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US20030180303A1 - Lipopolysaccharide binding protein derivatives - Google Patents

Lipopolysaccharide binding protein derivatives Download PDF

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US20030180303A1
US20030180303A1 US10131686 US13168602A US2003180303A1 US 20030180303 A1 US20030180303 A1 US 20030180303A1 US 10131686 US10131686 US 10131686 US 13168602 A US13168602 A US 13168602A US 2003180303 A1 US2003180303 A1 US 2003180303A1
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lbp
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Helene Gazzano-Santoro
Georgia Theofan
Patrick Trown
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Xoma Technology Ltd
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XOMA TECHNOLOGY Ltd
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K19/00Hybrid peptides
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K14/00Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof
    • C07K14/435Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans
    • C07K14/46Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans from vertebrates
    • C07K14/47Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans from vertebrates from mammals
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K14/00Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof
    • C07K14/435Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans
    • C07K14/46Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans from vertebrates
    • C07K14/47Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans from vertebrates from mammals
    • C07K14/4701Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans from vertebrates from mammals not used
    • C07K14/4742Bactericidal/Permeability-increasing protein [BPI]
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K38/00Medicinal preparations containing peptides
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    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K2319/00Fusion polypeptide

Abstract

Disclosed are novel biologically active lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) derivatives including LBP derivative hybrid proteins which are characterized by the ability to bind to and neutralize LPS and which lack the CD14-mediated immunostimutlatory properties of holo-LBP.

Description

  • [0001]
    This is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/079,510 filed Jun. 17, 1993.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to proteins useful for the treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections and specifically to the neutralization of the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is also known as endotoxin. LPS is a major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and consists of serotype-specific O-side chain polysaccharides linked to a conserved region of core oligosaccharide and lipid A. LPS is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of septic shock and is one of the major causes of death in intensive-care units in the United States. It has been observed that exposure to LPS during sepsis stimulates an immune response in monocytes and macrophages that results in a toxic cascade resulting in the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and other proinflammatory cytokines. Morrison and Ulevitch, Am. J. Pathol., 93:527 (1978). Endothelial damage in sepsis probably results from persistent and repetitive inflammatory insults. Bone, Annals Int. Med. 115:457 (1991).
  • [0003]
    LPS-binding proteins have been identified in various mammalian tissues. Among the most extensively studied of the LPS-binding proteins is bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a basic protein found in the azurophilic granules of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Human BPI protein has been isolated from polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) by acid extraction combined with either ion exchange chromatography or E. coli affinity chromatography. Weiss et al., J. Biol. Chem., 253:2664 (1978); Mannion et al., J. Immunol. 142:2807 (1989).
  • [0004]
    The holo-BPI protein isolated from human PMNs has potent bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of gram-negative bacteria. This antibacterial activity appears to be associated with the amino terminal region (i.e. amino acid residues 1-199) of the isolated human holo-BPI protein. In contrast, the C-terminal region (i.e. amino acid residues 200-456) of the isolated holo-BPI protein displays only slightly detectable anti-bacterial activity. Ooi et al., J. Exp. Med., 174:649 (1991). Human DNA encoding BPI has been cloned and the amino acid sequence of the encoded protein has been elucidated. Gray et al., J. Biol. Chem., 264:9505 (1989). Amino-terminal fragments of BPI include a natural 25 Kd fragment and a recombinant 23 Kd, 199 amino acid residue amino-terminal fragment of the human BPI holoprotein referred to as rBPI23. See, Gazzano-Santoro et al., Infect. Immun. 60:4754-4761 (1992). In that publication, an expression vector was used as a source of DNA encoding a recombinant expression product (rBPI23) having the 31-residue signal sequence and the first 199 amino acids of the N-terminus of the mature human BPI, as set out in SEQ ID NOS: 11 and 12 taken from Gray et al., supra, except that valine at position 151 is specified by GTG rather than GTC and residue 185 is glutamic acid (specified by GAG) rather than lysine (specified by AAG). Recombinant holoprotein referred to herein as rBPI has also been produced having the sequence set out in SEQ ID NOS: 11 and 12 taken from Gray et al., supra, with the exceptions noted for rBPI23. See also, Elsbach et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,198,541 the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference. In addition to its bactericidal effects, BPI has been shown to neutralize the toxic and cytokine-inducing effects of LPS to which it binds.
  • [0005]
    Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) is a 60 kD glycoprotein synthesized in the liver which shows significant structural homology with BPI. Schumann et al. disclose the amino acid sequences and encoding cDNA of both human and rabbit LBP. Like BPI, LBP has a binding site for lipid A and binds to the LPS from rough (R-) and smooth (S-) form bacteria. Unlike BPI, LBP does not possess significant bactericidal activity, and it enhances (rather than inhibits) LPS-induced TNF production. Schumann et al., Science, 249:1429 (1990). Thus, in contrast to BPI, LBP has been recognized as an immunostimulatory molecule. See, e.g., Seilhamer, PCT International Application WO 93/06228 which discloses a variant form of LBP which it terms LBP-β.
  • [0006]
    One of the normal host effector mechanisms for clearance of bacteria involves the binding to and subsequent phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. As part of this process, bacteria are exposed to bactericidal and bacteriostatic factors, including oxygen radicals, lysosomal enzymes, lactoferrin and various cationic proteins. LBP opsonizes LPS-bearing particles and intact Gram-negative bacteria, mediating attachment of these LBP-coated particles to macrophages. Wright et al., J. Exp. Med. 170:1231 (1989). The attachment appears to be through the CD14 receptor of monocytes which binds complexes of LPS and LBP. Wright et al., Science 249:1431 (1990). Anti-CD14 mAbs have been shown to block the synthesis of TNF by whole blood incubated with LPS. Wright et al. Science 249:1431 (1990). Interaction of CD14, which is present on the surface of polymorphonuclear leukocytes as well as monocytes, with LPS in the presence of LBP has been shown to increase the adhesive activity of neutrophils. Wright et al., J. Exp. Med. 173:1281 (1991), Worthen et al., J. Clin. Invest. 90:2526 (1992). Thus, while BPI has been shown to be cytotoxic to bacteria and to inhibit proflammatory cytokine production stimulated by bacteria, LBP promotes bacterial binding to and activation of monocytes through a CD14-dependent mechanism.
  • [0007]
    LPS, either directly or by inducing proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF, induces the expresion of adhesion molecules including CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, ICAM-1) and E-selectin (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1, ELAM-1) on endothelial cells, and thereby increases binding of leukocytes in vitro. Schleimer and Rutledge, J. Immunol. 136:649 (1986); Pohlman et al., J. Immunol. 136:4548 (1986); Bevilacqua et al., J. Clin. Invest. 76:2003 (1985); Gamble et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 82:8667 (1985); Smith et al., J. Clin. Invest. 82:1746 (1988); and Bevilacqua et al., Proc. Natl. Sci. USA 84:9238 (1987). However, as CD14 has not been detected on the surface of endothelial cells (Beekhuizen et al., J. Immunol. 147:3761 (1990)) and no other receptor for LPS on endothelial cells has been identified, a different mechanism may exist whereby LPS can affect the endothelium.
