US20040041699A1 - System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator - Google Patents

System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20040041699A1
US20040041699A1 US10233953 US23395302A US2004041699A1 US 20040041699 A1 US20040041699 A1 US 20040041699A1 US 10233953 US10233953 US 10233953 US 23395302 A US23395302 A US 23395302A US 2004041699 A1 US2004041699 A1 US 2004041699A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
field
magnetic
signal
system
strength
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US10233953
Other versions
US6911904B2 (en )
Inventor
John Nantz
Thomas Lemense
Qingfeng Tang
Riad Ghabra
Ronald King
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Lear Corp
Original Assignee
Lear Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60CVEHICLE TYRES; TYRE INFLATION; TYRE CHANGING OR REPAIRING; REPAIRING, OR CONNECTING VALVES TO, INFLATABLE ELASTIC BODIES IN GENERAL; DEVICES OR ARRANGEMENTS RELATED TO TYRES
    • B60C23/00Devices for measuring, signalling, controlling, or distributing tyre pressure or temperature, specially adapted for mounting on vehicles; Arrangement of tyre inflating devices on vehicles, e.g. of pumps, of tanks; Tyre cooling arrangements
    • B60C23/02Signalling devices actuated by tyre pressure
    • B60C23/04Signalling devices actuated by tyre pressure mounted on the wheel or tyre
    • B60C23/0408Signalling devices actuated by tyre pressure mounted on the wheel or tyre transmitting the signals by non-mechanical means from the wheel or tyre to a vehicle body mounted receiver
    • B60C23/0422Signalling devices actuated by tyre pressure mounted on the wheel or tyre transmitting the signals by non-mechanical means from the wheel or tyre to a vehicle body mounted receiver characterised by the type of signal transmission means
    • B60C23/0433Radio signals
    • B60C23/0435Vehicle body mounted circuits, e.g. transceiver or antenna fixed to central console, door, roof, mirror or fender
    • B60C23/0438Vehicle body mounted circuits, e.g. transceiver or antenna fixed to central console, door, roof, mirror or fender comprising signal transmission means, e.g. for a bidirectional communication with a corresponding wheel mounted receiver
    • B60C23/044Near field triggers, e.g. magnets or triggers with 125 KHz
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05FSYSTEMS FOR REGULATING ELECTRIC OR MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G05F7/00Regulating magnetic variables

