US20030236601A1 - Control and diagnostic system for vehicles - Google Patents

Control and diagnostic system for vehicles Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030236601A1
US20030236601A1 US10/349,060 US34906003A US2003236601A1 US 20030236601 A1 US20030236601 A1 US 20030236601A1 US 34906003 A US34906003 A US 34906003A US 2003236601 A1 US2003236601 A1 US 2003236601A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
vehicle
base station
processor
system according
controller
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/349,060
Inventor
Paul McLeod
Ken McClymonds
George Hummert
Norman Padgett
Russell King
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Club Car Inc
Original Assignee
Club Car Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US36533902P priority Critical
Application filed by Club Car Inc filed Critical Club Car Inc
Priority to US10/349,060 priority patent/US20030236601A1/en
Assigned to CLUB CAR, INC. reassignment CLUB CAR, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HUMMERT, GEORGE T., PADGETT, NORMAN R., KING, RUSSEL, MCCLYMONDS, KEN, MCLEOD, PAUL W.
Publication of US20030236601A1 publication Critical patent/US20030236601A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L3/00Electric devices on electrically-propelled vehicles for safety purposes; Monitoring operating variables, e.g. speed, deceleration or energy consumption
    • B60L3/12Recording operating variables ; Monitoring of operating variables
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L3/00Electric devices on electrically-propelled vehicles for safety purposes; Monitoring operating variables, e.g. speed, deceleration or energy consumption
    • B60L3/0023Detecting, eliminating, remedying or compensating for drive train abnormalities, e.g. failures within the drive train
    • B60L3/0046Detecting, eliminating, remedying or compensating for drive train abnormalities, e.g. failures within the drive train relating to electric energy storage systems, e.g. batteries or capacitors
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L50/00Electric propulsion with power supplied within the vehicle
    • B60L50/50Electric propulsion with power supplied within the vehicle using propulsion power supplied by batteries or fuel cells
    • B60L50/51Electric propulsion with power supplied within the vehicle using propulsion power supplied by batteries or fuel cells characterised by AC-motors
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L53/00Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles
    • B60L53/10Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles characterised by the energy transfer between the charging station and the vehicle
    • B60L53/14Conductive energy transfer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L53/00Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles
    • B60L53/30Constructional details of charging stations
    • B60L53/305Communication interfaces
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L53/00Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles
    • B60L53/60Monitoring or controlling charging stations
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L53/00Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles
    • B60L53/60Monitoring or controlling charging stations
    • B60L53/64Optimising energy costs, e.g. responding to electricity rates
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L53/00Methods of charging batteries, specially adapted for electric vehicles; Charging stations or on-board charging equipment therefor; Exchange of energy storage elements in electric vehicles
    • B60L53/60Monitoring or controlling charging stations
    • B60L53/65Monitoring or controlling charging stations involving identification of vehicles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L7/00Electrodynamic brake systems for vehicles in general
    • B60L7/10Dynamic electric regenerative braking
    • B60L7/14Dynamic electric regenerative braking for vehicles propelled by ac motors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C5/00Registering or indicating the working of vehicles
    • G07C5/008Registering or indicating the working of vehicles communicating information to a remotely located station
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2200/00Type of vehicles
    • B60L2200/22Microcars, e.g. golf cars
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2240/00Control parameters of input or output; Target parameters
    • B60L2240/60Navigation input
    • B60L2240/62Vehicle position
    • B60L2240/622Vehicle position by satellite navigation
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2240/00Control parameters of input or output; Target parameters
    • B60L2240/70Interactions with external data bases, e.g. traffic centres
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2240/00Control parameters of input or output; Target parameters
    • B60L2240/70Interactions with external data bases, e.g. traffic centres
    • B60L2240/72Charging station selection relying on external data
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2250/00Driver interactions
    • B60L2250/10Driver interactions by alarm
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LPROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; SUPPLYING ELECTRIC POWER FOR AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; MONITORING OPERATING VARIABLES OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; ELECTRIC SAFETY DEVICES FOR ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES
    • B60L2260/00Operating Modes
    • B60L2260/40Control modes
    • B60L2260/50Control modes by future state prediction
    • B60L2260/56Temperature prediction, e.g. for pre-cooling
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/60Other road transportation technologies with climate change mitigation effect
    • Y02T10/70Energy storage for electromobility
    • Y02T10/7005Batteries
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/60Other road transportation technologies with climate change mitigation effect
    • Y02T10/70Energy storage for electromobility
    • Y02T10/7072Electromobility specific charging systems or methods for batteries, ultracapacitors, supercapacitors or double-layer capacitors
    • Y02T10/7088Charging stations
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/60Other road transportation technologies with climate change mitigation effect
    • Y02T10/72Electric energy management in electromobility
    • Y02T10/7258Optimisation of vehicle performance
    • Y02T10/7291Optimisation of vehicle performance by route optimisation processing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/12Electric charging stations
    • Y02T90/121Electric charging stations by conductive energy transmission
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/12Electric charging stations
    • Y02T90/128Energy exchange control or determination
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/14Plug-in electric vehicles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/16Information or communication technologies improving the operation of electric vehicles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/16Information or communication technologies improving the operation of electric vehicles
    • Y02T90/161Navigation
    • Y02T90/162Position determination
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/16Information or communication technologies improving the operation of electric vehicles
    • Y02T90/163Information or communication technologies related to charging of electric vehicle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/16Information or communication technologies improving the operation of electric vehicles
    • Y02T90/167Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies for supporting the interoperability of electric or hybrid vehicles, i.e. smartgrids as interface for battery charging of electric vehicles [EV] or hybrid vehicles [HEV]
    • Y02T90/169Aspects supporting the interoperability of electric or hybrid vehicles, e.g. recognition, authentication, identification or billing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
    • Y04SSYSTEMS INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO POWER NETWORK OPERATION, COMMUNICATION OR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING THE ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION, TRANSMISSION, DISTRIBUTION, MANAGEMENT OR USAGE, i.e. SMART GRIDS
    • Y04S30/00Systems supporting specific end-user applications in the sector of transportation
    • Y04S30/10Systems supporting the interoperability of electric or hybrid vehicles
    • Y04S30/14Details associated with the interoperability, e.g. vehicle recognition, authentication, identification or billing

Abstract

An apparatus and method for a remote diagnostic system for motorized vehicles. Apparatus according to this aspect of the invention includes a base station having a processor associated with a transceiver and a remote unit installed in a vehicle. The remote unit includes a controller associated with a transceiver, where the controller gathers diagnostic data. The remote unit controller transmits a vehicle identification signal in conjunction with diagnostic data to the base station transceiver such that the base station processor monitors the diagnostic data for the vehicle.
Another aspect of the invention further includes a mapping processor associated with a memory. The memory stores a virtual map of a local operating area having areas that are allowable and restricted. The controller is coupled to the mapping processor and a global positioning system (GPS) receiver is coupled to the mapping processor. The GPS receiver determines a current vehicle location and the mapping processor correlates the current vehicle location to a corresponding location on the virtual map. The mapping processor determines whether the vehicle is about to enter a restricted area thereby causing the mapping processor to annunciate a warning to a user. The vehicle transceiver is configured to transmit a vehicle identification signal and location to the base station transceiver such that the base station processor monitors the location and status for each of the motorized vehicles.

