US20030188862A1 - System and method for sensing and monitoring the status/performance of a downhole tool - Google Patents

System and method for sensing and monitoring the status/performance of a downhole tool Download PDF

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Publication number
US20030188862A1
US20030188862A1 US10116235 US11623502A US2003188862A1 US 20030188862 A1 US20030188862 A1 US 20030188862A1 US 10116235 US10116235 US 10116235 US 11623502 A US11623502 A US 11623502A US 2003188862 A1 US2003188862 A1 US 2003188862A1
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Prior art keywords
member
tool
method
sensing
step
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10116235
Inventor
Steven Streich
Roger Schultz
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Halliburton Energy Services Inc
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Halliburton Energy Services Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B47/00Survey of boreholes or wells
    • E21B47/0002Survey of boreholes or wells by visual inspection
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B33/00Sealing or packing boreholes or wells
    • E21B33/10Sealing or packing boreholes or wells in the borehole
    • E21B33/12Packers; Plugs
    • E21B33/129Packers; Plugs with mechanical slips for hooking into the casing

Abstract

A system and method for sensing and monitoring the status/performance of components of a downhole tool to enable any problems to be corrected.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • In order to produce oil and gas from a subterranean well, oil field tubulars, commonly called a “work string,” are inserted in the well bore, or in a casing located in the well bore. Packers and downhole tools are connected to the work string with the packers functioning to isolate formations, and the tools assisting in displacing various fluids into the formations or for retrieving hydrocarbons from the formations. [0001]
  • Some packers are mechanically set at a desired depth in the casing, or well bore, by picking up on the work string at the surface, turning the work string and then lowering the work string until mechanical slips associated with the packer have extended outwardly to engage, or grip, the casing, or well bore. As additional work string weight is set down on the engaged slips, a series of elastomeric packer elements are deformed to seal off against the casing, or well bore. Fluid is then pumped down the work string so that its pressure is exerted against another set of slips located above the packer. This fluid pressure hydraulically extends the latter slips outwardly until they engage, or grip the casing, or well bore. Thus, various fluids can be pumped down the work string and through internal passages of the packer before they exit below the packer, while the packer slips are kept sealed against the casing, or well bore, by the weight of the work string. [0002]
  • In other techniques, the packers are set by utilizing the workstring to create hydraulic pressure to expand slips of a setting mechanism into engagement with the casing, or well bore. [0003]
  • It can be appreciated that these types of packers and downhole tools encompass a number of subsystems and/or components that function together in an integral manner thus allowing the device to be manipulated so that it will perform its intended task. However, there is no method to monitor, evaluate, report, or improve the condition, or function, of these devices or their surroundings during the downhole operation. Therefore, if a problem occurs during the operation, the devices would have to be removed from the well for inspection and repair and then reinserted into the well—a procedure that is time-consuming and costly. [0004]
  • Therefore, what is needed is a system and method for sensing and monitoring the status/performance of components of a packer, and/or downhole tool to enable any problems to be corrected. [0005]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • The drawing is a schematic view of a system according to an embodiment of the invention. [0006]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to the drawing, a packer is referred to in general by the reference numeral [0007] 10 and is in the form of an elongated tubular body member 12 adapted to be inserted into a casing, or well bore, on a work string, or the like (not shown). Since the packer 10, per se, does not form any part of the present invention, it is shown, and will be described, only generally.
  • The packer includes upper slips [0008] 14 and 16 mounted on the body member 12 which operate in a conventional manner so that they can be set in response to fluid being pumped down the work string to exert pressure against the slips. This pressure causes the upper slips 14 and 16 to extend outwardly to engage, or grip, the casing or well bore, in a conventional manner.
  • Lower slips [0009] 18 are also provided on the body member 12 which are mechanically set in a conventional manner by picking up on the work string at the surface, turning the work string for a predetermined angular amount, and then lowering the work string until the lower slips 18 have extended outwardly to engage (grip) the casing, or well bore.
  • Packer elements [0010] 20 and 22 are provided on the body member 12 and extend between the upper slips 16 and the lower slips 18. The packer elements 20 and 22 deform, usually by compressing or extending, as additional work string weight is set down in the casing, or wellbore, to seal off against the casing, or well bore. A series of drag blocks 24 are angularly spaced around the body member 12 below the packer element 22.
  • Since the slips [0011] 14, 16, 18; the packer elements 20 and 22; and the drag blocks 24 are all, per se, conventional, they will not be shown or described in any greater detail.
  • As a result of the foregoing, various fluids can be pumped down the work string, and pass through internal passages, or bores, of the body member [0012] 12 before they exit below the packer 10, while the slips 14,16 and 18 are kept sealed against the casing, or well bore, by the weight of the work string.