Abstract

A system for controlling a magnetic field strength includes a magnetic field generator for generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device and a controller in communication with the magnetic field generator for determining a strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to magnetic field generators generally and, more particularly, to an adaptive variable magnetic field generator.
  • [0003]
    2. Background Art
  • [0004]
    Magnetic field generation devices, circuits and systems are implemented in connection with low frequency initiator (LFI) devices to perform a variety of wireless operations. In the case of a conventional vehicle tire pressure monitoring system, the operations performed via the LFI related operations can include system diagnostics, system reconfiguration for different environments and identification of tire relocation after tire rotation.
  • [0005]
    In the conventional tire pressure monitor system, an LFI is mounted near a respective tire. The LFI generates a magnetic field in response to information (i.e., signals) that are presented by a central control module in the vehicle where the tire pressure monitor system is implemented. Tire monitor devices (e.g., devices that include receivers that receive the LFI system signals and transmitters that present signals in response to pressure, temperature, etc.) are disposed within the respective tires. The LFI system includes a power supply, a data generator (or driver controller section), an output driver, and a resonant circuit (e.g., an antenna coil and capacitance). In the conventional LFI system, the power supply provides power (i.e., supply voltage and current) to the data generator and the output driver. The data generator presents signals to the output driver. The output driver amplifies the signals and presents the amplified signals to the resonant circuit and the resonant circuit wirelessly presents the signals to the tire monitor devices via the LFI electromagnetic field. In response to the LFI signals, the tire devices transmit signals related to tire identification, tire pressure, tire temperature, etc.
  • [0006]
    To generate a magnetic field having sufficient magnitude to wirelessly communicate with the tire monitor devices, the conventional LFI system power supply presents a relatively high current to the output driver. Since the output driver current is relatively high, the supply voltage presented to the output driver is typically unregulated battery voltage. The unregulated output driver supply voltage can vary between approximately 9 VDC and 16 VDC in typical conventional vehicle tire pressure monitor system applications. Since the magnetic field strength varies directly with the output driver supply power (i.e., voltage and current), the output driver supply voltage variation can cause a variation in the magnetic field strength. Furthermore, changes is vehicle operation conditions (e.g., ice, mud, or snow buildup in wheel wells where the LFIs are installed, changes in temperature, changes in tire orientation as wheels turn, etc.) can alter electromagnetic field strength in the wireless communication path between the LFI and the respective tire.
  • [0007]
    The conventional LFI system is configured to provide adequate magnetic field strength for proper system operation at the lowest output driver supply voltage. However, as the supply voltage increases the conventional LFI system generates higher strength magnetic fields. In particular, at higher output driver supply voltage levels the conventional LFI systems can present magnetic fields that generate electromagnetic interference (EMI) with other modules and/or circuits in the vehicle where the conventional LFI system is implemented. In addition, the higher output driver supply voltage levels can consume excessive power from the vehicle battery. Conventional approaches at limiting the upper level of the magnetic field amplitude typically include regulation of the LFI supply voltage. However, regulation of the LFI supply voltage is costly and can generate excessive heat in the LFI.
  • [0008]
    Thus, there exists a need for a magnetic field generator that has a relatively fixed field strength when the input voltage to the generator varies, generates the substantially minimum magnetic field that is adequate to actuate the magnetic field receivers and thereby generates the substantially minimum electromagnetic interference, reduces power consumption, minimizes heat generation, and/or adapts to variations in component, installation, operation, and/or environmental conditions.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    Accordingly, the present invention may provide an improved system and method for an adaptive, variable low frequency initiator magnetic field generator where the system includes a magnetic field generator for generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device and a controller in communication with the magnetic field generator for determining a strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device, thereby minimizing electromagnetic interference, reducing power consumption, reducing heat generation, and/or reducing cost when compared to conventional approaches.
  • [0010]
    According to the present invention, a system for controlling a magnetic field strength is provided comprising a magnetic field generator for generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device and a controller in communication with the magnetic field generator for determining a strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device Also according to the present invention, a method for controlling a magnetic field strength is provided comprising generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device and adjusting the strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device.
  • [0011]
    The above features, and other features and advantages of the present invention are readily apparent from the following detailed descriptions thereof when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    [0012]FIG. 1 is a diagram of an example implementation of the present invention;