Description

    REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/365,339, filed on Mar. 18, 2002.[0001]
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present invention relates to motorized vehicles. More particularly, the present invention relates to apparatus and methods for control and remote monitoring of motorized vehicles. [0002]
  • Today's motorized vehicles exhibit a high degree of intelligence. Most vehicles contain one or more processors that provide control over essential operating systems such as mechanical braking and engine management controls, to nonessential systems such as ventilation. With this intelligence comes a limited form of data acquisition. If a fault were to occur in a system or subsystem, a fault code is dispatched to a central processor located in the vehicle where the fault is logged and annunciated for a user to take action. The action is usually to return the vehicle to a service center to have a service technician extract and translate the fault code. [0003]
  • A processor is usually employed to monitor and store in memory parameters that can be uploaded to a hand-held device specifically for that purpose. Service technicians routinely provide preventive maintenance or perform service calls to diagnose reported problems using these devices. The handheld device can also be used to interrogate certain components to test for proper operation. However, for the majority of vehicles, this is a manual operation. Most vehicle data acquisition systems are not automated communication processes by which data is collected remotely and transmitted over a communication medium to receiving equipment for monitoring and analysis. [0004]
  • Data recorders have also made their way into motor vehicles. Data recorders play an essential role in preserving the acquired data. Unfortunately, the most common in use today is for analyzing accidents. Information such as velocity, braking and other control parameters are recorded with a time stamp and later retrieved for analysis. [0005]
  • Services such as OnStar™ (www.onstar.com) provide telephony in conjunction with the global positioning system (GPS). This subscription service is used for applications ranging from tracking a stolen vehicle, communicating directions to a driver or remotely retrieving codes from an engine controller to diagnose engine trouble or unlock car doors. However, this is only provided when personal safety is at risk or when initiated by a user. [0006]
  • For preventive maintenance or for trouble shooting, a trained technician or mechanic must be physically present in order to measure vehicle performance and observe malfunctions. While the handheld device described above greatly assists the technician, the device must be used at the vehicle. For large vehicle fleets, manual inspection is very time consuming. [0007]
  • In conjunction with ascertaining the health of a motorized vehicle, automated control is almost nonexistent. Limited vehicle control is available today, mostly in the form of radar collision avoidance. Control of the vehicle is left strictly to the user with little or no supervening input by a control system. While GPS navigation is available on many upscale vehicles, its role is limited to vehicle location and giving directions. [0008]
  • It would be desirable to have an integrated system monitor a vehicle in real time for vehicle operation, control, performance, maintenance and problem diagnosis. [0009]
  • SUMMARY
  • One aspect of the present invention provides apparatus and methods for a remote diagnostic system for motorized vehicles. Apparatus according to this aspect of the invention includes a base station having a processor associated with a transceiver and a remote unit installed in a vehicle. The remote unit includes a controller associated with a transceiver, where the controller gathers diagnostic data. The remote unit controller transmits a vehicle identification signal in conjunction with diagnostic data to the base station transceiver such that the base station processor monitors the diagnostic data for the vehicle. [0010]
  • Another aspect of the invention further includes a mapping processor associated with a memory. The memory stores a virtual map of a local operating area having areas that are allowable and restricted. The controller is coupled to the mapping processor and a global positioning system (GPS) receiver is coupled to the mapping processor. The GPS receiver determines a current vehicle location and the mapping processor correlates the current vehicle location to a corresponding location on the virtual map. The mapping processor determines whether the vehicle is about to enter a restricted area thereby causing the mapping processor to annunciate a warning to a user. The vehicle transceiver is configured to transmit a vehicle identification signal and location to the base station transceiver such that the base station processor monitors the location and status for each of the motorized vehicles. [0011]
  • Other objects and advantages of the apparatus and method will become apparent to those skilled in the art after reading the detailed description of the preferred embodiment.[0012]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a preferred embodiment of a base station in accordance with the present invention. [0013]
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a preferred embodiment of a remote unit in accordance with the present invention. [0014]
  • FIG. 3 is an application of a first embodiment of the present invention. [0015]
  • FIG. 4 is an application of a second embodiment of the present invention. [0016]
  • FIG. 5 is an application of a third embodiment of the present invention. [0017]
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a first embodiment of a local monitoring base station in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention. [0018]
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a second embodiment of a local monitoring base station in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention. [0019]
  • FIGS. 8[0020] a, 8 b and 8 c illustrate the intelligent charging method in accordance with the system of the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 is a third embodiment of a remote unit in accordance with the present invention. [0021]
  • FIG. 10 is a virtual golf hole layout as displayed by the invention. [0022]
  • FIGS. 11[0023] a and 11 b illustrate the vehicle control method in accordance with the system of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawing figures wherein like numbers represent like elements throughout. [0024]
  • The preferred embodiments are shown in use with an electric vehicle, namely a battery powered golf cart, for illustrating the system and method of the present invention. However, the invention may be used with other electric vehicles such as neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs), petroleum powered vehicles, hybrid vehicles as well as vehicles using alternate energy sources. Additionally, to thoroughly illustrate the use of the invention, the description that follows refers to a typical, prior art golf course layout, to illustrate a local area of operation and the type of control and monitoring encountered. For those knowledgeable about the art of golf, a typical course includes play in a plurality of areas varying in topography over a predefined area. The varied areas are particularly useful in teaching the invention. The scale of the region is not meant to limit the scope of the invention or other applications for the invention but merely defines a local operating area. [0025]
  • The apparatus of the invention preferably comprises a system [0026] 15 that includes a base station 17 and a remote unit 19. The remote unit 19 is installed in a motorized vehicle 21. To illustrate the use of the invention, the remote unit 19 is installed in a battery powered golf cart 21.
  • A first embodiment of a base station [0027] 17 is shown in FIG. 1. Each base station 17 includes a processor 23 and wireless transceiver 25. The processor 23 includes a CPU 27, memory 29, a reader 31 for reading computer readable instructions, I/O 33, a common communication bus 35, a communication suite 37 with external ports 41 and a graphical user interface (GUI) 39. The communication bus 35 allows bi-directional communication between the components of the processor 23. The communication suite 37 and external ports 41 allow bi-directional communication between the processor 23, other processors 23, and external compatible devices such as laptop computers and the like using communication protocols such as IEEE 1394 (FireWire or i.LINK), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), RS (recommended standard) 232, 422, 423, universal serial bus (USB) and others. The GUI 39 includes a graphics display such as a CRT, fixed pixel display or others 43, a key pad, keyboard or touchscreen 45 and pointing device 47 such as a mouse, trackball, optical pen or others to provide an easy-to-use, user interface for the invention. The processor 23 can be a handheld device or conventional personal computer such as a PC or Macintosh™ running their appropriate OS (operating system). The CPU 27 executes compatible instructions or software 49 stored in the memory 29.
  • The wireless transceiver [0028] 25 includes an antenna 51, a radio 53 and a modem 55 for coupling 57 to the processor 23 IO 33. The transceiver 25 is part of a multiple-access communication system that allows a plurality of users to access the same communication medium to transmit and receive information. The communication medium is referred to as a communication channel 59. Communication techniques such as frequency division multiple access or FDMA, time division multiple access or TDMA, carrier sense multiple access or CSMA, code division multiple access or CDMA and others allow access to the same communication medium for more than one user. These techniques can be mixed together creating hybrid varieties of multiple access schemes.
  • The radio [0029] 53 adds during transmission, and removes during reception, a carrier signal mixed with the information. The information can include symbols representing voice and data. Depending upon the multiple access scheme, the modem 55 coupled to the radio 53 demodulates a received signal extracting the original sent signal. To transmit, the modem 55 modulates the signal according to the same access scheme prior to transmission. The operating range of the multiple-access communication system is sized for each local area 61. The bi-directional communication channel can be a dedicated radio service or part of a cellular communication network.
  • A first embodiment of a remote unit [0030] 19 is shown in FIG. 2. The remote unit 19 includes a wireless transceiver 25 and a controller 63. The controller 63 includes a CPU 27, memory 29, I/O 33, a common communication bus 35, a communication suite 37 with external ports 41 and a motor controller 65. For this embodiment of the invention, the motor controller 65 is configured for use with an electric motor 67 that provides the motive force for the cart 21. The motor controller 65 also provides data acquisition in conjunction with controller 63 I/O. For embodiments using batteries as their energy source, the remote unit 19 includes a port 70 coupled to the motor controller 65 for intelligent battery 69 pack charging. The use of the invention to provide intelligent charging will be described below. Other embodiments of the invention can use motor controllers 65 configured for motors that use petroleum or other energy sources. The remote unit 19 controller 63 CPU 27 executes instructions 49 stored in the memory 29.
  • The electric motor controller [0031] 65 is preferably a solid-state device containing power semiconductors and transducers for monitoring a plurality of parameters such as current, voltage and temperature that are needed to derive proper motor 67 control signals. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a common method of control where semiconductor switches such as power field effect transistors (FETs) are used to alternately connect then disconnect the power source to the motor 67. The motor controller 65 can be configured to control alternating or direct current.
  • During normal operation, the controller [0032] 63 continuously monitors each system parameter and component of the vehicle 21 to maximize efficiency. Monitoring is controlled by the readable instructions or configured software stored in memory 29. For example, instantaneous motor current, battery 69 voltage, battery state of charge, temperature of the controller circuit, and other parameters are monitored, for the controller 63 CPU 27 to send the appropriate control signals to the PWM FETs 65. Since the controller 63 has processing capability, other signals such as the position of the accelerator 71 and brake 73 pedals (by-wire) can be monitored and used for deriving control signals. The controller 63 monitors various vehicle diagnostic information as will be explained hereinafter. This data can be stored in memory 29 as operating status information and motor controller 65 configuration settings. Each remote unit 19 installed in a vehicle has a unique identification number assigned which is included in transmitted messages. The remote unit 19 transceiver 25 communicates with the base station 17 transceiver 25 over the communication channel 59.
  • Shown in FIG. 3 is a preferred embodiment of the system [0033] 15. At least one electric vehicle 21 with a remote unit 19 installed traverses a local area 61. It is to be understood that the system 15 of the invention can be practiced with a plurality of vehicles 21 having remote units 19 in a plurality of local areas 61. Each vehicle 21 can travel to and from other local areas 61 with handoff occurring. Each vehicle's 21 remote unit 19 communicates with the base station 17 in the local area 61. Each base station 17 is configured to receive and identify diagnostic data belonging to a specific vehicle 21 in its local area 61 over the communication channel 59 and transfer the data to the associated processor 23.
  • Each base station [0034] 17 processor 23 stores the collected data in memory 29. In this embodiment, each base station 17 processor 23 also transfers the data to a central maintenance service center 75. Located at the central maintenance service center 75 is a transceiver 25 and processor 23. From each local 61 base station 17 processor 23, data is transferred to the central service center 75 via a data link 77. The data link 77 can be the same communication channel 59 or more preferably, a hard-line connection 79 such as a copper wire or optical waveguide used in the classic telephone or Internet infrastructure.
  • The central maintenance service center [0035] 75 monitors the incoming data from the local 61 base stations 17, stores the data, and provides a service indicator when it is determined that one of the vehicles 21 requires immediate service or scheduled, preventive maintenance. The service indicator is logged and displayed 43. The required service for a particular vehicle as determined by the central service center is then communicated to a service center 79 that is nearest to the respective vehicle's area 61, whereby a technician is dispatched to perform the necessary corrective or preventive action.
  • For example, if one of the vehicles [0036] 21 in a local system 61 exhibited the symptoms of a failure of one battery 69 in a battery pack, the onboard controller 63 would sense and flag the problem as a service indicator, preferably using a problem code, and transmit the code to its local base station 17. The base station 17 processor 23 receives the problem code, dates, time stamps and stores the code, displays the problem condition and transmits the code to the central maintenance service center 75 processor 23. Both the local area 61 base station 17 and the central maintenance service center 75 processor 23 are knowledgeable of the condition. Upon receipt, the central service center 75 processor 23 translates the code and schedules the nearest local service center 79 to perform the service required.
  • The communication from the central maintenance service center [0037] 75 to the local service center 77 can be performed manually, for example, by service personnel at the central maintenance service center 75, or can be communicated automatically. That is, upon identification of a service indicator, the central 75 processor 23 is configured to automatically direct and communicate the service indicator to the local service center 79 responsible for servicing the respective local area 61. The central maintenance service centers 75 and local service centers 79 can be assigned to specific makes or types of vehicles 21. For example, if some vehicles 21 in a local area 61 are electric and other vehicles 21 are petroleum powered, the central maintenance service center 75 and local service center 79 can be different for the different technologies, or for the different manufacturers of the vehicles 21.
  • A second embodiment of the system of the invention is shown in FIG. 4. The system [0038] 15′ is substantially the same as the system 15 of the first embodiment, except that the central maintenance service center 75 (FIG. 3) is eliminated. Here, each local 61 base station 17 is linked directly to a local service center 79 via the data link 77. Each local service center 79 serves as a regional service center. The local service center 79 has a processor 23 that is connected via data links 77 to a plurality of local 61 base stations 17 at respective local areas 61. The number of local service centers 79 and the number of local 61 base stations 17 associated with each service center 79 can be varied.
  • A third embodiment of the system of the invention is shown in FIG. 5. The system [0039] 15″ is substantially the same as the system 15 of the first embodiment, except that the local 61 base station 17 processor 23 is eliminated. Each vehicle 21 transmits directly to a central maintenance service center 75 or a local service center 79. Each vehicle 21 includes a transceiver 25 configured to communicate and transfer data directly to either a central maintenance service center 75 or a local service center 79 processor 23. The system can be configured such that the vehicle communicates at preset times, for example, every morning and every evening, at preset intervals, for example, every twelve hours, or based on some other event, for example, when the vehicle 21 is returned to an assembly area 81. Other communication embodiments between a remote unit 19, base station 15, central maintenance service center 75 and local service center 79 are possible.
  • Referring to FIG. 6, an exemplary local monitoring [0040] 61 base station 17 location is shown. For the golf cart 21 example, the location generally includes a storage facility 83 at which a fleet of electric vehicles 21 is stored during off-hours, charged and maintenanced, and a staging area (not shown) where the vehicles 21 are assembled for dispatch. The base station 17 can be located anywhere at the clubhouse or at the storage facility 83. The base station 17 is coupled to the data link 77 via the communication ports 41.
  • Information pertaining to vehicle performance or required maintenance that is gathered by the controller [0041] 63 is transmitted from the vehicle's transceiver 25 to the local 61 base station 17. Bi-directional communication allows information to be transferred from the base station 17 processor 23 to the vehicle controller 63. The base station 17 can therefore poll each vehicle's controller 63 for specific diagnostics such as battery parameters, motor faults, and others, or can convey information of a general nature, for example, course information to be displayed on a vehicle display system, described below.
  • In second embodiments of the base station [0042] 17 and remote 19 units, the embodiment shown in FIG. 7 uses infrared (IR) transceivers 85 in lieu of wireless transceivers 25 to transfer information between the base station 17 and remote 19 units. Since IR communication generally requires a line of sight and has a limited range, each vehicle 21 is positioned at, or driven through a specific location 85 to properly transfer the desired information. A visual or audible signal 89 can be provided to inform the user when the IR communication link has been established, when information transfer is ongoing and when it is completed.
  • While the illustrated embodiments use RF or IR transceivers, or both, the invention is not limited to such technology and other wireless technologies can be used. [0043]
  • In addition to the above-described communication paths (FIGS. 3, 4, [0044] 5, 6 and 7) from each vehicle 21 to a base station 17, equipment used to service a vehicle 21 may be intelligent. For example, the invention is being taught using a fleet of electric golf carts 21 for use at a golf course. At the end of play, or during a round of golf, the battery 69 packs in the carts may require charging. At the storage facility 83, the carts 21 will be coupled via a line 91 to a battery 69 charging station 93. The chargers 93 may be intelligent, and data output by a specific battery charger can be monitored by the local 61 base station 17 via a transceiver 25 over the communication channel 59 or a hard-line connection 95. Data such as battery state of charge, number of charge cycles the charger performed and other information.
  • However, the battery [0045] 69 chargers located at the storage facility 83 may be basic, housing only a transformer with rectification, outputting a dc source. Since the remote unit 19 controller 63 and motor controller 65 acquires more detailed data pertaining to a specific battery 69 pack (not for a charger 93), the battery 69 pack data can be communicated to the local 61 base station 17 processor 23 through the transceiver 25.
  • The data can be manipulated and stored in various manners. For example, the vehicle controller [0046] 63 can be configured to gather and process the diagnostic data and thereafter send configured data messages anytime in the local area 61. For example, the controller 63 can filter the diagnostic data and communicate to the user of the vehicle 21 and the operator at the local 61 base station 17 a general vehicle health condition. The health conditions can be indicated as “all systems okay” or “service needed”, or alternatively as green, amber and red icons. Vehicles 21 determined to have a healthy charge would show green, vehicles determined to have a marginal charge would show amber and vehicles low on charge would show red. Alternatively, raw data can be transferred from the vehicle controller 63 to the local 61 base station 17. Either the local 61 base station 17 or the central maintenance 75 processor 23 can thereafter process the raw data. In either case, vehicle 21 system status is preferably transmitted from either the local 61 or central 75 processors to the remote unit 19 vehicle controller 63. In that way, an onboard vehicle indicator 97, for example a dashboard display or other indicator, can be used to annunciate and inform the user when the vehicle 21 is in need of service. The operator can then remove the vehicle 21 from the fleet rotation until the necessary service is performed.
  • A variety of data can be gathered and analyzed. For electric vehicles, an important maintenance parameter is the vehicle's battery [0047] 69 condition. The vehicle controller 63 or the local 61 or central 75 processors 23 can be used to analyzed the data and produce diagnostic signals.
  • For example, during normal operation, current surges of more than 150 amps are typically generated during acceleration after which the motor [0048] 67 current falls to 40 or 50 amps. Although the high current surge duration is less than 2 seconds, it is enough time for the controller 63 to monitor battery 69 voltage and calculate the effective internal resistance of the battery 69 pack. Given the initial voltage, state-of-charge (SOC) estimate from the integrated current, and instantaneous current and voltage during the discharge, the internal resistance of the battery pack (50 milliohms for a series combination of six, 8 Volt, 100 Amp-hour batteries), can be estimated by the controller 65. If either the resistance or equivalent no-load voltage fall outside the usual envelope of expectations, the remote unit 19 controller 63 can indicate the battery 69 as suspicious, store the information in onboard memory 29 and communicate the same to the base station 17. The means of ascertaining battery 69 condition does not have to be perfect, as any indication of batteries 69 that may need service or replacement will be an aid to mechanics that are responsible for a large fleet of up to several hundred vehicles.
  • In the preferred embodiment, messages transmitted from a vehicle [0049] 21 to a base station 17 will contain the vehicle identification number and vehicle information. Vehicle information can contain, for example, battery voltage, battery Amp-hour status, charger plugged in (y/n), and diagnostic codes produced by the controller 63. The base station 17 processor 23 can be programmed to record and display 43 this information in a way that is convenient for the operator. Additional programming may allow data analysis and provide trend advisory, for example, for proper fleet rotation.