  • [0008]
    Soluble CD14, found in serum (Bazil et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 16:1583 (1986)), has been hypothesized to be responsible for transmitting the LPS signal to endothelial cells. Specifically, soluble CD14 has been shown to mediate a number of LPS-dependent effects on endothelial cells, including E-selectin and VCAM expression, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, and cell death, Frey et al., J. Exp. Med. 176:1665 (1992); Pugin et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 90:2744 (1993).
  • [0009]
    Recent studies have shown that soluble CD14 is involved in the LPS-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. Anti-CD14 mAbs were able to completely inhibit the adhesion induced by LPS, indicating that the contribution of other CD14-independent LPS receptors to these effects is minimal. The protein(s) on the endothelial cells that soluble CD14 might associate with to transduce the LPS signal remains to be identified. LBP has been shown to be involved in the signal transduction of LPS through soluble CD14; however, at high concentrations of LPS or soluble CD14, LBP does not further enhance the response of endothelial cells to LPS (Pugin et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 90:2744 (1993).
  • [0010]
    Larrick et al., Biochem. and Biophysical Res. Commun., 179:170 (1991) relates to a cationic protein obtained from rabbit granulocytes which is identified as CAP18. CAP18 is identified as bearing no sequence homology with either BPI or LBP. In the course of their disclosure, Larrick et al. characterize other publications which discuss the structure of proteins including LBP and incorrectly attribute to the Wright et al., supra disclosure the speculation that “LBP is believed to be composed of two regions: an amino-terminal domain that binds to LPS and a carboxy-terminal domain that may (emphasis supplied) mediate binding of the LBP-LPS complex to the CD14 receptor on leukocytes.”
  • [0011]
    Ulevitch, PCT International Application WO 91/01639 discloses methods and compositions for treatment of sepsis comprising administering anti-CD14 antibodies. The published application also describes “LBP peptide analogs” at page 17 which are stated to be polypeptides capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of LPS-LBP complexes to CD14 expressed on the surface of monocyte derived macrophages. The sequences of the three disclosed “LBP peptide analogs” show 90 to 100% homology with CD14 polypeptide sequences and no homology with LBP sequences.
  • [0012]
    Ulevitch et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,245,013 discloses a lipopolysaccharide binding protein which binds to Gram-negative bacterially secreted LPS and retards in vitro binding of LPS to high density lipoprotein.
  • [0013]
    Marra, PCT International Application WO 92/03535 discloses various chimeric BPI molecules including an rLBP/BPI chimeric molecule designated LBP25K/BPI30K [LBP(1-197)/BPI(200-456)] and comprising the first 197 amino acid residues of LBP and amino acid residues 200-456 of BPI wherein the coding sequence for the amino-terminal 25 kD portion of LBP was linked to the coding sequence for the carboxy-terminal portion of the BPI protein by virtue of an engineered ClaI site within the coding sequence. The resulting molecule reacted positively in an ELISA assay utilizing anti-BPI protein antibodies and also reacted positively in an endotoxin binding assay. Rogy et al., J. Clin. Immunol., 14: 120-133 (1994) describes experiments utilizing the LBP(1-197)/BPI(200-456) molecule wherein animals treated with the molecule in a primate bacteremia model demonstrated decreased LPS levels compared to controls, but still developed the sequalae of septic shock. For example, no significant reduction in endotoxin mediated cytokine synthesis was observed in endotoxin-treated baboons to whom the compound was administered.
  • [0014]
    There exists a need in the art for LPS binding and neutralizing proteins which lack CD14-mediated immunostimulatory properties, including the ability to mediate LPS activity through the CD14 receptor.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0015]
    The present invention provides novel biologically active polypeptide derivatives of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP), including LBP derivative hybrid proteins, which are characterized by the ability to bind to LPS and which lack CD14-mediated immunostimulatory properties, including the ability of LBP holoprotein to mediate LPS activity via the CD14 receptor. More particularly, LBP protein derivatives including LBP derivative hybrid proteins according to the invention lack those carboxy terminal-associated elements characteristic of the LBP holoprotein which enable LBP to bind to and interact with the CD14 receptor on monocytes and macrophages so as to provide an immunostimulatory signal to monocytes and macrophages.
  • [0016]
    Presently preferred LBP protein derivatives are characterized by a molecular weight less than or equal to about 25 kD. Particularly preferred LBP protein derivatives of the invention are LBP fragments comprising an amino-terminal region of LBP (e.g., amino acid residues 1-197). A molecule comprising the first 197 amino terminal residues of LBP and designated rLBP25 exemplifies the derivatives of the invention. This particular derivative includes amino acid regions comprising LBP residues 17 through 45, 65 through 99 and 141 through 167 which correspond to respective LPS binding domains (e.g., residues 17 through 45, 65 through 99 and 142 through 169) of Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing protein (BPI).
  • [0017]
    LBP derivative hybrid proteins of the invention comprise hybrids of LBP protein sequences with the amino acid sequences of other polypeptides and are also characterized by the ability to bind to LPS and the absence of CD14-mediated immunostimulatory properties. Such hybrid proteins can comprise fusions of LBP amino-terminal fragments with polypeptide sequences of other proteins such as BPI, immunoglobulins and the like. Preferred LBP/BPI hybrids of the invention comprise at least a portion (i.e., at least five consecutive amino acids and preferably ten or more amino acids) of an LPS binding domain of BPI. One preferred LBP derivative hybrid protein of the LBP/BPI type comprises an amino-terminal LBP amino acid sequence selected from within the amino terminal half of LBP (e.g. within amino acid residues 1-197 of LBP) in which one or more portions of that sequence is replaced by the corresponding sequence of BPI selected from within the amino terminal half of BPI (e.g., within amino acid residues 1-199 of BPI). Another preferred LBP derivative hybrid protein comprises a fusion of amino terminal portions of LBP and heavy chain regions of IgG. Other LBP derivative hybrid proteins comprise LBP amino acid sequences into which all or portions of LPS binding domains of e.g., BPI or other LPS binding protein have been inserted or substituted for all or part of an LPS binding region of LBP. Preferred LBP derivative hybrid proteins include those in which all or portions of the previously-noted amino terminal LPS binding domains of BPI replace the corresponding region within LBP.
  • [0018]
    LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins of the invention are expected to display one or more advantageous properties in terms of pharmacokinetics, LPS binding, LPS neutralization and the like.
  • [0019]
    The present invention further provides novel pharmaceutical compositions comprising the LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins along with pharmaceutically acceptable diluents, adjuvants, and carriers and correpsondingly addresses the use of LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins in the manufacture of medicaments for treating gram negative bacterial infections and the sequelae thereof.
  • [0020]
    Polypeptides of the invention may be synthesized by assembly of amino acids. In addition, the invention provides DNA sequences, plasmid vectors, and transformed cells for producing the LBP protein derivatives and LBP hybrid derivative proteins of the invention.