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 2 is a diagram of a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 3(a-d) are diagrams of waveforms of the present invention; and
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 4(a-c) are alternative embodiments of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)
  • [0016]
    With reference to the Figures, the preferred embodiments of the present invention will now be described in detail. Generally, the present invention provides a low frequency initiator (LFI) system having adaptive, variable magnetic field generation. The adaptive, variable magnetic field generation of the present invention may have a relatively fixed field strength when the input voltage to a magnetic field generator varies, generate a substantially minimum magnetic field that is adequate to actuate magnetic field receivers and thereby minimize electromagnetic interference (EMI), reduce power consumption, and/or adapt to variations in component, installation, and/or environmental conditions.
  • [0017]
    The present invention may be advantageously implemented in connection with a vehicle tire pressure monitoring system. However, the present invention may be implemented in connection with any appropriate magnetic field generation implementation to meet the design criteria of a particular application.
  • [0018]
    Referring to FIG. 1, a diagram illustrating a vehicle tire pressure monitoring system 100 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown. The system 100 generally comprises a central control module 102, a plurality of low frequency initiators (LFIs) 104 (e.g., LFIs 104 a-104 n), a plurality of tire monitor devices 106 (e.g., devices 106 a-106 n), and a plurality of tires 108 (e.g., tires 108 a-108 n). The module 102 may be implemented as a standalone module. However, the module 102 may be implemented in connection with any appropriate module and/or circuitry to meet the design criteria of a particular application. The module 102 generally communicates with at least one other module, interface, controller, etc. (not shown) within the vehicle where the system 100 is implemented to perform a number of operations (e.g., tire pressure monitoring, tire temperature monitoring, tire rotation monitoring, etc.).
  • [0019]
    The LFIs 104 are generally connected to the module 102. The LFIs 104 are generally disposed (e.g., mounted, installed, positioned, etc.) in proximity to the respective tires 108. The devices 106 are generally disposed within the respective tires 108. The devices 106 are generally configured to provide data (i.e., information) that relates to the respective tires 108 (e.g., tire identification, tire pressure, tire temperature, etc.). The LFIs 104 are generally magnetic field generators that communicate wirelessly with the respective responsive devices 106 via low frequency electromagnetic waves. The devices 106 are generally configured to communicate wirelessly with at least one other module, interface, controller, etc. (not shown) within the vehicle where the system 100 is implemented.
  • [0020]
    The module 102 may present signals (e.g., VDD, VSS and/or CTLa-CTLn) to the LFIs 104. The signal VDD may be implemented as the battery (i.e., supply) voltage and the signal VSS may be implemented as the power supply (or vehicle) electrical ground potential. The signals CTLa-CTLn may be implemented as at least one control signal. The signals CTLa-CTLn may be implemented as bus signals, serial control signals, etc. However, the signals CTLa-CTLn may be implemented as any appropriate control signals to meet the design criteria of a particular application. The signals CTLa-CTLn generally control at least one operation (e.g., a transmit operation) of the respective LFIs 104 a-104 n.
  • [0021]
    The LFIs 104 a-104 n may be configured to wirelessly transmit a respective signal (e.g., LFEMa-LFEMn) in response to the respective signal CTLa-CTLn. The signal LFEM may be implemented as at least one control signal. The signal LFEM is generally implemented via a magnetic field (i.e., a low frequency electromagnetic wave). The signal LFEM may control at least one operation of the respective device 106 (e.g., a transmit operation).
  • [0022]
    The devices 106 a-106 n may be configure to generate a respective signal (e.g., TSa-TSn) in response to the signals LFEMa-LFEMn. The devices 106 may also be configured to generate the signal TS in response to other parameters (e.g., after a predetermined time, periodically, in response to other wireless signals (not shown), etc.). The signal TS may be implemented as a data signal that provides information (e.g., tire pressure, tire temperature, tire identification such that each tire device 106 (and the respective tire 108) is uniquely identified, etc.). The signal TS is generally wirelessly communicated to and from the module 102 and/or with the at least one other module, interface, controller, etc. within the vehicle where the system 100 is implemented. Since the device 106 is generally configured to generate the signal TS in response to the signal LFEM, a battery (not shown) that is generally implemented in connection with the device 106 internally within the tire 108 may have improved life when compared with the battery implemented in conventional LFI approaches.
  • [0023]
    Referring to FIG. 2, a diagram illustrating an LFI 104 of the present invention is shown. The LFI 104 generally comprises a power supply 120, a driver controller 122, a driver circuit 124, and a resonant circuit (e.g., antenna, coil and capacitance, etc.) 126. The power supply 120 may have an input that may receive the supply voltage VDD, an input that may receive the signal CTL, and an output that may present a signal (e.g., VCC). The signal VCC may be implemented as a supply voltage. The signal VCC is generally presented at an amplitude that provides the LFI 104 sufficient power to generate the signal LFEM at an amplitude such that the system 100 may perform at least one normal operation. The power supply 120 may be configured to present the supply voltage VCC (i.e., turn on) in response to the supply voltage VDD and the signal CTL (i.e., the supply voltage VCC may be switched on and off in response to the signal CTL).