  • The transmitted information can be used for various diagnostic tests. Exemplary tests include: monitoring battery internal resistance and comparing the monitored value to a tabulated or calculated desired value and producing a service indicator signal when the measured resistance is greater than the desired value; monitoring battery pack voltage as a function of current, Amp-hour and temperature producing a service indicator signal when the measured pack value is below a desired value; measuring voltage prior to recharging and producing a service indicator signal when the measured voltage is below a desired value; sending a specific test current to the motor and producing a service indicator signal when the measured battery current and voltage is outside of a desired range; monitoring voltage between batteries and producing a service indicator signal when the measured voltage of a given battery is substantially inconsistent with the value of the other battery voltages; or monitoring dv/dt during battery recovery and producing a service indicator signal when the battery capacitance is low. These diagnostic procedures are provided for illustration only. The invention is not limited to these specific diagnostic evaluations and other diagnostic tests can be performed. [0050]
  • Using the communication channel [0051] 59, each vehicle 21 controller 63 forwards the battery status data to the base station 17 processor 23. Since each vehicle 21 has a unique identifier, a profile is maintained for each vehicle 21 and for each vehicle's specific battery 69 pack. The base station 17 processor 23 can therefore determine the Amp-hours removed (discharge) since the last charging cycle. The time required to charge a specific battery 69 pack to full from its discharge level is found empirically from previous charging cycles. At the beginning and end of each charging cycle, the controller 63 records and forwards the Ah measurement to the base station 15 processor 23. Thereafter, the base station 15 processor 23 assembles a charge history for that specific battery 69 pack that can be stored in a look-up table (LUT) resident in the base station processor's 23 memory 29 and in the vehicle's 21 controller 23 memory 29. The remote unit 19 can be configured to transmit messages to the base station 17 at any time. However, if the communication channel 59 is broken, or not available, data acquisition continues in a default mode until communication with the base station 17 is restored.
  • With this level of detailed specific data relating to each vehicle [0052] 21, the base station 15 processor 23 creates a charging schedule for all vehicles 21 returning to the local area 61 storage facility 83. The charging schedule takes into account the length of time required for the vehicles exhibiting the deepest state of discharge (longest) to vehicles near complete charge (shortest). The charging schedule for a specific vehicle 21 is based upon energy rate ($kWh) information for on-peak and off-peak utility rates, and the length of time to recharge. The base station 17 processor 23 determines a charge initiation window from when off-peak hours start and end, and assigns vehicles 21 exhibiting the deepest state of discharge the earliest start time and those vehicles 21 exhibiting lesser degrees of discharge start times near the end of the window, thereby staggering the load placed on the electrical system. Other factors such as ambient temperature are considered, either increasing or decreasing the expected charging time. Each vehicle's charging start time and period determined by the base station 17 processor 23 is communicated to each vehicle's remote unit 19 processor 23. Upon return to a storage facility 83, maintenance personal couple 91 each vehicle 21 to a charging station 93. The vehicle 21 controller 63 communicates with the base station 17 processor 23, updating information about the state of charge for the batteries 69 in time.
  • FIGS. 8[0053] a, 8 b and 8 c illustrate the above-described intelligent charging method using the system of the invention. For vehicles 21 using batteries as the energy source, the controller 63 provides an intelligent battery charger function. As described above, the base station 17 processor 23 determines a specific charging schedule for each vehicle 21 and communicates each schedule to the controller 63 of a respective vehicle 21. Upon arriving at the storage facility 83, a basic charger 93 is coupled 91 to the controller 63 charger port 70 (step 201). The vehicle 21 controller 63 senses the coupling with the charger 93 and forwards a message to the base station 17 processor 23 requesting permission to proceed with charging (step 203). The base station 17 processor 23 performs a status check (step 205) for that specific vehicle 21 and if there are no known maintenance concerns, the base station 17 replies with a confirmation to proceed (step 207). The vehicle 21 controller 63 accesses the charging schedule from memory 29, and at the appointed time, begins charging the battery 69 pack (step 209). The vehicle 21 communicates to the base station 17 whether charging is proceeding (step 211), or whether there is a problem (step 211). Depending on the response, the base station 17 logs the start time for that specific battery 69 pack (step 215) or schedules maintenance (step 213). As charging progresses, the vehicle 21 controller 63 can be configured to forward progress messages periodically to the base station 17 (step 217). The controller 63 integrates the time of the charge and monitors for over charging conditions (step 219), for example, if a particular vehicle's 21 battery 69 pack is deeply discharged.
  • If the period of time is extreme, ≧x, where x is determined empirically (in hours), the controller [0054] 63 will prohibit further charging and report the time to the base station 17 (step 221). The base station will then schedule corrective action (step 223). Each vehicle's controller 63 monitors the battery 69 pack condition as charging progresses (step 225) and periodically updates the base station 17 (steps 227, 219 and 225). The base station 17 adds the data to the specific battery 69 pack profile in memory 29. If the charging is complete according to the schedule (step 229), the controller 63 sends a message to the base station 17 processor 23 and awaits an instruction to terminate charging (step 231).
  • Since a vehicle [0055] 21 may not be put in service immediately following a charge, or for several days (step 233), the vehicle 21 can remain coupled to a charger if the vehicle 21 is not in current use rotation, or the vehicle 21 may be coupled to a basic charger 93 continuously for a float charge. A float charge is the voltage required to counteract the self-discharge of the battery 69 pack at a certain temperature. The base station 17 processor 23 (step 235) monitors the battery 69 pack. If the battery 69 pack begins to discharge, since the controller 63 periodically updates the base station 17 processor 23 on battery 69 pack status, the base station 17 can commence a new charging period determined by the battery 69 pack profile resident in base station 17 processor 23 memory 29 (step 237).
  • Shown in FIG. 9 is a third embodiment of the remote unit [0056] 19 of the present invention. The remote unit 19 further includes a GPS receiver 101 and a mapping processor 103. The mapping processor 103 includes a CPU 27, memory 29, a common communication bus 35, a communication suite 37 with external ports 41, a GUI 105 and a reader 31 for reading computer executable instructions on computer readable media 109. The GUI 105 display is preferably any of a variety of fixed pixel LCD or plasma displays having a vga, xga or wxga resolution. The reader 31 can be a drive for magnetic or optical media, a port for a memory card, or others. The mapping processor 103 is coupled to the GPS receiver 101 and to the remote unit 19 controller 63 using the communication suites 37 and ports 41 over line a.
  • By way of background, the GPS system is a constellation of satellites in earth orbit transmitting signals. There are [0057] 24 NAVSTAR (navigation signal timing and ranging) GPS satellites in operation at all times. Each GPS satellite transmits data that indicates its location and the current time. All GPS satellites synchronize operations so that these repeating signals are transmitted at the same time. The signals, moving at the speed of light, arrive at a GPS receiver at slightly different times because some satellites are farther away than others. The distance to the GPS satellites can be determined by estimating the amount of time it takes for their signals to reach the receiver. When the receiver estimates the distance to at least three GPS satellites, it can calculate its position in two dimensions. When the receiver estimates the distance to at least four GPS satellites, it can calculate its position in three dimensions.
  • GPS receivers passively receive satellite signals, they do not transmit. GPS receivers require an unobstructed view of the sky, so they are used only outdoors and they often do not perform well within forested areas or near tall buildings. GPS operations depend on a very accurate time reference, which is provided by atomic clocks at the U.S. Naval Observatory. Each GPS satellite has atomic clocks on board. [0058]
  • The accuracy of a position determined with GPS depends on the type of receiver. Receivers that use a method called differential GPS (DGPS) obtain a higher accuracy. DGPS requires an additional receiver fixed at a known location nearby. Observations made by a stationary receiver are used to correct positions made by roving units, producing accuracy greater than one meter. The present invention uses DGPS. [0059]
  • GPS is used by surveyors and mapmakers for precision positioning and is used to map the location of the local area [0060] 61. During data collection, GPS points can be assigned codes to identify them as roads, streams, or other objects, or to define areas within areas. This data can then be compared and analyzed in computer programs called Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Surveying that previously required hours or even days using conventional methods can be done in minutes with GPS.
  • A virtual map of a local area [0061] 61 is created using GPS and stored on computer readable media 109, and is loaded into the base station 17 processor and remote unit 19 mapping processor 103. The map can be downloaded to the remote unit 19 mapping processor 103 from the base station 17 processor 23 via the communication channel 59 as well.
  • An example of a virtual map is shown in FIG. 9. In keeping with the golf cart/golf course example, the map [0062] 121 is that of a long par 4 golf hole layout 123 as displayed on the mapping processor 103 GUI 105. The display 105 depicts a simplified view of an area 123 within the local area 61 (one hole out of eighteen on the course) whereby a user can zoom in or out using a keypad located on the display 105. The display 105 shows the remote unit 19 or cart 21 location and direction of travel 125 as a unique color or symbol. The display may be configured to show the vehicle position 125 stationary with the area scrolling around the symbol, or have the vehicle position 125 move on the displayed map 123. The size of the area 123 can be adjusted using the cursor keys. The operator can monitor the location of all carts 21 from the base station 17 GUI 39, or apply a filter for carts 21 by user name or that departed within a certain time or by other criteria. The base station 17 processor 23 can be configured to leave “bread crumbs” for a specific vehicle 21 to determine the route taken during a round of golf. Congested or high-use areas can therefore be identified. In this manner, analyzing the routes taken by the fleet over time can perform traffic analysis. The route of a specific vehicle 21 during a specific time such as a partial or full round can be displayed to aid in customer disputes.
  • In accordance with the teachings of the invention, the golf course has areas that are allowable and restricted. The different areas are denoted on the display using differing colored outlines or fills. One allowable area is the cart path [0063] 127 that typically passes through every hole on the course along with associated areas such as the cart storage facility, clubhouse and automobile parking lot. Restricted areas would include the putting green 129, the tee boxes 131, bunkers 133, lateral hazards 135 such as water and woods, and lakes 137, areas of the course under construction or repair and areas outside of property lines. The base station 17 assigns whether an area is allowable or restricted. After the virtual map is created 123, and depending upon the degree of control desired, predefined areas are made addressable and can therefore be changed at will by a course operator. For example, the fairway 139, rough 141 and automobile parking lot (not shown). On days when the fairway conditions are very wet, the course operator may deem play “cart path only” and change the fairways on some holes, or all holes from allowable to restricted. Similarly, some courses do not allow carts to traverse the automobile parking lot. The change can be communicated to all vehicles, or those specifically addressed in the local area 61 over the communication channel 59. The base station 17 processor 23 assigns all areas in the local area 61.
  • The user operates the cart [0064] 21 using conventional means such as the accelerator 71 and brake 73 pedals, forward or reverse switch and steering wheel (not shown). However, transparent to the user, as the user negotiates the course 61, boundary and speed control of the vehicle can be effected by an operator located at the base station, or unintentionally by the driver.
  • There are four modes of vehicle [0065] 21 operation based on a vehicle's 21 position and/or time. First, normal vehicle 21 operation based the remote unit 19 controller 63 default settings. Second, where the motive ability 67 of the vehicle 21 is completely disabled (forward or reverse operation disabled). Third, where the performance of the vehicle 21 is reduced in specific areas of the local area 61 (reduced speed near hazards, cart path). And fourth, restricted area progressive deterrence (hobble mode). The deterrence mode further includes reduced speed, repeated start/stop operations, forward operation disabled and full vehicle 21 disable (forward or reverse operation disabled).
  • The base station [0066] 17 effectively controls the operational status of each vehicle 21 rather than the use of a mechanical key. A cart 21 may only be used after a golfer has paid for the privilege to play at the course and signed-out for a cart 21. The operator then enters a user name and assigns a cart 21 via the base station 17 processor 23 that activates a next available cart 21 via the communication channel 59. The operator can likewise deactivate an individual cart, or all carts from the base station 17 processor 23. For example, securing the storage facility at the end of a day (second operating mode).
  • Allowable areas of the local area [0067] 61 have a speed field assigned to them that can be varied depending upon environmental conditions, topography, weather and others. Continuing with the golf course example, different places on the cart path may have certain “speed limits” imposed depending on location and topography (third operating mode). Cart path areas around tee boxes 143 and greens 145 may have lower speeds than the cart path 147 in-between. Furthermore, if a downhill grade with a curve is experienced 149, a reduced speed zone can be imposed. Regardless of topography or weather, the maximum speed of a cart 21 may be reduced due to a user's age. Other areas where speed can be controlled are in both temporary and permanent restricted areas, temporary and permanent hazard areas, automobile parking lots, storage facilities 83, public areas such as swimming pools, restrooms, club house, etc. and others. Other items in the local area 61 can be identified in the virtual map for use as landmarks having special properties such as sprinkler heads 151, 153, 155, 157.
  • As long as a user negotiates the course [0068] 61 keeping to the cart path 127 or fairway 139, automatic control will not be effected. If a user decides to enter an area that is defined as restricted, such as the putting green 129, automatic control will become apparent.
  • The fourth operating mode, restricted area progressive deterrence, can be based on sequential entries into one or more restricted areas, and/or continued and persistent violation of a single restricted area. The increasing levels of deterrence are completely configurable and selectable form the base station [0069] 17 processor 23.
  • FIGS. 11[0070] a and 11 b illustrate the fourth mode of operation. The mapping processor 103 calculates a buffer area of varying distance in front of a restricted area boundary depending upon the user's course and speed. If a user steers the vehicle 21 (step 301) on a course that will intersect (step 303) with a restricted area 129, upon entering the buffer zone, a warning (configurable between manual or automatic) will be given in the form of a display and/or tone (step 305). The user has the option of continuing or changing course as prompted by the mapping processor 103. Upon changing direction the warning will cease. If the user continues further (step 307), the mapping processor 103 will signal the controller to apply the vehicle brakes 73 and motor 67 braking in proportion to the vehicle's speed and interrupts motor 67 operation (step 309).
  • An optional signal can be transmitted at this time from the vehicle [0071] 21 to the base station 17 alerting the course operator of the violation. The operator has the option of replying back to the user over the communication channel 59 either by voice or by instruction displayed on the mapping processor 103 GUI 105 (step 309). The message display in response to a violation of the restricted area may also be automated. If the user acknowledges the trespass (step 311), the system can be configured for the operator at the base station 17 to manually reset the operation of the vehicle 21 in order for it to exit the restricted area, or this reset can be automatic (step 313). The speed can be reduced while exiting the restricted area.
  • When leaving (step [0072] 315) the restricted area the vehicle will come to a rest for the user to acknowledge the exiting of the restricted area and a return to normal default speed (step 317). Since the vehicle 21 speed was reduced while exiting the restricted area, the acknowledgement is to obviate a sudden, unexpected increase in speed when crossing into an allowable area. After the user acknowledges the exit message (step 319), vehicle 21 speed will increase (step 321) to the default remote unit 19 controller 63 setting.
  • If the user persists in remaining, or negotiating in the restricted area (step [0073] 315), the vehicle 21 will come to rest again via automatic application of motor and/or mechanical braking (step 323). An optional signal may be sent from the vehicle 21 at this time to the base station 17 alerting the course operator of the continued violation. The operator will reply back to the user over the communication channel 59 either by voice or by instruction displayed on the mapping processor 103 GUI 105 (step 325). The deterrence mode can also be configured for an automated response to this continued violation. If the user acknowledges the trespass, the operator can manually, or the system can automatically reset operation of the vehicle 21 in order for the user to exit the restricted area (step 317).
  • In keeping with the concept of progressive deterrence, if the user continues to violate the restricted area, even after the vehicle has been brought to a stop with an alert message displayed, the system can respond automatically or the base station operator can manually respond to this continued violation by causing a repeated and regular stop/start operation to be set up in the vehicle. This repeated and regular stop/start operation would be accomplished by the automatic application of the vehicle motor braking or mechanical brake until the vehicle has been brought to stop (step [0074] 323). At this point, a message will again warn the user of the violation and require acknowledgment before releasing the brakes. This sequence can then be repeated at configurable time or distance intervals to yield a continuous series of starts and stops which acts as a higher level of deterrence (step 325).
  • Yet an even higher level of deterrence can be established in response to continued violation by disabling the forward motion of the vehicle (manually or automatically) along with messages and required acknowledgements (step [0075] 327). The deterrence nature of this technique is in the form of forcing the user to back out of a restricted area with the vehicle in reverse (step 329).
  • A final level of deterrence takes the form of a total disabling of the vehicle (both forward and reverse operation) in conjunction with the dispatching of a course marshal to personally enforce the restricted area (step [0076] 331). All of the deterrence levels up to this point give the user the ability to leave the restricted area albeit at reduced vehicle operation or “hobbled modes” of operation. This final deterrence level is implemented for users who flagrantly violate the restricted area. In these cases, the system totally disables the vehicle.
  • Each vehicle [0077] 21 will have an emergency override that will allow the vehicle 21 to operate in the normal mode of operation regardless if in a restricted area (possibly with the exception of hazard areas). The override allows users to travel with haste to a desired location during times of emergency or duress, for example, when in need of medical attention or impending weather conditions. Activation of the override will send a message to the base station 17 processor 23.
  • The base station [0078] 17 located in an area such as the proshop will display vehicle status such as: vehicle missing, no vehicle communications, vehicle position, vehicle health (green, amber, or red; possibly augmented with specific fault(s)), vehicle 21 in restricted area alert, vehicle lockdown (y/n), vehicle fault condition (specific fault(s) as opposed to general health), and others.
  • The base station [0079] 17 processor 23 communication suite 37 and ports 41 can be used to output all of the information described above to other processors, and also allows for connectivity to other intelligent devices. One application in keeping with the golf course theme is to provide input to a sprinkler system (not shown). While prior art sprinkler systems range from the entire course being timer controlled, to localized zone RF control, the present invention can identify each sprinkler head on the course and export the information to a central sprinkler controller. As a cart 21 approaches a sprinkler head 151, 153, 155, 157, since the base station 17 processor 23 knows the location of the cart 21 and sprinkler, it output a signal to the sprinkler controller in a compatible protocol whereby the sprinkler controller can suspend operation for that sprinkler or that hole for a predetermined period of time.
  • Another variant on using the base station [0080] 17 information is to create a user profile. The base station 17 would keep a record of a user's name, address, etc., but also a list of personal information. The information could range from music choices, to vehicle speed preferences, to other services regarding hole location. Perhaps a user desires a meal query before the turn, or a particular music selection for each hole. Providing the requisite intelligent device downstream of the base station 17 can accommodate these services.
  • Another variant would guard for vehicle [0081] 21 collisions. Since the base station 17 monitors the location of all carts 21, in conjunction with the aforementioned modes of vehicle control, the base station can prevent collisions. By plotting a course vector and speed for each cart 21, the base station can effect motor and/or mechanical braking if a collision is imminent.
  • Yet another variant of monitoring cart [0082] 21 position would allow for the changing of one motive source to another. For example, hybrid vehicles 21 operating on either electrical or petroleum can change automatically in dependence upon local area 61 location. If an allowable region were deemed to be ultra quiet, electric operation would be used solely in that region.
  • Although the invention herein has been described with reference to particular embodiments, it is to be understood that these embodiments are merely illustrative of the principles and applications of the present invention. It is therefore to be understood that numerous modifications may be made to the illustrative embodiments and that other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims. [0083]