  • A sensor [0013] 30 is disposed inside the bore of the body member 12, three sensors 30 are placed on, in, and/or around the slips 14, 16, and 18, respectively; two sensors 30 are placed on, in, or around the packer elements 20 and 22, respectively; and a sensor 30 is placed on, in, or around the drag blocks 24.
  • The sensors [0014] 30 are conventional, and, as such, sense and provide information that will be described that is transmitted to the surface to enable personnel on the surface to change parameters that would improve the performance of the packer 10.
  • The sensors [0015] 30 can include, but are not limited to, sensors that sense pressure, load, movement, fluid identification, fluid flow, acoustic properties and/or acceleration. For example, they could provide information about differential pressure across various components of the packer 10 including the slips 14, 16, and 18, and the packer elements 20 and 22, thus providing information about stresses in these components due to pressure loading. Also, the sensors 30 could be utilized to determine if fluid is flowing in areas by measuring the pressure drop between components in these areas. They could also sense, and provide analysis of, stresses within components thus warning of premature failure of a component. Further, the sensors 30 could determine if the initial weight set down on the packer 10 is within proper operating parameters, and, if not, they could send a signal to the surface so that the operator could make adjustments from the surface or to other downhole devices (passive or active) that could be called upon to adjust the force needed to maintain the proper operation of the tool. Still further, the sensors 30 could also sense relative movement between components of the packer 10 including the slips 14, 16, and 18, as well as the packer elements 20 and 22 and the drag blocks 24, to evaluate the position of the components relative to one another and thus help determine if the component may become unstable.
  • The sensors [0016] 30 could also be used to determine the effects that fluids may have on various components. For example, these effects could include chemical degradation of elastomers or metals to the point they will no longer function within their design limits. Further, the sensors 30 could be used to determine fluid flow through the packer 10, the casing, or the well bore to assist in determining leakage, erosion or imminent removal of components such as the washing off of the packer elements before they are set. Moreover, the sensors 30 could be utilized to determine leakage of fluids or gases past components of the packer 10, such as the packer elements 20 and 22, and/or they could be in the form of acoustic sensors to determine factors involving acoustics, such as the condition of cement behind the casing, or thickness of the casing or components. This would, in turn, provide information as to the condition of the casing prior to setting the packer 10 or the condition of a component that may be experiencing erosion during the job. The sensors 30 could also be in the form of accelerometers which could be utilized to help determine if vibrational forces are exceeding design limits or if fatigue in any of the components of the packer 10 is excessive.
  • A series of relatively small video cameras [0017] 34 are placed inside the inner diameter of the body member 12; in or around the slips 14, 16, and 18; on each side of the packer elements 20 and 22; and/or in or around the drag blocks 24. The video cameras 34 could be provided in place of, or in addition to, the sensors 30, and function to provide operators with a visual picture of the condition of these components, as well as the packer 10 in general, and its surroundings. This would enable an operator on the surface to observe these components and, if they are not functioning in a normal manner, to make adjustments from the surface.
  • The video cameras [0018] 34 are conventional and, as a non-limiting example, could be solid state CMOS cameras. Electronic circuits associated with the video cameras 34 could be fabricated using bulk CMOS processes.
  • A central processor [0019] 36 is disposed on the body member 12 to receive data from the sensors 30 and/or video data from the video cameras 34, process the data, and generate a signal or signals corresponding to the processed data to send to another location such as directly to the surface or to any intervening downhole device. In this context, various methods for transferring this data could be utilized including mud pulse, acoustic transfer through the fluid or tubulars, electromagnetic, fiber optics or hard wire, all of which are known in the art.
  • The above enables the packer [0020] 10, in general, as well as its various components, to be continuously monitored and evaluated so that any problems detected can be corrected.
  • It is understood that several variations may be made in the foregoing without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the invention is not limited to use with a packer, but is equally applicable to any downhole device. Also, the above-mentioned electronic circuits could be replaced with an optical system. Also, additional sensors can also be placed on other sub-systems, or components, of the packer [0021] 10 including, but not limited to, seals (such as o-rings), j-slots, springs, internal tubes, adapters, subs, fasteners, and the like. Further, the sensors 30 and/or the video cameras 34 could be replaced with artificially intelligent devices. It is also understood that spatial references, such as “upper”, “lower”, “inner”, and “outer” “below” “in between”, etc., are for the purpose of illustration only and do not limit the specific orientation or location of the layers described above.
  • The foregoing descriptions of specific embodiments of the present invention have been presented for purposes of illustration and description. They are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed, and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its practical application, to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the invention and various embodiments with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto and their equivalents. [0022]