  • [0024]
    The power supply 120 is not generally configured to provide high voltage regulation to the supply voltage VDD. The power supply 120 is generally lower in cost and does not have excessive heat generation as is typical in many conventional LFI power supplies.
  • [0025]
    The driver controller 122 may have an input that may receive the supply voltage VCC, an input that may receive the signal CTL, an input that may receive the ground potential VSS, and a pair of outputs that may present a pair of signals (e.g., DCa and DCb). The signals DCa and DCb may be implemented as control signals. The driver controller 122 may be configured to present the signals DCa and DCb in response to the signal CTL.
  • [0026]
    The driver 124 may have a pair of inputs that may receive the signals DCa and DCb, an input that may receive the supply voltage VCC, an input that may receive the ground potential VSS, and a pair of outputs that may present a pair of signals (e.g., ASa and ASb). The signals ASa and ASb may be implemented as complementary portions of an antenna (or resonant circuit) current signal. The circuit 124 may be configured to generate and present the signals ASa and ASb in response to the supply voltage VCC and the signals DCa and DCb, respectively.
  • [0027]
    The resonant circuit 126 may have a pair of inputs that may receive the signals (or currents) ASa and ASb and the antenna 126 may wirelessly transmit (e.g., radiate, present, etc.) the signal LFEM. The resonant circuit 126 may be configured to transmit the signal LFEM in response to the signals ASa and ASb.
  • [0028]
    The driver 124 generally comprises a pair of amplifiers (or amplifier sections or stages) 130 (e.g., amplifiers 130 a and 130 b). The amplifiers 130 a and 130 b are generally implemented similarly. Each section (or stage) 130 may have an input that may receive the supply voltage VCC, an input that may receive the ground potential VSS, an input that may receive the respective control signal DC, and an output that may present the respective current signal AS.
  • [0029]
    The driver controller 122 generally controls the output signal LFEM via adjustment (i.e., modification, variation, control, etc.) of the resonant circuit 126 current signals ASa and/or ASb in response to the control signals DCa and/or DCb. The signal LFEM is generally adaptively variable. The signal LFEM is generally controlled (or adjusted) such that the system 100 of the present invention provides a sufficient and not excessive magnitude to the output signal LFEM (i.e., the respective magnetic field) for operation of the LFI signal receivers in the tire devices 106 during all normally anticipated operating conditions while minimizing EMI. In contrast, conventional LFI systems can generate excessive magnetic fields during some operating conditions (e.g., vehicle battery voltages that exceed a nominal range) and inadequate magnetic fields during other operating conditions (e.g., when the temperature of the conventional LFI is elevated, when the battery voltage is below a nominal range, during some wheel turns, when ice, mud, snow, etc. build up in the proximity of the LFI, etc.). In so-called 12 V vehicle systems, the nominal battery voltage range may be 9.0 V to 13.8 V.
  • [0030]
    Referring to FIGS. 3(a-d), diagrams illustrating a waveform 200 of the present invention are shown. The waveform 200 generally corresponds to the control signals DCa and DCb, the respective current signals ASa and ASb, and/or the respective signals LFEMa-LFEMn. The waveform 200 generally has a zero value (or amplitude) 202, a positive peak amplitude 204, and a negative peak amplitude 206. The amplitude 202 generally corresponds (or relates) to the supply ground potential VSS. The positive portion of the waveform 200 generally corresponds to the positive levels of the signals LFEM, DCa, and/or ASa and the negative portion of the waveform 200 generally corresponds to the negative levels of the signals LFEM, DCb, and/or ASb. The amplitudes 202-204 and 202-206 generally have the similar absolute values. However, the amplitudes 202-204 and 202-206 may be implemented having different absolute values (e.g., via dissimilar circuits 130 a and 130 b) to meet the design criteria of a particular application. The waveform 200 generally has a carrier frequency for use in conveying information (e.g., via modulation).
  • [0031]
    Referring to FIG. 3a, during one example mode of operation, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the magnetic field strength transmitted by the LFI 104 (i.e., the power of the signal LFEM) via pulse width modulation (PWM) of the signal LFEM carrier frequency. The pulse width modulation (PWM) of the signal LFEM carrier frequency may be implemented via variation (or adjustment) of the waveform 200 duty cycle (e.g., a ratio of time the waveform 200 is positive to the total cycle time of the waveform 200) such that average (or RMS) power of the signal LFEM is varied to meet the design criteria of the particular application for the current operating conditions. In one example (e.g., during time intervals 210-212 and 214-216), the duty cycle of the signal LFEM may be constant during the assertion of the signal CTL. In another example (e.g., during time interval 218-220), the duty cycle of the signal LFEM may be selectively (or adaptively) adjusted to meet the magnetic field strength power design criteria of the particular application and the operating conditions. In yet example (not shown), the duty cycle of the waveform 200 may be adjusted periodically (e.g., at every other cycle, every third cycle, every fourth cycle, etc.).
  • [0032]