Claims (49)

What is claimed is:
1. A remote diagnostic system for vehicles, the system comprising:
a base station having a processor associated with a transceiver;
a remote unit installed in a vehicle, said remote unit having a controller associated with a transceiver, said controller operable to gather diagnostic data; and
said remote unit controller configured to transmit a vehicle identification signal in conjunction with diagnostic data to said base station transceiver such that said base station processor monitors said diagnostic data for said vehicle.
2. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 1 comprising a plurality of base stations, each base station corresponding to a local operating area.
3. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 2, wherein each base station is connected via a data link with a central maintenance processor.
4. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 3, wherein said central maintenance processor is associated with at least one local service center.
5. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 4, wherein a service indicator signal is created when a vehicle's diagnostic data corresponds to a defined condition.
6. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 5, wherein said central maintenance processor is configured to identify said service indicator signals and to automatically communicate such indicator signal to said local service center upon identification thereof.
7. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 1, wherein said base station transceiver and said remote unit transceiver communicate via radio frequencies.
8. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 1, wherein said base station transceiver and said remote unit transceiver communicate via optical frequencies.
9. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 1, wherein said base station transceiver and said remote unit transceiver communicate via cellular telephony.
10. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 2, wherein each base station communicates with a local service center processor.
11. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 10, wherein a service indicator signal is created when a vehicle's diagnostic information corresponds to a defined condition.
12. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 11, wherein said local service center processor is configured to identify said service indicator signals.
13. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 2, wherein each remote unit communicates with a central maintenance processor.
14. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 13, wherein said central maintenance processor is associated with at least one local service center.
15. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 14, wherein a service indicator signal is created when a vehicle's diagnostic data corresponds to a defined condition.
16. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 1 further comprising:
a mapping processor associated with a memory, said memory storing a virtual map of a local operating area having areas that are allowable and restricted, said controller operably coupled to said mapping processor; and
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver operably coupled to said mapping processor to determine a current vehicle location and correlate said current vehicle location to a corresponding location on said virtual map wherein said mapping processor determines whether said vehicle is about to enter a restricted area thereby causing said mapping processor to provide a warning at the vehicle.
17. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 16, wherein said controller is configured to monitor and control vehicle motive ability such that if said mapping processor determines that said vehicle has entered a restricted area, said mapping processor outputs a signal to said controller whereby said controller stops said vehicle.
18. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 17, wherein said controller is configured to restore said motive ability of said vehicle at reduced maximum speed after said controller receives an acknowledgement of restricted area operation from the vehicle.
19. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 18, wherein said mapping processor is configured to prohibit forward motive ability of said vehicle if said vehicle remains in said restricted area for a predetermined period of time.
20. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 19, wherein said mapping processor is configured to prohibit all said motive ability of said vehicle indefinitely if said vehicle remains in said restricted area beyond said predetermined period of time.
21. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 16, wherein said base station further comprises a memory storing said virtual map of said local operating area such that said base station processor can change said allowable and restricted area status and communicate such changes to said vehicle mapping processor using said base station and remote unit transceivers.
22. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 21, wherein when a warning is provided to a vehicle, a corresponding message is sent to said base station processor.
23. The remote diagnostic system according to claim 22, wherein said base station processor logs each said received warning message for a vehicle.
24. A control system for vehicles, the system comprising:
a remote unit installed in a vehicle, said remote unit having a mapping processor associated with a memory, said memory storing a virtual map of a local operating area having areas that are allowable and restricted;
a controller operably coupled to said mapping processor; and
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver operably coupled to said mapping processor to determine a current vehicle location and correlate said current vehicle location to a corresponding location on said virtual map wherein said mapping processor determines whether said vehicle is about to enter a restricted area thereby causing said mapping processor to provide a warning at the vehicle.
25. The control system according to claim 24, wherein said controller is configured to monitor and control vehicle motive ability such that if said mapping processor determines that said vehicle has entered a restricted area, said mapping processor outputs a signal to said controller whereby said controller stops said vehicle.
26. The control system according to claim 25, wherein said controller is configured to permit said motive ability of said vehicle at reduced speed after said controller receives acknowledgement of restricted area operation from the vehicle.
27. The control system according to claim 26, wherein said mapping processor is configured to prohibit forward motive ability of said vehicle if said vehicle remains in said restricted area for a predetermined period of time.
28. The control system according to claim 27, wherein said mapping processor is configured to prohibit all said motive ability of said vehicle indefinitely if said vehicle remains in said restricted area beyond said predetermined period of time.
29. The control system according to claim 28, further comprising a transceiver associated with said remote unit controller.
30. The control system according to claim 29, further comprising a base station having a processor associated with a transceiver, said base station processor storing said virtual map of said local operating area such that said base station processor can change said allowable and restricted area status and communicate such changes to said vehicle mapping processor with said base station and remote unit transceivers.
31. The control system according to claim 30, wherein each said remote unit transceiver transmits a unique vehicle identification number when communicating with said base station.
32. The control system according to claim 31, wherein when a warning is provided to a vehicle, a corresponding message is sent to said base station processor.
33. The control system according to claim 32, wherein said base station processor logs each said received warning message for a vehicle.
34. A method of vehicle control comprising:
reading a virtual map of a local area having restricted and allowable areas from a memory device;
determining a current vehicle position using a navigation device;
anticipating entry into a restricted area using a mapping processor in conjunction with said current vehicle position; and
providing a warning at the vehicle.
35. The method of vehicle control according to claim 34, further comprising allowing acknowledgement of said warning from the vehicle.
36. The method of vehicle control according to claim 35, further comprising interrupting the vehicle's motive ability upon entering a restricted area.
37. The method of vehicle control according to claim 36, further comprising restoring the vehicle's motive ability after receipt of said acknowledgement of said warning from the vehicle.
38. The method of vehicle control according to claim 37, further comprising reducing available vehicle speed while in said restricted area.
39. The method of vehicle control according to claim 38, further comprising prohibiting forward vehicle motive ability if said vehicle remains in a restricted area for a predetermined period of time.
40. The method of vehicle control according to claim 39, further comprising prohibiting all vehicle motive ability indefinitely if said vehicle remains in said restricted area beyond said predetermined period of time.
41. A vehicle control system comprising:
means for reading a virtual map of a local area having restricted and allowable areas from a memory device;
means for determining a current vehicle position using a navigation device;
means for anticipating entry into a restricted area using a mapping processor in conjunction with said current vehicle position; and
means for providing a warning at the vehicle.
42. The vehicle control system according to claim 41, further comprising means for acknowledging said warning from the vehicle.
43. The vehicle control system according to claim 42, further comprising means for interrupting the vehicle's motive ability upon entering a restricted area.
44. The vehicle control system according to claim 43, further comprising means for restoring the vehicle's motive ability after receipt of said acknowledgement of said warning from the vehicle.
45. The vehicle control system according to claim 44, further comprising means for reducing available vehicle speed while in said restricted area.
46. The vehicle control system according to claim 45, further comprising means for prohibiting forward vehicle motive ability if said vehicle remains in a restricted area for a predetermined period of time.
47. The vehicle control system according to claim 46, further comprising means for prohibiting all vehicle motive ability indefinitely if said vehicle remains in said restricted area beyond said predetermined period of time.
48. A method of charging a vehicle battery, comprising:
obtaining battery related information for a specific vehicle using a controller;
transmitting said battery related information from said specific vehicle to a base station;
receiving said battery related information at said base station;
storing said battery related information for said specific vehicle at said base station;
determining a battery charge schedule for said specific vehicle from said stored battery related information at said base station; and
transmitting said battery charge schedule from said base station to said specific vehicle controller.
49. A battery charging system, comprising:
means for obtaining battery related information for a specific vehicle using a controller;
means for transmitting said battery related information from said specific vehicle to a base station;
means for receiving said battery related information at said base station;
means for storing said battery related information for said specific vehicle;
means for determining a battery charge schedule for said specific vehicle from said stored battery related information at said base station; and
means for transmitting said battery charge schedule from said base station to said specific vehicle controller.
US10/349,060 2002-03-18 2003-01-22 Control and diagnostic system for vehicles Abandoned US20030236601A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36533902P true 2002-03-18 2002-03-18
US10/349,060 US20030236601A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-01-22 Control and diagnostic system for vehicles