  • [0021]
    Numerous additional aspects and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the following detailed description of the invention which describes presently preferred embodiments thereof.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 1 depicts the DNA sequence and translated amino acid sequence (1-197) of rLBP25 [SEQ ID NOS: 1 and 2];
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 2 depicts the DNA sequences and translated amino acid sequence (1-456) of rLBP [SEQ ID NOS: 3 and 4];
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 3 depicts the construction of an rLBP25 mammalian expression vector pING4505;
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 4 depicts construction of a vector pIC111 encoding an LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199) hybrid protein;
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 5 depicts constriction of mammalian expression vectors pING4525 and pING4526 for LBP/BPI hybrid proteins;
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 6 depicts construction of plasmids pML105 and pML103 for in vitro transcription/translation of LBP/BPI hybrid proteins;
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 7 depicts construction of a vector pIC112 encoding a BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197) hybrid protein;
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 8 depicts a graph illustrating the pharmacokinetics of 125I labeled rLBP25 and rBPI23;
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 9 depicts binding of rLBP25 to E. coli J5 lipid A;
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 10 depicts competition by rBPI23 and by rLBP25 for the binding of 125I-rLBP25 to immobilized lipid A;
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 11 depicts competition by rBPI23 and by recombinant LBP holoprotein (rLBP) for the binding of 125I-rLBP to immobilized lipid A;
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 12 depicts the ability of rLBP25 and rLBP to inhibit the LAL assay;
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 13 depicts the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP on binding uptake of 125I-labeled LPS by THP-1 cells;
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 14 depicts the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP molecules on TNF production by THP-1 cells;
  • [0036]
    [0036]FIGS. 15A and 15B depict the effect of rLBP on Tissue Factor (TF) and TNF production, respectively, in PBMCs;
  • [0037]
    [0037]FIG. 16 depicts the effect of rLBP on TNF production in PBMCs;
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 17 depicts the effect of rLBP25 on TNF production in PBMCs;
  • [0039]
    [0039]FIG. 18 depicts the effect of LBP molecules on Tissue Factor production in PBMCs; and
  • [0040]
    [0040]FIG. 19 depicts the effect of rLBP25 on LPS induced endothelial adhesiveness for neutrophils:
  • [0041]
    [0041]FIG. 20 depicts the effect of rLBP on bacterial binding to monocytes;
  • [0042]
    [0042]FIG. 21 depicts the effect of rLBP25 on bacterial binding to monocytes;
  • [0043]
    [0043]FIG. 22 depicts the binding of rLBP and rLBP25 in an LBP sandwich ELISA assay; and
  • [0044]
    [0044]FIG. 23 depicts a homology comparison of the amino-terminal amino acid residues of human LBP and human BPI.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0045]
    The present invention encompasses LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins which are characterized by the ability to bind to LPS but which lack the carboxy terminal-associated immunostimulatory element(s) characteristic of the LBP holoprotein and thus lack the CD14-mediated immunostimulatory activity characteristic of LBP holoprotein. Preferred LBP protein derivatives are characterized as including N-terminal LBP fragments having a molecular weight of about 25 kD. Most preferred are LBP N-terminal fragments characterized by the amino acid sequence of the first 197 amino acids of the amino-terminus of LBP set out in FIG. 1 and SEQ ID NOS: 1 and 2. It is also contemplated that LBP protein derivatives containing N-terminal fragments considerably smaller than 25 kD and comprising substantially fewer than the first 197 amino acids of the N-terminus of the LBP holoprotein molecule are suitable for use according to the invention provided they retain the ability to bind to LPS. Thus, specifically contemplated are LBP derivatives comprising part or all of one or more of three regions (defined by LBP amino acid sequences 17-45, 65-99 and 141-167) corresponding (by reason of amino acid homology) to LPS binding regions (comprising amino acid sequences 17-45, 65-99 and 142-169) of BPI. Moreover, it is contemplated that LBP protein derivatives comprising greater than the first 197 amino acid residues of the holo-LBP molecule, i.e., including amino acids on the carboxy-terminal side of residue 197 of rLBP as disclosed in FIG. 2 and SEQ ID NOS: 3 and 4 will likewise prove useful according to the methods of the invention provided they lack CD14-mediated immunostimulatory activity. It is further contemplated that those of skill in the art are capable of making additions, deletions and substitutions of the amino-acid residues of SEQ ID NOS: 1-4 without loss of the desired biological activities of the molecules. Such, LBP protein derivatives may be obtained by deletion, substitution, addition or mutation, including mutation by site-directed mutagenesis of the DNA sequence encoding the LBP holoprotein, wherein the LBP protein derivative maintains LPS-binding activity and lacks CD14-mediated immunostimulatory activity. One preferred LBP derivative is that wherein the alanine residue at position 131 of the illustrative LBP (1-197) polypeptide fragment is substituted with a cysteine residue. The resulting LBP (1-197) (Cys 131) polypeptide may have the ability to dimerize via interchain disulfide bond formation through cysteine 131 and the resulting dimer may be characterized by improved biological activity.
  • [0046]
    Also contemplated are LBP derivative hybrid proteins including LBP/BPI hybrid proteins [but excluding the hybrid designated LBP(1-197)/BPI(200-456) noted above] and LBP-Ig fusion proteins which are characterized by the ability to bind LPS but which lack CD-14 immunostimulatory activity. A preferred LBP/BPI hybrid protein of the invention is a protein comprising one or more portion of the amino-terminal half of LBP, e.g., selected from within amino acid residues 1-197 of LBP, and a one or more portions of the amino-terminal half of BPI, e.g., selected from within amino acid residues 1-199 of BPI.
  • [0047]
    Other LBP hybrid proteins comprise LBP amino acid sequences into which all or portions of LPS binding domains of other LPS binding proteins (such as BPI) have been inserted or substituted. Preferred LBP hybrid proteins include those in which all or portions of the LPS binding domains of BPI (comprising BPI residues 17-45, 65-99 and 142-169) are substituted into the corresponding region of LBP. Portions of such BPI domains substituted into the hybrid proteins may comprise as few as five continuous amino acids but preferably include ten or more continuous amino acids.
  • [0048]
    LBP derivative hybrid proteins in which all or portions of the LPS binding regions of BPI are substituted into the corresponding region of LBP thus include those comprising at least a part of an LPS binding domain of BPI selected from the group of amino acid sequences consisting of:
  • [0049]
    ASQQGTAALQKELKRIKPDYSDSFKIKH (SEQ ID NO: 17) designated Domain I comprising the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 17 to about position 45;
  • [0050]
    SSQISMVPNVGLKFSISNANIKISGKWKAQKRFLK (SEQ ID NO: 18) designated Domain II comprising the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 65 to about 99; and
  • [0051]
    VHVHISKSKVGWLIQLFHKKIESALRNK (SEQ ID NO: 19) designated Domain III comprising the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 142 to about position 169.