    Referring to FIG. 3b, during another example mode of operation, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the magnetic field strength transmitted by the LFI 104 (i.e., the power of the signal LFEM) via variation (or adjustment) of the signal LFEM carrier frequency (or period) or pulse timing. The adjustment of the signal LFEM carrier frequency may be implemented such that the average (or RMS) power of the signal LFEM is varied to meet the design criteria and the current operating conditions. The carrier frequency of the signal LFEM may be decreased during a time interval 222-224 and increased during time interval 224-226. The carrier frequency of the signal LFEM may be adjusted during the assertion of the signal CTL. Alternatively, the carrier frequency adjustment of the signal LFEM may be alternated (e.g., decreased then increased or vice versa) at different assertions of the signal CTL (not shown). In yet another example (not shown), the carrier frequency of the signal LFEM-may be adjusted (or modified) on a cycle by cycle basis of the signal LFEM (e.g., at every other cycle, every third cycle, every fourth cycle, etc.).
  • [0033]
    Referring to FIG. 3c, during another example mode of operation, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the magnetic field strength transmitted by the LFI 104 (i.e., the power of the signal LFEM) via variation (or adjustment) of a delay between turn on and turn off of the driver circuit 124 (or omission of cycles of the signal LFEM). The delay may be implemented via the driver controller 122 monitoring pulse edges of the signals DCa and DCb. For example, the driver 124 turn off to turn on time may be delayed by 1.5 cycles during time interval 230-232, 2 cycles during time interval 234-236, 2.5 cycles during time interval 238-240 and 1.5 cycles during time interval 242-244. During the delay between turn off and turn on the resonant circuit 126 coil may discharge more completely and thus reduce peak output power. In one example, the coil of the resonant circuit 126 may be opened (i.e., the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM may be selectively varied) via floating the driver 124 output (e.g., placing an output of the driver 124 in a high impedance state).
  • [0034]
    Referring to FIG. 3d, during yet another example mode of operation, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the magnetic field strength transmitted by the LFI 104 (i.e., the power of the signal LFEM) via switching between operating the driver circuit 124 in a single-ended or half-bridge mode (i.e., operating only one of the circuits 130 a and 130 b) and in a double-ended or full-bridge mode (i.e., operating both of the circuits 130 a and 130 b). The circuit 124 may be operated in a full-bridge mode during time interval 250-252. The circuit 124 may be operated in a half-bridge mode during time intervals 252-254 (positive), 254-256 (negative), and 256-258 (positive). The full-bridge mode of operation may effectively double the operating voltage of the resonant circuit 126.
  • [0035]
    The system 100 may be operated in any of the modes described in connection with FIGS. 3(a-d) singularly or in any combination thereof. In one example, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the power (i.e., magnetic field strength) of the signal LFEM via a combination of PWM (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 3a) and half-bridge or full-bridge transmission (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 3d). In another example, the system 100 may control (or adjust) the power (i.e., magnetic field strength) of the signal LFEM via a combination of PWM (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 3a) and transmission delay (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 3c). However, the system 100 may be operated in any of the modes described in connection with FIGS. 3(a-d) singularly or in an appropriate combination to meet the design criteria of a particular application. Since the system 100 may be operated in the various modes alone or in any combination, the system 100 generally provides improved resolution when compared to conventional LFI approaches.
  • [0036]
    Referring to FIGS. 4(a-c), alternative embodiments of the LFI 104 (e.g., LFI 104′, LFI 104″, and LFI 104′″) are shown. The LFIs 104′, 104″, and 104′″ are generally implemented similarly to the LFI 104. As illustrated in FIG. 4a, the LFI 104′ is generally implemented without the power supply 120. The circuits 122 and 124 may receive the supply voltage VDD instead of the supply voltage VCC.
  • [0037]
    Referring to FIG. 4b, the LFI 104″ is generally implemented without the driver controller 122. The circuit 122 may receive the signals DCa and DCb from a modified version of the controller 102 (not shown). As illustrated in FIG. 4c, the LFI 104′″ is generally implemented without the power supply 120 and the driver controller 122. In the case of implementation of the LFI 104′″, the circuits 122 and 124 may receive the supply voltage VDD instead of the supply voltage VCC and the circuit 122 may receive the signals DCa and DCb from the modified version of the controller 102.
  • [0038]
    In one example, the system 100 may determine the level of the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM via monitoring (or sensing) the level and/or operating parameters (e.g., turn on time) of the current signals ASa and/or ASb (e.g., via the controller 122) (i.e., the controller 122 may operate as a current sensor configured to sense the amplitude of the current AS).
  • [0039]
    In another example, the system 100 may determine the level of the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM via assertion of the signal CTL and incremental increasing of the level of the signals ASa and/or ASb to incrementally increase the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM via adjusting parameters (e.g., driver 124 turn on time, signal LFEM carrier frequency or duty cycle, etc.) until the responsive devices 106 respond (e.g., transmit the signal TS). The routine, process, method, etc. for determining and/or monitoring the level of the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM may be implemented within the driver 122, the controller 102, and/or any other appropriate circuit to meet the design criteria of a particular application.
  • [0040]
    Since the system 100 of the present invention may continuously monitor and/or adjust the level of the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM, the present invention may provide a system and a method for an adaptive, variable magnetic field generator (e.g., the LFI 104). The system 100 is generally configured such that the level of the magnetic field strength of the signal LFEM is adaptive at each LFI 104 and the respective tire device 106 to meet the design criteria of the application and the operating conditions.