Claims (37)

What is claimed is:
1. A downhole tool comprising:
a body member;
at least one slip member;
at least one packer member;
at least one drag member; and
a sensor mounted on or near at least one of the members for sensing information relating to the performance of the member.
2. The tool of claim 1 further comprising a central processor disposed on the body member for receiving data from the sensor, processing the data, and generating a signal corresponding to the processed data to send to another location.
3. The tool of claim 2 wherein the signal is transmitted to the surface to enable personnel on the surface to change parameters to improve the performance of the tool.
4. The tool of claim 2 wherein the signal is transmitted to another down hole device to adjust the parameters needed to maintain proper operation of the tool.
5. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses load on the member.
6. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses the differential pressure across the member.
7. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses whether fluid is flowing in a certain area of the tool by sensing the pressure drop between adjacent members.
8. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses stresses within the member.
9. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses the weight set down on the tool.
10. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses movement of the member.
11. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses the effects that fluids may have on the member.
12. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses fluid flow through the body member.
13. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor senses leakage of fluids or gases past the member.
14. The tool of claim 1 wherein the body member is disposed in a casing and wherein the sensor senses acoustics related to the casing.
15. The tool of claim 1 wherein the sensor is in the form of an accelerometer to sense vibrational forces on the member.
16. A downhole tool comprising:
a body member;
at least one slip member;
at least one packer member;
at least one drag member; and
a camera mounted on or near at least one of the members to provide video data relating to the condition of the member to enable the member to be monitored.
17. The tool of claim 16 further comprising a central processor disposed on the body member for receiving the video data from the camera, processing the video data, and generating a signal corresponding to the processed video data to send to another location.
18. The tool of claim 16 wherein the video data is transmitted to another downhole device to adjust the parameters needed to maintain proper operation of the tool.
19. The tool of claim 17 wherein the signal enables an operator on the surface to observe the condition of the member and change parameters to improve the performance of the tool.
20. The tool of claim 16 wherein the camera is a CMOS camera.
21. A method for sensing the performance of a downhole tool having a body member, at least one slip member, at least one packer member, and at least one drag member; the method comprising the steps of:
disposing a sensor at or near at least one of the members;
sensing information relating to the performance of the member; and
transmitting the information to the surface to enable personnel on the surface to change parameters to improve the performance of the tool.
22. The method of claim 21 further comprising the step of providing a central processor on the body member for receiving the information from the sensor, processing the information, and generating a signal corresponding to the processed information to send to another location.
23. The method of claim 21 further comprising the step of transmitting the information to another downhole device to adjust the parameters needed to maintain proper operation of the tool.
24. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing the load on the member.
25. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing the differential pressure across the member.
26. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing whether fluid is flowing in a certain area of the tool by sensing the pressure drop between adjacent members.
27. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing stresses within the member.
28. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing the weight set down on the tool.
29. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing movement of the member.
30. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing the effects that fluids may have on the member.
31. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing fluid flow through the body member.
32. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing leakage of fluids or gases past the member.
33. The method of claim 21 wherein the body member is disposed in a casing and wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing acoustics related to the casing.
34. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of sensing comprises sensing vibrational forces on the member.
35. A method for monitoring the performance of a downhole tool having a body member, at least one slip member, at least one packer member, and at least one drag member; the method comprising the steps of:
mounting a camera on or near at least one of the members to provide video data relating to the condition of the member; and
monitoring the condition of the member from the surface.
36. The method of claim 35 further comprising the steps of:
providing a central processor on the body member for receiving the video data from the camera;
processing the video data;
generating a signal corresponding to the processed video data; and
transmitting the signal to the surface.
37. The method of claim 35 further comprising the step of changing parameters relating to the member in response to the video data to improve the performance of the tool.
US10116235 2002-04-03 2002-04-03 System and method for sensing and monitoring the status/performance of a downhole tool Abandoned US20030188862A1 (en)