Applications Claiming Priority (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/349,060 US20030236601A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-01-22 Control and diagnostic system for vehicles
PCT/US2003/008090 WO2003081538A2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostic system and method for vehicles
KR10-2004-7014745A KR20040091766A (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostic system and method for vehicles
JP2003579182A JP4373224B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Systems and methods of diagnosis and control of the vehicle
AU2003218203A AU2003218203A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostic system and method for vehicles
US10/508,046 US7778746B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostics system and method for vehicles

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/508,046 Continuation US7778746B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostics system and method for vehicles

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030236601A1 true US20030236601A1 (en) 2003-12-25

Family

ID=28457018

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/349,060 Abandoned US20030236601A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-01-22 Control and diagnostic system for vehicles
US10/508,046 Active 2026-08-04 US7778746B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostics system and method for vehicles

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/508,046 Active 2026-08-04 US7778746B2 (en) 2002-03-18 2003-03-18 Control and diagnostics system and method for vehicles

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (2) US20030236601A1 (en)
JP (1) JP4373224B2 (en)
KR (1) KR20040091766A (en)
AU (1) AU2003218203A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2003081538A2 (en)

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030182099A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2003-09-25 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Java telematics emulator
US20040044452A1 (en) * 2002-08-29 2004-03-04 Lester Electrical Of Nebraska, Inc. Vehicle monitoring system
US20040245410A1 (en) * 2003-05-22 2004-12-09 General Electric Company Locomotive control system and method
WO2005091244A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2005-09-29 Zhurkovich Vitaly Vladimirovic Method for controlling transport means use and system for carrying out said method
US20050234642A1 (en) * 2004-04-15 2005-10-20 International Business Machines Corporation Location responsive application development and system
US20060030983A1 (en) * 2004-01-06 2006-02-09 Textron Inc. Apparatus and methods for facilitating vehicle maintenance
US20060044146A1 (en) * 2004-08-25 2006-03-02 Caterpillar Inc. Systems and methods for radio frequency trigger
US20060045127A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Honeywell International Inc. Portable communication interface device
US20060138285A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2006-06-29 General Electric Company Consist manager for managing two or more locomotives of a consist
US20070043488A1 (en) * 2005-08-18 2007-02-22 Environmental Systems Products Holdings Inc. System and method for testing the integrity of a vehicle testing/diagnostic system
US20070090797A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-04-26 Glosser Richard J Jr Battery charging system and method of operating same
US20080089709A1 (en) * 2006-10-17 2008-04-17 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Image forming apparatus
US20090112396A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Automobile servicing method, diagnostic server and automobile thereof
EP2115692A2 (en) * 2006-12-13 2009-11-11 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US8142304B2 (en) 2000-12-19 2012-03-27 Appalachian Technology, Llc Golf round data system golf club telemetry
US8172702B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2012-05-08 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc. Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US8221269B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2012-07-17 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US20120262126A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2012-10-18 Sb Limotive Germany Gmbh Method for initializing and operating a battery management system
US20140217979A1 (en) * 2011-09-07 2014-08-07 Electricite Reseau Distribution France Method and device for optimized recharging of an electric battery
US20140358342A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 E-Car Solar Llc Systems and methods for photovoltaic vehicle operation
US20140371962A1 (en) * 2013-06-18 2014-12-18 David W. Smith Vehicle immobilizer
US20150230427A1 (en) * 2012-09-04 2015-08-20 Lely Patent N.V. System and method for performing an animal-related action
US9135760B2 (en) 2013-11-13 2015-09-15 Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd. Information sharing system, on-vehicle diagnosis terminal, and display terminal
US9145067B1 (en) * 2014-06-05 2015-09-29 Shane J Dahlen System and method of monitoring and controlling motorized passenger carts
US9151232B2 (en) 2001-03-27 2015-10-06 General Electric Company Control system and method
US20150294319A1 (en) * 2010-06-14 2015-10-15 Knut Are Dyrdal System and method for assuring a correct performance of a manual operation
EP2821277A4 (en) * 2012-02-29 2015-11-25 Nissan Motor Device for restricting vehicle movement during connection with charging cable
US20160019729A1 (en) * 2013-03-04 2016-01-21 Padro David Gonzalez Vera System and method for the access to information contained in motor vehicles
US20160031324A1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-02-04 Hyundai Motor Company Method and system for diagnosing charging state
WO2016040143A1 (en) * 2014-09-09 2016-03-17 Panasonic Automotive Systems Company Of America, Divison Of Panasonic Corporation Of North America Smart plug and play automatic obd-ii system tester
US9342934B2 (en) * 2014-09-30 2016-05-17 Innova Electronics, Inc. Vehicle specific reset device and method
US20160233693A1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2016-08-11 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Electric storage system
US9449439B2 (en) 2014-08-05 2016-09-20 Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd. Battery state display system