  • [0041]
    While the present invention has been described in connection with a vehicle tire pressure monitoring system having a plurality of LFIs 104, the present invention may be advantageously implemented in connection with any appropriate magnetic field generation implementation having at least one LFI 104 to meet the design criteria of a particular application.
  • [0042]
    While embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it is not intended that these embodiments illustrate and describe all possible forms of the invention. Rather, the words used in the specification are words of description rather than limitation, and it is understood that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (24)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A system for controlling a magnetic field strength, the system comprising:
    a magnetic field generator for generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device; and
    a controller in communication with the magnetic field generator for determining a strength of the magnetic field and generating a control signal operative to adjust the strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1 wherein the responsive device comprises a tire monitor device.
  3. 3. The system of claim 2 wherein the generator comprises a low frequency initiator.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1 wherein the generator includes a coil and the controller includes a current sensor for sensing current in the coil to determine the magnetic field strength.
  5. 5. The system of claim 3 wherein the initiator comprises the controller.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1 wherein the magnetic field comprises a carrier frequency for use in conveying information to the responsive device and the control signal is operative to adjust the strength of the magnetic field by varying a pulse width modulation of the carrier frequency.
  7. 7. The system of claim 6 wherein the control signal is operative to adjust the strength of the magnetic field by selectively varying the carrier frequency period.
  8. 8. The system of claim 7 wherein the strength of the magnetic field is selectively varied on a cycle by cycle basis.
  9. 9. The system of claim 7 wherein the magnetic field generator comprises a driver circuit and the control signal is operative to adjust the magnetic field strength by varying a delay between activation and deactivation of the driver circuit.
  10. 10. The system of claim 9 wherein the magnetic field strength is selectively varied by placing an output of the driver in a high impedance state.
  11. 11. The system of claim 8 wherein the driver circuit comprises first and second sections and the control signal is operative to adjust the magnetic field strength by selective activation of either one or both of the first and second sections.
  12. 12. The system of claim 1 wherein the magnetic field strength is variable and is at least a minimum level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device.
  13. 13. The system of claim 1 wherein the magnetic field strength level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device remains constant with varying input voltage to the magnetic field generator.
  14. 14. The system of claim 1 wherein the magnetic field strength level is varied in response to operating conditions where the system is implemented.
  15. 15. The system of claim 1 wherein the magnetic field generator comprises a driver circuit and the control signal is operative to adjust the magnetic field strength to the level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device by incrementally increasing the magnetic field until the responsive device responds.
  16. 16. A method for controlling a magnetic field strength, the method comprising:
    generating a magnetic field for receipt by a responsive device;
    determining a strength of the magnetic field; and
    adjusting the strength of the magnetic field to a level sufficient for use in controlling the responsive device.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein the responsive device comprises a tire monitor device.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17 wherein the magnetic field is generated by a low frequency initiator.
  19. 19. The method of claim 16 wherein the magnetic field comprises a carrier frequency for use in conveying information to the responsive device and adjusting the strength of the magnetic field comprises varying a pulse width modulation of the carrier frequency.
  20. 20. The method of claim 19 wherein adjusting the strength of the magnetic field further comprises selectively varying the carrier frequency period.
  21. 21. The method of claim 20 wherein the carrier frequency is selectively varied on a cycle by cycle basis.
  22. 22. The method of claim 20 wherein the magnetic field is generated by a driver circuit and adjusting the magnetic field strength comprises varying a delay between activation and deactivation of the driver circuit.
  23. 23. The method of claim 22 wherein adjusting the magnetic field strength comprises selectively placing the driver in a high impedance state.
  24. 24. The method of claim 22 wherein the driver circuit comprises first and second sections and adjusting the magnetic field strength comprises selectively activating one of either or both of the first and second sections.
US10233953 2002-09-03 2002-09-03 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator Expired - Fee Related US6911904B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10233953 US6911904B2 (en) 2002-09-03 2002-09-03 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10233953 US6911904B2 (en) 2002-09-03 2002-09-03 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator
GB0300172A GB2392741B (en) 2002-09-03 2003-01-06 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator
DE2003104683 DE10304683B4 (en) 2002-09-03 2003-02-05 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20040041699A1 true true US20040041699A1 (en) 2004-03-04
US6911904B2 US6911904B2 (en) 2005-06-28