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030231117A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2003-12-18 Schultz Roger L. System and method for monitoring packer slippage
US20040060696A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2004-04-01 Schultz Roger L. System and method for monitoring packer conditions
US20050028972A1 (en) * 2002-08-05 2005-02-10 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Inflation tool with real-time temperature and pressure probes
US20050167094A1 (en) * 2004-01-30 2005-08-04 Streich Steven G. System and method for sensing load on a downhole tool
US20060164256A1 (en) * 2003-07-04 2006-07-27 Hudson Steven M Downhole data communication
US20060185844A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Patterson Daniel L Downhole device to measure and record setting motion of packers
US20070005250A1 (en) * 2005-06-27 2007-01-04 Geo Estratos, S.A. De C.V. System and method for locating leaks in petroleum wells
US20080190605A1 (en) * 2007-02-12 2008-08-14 Timothy Dale Clapp Apparatus and methods of flow testing formation zones
US20100186947A1 (en) * 2009-01-28 2010-07-29 David Bishop Retractable Downhole Backup Assembly for Circumferential Seal Support
US20110036561A1 (en) * 2009-01-28 2011-02-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Retractable Downhole Backup Assembly for Circumferential Seal Support
US8127856B1 (en) 2008-08-15 2012-03-06 Exelis Inc. Well completion plugs with degradable components
US8267177B1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2012-09-18 Exelis Inc. Means for creating field configurable bridge, fracture or soluble insert plugs
US8579023B1 (en) 2010-10-29 2013-11-12 Exelis Inc. Composite downhole tool with ratchet locking mechanism
US20140096956A1 (en) * 2008-08-29 2014-04-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated System and method of monitoring displacement of a member during a downhole completion operation
US8770276B1 (en) 2011-04-28 2014-07-08 Exelis, Inc. Downhole tool with cones and slips
US20140340506A1 (en) * 2011-12-29 2014-11-20 Welltec A/S Downhole visualisation method
US8997859B1 (en) 2012-05-11 2015-04-07 Exelis, Inc. Downhole tool with fluted anvil
US20150159453A1 (en) * 2013-12-05 2015-06-11 Jeffrey J. Brown Downhole fishing tool and method of use
EP2232011A4 (en) * 2007-12-20 2015-09-30 Transocean Sedco Forex Ventures Ltd Telescopic joint mini control panel
WO2015167532A1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2015-11-05 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Equipment monitoring using enhanced video
GB2538821A (en) * 2014-11-06 2016-11-30 Baker Hughes Inc Property mointoring below a nonpenetrated seal
US9845658B1 (en) 2015-04-17 2017-12-19 Albany International Corp. Lightweight, easily drillable or millable slip for composite frac, bridge and drop ball plugs
US10174603B2 (en) * 2011-12-29 2019-01-08 Welltec A/S Downhole visualisation method