  • [0052]
    These LPS binding domains of BPI correspond to LBP regions consisting of:
  • [0053]
    AAQEGLLALQSELLRITLPDFTGDLRIPH (SEQ IS NO: 20) comprising the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 17 to about position 45;
  • [0054]
    HSALRPVPGQGLSLSISDSSIRVQGRWKVRKSFFK (SEQ ID NO: 21) comprising the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 65 to about 99; and
  • [0055]
    VEVDMSGDLGWLLNLFHNQIESKFQKV (SEQ ID NO: 22) comprising the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 141 to about position 167.
  • [0056]
    According to another aspect of the invention, DNA sequences are provided which encode the above-described LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins. Also provided are autonomously replicating DNA plasmid vectors including such DNA sequences and host cells stably transformed or transfected with such DNA sequences in a manner allowing their expression. Transformed host cells of the invention are of manifest utility in procedures for the large-scale production of the LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins of the invention involving the cultured growth of the hosts in a suitable medium and the isolation of the proteins from the cells or their growth medium.
  • [0057]
    The invention further provides novel pharmaceutical compositions comprising an LBP protein derivative or an LBP derivative hybrid protein which retains LPS-binding activity and lacks CD14-mediated immunostimulatory activity together with pharmaceutically acceptable diluents, adjuvants, and carriers. The compositions are useful in methods for treating a gram-negative bacterial infection, including the sequelae thereof such as endotoxin related shock, and one or more of conditions associated with gram-negative bacterial infection and resulting endotoxic shock such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, adult respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure, hypotension, fever and metabolic acidosis. Such methods comprise administering an LBP protein derivative or LBP derivative hybrid protein to a subject suffering from a gram-negative bacterial infection, including the sequelae thereof.
  • [0058]
    When employed for treatment of a gram-negative bacterial infection, including the sequelae thereof, LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins of the invention are preferably administered parenterally and most preferably intravenously in amounts broadly ranging from about 0.1 milligram and about 100 milligrams per kilogram of body weight of the treated subject with preferred treatments ranging from about 1 milligrams and 25 milligrams per kilogram of body weight. It is contemplated that administration of LBP derivative protein derivatives, such as rLBP25, and LBP hybrid proteins may be useful as one aspect of a combination therapy in which BPI or other antibiotics are administered to a subject.
  • [0059]
    According to a further aspect of the invention, LBP protein derivatives and LBP derivative hybrid proteins may be administered in combination with other therapeutic compositions which are not strictly antibiotics but rather which neutralize the endotoxic effects of LPS such as anti-LPS antibodies and antibodies to constituents of the LPS mediated toxic cascade such as anti-TNF antibodies.
  • [0060]
    The following detailed description relates to the manufacture and properties of LBP protein derivatives and LBP hybrid proteins of the invention. More specifically, Example 1 relates to the construction of vectors for expression of an exemplary LBP protein derivative, rLBP25. Example 2 relates to the construction of vectors for expression of rLBP. Examples 3 and 4 relate to the incorporation of the vectors of Examples 1 and 2 into appropriate host cells and further describes the expression and purification of rLBP25 and rLBP. Examples 5 and 6 relate to construction of vectors encoding LBP/BPI hybrid proteins. Example 7 relates to in vitro transcription translation of the LBP/BPI hybrid protein, LBP(1-43)/BPI(44-199) and BPI(1-159)/LBP(158-197). Example 8 relates to the pharmacokinetics of rLBP25, rLBP and rBPI23 in vivo. Example 9 relates to the binding of rLBP25 and rLBP to Lipid A. Example 10 relates to competition by rLBP25 and rBPI23 for the binding of 125I-rLBP25 to immobilized lipid A. Example 11 relates to competition by rLBP and rBPI23 for the binding of 125I-rLBP to immobilized lipid A. Example 12 relates to the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP on an LAL assay. Example 13 relates to the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP on the binding/uptake 125I-labeled LPS on TNF production by a human monocyte cell line THP-1. Example 14 relates to the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP on TF and TNF production by isolated PBMCs. Example 15 relates to the effect of rLBP25 on LPS-induced adhesiveness of endothelial cells for neutrophils. Example 16 relates to the effect of rLBP and rLBP25 on bacterial binding to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Example 17 relates to a sandwich ELISA assay for rLBP and rLBP25. Example 18 relates to construction of vectors for production of LBP (1-197) (Cys 131). Example 19 relates to construction of vectors for production of LBP-IgG hybrid fusion proteins. Example 20 relates to in vitro transcription/translations of truncated LBP fragments and determination of their ability to mediate LPS stimulation of TNF activity. Example 21 relates to construction of vectors for production of LBP/BPI hybrid proteins. Example 22 relates to construction of vectors for production of LBP/BPI hybrid proteins comprising BPI/LBP active domain replacement and partial replacement mutants. Example 23 relates to properties of synthetic LBP peptides.
  • EXAMPLE 1
  • [0061]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of rLBP25 Protein
  • [0062]
    A. Cloning and Sequencing of Human rLBP25
  • [0063]
    The DNA encoding amino acids 1-197 of human LBP without the signal sequence (designated “rLBP25”) was obtained by PCR using human liver poly (A)+ RNA (Clontech Laboratories, Palo Alto, Calif.) as the source of material for amplification. Reverse transcription of the RNA to cDNA and PCR amplification were carried out using the GeneAmp RNA PCR Kit (Perkin Elmer Cetus, Norwalk, Conn.) according to the manufacturer's protocols. The sequence of human LBP was obtained from GenBank, accession number M35533, as published by Schumann et al., Science, 249:1429-1431 (1990). The 5′ PCR primer corresponded to the amino terminal sequence of the coding region of mature LBP and included a BsmI recognition site at its 5′ end. The sequence of this primer, LBP-Bsm, was: 5′-GAATGCAGCCAACCCCGGCT TGGTCGCCA-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 5). The 3′ PCR primer was designed to place a stop codon and an XhoI site following the isoleucine at amino acid position No. 197. The sequence of this primer, LBP-2, was: 5′-CTCGAGCTAAATC TCTGTTGTAACTGGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 6). This amino acid was chosen as the endpoint of rLBP25 based on sequence homology with an amino-terminal active fragment of BPI (designated rBPI23).
  • [0064]
    The amplified rLBP25 DNA was blunt-end cloned into SmaI cut pT7T318U (Pharmacia, LKB Biotechnology, Piscataway, N.J.) to generate plasmid pIC106. The LBP insert in pIC 106 was sequenced using Sequenase (USB). The rLBP25 DNA sequence obtained and the derived amino acid sequence is set out in SEQ ID NOS: 1 and 2. The sequence differs in two areas from the sequence of the corresponding region of LBP as published by Schumann et al. (1990) Science, 249:1429-1431, which involve changes in amino acids. These sequence differences are detailed in Table 1.