Family

ID=22879316

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10233953 Expired - Fee Related US6911904B2 (en) 2002-09-03 2002-09-03 System and method for adaptive variable magnetic field generator

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US6911904B2 (en)
DE (1) DE10304683B4 (en)
GB (1) GB2392741B (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR101190470B1 (en) 2006-01-02 2012-10-11 주식회사 현대오토넷 Tire pressure monitoring system whit tire independence location registration function using low frequency indicator and method thereof
CN104553635A (en) * 2013-10-29 2015-04-29 上海保隆汽车科技股份有限公司 Two-way communication tire pressure monitoring system
US20160328341A1 (en) * 2015-05-07 2016-11-10 Broadcom Corporation Near Field Communication (NFC) Enabled Peripheral Device

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2005181064A (en) * 2003-12-18 2005-07-07 Denso Corp Tire pressure detecting device
US7202777B2 (en) * 2004-01-09 2007-04-10 Denso Corporation Tire condition monitoring system
US20060259215A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2006-11-16 Trw Automotive U.S. Llc Tire parameter sensing system having a tunable circuit
US7363806B2 (en) * 2006-06-22 2008-04-29 Silicon Valley Micro C Corp. Tire parameter monitoring system with inductive power source
KR100748890B1 (en) 2006-07-18 2007-08-07 현대자동차주식회사 Auto learning method of tpms high line
US7716976B2 (en) * 2006-11-03 2010-05-18 Trw Automotive U.S. Llc Method and apparatus for determining tire location in a tire pressure monitoring system using directional low frequency initiation

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3080507A (en) * 1961-06-08 1963-03-05 Gulf Research Development Co Apparatus for stabilizing magnetic fields
US4749993A (en) * 1985-02-01 1988-06-07 Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche Aktiengesellschaft Arrangement for the wireless transmission of measuring signals
US4819543A (en) * 1987-10-23 1989-04-11 Topworks, Inc. Electric and pneumatic feedback controlled positioner
US5307512A (en) * 1991-06-03 1994-04-26 Motorola, Inc. Power control circuitry for achieving wide dynamic range in a transmitter
US5697073A (en) * 1994-08-26 1997-12-09 Motorola, Inc. Apparatus and method for shaping and power controlling a signal in a transmitter
US6612165B2 (en) * 2002-02-04 2003-09-02 Trw Inc. Tire pressure monitoring system with pressure gauge operating mode for indicating when air pressure within a tire is within a predetermined pressure range
US6700480B2 (en) * 2002-04-29 2004-03-02 Robert Bosch Corporation Addressable vehicle monitoring system and method

Family Cites Families (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1095603A (en) 1965-03-11 1967-12-20 Ibm Electromagnet control circuit
DE2019345C3 (en) 1970-04-22 1982-12-09 Voith Getriebe Kg, 7920 Heidenheim, De
DE2715870B2 (en) * 1977-04-09 1981-07-16 Carl Schenck Ag, 6100 Darmstadt, De
GB2112213B (en) 1981-12-21 1985-12-11 Gen Electric Electromagnetic contactor with flux sensor
US4656400A (en) 1985-07-08 1987-04-07 Synektron Corporation Variable reluctance actuators having improved constant force control and position-sensing features
US4608620A (en) 1985-11-14 1986-08-26 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Magnetic sensor for armature and stator
US5666333A (en) 1995-04-07 1997-09-09 Discovision Associates Biasing level controller for magneto-optical recording device

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3080507A (en) * 1961-06-08 1963-03-05 Gulf Research Development Co Apparatus for stabilizing magnetic fields
US4749993A (en) * 1985-02-01 1988-06-07 Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche Aktiengesellschaft Arrangement for the wireless transmission of measuring signals
US4819543A (en) * 1987-10-23 1989-04-11 Topworks, Inc. Electric and pneumatic feedback controlled positioner
US5307512A (en) * 1991-06-03 1994-04-26 Motorola, Inc. Power control circuitry for achieving wide dynamic range in a transmitter
US5697073A (en) * 1994-08-26 1997-12-09 Motorola, Inc. Apparatus and method for shaping and power controlling a signal in a transmitter
US6612165B2 (en) * 2002-02-04 2003-09-02 Trw Inc. Tire pressure monitoring system with pressure gauge operating mode for indicating when air pressure within a tire is within a predetermined pressure range
US6700480B2 (en) * 2002-04-29 2004-03-02 Robert Bosch Corporation Addressable vehicle monitoring system and method