Families Citing this family (132)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7239965B2 (en) * 2003-01-17 2007-07-03 Uplink Corporation Method and system for golf cart control
US7962119B2 (en) * 2003-06-30 2011-06-14 Harman Becker Automotive Systems Gmbh System for transmitting an emergency call
DE102004006848A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-09-01 Deere & Company, Moline A method and monitoring system for monitoring the condition of working machines
DE102004015163A1 (en) * 2004-02-13 2005-08-25 Volkswagen Ag Vehicle diagnosis procedure uses processor to filter operating and failure data against manufacturer supplied data
US20050182536A1 (en) * 2004-02-18 2005-08-18 Doyle Marquis D. Methods and apparatus for determining battery characteristics in a vehicle
DE102004035513A1 (en) * 2004-07-22 2006-02-16 Robert Bosch Gmbh A method for detecting the connection between the energy store and the electrical system of a vehicle
US7332881B2 (en) * 2004-10-28 2008-02-19 Textron Inc. AC drive system for electrically operated vehicle
NZ538796A (en) * 2005-03-10 2007-05-31 Brunswick New Technologies Asi Vehicle location and navigation system
KR100716893B1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-05-09 주식회사 현대오토넷 Apparatus and method for registrating a non-registration road in a car navigation system
DE102005041068B4 (en) * 2005-08-30 2007-06-06 Siemens Ag Test methods for the detection of deviations from geoobjects
DE102006009098A1 (en) * 2006-02-28 2007-08-30 Daimlerchrysler Ag Diagnosis data transmitting method for e.g. passenger car, involves transmitting connection request via channel of radio interface to onboard communication module found in vehicle
US7739007B2 (en) * 2006-03-29 2010-06-15 Snap-On Incorporated Vehicle diagnostic method and system with intelligent data collection
DE102006017644B4 (en) * 2006-04-12 2008-04-17 Dr.Ing.H.C. F. Porsche Ag Detection and diagnosis of vehicle data
US8428813B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2013-04-23 Service Solutions Us Llc Dynamic decision sequencing method and apparatus for optimizing a diagnostic test plan
US7765040B2 (en) * 2006-06-14 2010-07-27 Spx Corporation Reverse failure analysis method and apparatus for diagnostic testing
US8423226B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2013-04-16 Service Solutions U.S. Llc Dynamic decision sequencing method and apparatus for optimizing a diagnostic test plan
US7643916B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2010-01-05 Spx Corporation Vehicle state tracking method and apparatus for diagnostic testing
US9081883B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2015-07-14 Bosch Automotive Service Solutions Inc. Dynamic decision sequencing method and apparatus for optimizing a diagnostic test plan
US8762165B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2014-06-24 Bosch Automotive Service Solutions Llc Optimizing test procedures for a subject under test
US8775066B2 (en) * 2006-07-05 2014-07-08 Topcon Positioning Systems, Inc. Three dimensional terrain mapping
US20090066287A1 (en) * 2006-08-10 2009-03-12 V2Green, Inc. Business Methods in a Power Aggregation System for Distributed Electric Resources
GB0624191D0 (en) * 2006-12-04 2007-01-10 Nxp Bv Road toll system
US10013815B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2018-07-03 Crown Equipment Corporation Information system for industrial vehicles
US7849944B2 (en) * 2007-06-12 2010-12-14 Ut-Battelle, Llc Self-learning control system for plug-in hybrid vehicles
US7917251B2 (en) * 2007-09-05 2011-03-29 Consolidated Edison Company Of New York, Inc. Metering system and method of operation
US7693609B2 (en) * 2007-09-05 2010-04-06 Consolidated Edison Company Of New York, Inc. Hybrid vehicle recharging system and method of operation
JP4727636B2 (en) * 2007-09-13 2011-07-20 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Charging control device and a vehicle of the vehicle
US20100094496A1 (en) * 2008-09-19 2010-04-15 Barak Hershkovitz System and Method for Operating an Electric Vehicle
US8368348B2 (en) * 2007-09-20 2013-02-05 Semaconnect, Inc. Automated recharging system
US8054048B2 (en) * 2007-10-04 2011-11-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Power grid load management for plug-in vehicles
US8239094B2 (en) 2008-04-23 2012-08-07 Spx Corporation Test requirement list for diagnostic tests
US9853488B2 (en) * 2008-07-11 2017-12-26 Charge Fusion Technologies, Llc Systems and methods for electric vehicle charging and power management
JP5044524B2 (en) * 2008-10-27 2012-10-10 アイシン・エィ・ダブリュ株式会社 Point registration device
US7890228B2 (en) * 2008-12-01 2011-02-15 Savant Automation, Inc. Power source monitoring system for AGVs and method
BRPI1013676A2 (en) * 2009-04-03 2016-04-26 Crown Equip Corp methods to track the use of an industrial vehicle, to collect information related to a lock event occurred in an industrial vehicle, and to enable a replacement for a normal registration procedure for an industrial vehicle and industrial vehicle
US8970180B2 (en) * 2009-04-07 2015-03-03 Qualcomm Incorporated Wireless power transmission scheduling
DE102009025303A1 (en) * 2009-06-15 2010-12-16 Rwe Ag Method and apparatus for communication between an electric vehicle and a charging station
US8648700B2 (en) 2009-06-23 2014-02-11 Bosch Automotive Service Solutions Llc Alerts issued upon component detection failure
WO2011028649A2 (en) * 2009-09-01 2011-03-10 Crown Equipment Corporation Information system for industrial vehicles including cyclical recurring vehicle information message
US9367825B2 (en) 2009-10-23 2016-06-14 Viridity Energy, Inc. Facilitating revenue generation from wholesale electricity markets based on a self-tuning energy asset model
US9159108B2 (en) 2009-10-23 2015-10-13 Viridity Energy, Inc. Facilitating revenue generation from wholesale electricity markets
US9159042B2 (en) 2009-10-23 2015-10-13 Viridity Energy, Inc. Facilitating revenue generation from data shifting by data centers
US8457802B1 (en) 2009-10-23 2013-06-04 Viridity Energy, Inc. System and method for energy management
US8892264B2 (en) 2009-10-23 2014-11-18 Viridity Energy, Inc. Methods, apparatus and systems for managing energy assets
US20110130905A1 (en) * 2009-12-01 2011-06-02 Ise Corporation Remote Vehicle Monitoring and Diagnostic System and Method
JP5493962B2 (en) * 2010-02-12 2014-05-14 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Vehicle control system, a control method, and control program
DE112011100624B4 (en) * 2010-02-22 2017-12-28 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Power supply control device and information providing device
KR101377035B1 (en) 2010-02-25 2014-03-26 주식회사 만도 Method for determining target of vehicle collision reduction apparatus and vehicle collision reduction apparatus therefor
US8346420B2 (en) * 2010-03-23 2013-01-01 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for predicting vehicle energy consumption
US8836490B2 (en) * 2010-04-09 2014-09-16 Dsg Tag Systems Inc. Vehicle management
US9280902B2 (en) * 2010-04-09 2016-03-08 DSG TAG Systems, Inc. Facilities management
US8954225B2 (en) * 2010-04-22 2015-02-10 Mission Motor Company Remote monitoring of a plurality of vehicles
US8841881B2 (en) 2010-06-02 2014-09-23 Bryan Marc Failing Energy transfer with vehicles
US20120025759A1 (en) * 2010-08-02 2012-02-02 Consolidated Edison Company Of New York, Inc. Electric Charger for Vehicle
FR2963698B1 (en) * 2010-08-05 2015-06-12 E4V System storage batteries manager
JP5506943B2 (en) * 2010-10-05 2014-05-28 三菱電機株式会社 The charge control device
US8401722B2 (en) * 2010-12-22 2013-03-19 Ford Global Technologies, Llc System and method for charging a vehicle battery
US9527398B2 (en) * 2011-01-20 2016-12-27 General Motors Llc Virtual charge for electric vehicles
US20120233077A1 (en) * 2011-03-07 2012-09-13 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Electric charging station reservation system and method
ES2530870T3 (en) * 2011-03-11 2015-03-06 Telit Automotive Solutions Nv System and method of toll roads
US20120245756A1 (en) * 2011-03-23 2012-09-27 Tk Holdings Inc. Driver assistance system
US8727056B2 (en) * 2011-04-01 2014-05-20 Navman Wireless North America Ltd. Systems and methods for generating and using moving violation alerts
US9346365B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-05-24 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for electric vehicle (EV) charging, charging unit (CU) interfaces, auxiliary batteries, and remote access and user notifications
US9189900B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-11-17 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for assigning e-keys to users to access and drive vehicles
US9365188B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-06-14 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for using cloud services to assign e-keys to access vehicles
US9171268B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-10-27 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for setting and transferring user profiles to vehicles and temporary sharing of user profiles to shared-use vehicles
US9104537B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-08-11 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for generating setting recommendation to user accounts for registered vehicles via cloud systems and remotely applying settings
US9818088B2 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-11-14 Emerging Automotive, Llc Vehicles and cloud systems for providing recommendations to vehicle users to handle alerts associated with the vehicle
US9371007B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-06-21 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for automatic electric vehicle identification and charging via wireless charging pads
US9348492B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-05-24 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for providing access to specific vehicle controls, functions, environment and applications to guests/passengers via personal mobile devices
US9285944B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-03-15 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for defining custom vehicle user interface configurations and cloud services for managing applications for the user interface and learned setting functions
US9648107B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-05-09 Angel A. Penilla Methods and cloud systems for using connected object state data for informing and alerting connected vehicle drivers of state changes
US9229905B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-01-05 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for defining vehicle user profiles and managing user profiles via cloud systems and applying learned settings to user profiles
US9230440B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-01-05 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for locating public parking and receiving security ratings for parking locations and generating notifications to vehicle user accounts regarding alerts and cloud access to security information
US9139091B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-09-22 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for setting and/or assigning advisor accounts to entities for specific vehicle aspects and cloud management of advisor accounts
US9855947B1 (en) 2012-04-22 2018-01-02 Emerging Automotive, Llc Connected vehicle communication with processing alerts related to connected objects and cloud systems
US9697503B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-07-04 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for providing recommendations to vehicle users to handle alerts associated with the vehicle and a bidding market place for handling alerts/service of the vehicle
US9180783B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-11-10 Penilla Angel A Methods and systems for electric vehicle (EV) charge location color-coded charge state indicators, cloud applications and user notifications
US9809196B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-11-07 Emerging Automotive, Llc Methods and systems for vehicle security and remote access and safety control interfaces and notifications
US9581997B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-02-28 Angel A. Penilla Method and system for cloud-based communication for automatic driverless movement
US9536197B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2017-01-03 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for processing data streams from data producing objects of vehicle and home entities and generating recommendations and settings
US9123035B2 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-09-01 Angel A. Penilla Electric vehicle (EV) range extending charge systems, distributed networks of charge kiosks, and charge locating mobile apps
US9493130B2 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-11-15 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for communicating content to connected vehicle users based detected tone/mood in voice input
US9288270B1 (en) 2011-04-22 2016-03-15 Angel A. Penilla Systems for learning user preferences and generating recommendations to make settings at connected vehicles and interfacing with cloud systems
US9215274B2 (en) 2011-04-22 2015-12-15 Angel A. Penilla Methods and systems for generating recommendations to make settings at vehicles via cloud systems
US9505318B2 (en) * 2011-05-26 2016-11-29 Sierra Smart Systems, Llc Electric vehicle fleet charging system
US9000722B2 (en) * 2011-07-01 2015-04-07 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Electric vehicle charging strategy
WO2013016570A1 (en) 2011-07-26 2013-01-31 Gogoro, Inc. Apparatus, method and article for authentication, security and control of power storage devices, such as batteries, based on user profiles
US9182244B2 (en) 2011-07-26 2015-11-10 Gogoro Inc. Apparatus, method and article for authentication, security and control of power storage devices, such as batteries
JP5960260B2 (en) 2011-07-26 2016-08-02 ゴゴロ インク Collecting power storage device, charging, and apparatus for providing the location of the dispensing machine, methods, and articles
TWI618019B (en) 2011-07-26 2018-03-11 Gogoro Inc Method, system and medium for portable electrical energy storage devices
JP2014525230A (en) 2011-07-26 2014-09-25 ゴゴロ インク Dynamic restriction of vehicle operation for the best effort Economy
CN103918155B (en) 2011-07-26 2017-04-12 睿能创意公司 Physical security apparatus for a vehicle power storage device, the method and articles
US20130030920A1 (en) 2011-07-26 2013-01-31 Gogoro, Inc. Apparatus, method and article for providing information regarding availability of power storage devices at a power storage device collection, charging and distribution machine
JP5793245B2 (en) * 2011-07-26 2015-10-14 ゴゴロ インク Apparatus for providing a vehicle diagnostic data, methods, and articles
WO2013016564A2 (en) 2011-07-26 2013-01-31 Gogoro, Inc. Apparatus, method and article for reserving power storage devices at reserving power storage device collection, charging and distribution machines
US10186094B2 (en) 2011-07-26 2019-01-22 Gogoro Inc. Apparatus, method and article for providing locations of power storage device collection, charging and distribution machines
JP6058665B2 (en) 2011-07-26 2017-01-11 ゴゴロ インク Collect power storage device, such as a battery, charging device for dispensing, methods and articles
EP2737594B1 (en) 2011-07-26 2019-02-13 Gogoro Inc. Apparatus, method and article for a power storage device compartment
US8768549B2 (en) * 2011-11-04 2014-07-01 Tennant Company Battery maintenance system
US9659500B2 (en) 2011-12-05 2017-05-23 Navman Wireless North America Ltd. Safety monitoring in systems of mobile assets
US8886392B1 (en) * 2011-12-21 2014-11-11 Intellectual Ventures Fund 79 Llc Methods, devices, and mediums associated with managing vehicle maintenance activities
US9637019B2 (en) * 2012-01-09 2017-05-02 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for charging a plug-in electric vehicle
US20130200855A1 (en) * 2012-02-02 2013-08-08 Robert Bosch Gmbh System and Method for Discharging a Battery in a Vehicle after a Crash
US9045042B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2015-06-02 Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. System and method for a one-time departure schedule setup for charging battery-electric vehicles
US10217160B2 (en) * 2012-04-22 2019-02-26 Emerging Automotive, Llc Methods and systems for processing charge availability and route paths for obtaining charge for electric vehicles
US20140025444A1 (en) * 2012-07-23 2014-01-23 Payurtoll LLC Universal Toll Tag Device and Systems and Methods to Automate Toll Payments
JP5974108B2 (en) * 2012-10-01 2016-08-23 日立オートモティブシステムズ株式会社 Control device for an electric vehicle
BR112015011290A2 (en) 2012-11-16 2017-07-11 Gogoro Inc apparatus, method, and article for performing carrier signal curve
DE102012221133A1 (en) * 2012-11-20 2014-05-22 Robert Bosch Gmbh Apparatus for testing and maintenance of a high-voltage battery and uses this device
US9854438B2 (en) 2013-03-06 2017-12-26 Gogoro Inc. Apparatus, method and article for authentication, security and control of portable charging devices and power storage devices, such as batteries
US8798852B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2014-08-05 Gogoro, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for authentication of vehicular components
US9171276B2 (en) * 2013-05-06 2015-10-27 Viridity Energy, Inc. Facilitating revenue generation from wholesale electricity markets using an engineering-based model
US9098876B2 (en) 2013-05-06 2015-08-04 Viridity Energy, Inc. Facilitating revenue generation from wholesale electricity markets based on a self-tuning energy asset model
US20150018984A1 (en) * 2013-07-11 2015-01-15 General Electric Company Monitoring interface
CN105705370B (en) 2013-08-06 2018-03-23 睿能创意公司 Based on the electric-vehicle system electrical energy storage device thermal profile
EP3030453A4 (en) 2013-08-06 2017-02-08 Gogoro Inc. Systems and methods for powering electric vehicles using a single or multiple power cells
CN105579268B (en) * 2013-08-29 2019-04-05 Kpit技术有限责任公司 For vehicle to be converted to the modifying system of hybrid electric vehicle or electric vehicle
US9047722B2 (en) * 2013-10-03 2015-06-02 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Vehicle location and fault diagnostic systems and methods
US9124085B2 (en) 2013-11-04 2015-09-01 Gogoro Inc. Apparatus, method and article for power storage device failure safety
CN105873797B (en) 2013-11-08 2018-06-29 睿能创意公司 Means for providing a vehicle event data, the method and article
US20150153184A1 (en) * 2013-12-04 2015-06-04 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for dynamically focusing vehicle sensors
TWI645646B (en) 2014-01-23 2018-12-21 英屬開曼群島商睿能創意公司 System and method are arranged in a matrix of the electrical energy storage device
US9701214B2 (en) 2014-04-21 2017-07-11 Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd. Information sharing system, on-vehicle diagnosis terminal, and display terminal
US10017068B2 (en) * 2014-06-19 2018-07-10 Proterra Inc. Charging of a fleet of electric vehicles
US9407024B2 (en) 2014-08-11 2016-08-02 Gogoro Inc. Multidirectional electrical connector, plug and system
USD789883S1 (en) 2014-09-04 2017-06-20 Gogoro Inc. Collection, charging and distribution device for portable electrical energy storage devices
US9238450B1 (en) * 2014-09-09 2016-01-19 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Vehicle master reset
CN104442735B (en) * 2014-10-31 2016-05-25 芜湖国氢能源股份有限公司 Intelligent positioning fuel monitoring system for hydrogen cars
US9910433B1 (en) * 2016-10-17 2018-03-06 General Electric Company System for remotely operating a vehicle system
US10017169B1 (en) 2016-12-30 2018-07-10 Textron Innovations Inc. Controlling an electric brake of a utility vehicle which has a lithium battery management system
US10195948B2 (en) 2017-03-07 2019-02-05 Textron Innovations Inc. Controlling charge on a lithium battery of a utility vehicle