  • [0065]
    B. Construction of Vectors for Expression of rLBP,5 in Mammalian Cells
  • [0066]
    A vector for the expression of rLBP25 using the BPI signal sequence was constructed using the rLBP25 coding region sequence isolated from PIC106 by digestion with BsmI, blunt ending with T4 polymerase, and digestion with XhoI. This was ligated to two fragments isolated from pING4503 (a plasmid described in co-owned and copending U.S. Ser. No. 07/885,911 filed May 19, 1992 by Theofan et al. which is hereby incorporated by reference). Briefly, the construction of pING4503 is based on plasmid pING2237N which contains the mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer element, the LTR enhancer-promoter element from Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) DNA, the SV40 19S/16S splice junction at the 5′ end of the gene to be expressed, and the human genomic gamma-1 polyadenylation site at the 3′ end of the gene to be expressed. Plasmid pING2237N also has a mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) selectable marker. The two fragments from pING4503 were the vector fragment generated by digestion with ClaI and XhoI, and a fragment containing the BPI signal sequence generated by digestion with EagI, blunt ending with T4 polymerase, and digestion with ClaI. This ligation resulted in a fusion of the BPI signal to the rLBP25 coding region, keeping the correct reading frame, and generating pING4505 (DHFR gene). The corresponding gpt vector designated pING4508, was generated by subcloning the SalI to SstII insert from pING4505 into the SalI and SstII vector fragment from pING3920 (the structure of which is described in co-owned and copending U.S. Ser. No. 07/718,274 filed Jun. 20, 1991 by Grinna et al., which is hereby incorporated by reference). The construction of pING4505 is outlined in FIG. 3.
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • [0067]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of rLBP Proteins
  • [0068]
    A. Cloning and Sequencing of Human rLBP
  • [0069]
    The DNA encoding full length human rLBP (amino acids 1-452, designated “rLBP,” plus the 25 amino acid signal sequence) was obtained by PCR using human liver poly (A)+ RNA (Clontech Laboratories, Palo Alto, Calif.) as described for rLBP25 above. The 5′ PCR primer introduced a SalI recognition site at the 5′ end of the LBP signal. The sequence of this primer, LBP-3, was: 5′-CATGTCGACACCATGGGGGCCTTG G-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 7). The 3′ PCR primer was designed to introduce an SstII site following the stop codon of LBP. The sequence of this primer, LBP-4, was: 5′-CATGCCGCGGTCAAACTCTCATGTA-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 8). The amplified rLBP DNA was blunt-end cloned into SmaI cut pT7T318U to generate plasmid pIC128. The LBP insert in pIC128 was sequenced using Sequenase (USB). The rLBP DNA sequence obtained and the derived amino acid sequence are shown in SEQ ID NOS: 3 and 4. Additional differences were found between the LBP sequence in pIC128 and the sequence of LBP as published by Schumann et al., Science 249:1429-1431 (1990). The rLBP sequence actually encoded 456 amino acids; there was an insertion of 4 amino acids at position 241. The rLBP sequence in pIC128 additionally contained several nucleotide substitutions that did not change the amino acids compared to Schumann et al. All the differences are highlighted in Table 1. The amino acid sequence is identical to the recently published sequence of LBPβ (Seilhamer, PCT International Application WO 93/06228), however, the nucleotide sequence of rLBP herein differs from that of the published LBPβ sequence at the sequence encoding amino acids 152 and 179 as shown in Table 1.
    TABLE 1
    LBP Sequence Differences
    Schumann LBP
    Amino Acid rLBP Sequence Sequence
    Position 1 Nucleotide Protein Nucleotide Protein
    −21 GCC A GCA A
     72 CCT P CCC P
    129 GTT V GGT G
    130 ACT T TAC Y
    131 GCC A TGC C
    132 TCC S CTC L
    148 GAC D GAT D
    149 TTG L TCG S
     1522 CTG L CTC L
    179 TCG/TCA3 S TCA S
    241-245 GTC ATG VMSLP GCT A
    AGC CTT (SEQ ID
    CCT (SEQ ID NO:10)
    NO:9)
    411 TTC F CTC L
  • [0070]
    B. Construction of Vectors for Expression of rLBP in Mammalian Cells
  • [0071]
    To construct a vector for expression of rLBP in mammalian cells, pIC128 was digested with SalI and SstII, the LBP insert was isolated, and then subcloned into SalI and SstII digested vector pING4222 which is described in co-owned and copending U.S. Ser. No. 08/013,801 filed Feb. 2, 1993 which is hereby incorporated by reference. The resulting rLBP vector was designated pING4539 and also contained the DHFR gene for selection.
  • EXAMPLE 3
  • [0072]
    Production and Purification of rLBP
  • [0073]
    Mammalian cells are preferred host cells for production of LBP protein derivatives of the invention because such cells allow secretion and proper folding of heterodimeric and multimeric proteins and provide post-translational modifications such as pro-sequence processing and glycosylation.
  • [0074]
    Mammalian cells which may be useful as hosts for the production of LBP protein derivatives (including LBP/BPI hybrid proteins and rLBP-Ig fusion proteins) include cells of lymphoid origin, such as the hybridoma Sp2/O—Ag14 (ATCC CRL 1581) and cells of fibroblast origin, such as Vero cells (ATCC CRL 81), CHO—K1, CHO-DXB11, or CHO-DG44. The latter cell line (a DHFR mutant of CHO Toronto obtained from Dr. Lawrence Chasin, Columbia University) was maintained in Ham's F12 medium plus 10% fetal bovine serum supplemented with glutamine/penicillin/streptomycin (Irvine Scientific, Irvine, Calif.).
  • [0075]
    CHO-DG44 cells were transfected with linearized pING4539 DNA (40 μg, digested with PvuI, phenol-chloroform extracted and ethanol precipitated) using electroporation. Following recovery, the cells were diluted and 1×104 cells were plated per 96-well plate well in selective medium consisting of an αMEM medium lacking nucleosides (Irvine Scientific) and supplemented with dialyzed fetal bovine serum (100 ml serum dialyzed using 4L cold 0.15 NaCl using 6000-8000 cutoff for 16 hours at 4° C.). Untransfected CHO-DG44 cells are unable to grow in this medium because they possess the DHFR mutation and were removed during successive feedings with the selective medium. At 1.5-2 weeks, microcolonies consisting of transfected cells were observed.
  • [0076]
    Clones were analyzed for the presence of LBP-reactive protein in culture by ELISA using Immulon-II 96 well plates (Dynatech). Supernatant samples were added to the plates, incubated 46 hours, 4° C. followed by goat anti-LBP antiserum and peroxidose-labeled rabbit anti-goat anti-serum. The 21 most productive positive clones were expanded in selective αMEM medium and then grown on selective medium supplemented with 0.05 μM methotrexate. The best producing amplified clone was chosen based on ELISA of supernatants as described above and then expanded in αMEM media containing 0.05 μM methotrexate for growth in roller bottles.