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR101190470B1 (en) 2006-01-02 2012-10-11 주식회사 현대오토넷 Tire pressure monitoring system whit tire independence location registration function using low frequency indicator and method thereof
CN104553635A (en) * 2013-10-29 2015-04-29 上海保隆汽车科技股份有限公司 Two-way communication tire pressure monitoring system
US20160328341A1 (en) * 2015-05-07 2016-11-10 Broadcom Corporation Near Field Communication (NFC) Enabled Peripheral Device
US9965411B2 (en) * 2015-05-07 2018-05-08 Avago Technologies General Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Near field communication (NFC) enabled peripheral device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE10304683B4 (en) 2009-04-09 grant
GB0300172D0 (en) 2003-02-05 grant
GB2392741A (en) 2004-03-10 application
GB2392741B (en) 2004-11-24 grant
US6911904B2 (en) 2005-06-28 grant
DE10304683A1 (en) 2004-03-11 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7372333B2 (en) Monolithic supply-modulated RF power amplifier and DC-DC power converter IC
US4945541A (en) Method and apparatus for controlling the bias current of a laser diode
EP2244366A1 (en) Envelope tracking power supply circuit and high-frequency amplifier including envelope tracking power supply circuit
US20060176036A1 (en) Variable frequency current-mode control for switched step up-step down regulators
US20110084760A1 (en) Highly efficient class-g amplifier and control method thereof
US7274183B1 (en) Versatile system for high-power switching controller in low-power semiconductor technology
US20070085609A1 (en) Transmitting arrangement and method for impedance matching
US7233131B2 (en) Circuit and method for implementing a multi-function pin on a PWM controller chip in a voltage converter
US6058030A (en) Multiple output DC-to-DC converter having enhanced noise margin and related methods
US5442317A (en) Switching regulator and amplifier system
US6664770B1 (en) Wireless power transmission system with increased output voltage
US20100171553A1 (en) Power circuit
WO2015097809A1 (en) Resonant transmitting power-supply device and resonant transmitting power-supply system
US6980780B2 (en) Power controller
US20130223651A1 (en) Audio amplifier using multi-level pulse width modulation
US20080278136A1 (en) Power supplies for RF power amplifier
US8792840B2 (en) Modified switching ripple for envelope tracking system
US6998911B2 (en) Gate control circuit with soft start/stop function
US20070146069A1 (en) Filterless class D power amplifier
US5742142A (en) Low radiated emission motor speed control with PWM regulator
US20050285682A1 (en) Amplifying circuit with variable supply voltage
US20090033299A1 (en) Step-down type switching regulator, control circuit thereof, and electronic device using the same
US6791407B2 (en) Switchable power amplifier
US20140285164A1 (en) Power supply device and semiconductor integrated circuit device
US6984966B2 (en) Switching power supply

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NANTZ, JOHN S.;LEMENSE, THOMAS J.;TANG, QINGFENG;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:013390/0289

Effective date: 20020911

AS Assignment

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS GENERAL ADMINISTRATI

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:LEAR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:017858/0719

Effective date: 20060425

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT

Free format text: GRANT OF FIRST LIEN SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:LEAR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:023519/0267

Effective date: 20091109

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT

Free format text: GRANT OF SECOND LIEN SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:LEAR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:023519/0626

Effective date: 20091109

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

AS Assignment

Owner name: JPMORGAN CAHSE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT, ILLINOIS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LEAR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:030076/0016

Effective date: 20130130

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT, ILLINOIS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LEAR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:030076/0016

Effective date: 20130130

AS Assignment

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:032722/0553

Effective date: 20100830

AS Assignment

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:032770/0843

Effective date: 20100830

AS Assignment

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:037701/0180

Effective date: 20160104

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:037701/0340

Effective date: 20160104

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:037701/0251

Effective date: 20160104

AS Assignment

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:037702/0911

Effective date: 20160104

Owner name: LEAR CORPORATION, MICHIGAN

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:037731/0918

Effective date: 20160104

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20170628