Citations (48)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3786411A (en) * 1970-11-26 1974-01-15 Sumitomo Electric Industries Device for detecting location of a movable body
US3868692A (en) * 1973-09-13 1975-02-25 Roland L Woodard Golf yardage finder
US4027840A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-06-07 International Standard Electric Corporation Vehicle position indicator with radar interrogation each of spaced transponders disposed along a pathway for the vehicle
US4156873A (en) * 1977-07-25 1979-05-29 Motorola, Inc. Transponder for a moving vehicle tracking system
US4297701A (en) * 1979-08-08 1981-10-27 John D. Angleman Rangefinder using expanded time delay
US4303243A (en) * 1980-06-17 1981-12-01 Wolfe Noah T System and method of timing golfers on a golf course
US4419655A (en) * 1980-07-30 1983-12-06 Precision Golf Design, Inc. Golf course play indicator devices
US4480310A (en) * 1980-05-30 1984-10-30 Alvarez Luis W Dead reckoning range finding device for cart
US4656476A (en) * 1985-08-26 1987-04-07 Richard Tavtigian Warning device for golf carts
US4698781A (en) * 1983-08-01 1987-10-06 Spymark, Incorporated Systems for determining distances to and locations of features on a golf course
US4702342A (en) * 1986-01-03 1987-10-27 Judy Hale Golf cart entertainment system
US4819174A (en) * 1986-06-09 1989-04-04 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Road navigation system
US4863123A (en) * 1986-01-07 1989-09-05 Societe Nationale Des Chemins De Fer Francais Process and system for localizing a mobile unit which travels on a system of railroads
US4926161A (en) * 1989-10-23 1990-05-15 Cupp Ted W Method of monitoring golf carts on a golf course
US5097416A (en) * 1990-01-16 1992-03-17 Matthews Gordon H System for monitoring play of a golfer
US5319548A (en) * 1993-04-27 1994-06-07 Germain Craig D Interactive golf game information system
US5319368A (en) * 1992-04-30 1994-06-07 Poholek Ernest M Golf car limiting system
US5326095A (en) * 1988-03-21 1994-07-05 Yardmark, Inc. Golf information system
US5349535A (en) * 1992-10-20 1994-09-20 Digicomp Research Corporation Battery condition monitoring and recording system for electric vehicles
US5364093A (en) * 1991-12-10 1994-11-15 Huston Charles D Golf distance measuring system and method
US5434789A (en) * 1993-10-06 1995-07-18 Fraker; William F. GPS golf diagnostic system
US5438518A (en) * 1994-01-19 1995-08-01 Bianco; Joseph A. Player positioning and distance finding system
US5469175A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-11-21 Golf Scoring Systems Unlimited, Inc. System and method for measuring distance between two objects on a golf course
US5507485A (en) * 1994-04-28 1996-04-16 Roblor Marketing Group, Inc. Golf computer and golf replay device
US5524081A (en) * 1994-05-02 1996-06-04 Paul; Benjamin J. Golf information and course mangement system
US5528888A (en) * 1993-12-27 1996-06-25 Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Autonomous mowing vehicle and apparatus for detecting boundary of mowed field
US5606242A (en) * 1994-10-04 1997-02-25 Duracell, Inc. Smart battery algorithm for reporting battery parameters to an external device
US5619417A (en) * 1994-11-23 1997-04-08 Chrysler Corporation Battery monitoring system for an electric vehicle
US5684476A (en) * 1993-12-30 1997-11-04 Concord, Inc. Field navigation system
US5685786A (en) * 1994-05-11 1997-11-11 Yardmark, Inc. Passive golf information system and method
US5689431A (en) * 1995-04-18 1997-11-18 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Golf course yardage and information system
US5703464A (en) * 1995-06-28 1997-12-30 Amerigon, Inc. Radio frequency energy management system
US5711388A (en) * 1995-07-20 1998-01-27 Golfpro International, Inc. Robotic golf caddy apparatus and method
US5751244A (en) * 1991-12-10 1998-05-12 Huston; Charles D. Method and apparatus for calibration of a GPS receiver
US5772534A (en) * 1992-09-09 1998-06-30 Dudley; Douglas P. Satellite enhanced golf information system
US5810680A (en) * 1996-07-17 1998-09-22 Lawrence P. Lobb Computer aided game apparatus
US5873797A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-02-23 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Remote golf ball locator
US5904726A (en) * 1994-01-19 1999-05-18 Golf Age Technologies Partnership Accelerometer-based golf distancing apparatus
US5930742A (en) * 1996-12-19 1999-07-27 Golf Car Systems, Inc. Wheeled fleet information processing and reporting system including hubmeter
US5944132A (en) * 1995-07-20 1999-08-31 Golfpro International, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling robotic golf caddy apparatus
US6024655A (en) * 1997-03-31 2000-02-15 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Map-matching golf navigation system
US6029121A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-02-22 Stashko; Stephen O. Golf pin distance measuring system
US6052647A (en) * 1997-06-20 2000-04-18 Stanford University Method and system for automatic control of vehicles based on carrier phase differential GPS
US6171199B1 (en) * 1998-08-20 2001-01-09 Callahan & Associates, Inc. Method and system of providing information on golf courses for players and for course design and modification
US6184656B1 (en) * 1995-06-28 2001-02-06 Aevt, Inc. Radio frequency energy management system
US6236940B1 (en) * 1995-09-08 2001-05-22 Prolink, Inc. Display monitor for golf cart yardage and information system
US6236360B1 (en) * 1995-04-18 2001-05-22 Richard W. Rudow Golf course yardage and information system
US6246932B1 (en) * 1997-02-20 2001-06-12 Komatsu Ltd. Vehicle monitor for controlling movements of a plurality of vehicles

Family Cites Families (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS61150853A (en) 1984-12-25 1986-07-09 Nissan Motor Co Ltd Car theft detecting device
DE4344368C1 (en) * 1993-12-24 1995-05-11 Daimler Benz Ag Charge information system for an electrical or hybrid vehicle
US5631536A (en) * 1994-05-16 1997-05-20 Tseng; Ling-Yuan Rechargeable battery vending apparatus
JP3498401B2 (en) 1995-01-10 2004-02-16 株式会社タツノ・メカトロニクス Anti-theft system in the vehicle transport
JP3554057B2 (en) * 1995-02-06 2004-08-11 本田技研工業株式会社 Electric vehicle battery charging control device
JPH08237810A (en) * 1995-02-27 1996-09-13 Aqueous Res:Kk Hybrid vehicle
US6114833A (en) * 1995-04-14 2000-09-05 Lester Electrical Of Nebraska, Inc. Monitoring and controlling system for battery and battery charger
US5732074A (en) * 1996-01-16 1998-03-24 Cellport Labs, Inc. Mobile portable wireless communication system
JPH1024784A (en) 1996-07-09 1998-01-27 Hitachi Ltd Vehicle, vehicle card system and vehicle maintenance method
JPH1056989A (en) 1996-08-14 1998-03-03 Amacos:Kk Production of boiled rice or gruel having good texture
US5803215A (en) * 1997-01-22 1998-09-08 Schott Power Systems Incorporated Method and apparatus for charging a plurality of electric vehicles
US7126341B2 (en) * 1997-11-03 2006-10-24 Midtronics, Inc. Automotive vehicle electrical system diagnostic device
DE19853456A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 1999-07-15 Robert Eberhart Holzgethan System for transmission of remote control signals, e.g. for convertible car roofs, garage doors
JPH11256542A (en) * 1998-03-09 1999-09-21 Nippon Josetsuki Seisakusho:Kk Automatic spraying system of anti-freezing agent spraying vehicle
JPH11272995A (en) 1998-03-23 1999-10-08 Mitsubishi Motors Corp Operation control device for traveling object
JPH11312292A (en) * 1998-04-28 1999-11-09 Honda Motor Co Ltd System used in common to vehicles
US6101433A (en) * 1998-12-07 2000-08-08 Challenger Enterprises, Llc Automated vehicle preventative maintenance system
US7356494B2 (en) * 1999-05-19 2008-04-08 I.D. Systems, Inc. Robust wireless communications system architecture and asset management applications performed thereon
US6941197B1 (en) * 1999-07-07 2005-09-06 The Regents Of The University Of California Vehicle sharing system and method with vehicle parameter tracking
JP2001076012A (en) 1999-08-31 2001-03-23 Hitachi Ltd Method and device for gathering vehicle information
US6952680B1 (en) * 1999-11-16 2005-10-04 Dana Corporation Apparatus and method for tracking and managing physical assets
US6339736B1 (en) * 2000-03-31 2002-01-15 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for the distribution of automotive services
US7256516B2 (en) * 2000-06-14 2007-08-14 Aerovironment Inc. Battery charging system and method
DE10032020A1 (en) 2000-07-01 2002-01-10 Gap Ag Gsm Applikationen Und P Arrangement for monitoring object position has monitoring control unit that determines reference location area depending on at least one instantaneous position specified by position signal
BR0113353A (en) * 2000-08-18 2004-10-19 Nnt Inc System and method for remote vehicle diagnostics, monitoring, configuration reprogramming
US20020184078A1 (en) * 2001-06-05 2002-12-05 Robert Uyeki Priority-based vehicle allocation methods
US20040044452A1 (en) * 2002-08-29 2004-03-04 Lester Electrical Of Nebraska, Inc. Vehicle monitoring system
US6625539B1 (en) * 2002-10-22 2003-09-23 Electricab Taxi Company Range prediction in fleet management of electric and fuel-cell vehicles
US7239965B2 (en) * 2003-01-17 2007-07-03 Uplink Corporation Method and system for golf cart control

