. The method of projecting an image recited in claim 35, wherein modulating the projected light further comprises modulating transmission of light by the light projector.
US10849249 2002-10-31 2004-05-20 Pen projection display Abandoned US20040212553A1 (en)

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EP1416740B1 (en) 2012-08-15 grant
US20040085523A1 (en) 2004-05-06 application
KR100954656B1 (en) 2010-04-27 grant
US7036938B2 (en) 2006-05-02 grant
EP1416740A2 (en) 2004-05-06 application
JP2004170927A (en) 2004-06-17 application
KR20040038647A (en) 2004-05-08 application
CN1499427A (en) 2004-05-26 application
US20050073657A1 (en) 2005-04-07 application
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US6964483B2 (en) 2005-11-15 grant
CN100468106C (en) 2009-03-11 grant

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