  • [0077]
    rLBP was produced in CHO-DG44 cells transfected with the plasmid pING-4539. All incubations were performed in a humidified 5% CO2 incubator maintained at 37° C. Working stock cultures were grown in DME/F-12 with 10% FCS, and were then seeded into 40 2-liter roller bottles (500 mL per bottle) at a density of 9.6×104 cells/mL in DME/F-12 with 5% FCS (4.8×107 cells/bottle). Four days later, the culture supernatants from each bottle were removed and then replaced with 500 mL of fresh media (DME/F-12 with 2.5% FCS). Ten mL of an S-Sepharose (Pharmacia) ion exchange resin slurry (50% v/v, sterilized by autoclaving) was then added to each bottle, and incubation was continued. After 2 days, the media containing S-Sepharose was harvested and replaced with fresh media again containing S-Sepharose. This process was repeated one more time, to yield three harvests of S-Sepharose over a four day period. After each harvest, the S-Sepharose resin was allowed to settle for 1 hour, and the spent media was removed by aspiration. The sedimented S-Sepharose was resuspended in fresh media and pooled. The method of purification using S-Sepharose has been described and claimed in co-owned and copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 07/855,501 and in co-owned and copending PCT US93/04752 filed May 19, 1993, the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.
  • [0078]
    All chromatographic resins used in the purification of rLBP and rLBP25 were depyrogenated by immersion in 0.2N NaOH, 1 M NaCl and then rinsed with pyrogen-free water. All buffers and reagents were prepared with bottled, pyrogen-free water for irrigation (Baxter).
  • [0079]
    The S-Sepharose resin harvested from culture supernatants was washed successively with 5 volumes of cold 20 mM MES, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 6.8 (two times), 20 mM NaAc, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 4.0 (two times), and 20 mM NaAc, 0.4 M NaCl, pH 4.0 (two times). For each of these sedimentations, the resin (in 1 L roller bottles) was allowed to settle at 1×g in the cold. The resin from each harvest (100-200 mL settled volume) was next packed into individual 5×10 cm columns and equilibrated in 20 mM NaAc, 0.4 M NaCl, pH 4.0 at 4° C. Two of the columns were subsequently washed with 20 mM NaAc, 0.7 M NaCl, pH 4.0, until the absorbance at 280 nm approached zero, and were then batch eluted with 20 mM NaAc, 1.0 M NaCl, pH 4.0. Eluted rLBP was identified by SDS-PAGE in 12.5% gels. These gels also showed that some of the rLBP has eluted in the 0.7 M NaCl wash. Consequently, the third batch of resin (about 300 mL) was eluted with a gradient of NaCl (0.4 M to 1.0 M) in 20 mM NaAc, pH 4.0, and 8.5 mL fractions were collected. SDS-PAGE analysis of column fractions indicated that rLBP eluted between fractions 70 and 100. It was estimated that the amount of total protein present in all three eluates was approximately 800 mg.
  • [0080]
    The S-Sepharose fractions containing rLBP from the three harvests were pooled (850 mL), and one-half of the material (425 ml, or about 400 mg rLBP) was purified further. To this material was added 1275 mL of 20 mM NaAc, pH 4.0, such that the final concentration of NaCl would be approximately 0.25 M, and the solution was applied to a second S-Sepharose column (2.5×30 cm) equilibrated at 4° C. in 20 mM NaAc, 0.4 M NaCl, pH 4.0. The column was eluted with a gradient of NaCl (0.4 to 1.0 M) in 20 mM NaAc, pH 4.0, and column fractions containing rLBP were again identified by SDS-PAGE and pooled. The final volume of pooled material was 133 ml, and it contained about 260 mg of rLBP.
  • [0081]
    Final purification of rLBP was accomplished by chromatographing the eluate from the second S-Sepharose column on a 345 mL Sephacryl S-100 size exclusion column equilibrated in 20 mM NaCitrate, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 5.0 at 40° C. Five 25 mL aliquots of the S-Sepharose eluate were successively applied to, and eluted from, the column, and 3.7 mL fractions were collected. SDS-PAGE analysis of the effluent fractions indicated that rLBP eluted as a single band, and peak fractions were pooled and stored at 4° C. The peak fractions from all five S-100 runs were then pooled. The final material (about 245 mg) was >99% pure by SDS-PAGE, and exhibited a molecular weight of about 60 kD.
  • EXAMPLE 4
  • [0082]
    Production and Purification of rLBP25
  • [0083]
    CHO-DG44 cells were transfected with linearized pING4505 DNA (40 μg, digested with PvuI, phenol-chloroform extracted and ethanol precipitated) using the calcium phosphate method of Wigler, et al., Cell, 11:223 (1977). Following calcium phosphate treatment, the cells were plated in T75 flasks and transfectants were obtained by growth in selective medium consisting of an αMEM medium lacking nucleosides (Irvine Scientific) and supplemented with dialyzed fetal bovine serum (100 ml serum dialyzed using 4L cold 0.15 NaCl using 6000-8000 cutoff for 16 hours at 4° C.). Untransfected CHO-DG44 cells are unable to grow in this medium because they possess the DHFR mutation and were removed during successive feedings with the selective medium. At 1.5-2 weeks, only microcolonies consisting of transfected cells were observed. The transfected cells were removed from the flasks by trypsinization and subcloned by limiting dilution in 96 well plates.
  • [0084]
    Subclones were analyzed for the presence of rLBP25 protein in culture supernatants by anti-gamma ELISA using Immulon-II 96 well plates (Dynatech) with LPS as a pre-coat, followed by culture supernatant, goat anti-LBP anti-serum and peroxidase-labeled rabbit anti-goat antiserum. The positive clones were also retested for LBP specific mRNA. The top producing clone was expanded in selective αMEM medium for growth in roller bottles.
  • [0085]
    rLBP25 was produced in CHO-DG44 cells transfected with the plasmid pING4505 following procedures similar to those described above in Example 3 for rLBP, with minor modifications. After the harvested S-Sepharose was washed in 20 mM NaAc, 0.4 M NaCl, pH 4.0, rLBP25 was batch eluted by the addition of 20 mM NaAc, 1.0 M NaCl, pH 4.0. To the pooled 1.0 M NaCl eluates from the 3 harvests (862 mL) was added 137 mL of 0.5 M MES, such that the final volume was 999 mL, and the final NaCl concentration was about 0.87 M. At this stage, it was estimated that the amount of total protein present was about 775 mg.
  • [0086]
    A portion of S-Sepharose eluate (549 mL) was diluted with water such that the final volume was 1600 mL, and the final NaCl concentration was about 0.3 M. This diluted material was applied to a 2.5×20 cm column of Q-Sepharose previously equilibrated in 20 mM MES, 0.2 M NaCl, pH 5.5 at 4° C. The eluate flowing through the column (which contains the rLBP25) was then applied to a second S-Sepharose column (2.5×30 cm), and the column was eluted with a gradient of 0.4 M to 1.2 M NaCl in 20 mM NaAc, pH 4.0. rLBP25-containing fractions were identified by SDS-PAGE and peak fractions were pooled. This pooled material (60 mL) was divided into 20 mL aliquots and sequentially chromatographed on Sephacryl S-100. Peak fractions from the three runs were pooled and rechromatographed over the same S-100 column. The final material (about 33 mg) was >99% pure by SDS-PAGE, and exhibited a molecular weight of about 22 kDa.