Patent Citations (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3786411A (en) * 1970-11-26 1974-01-15 Sumitomo Electric Industries Device for detecting location of a movable body
US3868692A (en) * 1973-09-13 1975-02-25 Roland L Woodard Golf yardage finder
US4027840A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-06-07 International Standard Electric Corporation Vehicle position indicator with radar interrogation each of spaced transponders disposed along a pathway for the vehicle
US4156873A (en) * 1977-07-25 1979-05-29 Motorola, Inc. Transponder for a moving vehicle tracking system
US4297701A (en) * 1979-08-08 1981-10-27 John D. Angleman Rangefinder using expanded time delay
US4480310A (en) * 1980-05-30 1984-10-30 Alvarez Luis W Dead reckoning range finding device for cart
US4303243A (en) * 1980-06-17 1981-12-01 Wolfe Noah T System and method of timing golfers on a golf course
US4419655A (en) * 1980-07-30 1983-12-06 Precision Golf Design, Inc. Golf course play indicator devices
US4698781A (en) * 1983-08-01 1987-10-06 Spymark, Incorporated Systems for determining distances to and locations of features on a golf course
US4656476A (en) * 1985-08-26 1987-04-07 Richard Tavtigian Warning device for golf carts
US4702342A (en) * 1986-01-03 1987-10-27 Judy Hale Golf cart entertainment system
US4863123A (en) * 1986-01-07 1989-09-05 Societe Nationale Des Chemins De Fer Francais Process and system for localizing a mobile unit which travels on a system of railroads
US4819174A (en) * 1986-06-09 1989-04-04 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Road navigation system
US5326095A (en) * 1988-03-21 1994-07-05 Yardmark, Inc. Golf information system
US4926161A (en) * 1989-10-23 1990-05-15 Cupp Ted W Method of monitoring golf carts on a golf course
US5097416A (en) * 1990-01-16 1992-03-17 Matthews Gordon H System for monitoring play of a golfer
US5364093A (en) * 1991-12-10 1994-11-15 Huston Charles D Golf distance measuring system and method
US5751244A (en) * 1991-12-10 1998-05-12 Huston; Charles D. Method and apparatus for calibration of a GPS receiver
US5319368A (en) * 1992-04-30 1994-06-07 Poholek Ernest M Golf car limiting system
US5772534A (en) * 1992-09-09 1998-06-30 Dudley; Douglas P. Satellite enhanced golf information system
US5349535A (en) * 1992-10-20 1994-09-20 Digicomp Research Corporation Battery condition monitoring and recording system for electric vehicles
US5469175A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-11-21 Golf Scoring Systems Unlimited, Inc. System and method for measuring distance between two objects on a golf course
US5319548A (en) * 1993-04-27 1994-06-07 Germain Craig D Interactive golf game information system
US5434789A (en) * 1993-10-06 1995-07-18 Fraker; William F. GPS golf diagnostic system
US5528888A (en) * 1993-12-27 1996-06-25 Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Autonomous mowing vehicle and apparatus for detecting boundary of mowed field
US5684476A (en) * 1993-12-30 1997-11-04 Concord, Inc. Field navigation system
US5904726A (en) * 1994-01-19 1999-05-18 Golf Age Technologies Partnership Accelerometer-based golf distancing apparatus
US5438518A (en) * 1994-01-19 1995-08-01 Bianco; Joseph A. Player positioning and distance finding system
US5507485A (en) * 1994-04-28 1996-04-16 Roblor Marketing Group, Inc. Golf computer and golf replay device
US5524081A (en) * 1994-05-02 1996-06-04 Paul; Benjamin J. Golf information and course mangement system
US5685786A (en) * 1994-05-11 1997-11-11 Yardmark, Inc. Passive golf information system and method
US5606242A (en) * 1994-10-04 1997-02-25 Duracell, Inc. Smart battery algorithm for reporting battery parameters to an external device
US5619417A (en) * 1994-11-23 1997-04-08 Chrysler Corporation Battery monitoring system for an electric vehicle
US6236360B1 (en) * 1995-04-18 2001-05-22 Richard W. Rudow Golf course yardage and information system
US5878369A (en) * 1995-04-18 1999-03-02 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Golf course yardage and information system
US5689431A (en) * 1995-04-18 1997-11-18 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Golf course yardage and information system
US6184656B1 (en) * 1995-06-28 2001-02-06 Aevt, Inc. Radio frequency energy management system
US5703464A (en) * 1995-06-28 1997-12-30 Amerigon, Inc. Radio frequency energy management system
US5711388A (en) * 1995-07-20 1998-01-27 Golfpro International, Inc. Robotic golf caddy apparatus and method
US5944132A (en) * 1995-07-20 1999-08-31 Golfpro International, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling robotic golf caddy apparatus
US6236940B1 (en) * 1995-09-08 2001-05-22 Prolink, Inc. Display monitor for golf cart yardage and information system
US5810680A (en) * 1996-07-17 1998-09-22 Lawrence P. Lobb Computer aided game apparatus
US5930742A (en) * 1996-12-19 1999-07-27 Golf Car Systems, Inc. Wheeled fleet information processing and reporting system including hubmeter
US6246932B1 (en) * 1997-02-20 2001-06-12 Komatsu Ltd. Vehicle monitor for controlling movements of a plurality of vehicles
US6024655A (en) * 1997-03-31 2000-02-15 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Map-matching golf navigation system
US5873797A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-02-23 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Remote golf ball locator
US6052647A (en) * 1997-06-20 2000-04-18 Stanford University Method and system for automatic control of vehicles based on carrier phase differential GPS
US6029121A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-02-22 Stashko; Stephen O. Golf pin distance measuring system
US6171199B1 (en) * 1998-08-20 2001-01-09 Callahan & Associates, Inc. Method and system of providing information on golf courses for players and for course design and modification

Cited By (66)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8556752B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2013-10-15 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc. Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US9656134B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2017-05-23 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc. Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US8221269B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2012-07-17 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US8172702B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2012-05-08 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc. Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US8523711B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2013-09-03 Skyhawke Technologies, Llc. Personal golfing assistant and method and system for graphically displaying golf related information and for collection, processing and distribution of golf related data
US8142304B2 (en) 2000-12-19 2012-03-27 Appalachian Technology, Llc Golf round data system golf club telemetry
US8535170B2 (en) 2000-12-19 2013-09-17 Appalachian Technology, Llc Device and method for displaying golf shot data
US8758170B2 (en) 2000-12-19 2014-06-24 Appalachian Technology, Llc Device and method for displaying golf shot data
US9656147B2 (en) 2000-12-19 2017-05-23 Appalachian Technology, Llc Golf player aid with stroke result forecasting
US9151232B2 (en) 2001-03-27 2015-10-06 General Electric Company Control system and method
US20060138285A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2006-06-29 General Electric Company Consist manager for managing two or more locomotives of a consist
US7618011B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2009-11-17 General Electric Company Consist manager for managing two or more locomotives of a consist
US7127386B2 (en) * 2002-03-22 2006-10-24 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Java telematics emulator
US20030182099A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2003-09-25 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Java telematics emulator
US20040044452A1 (en) * 2002-08-29 2004-03-04 Lester Electrical Of Nebraska, Inc. Vehicle monitoring system
US7131614B2 (en) * 2003-05-22 2006-11-07 General Electric Company Locomotive control system and method
US20040245410A1 (en) * 2003-05-22 2004-12-09 General Electric Company Locomotive control system and method
US20060030983A1 (en) * 2004-01-06 2006-02-09 Textron Inc. Apparatus and methods for facilitating vehicle maintenance
WO2005091244A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2005-09-29 Zhurkovich Vitaly Vladimirovic Method for controlling transport means use and system for carrying out said method
US20050234642A1 (en) * 2004-04-15 2005-10-20 International Business Machines Corporation Location responsive application development and system
US7330117B2 (en) * 2004-08-25 2008-02-12 Caterpillar Inc. Systems and methods for radio frequency trigger
US20060044146A1 (en) * 2004-08-25 2006-03-02 Caterpillar Inc. Systems and methods for radio frequency trigger
US7457311B2 (en) 2004-08-31 2008-11-25 Honeywell International Inc. Portable communication interface device
US20060045127A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Honeywell International Inc. Portable communication interface device
US7945358B2 (en) * 2005-08-18 2011-05-17 Environmental Systems Products Holdings Inc. System and method for testing the integrity of a vehicle testing/diagnostic system
US20070043488A1 (en) * 2005-08-18 2007-02-22 Environmental Systems Products Holdings Inc. System and method for testing the integrity of a vehicle testing/diagnostic system
US20120016552A1 (en) * 2005-08-18 2012-01-19 Enviromental Systems Products Holding Inc. System and method for testing the integrity of a vehicle testing/diagnostic system
US8355837B2 (en) * 2005-08-18 2013-01-15 Envirotest Systems Holdings Corp. System and method for testing the integrity of a vehicle testing/diagnostic system
US20070090797A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-04-26 Glosser Richard J Jr Battery charging system and method of operating same
US7642748B2 (en) 2005-10-19 2010-01-05 General Electric Company Battery charging system and method of operating same
US7769312B2 (en) * 2006-10-17 2010-08-03 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Image forming apparatus including operational cost efficiency management unit
US20080089709A1 (en) * 2006-10-17 2008-04-17 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Image forming apparatus
US8239251B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2012-08-07 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US8249910B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2012-08-21 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US8239252B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2012-08-07 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
EP2115692A4 (en) * 2006-12-13 2011-11-16 Crown Equip Corp Fleet management system
EP2963613A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2016-01-06 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
EP2115692A2 (en) * 2006-12-13 2009-11-11 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US9152933B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2015-10-06 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US9632506B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2017-04-25 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
EP2963596A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2016-01-06 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US9202186B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2015-12-01 Crown Equipment Corporation Fleet management system
US20090112396A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Automobile servicing method, diagnostic server and automobile thereof
US20120262126A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2012-10-18 Sb Limotive Germany Gmbh Method for initializing and operating a battery management system
US9643508B2 (en) * 2009-10-09 2017-05-09 Samsung Sdi Co., Ltd. Method for estimating an accurate state of charge for initializing a battery management system
US20150294319A1 (en) * 2010-06-14 2015-10-15 Knut Are Dyrdal System and method for assuring a correct performance of a manual operation
US20140217979A1 (en) * 2011-09-07 2014-08-07 Electricite Reseau Distribution France Method and device for optimized recharging of an electric battery
US9511671B2 (en) 2012-02-29 2016-12-06 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Device for restricting vehicle movement during connection with charging cable
EP2821277A4 (en) * 2012-02-29 2015-11-25 Nissan Motor Device for restricting vehicle movement during connection with charging cable
US20150230427A1 (en) * 2012-09-04 2015-08-20 Lely Patent N.V. System and method for performing an animal-related action
US9924699B2 (en) * 2012-09-04 2018-03-27 Lely Patent N.V. System and method for performing an animal-related action
US9633485B2 (en) * 2013-03-04 2017-04-25 Pedro David GONZÁLEZ VERA System and method for the access to information contained in motor vehicles
US20160019729A1 (en) * 2013-03-04 2016-01-21 Padro David Gonzalez Vera System and method for the access to information contained in motor vehicles
US20140358342A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 E-Car Solar Llc Systems and methods for photovoltaic vehicle operation
US9090171B2 (en) * 2013-06-18 2015-07-28 David W. Smith Vehicle immobilizer
US20140371962A1 (en) * 2013-06-18 2014-12-18 David W. Smith Vehicle immobilizer
US9135760B2 (en) 2013-11-13 2015-09-15 Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd. Information sharing system, on-vehicle diagnosis terminal, and display terminal
US20160233693A1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2016-08-11 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Electric storage system
US9973018B2 (en) * 2013-12-18 2018-05-15 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Electric storage system
US9145067B1 (en) * 2014-06-05 2015-09-29 Shane J Dahlen System and method of monitoring and controlling motorized passenger carts
US20160031324A1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-02-04 Hyundai Motor Company Method and system for diagnosing charging state
US9566865B2 (en) * 2014-08-01 2017-02-14 Hyundai Motor Company Method and system for diagnosing charging state
US9449439B2 (en) 2014-08-05 2016-09-20 Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd. Battery state display system
WO2016040143A1 (en) * 2014-09-09 2016-03-17 Panasonic Automotive Systems Company Of America, Divison Of Panasonic Corporation Of North America Smart plug and play automatic obd-ii system tester
US9781527B2 (en) 2014-09-09 2017-10-03 Panasonic Automotive Systems Company Of America, Division Of Panasonic Corporation Of North America Smart plug and play automatic OBD-II system tester
US9342934B2 (en) * 2014-09-30 2016-05-17 Innova Electronics, Inc. Vehicle specific reset device and method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU2003218203A8 (en) 2003-10-08
WO2003081538A3 (en) 2004-04-08
JP2005521170A (en) 2005-07-14
AU2003218203A1 (en) 2003-10-08
US7778746B2 (en) 2010-08-17
KR20040091766A (en) 2004-10-28
JP4373224B2 (en) 2009-11-25
WO2003081538A2 (en) 2003-10-02
US20060052918A1 (en) 2006-03-09

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9610856B2 (en) Network-controlled charging system for electric vehicles
US6920382B2 (en) Repair and maintenance support system and a car corresponding to the system
US8515629B2 (en) System for managing operation of an industrial vehicle in restricted areas
JP5228322B2 (en) Power storage device degradation assessment systems, vehicle, recording a computer-readable recording medium a program for implementing the deterioration evaluation method and the deterioration evaluation method of a power storage device to the computer
US20110029157A1 (en) Remote Rechargeable Monitoring System and Method
US20180072175A1 (en) Systems and methods for charging an electric vehicle at a charging station
US20050234622A1 (en) Steering control system and method
US9026347B2 (en) Smart electric vehicle (EV) charging and grid integration apparatus and methods
EP2305510A2 (en) Kiosk vehicle charging and selecting system
US8364388B2 (en) Traveling guidance system, traveling guidance method, and computer program
US20110130905A1 (en) Remote Vehicle Monitoring and Diagnostic System and Method
US20110130916A1 (en) Location Based Vehicle Data Logging and Diagnostic System and Method
US6701234B1 (en) Portable motion recording device for motor vehicles
CA2121470C (en) Charging station for electric vehicles
CN100504955C (en) Method in a communication network for distributing vehicle driving information and system implementing the method
US9519905B2 (en) Recording and reporting of driving characteristics using wireless mobile device
CN102591272B (en) For monitoring vehicle energy methods and systems
US10150381B2 (en) Street light mounted network-controlled charge transfer device for electric vehicles
US20110258112A1 (en) System and method for charging a vehicle
US8000852B2 (en) Vehicle preferential treatment system, electrically powered vehicle, server used for vehicle preferential treatment system, and vehicle preferential treatment method
US8890475B1 (en) Automobile charging and communications station
CN104044462B (en) Calendar-based user interface event of a system and method
US8564454B2 (en) Information providing system, information center, in-vehicle device and information providing method
US6556899B1 (en) Bus diagnostic and control system and method
US9317033B2 (en) Control of the autonomous mode of bimodal vehicles

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CLUB CAR, INC., GEORGIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MCLEOD, PAUL W.;MCCLYMONDS, KEN;HUMMERT, GEORGE T.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:014080/0526;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030422 TO 20030428