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US3412790A (en) * 1965-12-16 1968-11-26 Cicero C. Brown Well packer and method of manipulating same in a well bore
US5343963A (en) * 1990-07-09 1994-09-06 Bouldin Brett W Method and apparatus for providing controlled force transference to a wellbore tool
US5730219A (en) * 1995-02-09 1998-03-24 Baker Hughes Incorporated Production wells having permanent downhole formation evaluation sensors
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Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030231117A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2003-12-18 Schultz Roger L. System and method for monitoring packer slippage
US6924745B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2005-08-02 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. System and method for monitoring packer slippage
US20050028972A1 (en) * 2002-08-05 2005-02-10 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Inflation tool with real-time temperature and pressure probes
US7073580B2 (en) * 2002-08-05 2006-07-11 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Inflation tool with real-time temperature and pressure probes
US20040060696A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2004-04-01 Schultz Roger L. System and method for monitoring packer conditions
US20060164256A1 (en) * 2003-07-04 2006-07-27 Hudson Steven M Downhole data communication
US7460438B2 (en) 2003-07-04 2008-12-02 Expro North Sea Limited Downhole data communication
US20050167094A1 (en) * 2004-01-30 2005-08-04 Streich Steven G. System and method for sensing load on a downhole tool
US7234517B2 (en) * 2004-01-30 2007-06-26 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. System and method for sensing load on a downhole tool
US7377319B2 (en) 2005-02-22 2008-05-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole device to measure and record setting motion of packers and method of sealing a wellbore
US20060185844A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Patterson Daniel L Downhole device to measure and record setting motion of packers
US20070005250A1 (en) * 2005-06-27 2007-01-04 Geo Estratos, S.A. De C.V. System and method for locating leaks in petroleum wells
US20080190605A1 (en) * 2007-02-12 2008-08-14 Timothy Dale Clapp Apparatus and methods of flow testing formation zones
US8720554B2 (en) 2007-02-12 2014-05-13 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and methods of flow testing formation zones
US8286703B2 (en) 2007-02-12 2012-10-16 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and methods of flow testing formation zones
EP2232011A4 (en) * 2007-12-20 2015-09-30 Transocean Sedco Forex Ventures Ltd Telescopic joint mini control panel
US8746342B1 (en) 2008-08-15 2014-06-10 Itt Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc. Well completion plugs with degradable components
US8678081B1 (en) 2008-08-15 2014-03-25 Exelis, Inc. Combination anvil and coupler for bridge and fracture plugs
US8127856B1 (en) 2008-08-15 2012-03-06 Exelis Inc. Well completion plugs with degradable components
US8267177B1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2012-09-18 Exelis Inc. Means for creating field configurable bridge, fracture or soluble insert plugs
US20140096956A1 (en) * 2008-08-29 2014-04-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated System and method of monitoring displacement of a member during a downhole completion operation
US20100186947A1 (en) * 2009-01-28 2010-07-29 David Bishop Retractable Downhole Backup Assembly for Circumferential Seal Support
US8307891B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2012-11-13 Baker Hughes Incorporated Retractable downhole backup assembly for circumferential seal support
US20110036561A1 (en) * 2009-01-28 2011-02-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Retractable Downhole Backup Assembly for Circumferential Seal Support
US7806177B2 (en) * 2009-01-28 2010-10-05 Baker Hughes Incorporated Retractable downhole backup assembly for circumferential seal support
GB2496535A (en) * 2010-08-17 2013-05-15 Baker Hughes Inc Retractable downhole backup assembly for circumferential seal support
WO2012024041A1 (en) * 2010-08-17 2012-02-23 Baker Hughes Incorporated Retractable downhole backup assembly for circumferential seal support
US8579023B1 (en) 2010-10-29 2013-11-12 Exelis Inc. Composite downhole tool with ratchet locking mechanism
US8770276B1 (en) 2011-04-28 2014-07-08 Exelis, Inc. Downhole tool with cones and slips
US20140340506A1 (en) * 2011-12-29 2014-11-20 Welltec A/S Downhole visualisation method
US10174603B2 (en) * 2011-12-29 2019-01-08 Welltec A/S Downhole visualisation method
US8997859B1 (en) 2012-05-11 2015-04-07 Exelis, Inc. Downhole tool with fluted anvil
US9528339B2 (en) * 2013-12-05 2016-12-27 Jeffrey J. Brown Downhole fishing tool and method of use
US20150159453A1 (en) * 2013-12-05 2015-06-11 Jeffrey J. Brown Downhole fishing tool and method of use
WO2015167532A1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2015-11-05 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Equipment monitoring using enhanced video
GB2538821A (en) * 2014-11-06 2016-11-30 Baker Hughes Inc Property mointoring below a nonpenetrated seal
US9845658B1 (en) 2015-04-17 2017-12-19 Albany International Corp. Lightweight, easily drillable or millable slip for composite frac, bridge and drop ball plugs

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AS Assignment

Owner name: HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:STREICH, STEVEN G.;SCHULTZ, ROGER S.;REEL/FRAME:012777/0833;SIGNING DATES FROM 20020401 TO 20020402