  • EXAMPLE 5
  • [0087]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199) Hybrid Protein
  • [0088]
    In this example vectors encoding a hybrid protein [LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199) hybrid] comprising the first 43 amino-terminal amino acids of LBP and amino acid residues 44-199 of BPI (for BPI see [SEQ ID NOS: 11 AND 12] were constructed.
  • [0089]
    A. Construction of Intermediate Vector pIC111
  • [0090]
    Intermediate vector pIC111 was constructed according to the following procedure as set out in FIG. 4. A 250 bp fragment was isolated from pING4505 that encoded the BPI signal sequence and amino acids 1-43 of LBP by digesting with BamHI, blunting the end with T4 polymerase, then cutting with Sal I. To generate a fragment of BPI that would provide a blunt junction beginning with amino acid 44. a PCR fragment was produced using two primers. The sequence of primer BPI-18 was 5′ AAGCATCTTGGGAAGGGG 3′ [SEQ ID NO: 13] and the sequence of primer BPI-11 was 5′ TATTTTGGTCATTACTGGCAGAGT 3′ [[SEQ ID NO: 14]. The BPI-containing plasmid pING4502 was used as template. Plasmid pING4502 is essentially the same as plasmid pING4503, but does not contain the 30 bp of the 5′ UT region of BPI and has the gpt gene instead of DHFR gene for selection. The PCR amplified DNA was digested with AflII and the resulting 100 bp fragment, encoding BPI residues 44 through about 76 was purified. This fragment was ligated together with the 250 bp BPI signal/LBP 1-43 fragment described above into the SalI-AflII vector fragment from pIC110 (BPI in T7T3) to generate pIC111.
  • [0091]
    B. Construction of Mammalian Expression Vector pING4525
  • [0092]
    The insert in pIC111 encoding LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199) with BPI signal was digested with SalI and SstII and subcloned into SalI-SstII digested pING4502 vector to generate mammalian expression vector pING4525. The construction of pING4525 is set out in FIG. 5.
  • [0093]
    C. Construction of Vector for In Vitro Transcription, Translation (pML105)
  • [0094]
    The construction of in vitro transcription plasmid pML105 is set out in FIG. 6. pING4525 was digested with NotI, treated with mung bean nuclease to blunt the end, then digested with XhoI. The resulting 600 bp fragment, which encodes LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199) without a signal sequence, was gel purified. This fragment was subcloned into pIC127 plasmid which had been digested with NcoI, treated with T4 polymerase then XhoI, to generate pML105. pIC127 is essentially pGEM1 (Promega, Wis.) with a BPI23 insert cloned downstream of the SP6 RNA polymerase promoter designed for in vitro transcription of the BPI. Digestion of pIC127 with NcoI followed by T4 polymerase (to fill in) generates an ATG that can be joined in a blunt junction to a sequence that can then be transcribed in a cell free system.
  • EXAMPLE 6
  • [0095]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197) Hybrid Protein
  • [0096]
    In this example a vector encoding a hybrid protein [BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197)] comprising the first 159 amino terminal amino acids of BPI and amino acid residues 158-197 of LBP was constructed.
  • [0097]
    A. Construction of Intermediate pIC112.
  • [0098]
    Plasmid pING4505 was digested with EarI and SstII and the 135 bp fragment corresponding to LBP 158-197 (plus stop condon) was gel purified. This fragment was ligated with 2 fragments from pIC110, the 250 bp AflII-EarI fragment and the vector fragment (SstII-AflII) to generate pIC112 as set out in FIG. 7.
  • [0099]
    B. Construction of Mammalian Expression Vector pING4526.
  • [0100]
    The insert encoding BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197) was excised from pIC112 with SalI and SstII and subcloned into SalI-SstII digested pING4502 to generate pING4526 as set out in FIG. 5.
  • [0101]
    C. Construction of Vector for In Vitro Transcription/Translation (pML103)
  • [0102]
    pING4526 was used as the source of a 430 bp EcoRI-SstII fragment (encoding BPI 61-159/LBP 158-197). This fragment was subcloned into the SstII-EcoRI vector fragment from pIC127 to generate pML103, encoding the BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197) insert in a vector for in vitro transcription. This construction is set out in FIG. 6.
  • EXAMPLE 7
  • [0103]
    In Vitro Transcription/Translation and Lipid A Binding Activity of LBP/BPI Hybrid Protein
  • [0104]
    In this example, in vitro transcription/translation reactions were carried out for plasmids encoding BPI23 and the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins of Examples 5 and 6. Specifically, the TNT™ Coupled Reticulocyte Lysate System Kit (Promega, Wis.) with SP6 RNA polymerase was used to carry out in vitro transcription/translation of plasmids pML103 and pML105 to produce hybrid LBP/BPI proteins. The kit is a complete system, which provides all the reagents necessary to make protein. One adds only the DNA template specifying the protein sequence of interest, a radiolabeled amino acid (35S-methionine) and a ribonuclease inhibitor (Promega's recombinant RNasin).
  • [0105]
    The protocol used to generate the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins was essentially that suggested by Promega's Technical Bulletin #126. Reactions were prepared in volume of 50 μL containing: TNT Rabbit Reticulocyte Lysate, TNT Reaction Buffer, TNT SP6 RNA Polymerase, amino acid mixture minus Methionine, 35-S Methionine used was in vivo cell labelling grade purchased from Amersham (catalog #SJ.1015). One microgram of DNA from either pML103 or pML105 was put into the in Vitro transcription-translation system. As specified by Promega, the transcription-translation reactions were incubated for 2 hours in a water bath at 30° C., then analyzed in various ways to assess the protein products made.
  • [0106]
    The amounts and molecular weights of the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins were determined by SDS PAGE/Phosphorimager analysis (Molecular Dynamics, CA), TCA precipitation and ELISA. The binding of the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins to immobilized J5 Lipid A was also measured.
  • [0107]
    A BPI sandwich ELISA was carried out using rabbit anti-BPI as the capture antibody on the plate and biotin labeled anti-BPI followed by alkaline phosphatase conjugated to streptavidin as the detection system.
  • [0108]
    A J5 Lipid A binding (RIA) binding assay was carried out using pop-apart Immulon-2 strips coated overnight with 25 ng per well of J5 Lipid A. Two sets of plates (coated and uncoated) were blocked for three hours at 37° C. with 0.1% BSA/PBS, washed with PBS/0.05% Tween, then binding was done at 37° C. for one hour with 50 μL of a 1:25 dilution of the transcription-translation reactions. After binding, plates were washed, then placed in scintillation vials with 2 mL of scintillation fluid and counted in a (Beckman) beta-counter.
  • [0109]
    Comparable amounts of LBP/BPI hybrid protein of the anticipated molecular weight were made for each of the analogs. However, when the total protein in each reaction was quantitated by ELISA, the yields appeared to differ. The absolute numbers obtained in the ELISA may reflect altered epitopes in the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins which may not be recognized equally by the rabbit anti-BPI antibody. In particular, the low amount of pML105 detected by ELISA is thought to underestimate the actual protein yield. The LBP/BPI hybrid proteins bound immobilized J5 Lipid A as well as BPI23 (1-199) made with pIC127. Specific binding (background corrected) for the LBP/BPI hybrid proteins is shown in Table 2. LBP/BPI hybrid proteins of the invention may have such desired properties as LPS-binding activity comparable to rBPI23, while lacking CD14-mediated immunostimulatory activity characteristic of the holo-LBP proteins, and may have advantageous pharmacokinetic properties such as increased half-life as compared with rBPI23 as measured in Example 8 below.
    TABLE 2
    Yield Specific Binding
    Plasmid Description ELISA RIA, J5 Lipid A
    pIC127 BPI23 (1-199)  57 ng 140,000 cpms
    pML103 BPI (1-159) 100 ng  210,000 cpms
       LBP (158-197)
    pML105 LBP (1-43)   12 ng 150,000 cpms
     BPI (44-199)
  • EXAMPLE 8
  • [0110]
    Pharmacokinetics of rLBP25, rLBP and rBPI23 in Male CD Rats
  • [0111]
    (The pharmacokinetics of rLBP25, rLBP and rBPI23 were investigated in rats using an ELISA assay.) The pharmacokinetics of 1 mg/kg rLBP25 was investigated in 3 male CD rats. Blood samples were collected at selected times (from 0.5 minutes to 72 hours) after administration of dose. Plasma samples were then assayed by ELISA using affinity purified rabbit anti-LBP25 as the capture antibody and biotin labelled affinity purified rabbit anti-LBP25 as the secondary antibody.
  • [0112]
    The plasma concentration-time profile of rLBP25 could be fit to a three-compartment model, with α half-life of 2.3±0.3 minutes, β half-life of 10.8±1.0 minutes, and γ half-life of 101±14 minutes, with a systemic mean residence time of about 9.2±0.8 minutes (Table 3). The rate of clearance of rLBP25 from the plasma was about 10 times faster than that observed for rLBP, and about 5 times slower than the clearance rate of rBPI23. Unlike BPI, removing the carboxy terminal end of LBP significantly increased its clearance rate. However, the steady state volume of distribution of LBP25 is similar to that of LBP, suggesting that the distribution of LBP was not affected by this modification.
  • [0113]
    The pharmacokinetics of 1 mg/kg rLBP was investigated in 3 male CD rats. Blood samples were collected at selected times (from 0.5 minutes to 75 hours) after administration of dose. Plasma samples were then assayed by ELISA using affinity purified rabbit anti-LBP25 as the capture antibody and biotin labelled affinity purified rabbit anti-LBP25 as the secondary antibody.
  • [0114]
    The plasma concentration-time profile of rLBP could be fit to a three-compartment model, with α half-life of 14±2 minutes, β half-life of 130±16 minutes, γ half-life of 561±37 minutes (Table 3). The rate of clearance of rLBP from the plasma was very slow, about 60 times slower than rBPI23.
    TABLE 3
    Pharmacokinetics Parameter Values from the Serum Clearance
    Curve of 1 mg/kg rBPI23, rLBP25 and rLBP (mean ± se)
    Vc Vss Clearance MRT t1/2α t1/2β
    Test Article mL/kg mL/kg mL/min/kg minutes minutes minutes
    rBPI23 62.3 ± 15   78 ± 16 25.5 ± 5.4 3.0 ± 0.0  1.62 ± 0.06 18.0 ± 3.0
    rLBP25 46.8 ± 0.6 269 ± 60  5.1 ± 0.4 51.8 ± 8.9  2.33 ± 0.3 10.8 ± 1.0
    rLBP 55.7 ± 9.0 208 ± 77 0.45 ± 0.1 437.6 ± 55   13.57 ± 2.0  129.7 ± 16  
  • EXAMPLE 9
  • [0115]
    Binding of rLBP25 and rLBP to Lipid A
  • [0116]
    In this example, the binding of rLBP25 to immobilized lipid A was determined according to the method of Gazzano-Santoro et al., Infect. Immun. 60: 4754-4761 (1992) but utilizing 251I labeled rLBP25 instead of 125I labeled rBPI23. Radioiodination of proteins was performed essentially as previously described (Gazzano-Santoro et al.) except that the iodination was performed in the absence of Tween 20 and the iodinated protein was exchanged by gel filtration into 20 mM citrate, pH 5.0, 0.15M NaCl, 0.1% F68 (Poloxamer I88) 0.002% Polysorbate 80.
  • [0117]
    Specifically, an E. coli J5 lipid A suspension was sonicated, diluted in methanol to a concentration of 0.1 μg/mL and 100 μL aliquots were allowed to evaporate in wells (Immulon 2 Removawell Strips, Dynatech) at 37° C. overnight. The wells were then blocked with 215 μL of D-PBS/0.1% BSA (D-PBS/BSA) for three hours at 37° C. The blocking buffer was discarded, the wells were washed in D-PBS/0.05% Tween 20 (D-PBS/T) and incubated overnight at 4° C. with D-PBS/T containing increasing amounts of 125I labeled rLBP25, or rBPI23 as described in Gazzano-Santoro et al. After three washes, bound radioactivity was counted in a gamma counter. The binding to wells treated with (D-PBS/BSA) only was taken to represent nonspecific binding; specific binding was defined as the difference between total and nonspecific binding. For rLBP, the experiment was performed as described above except that the wells were blocked in D-PBS/1% BSA, washed with D-PBS/0.1% BSA and the binding incubation buffer was D-PBS/0.1% BSA. The resulting data were fitted to a standard binding equation by computerized non-linear curve fitting (Leatherbarrow, Trends Biochemical Sciences, 15: 455-458 (1990); GraFit Version 2.0, Erathicus Software Ltd., Staines, UK). According to these experiments the labeled rLBP25 had a Kd of about 76 nM (FIG. 9) and the rLBP had a Kd of about 60 nM, while rBPI23 had a Kd of approximately 3 nM, indicating an approximately 15-25 fold lower binding affinity of rLBP25 and rLBP, as compared with rBPI23, for LPS. However, the binding of rLBP25 and rLBP were comparable, demonstrating that the LBS-binding site of rLBP is localized in the N-terminal portion of the molecule.
  • EXAMPLE 10
  • [0118]
    Competition by rBPI23 and by rLBP25 for the Binding of 125I-rLBP25 to Immobilized Lipid A
  • [0119]
    In this example, the inhibition of 125I-labeled rLBP25 binding to E. coli J5 lipid A by unlabeled rBPI23 or rLBP25 was determined. Specifically, E. coli J5 lipid A was diluted in methanol to a concentration of 1 μg/mL and 50 μL aliquots were allowed to evaporate in wells overnight at 37° C. The wells were then blocked in D-PBS/BSA. Increasing amounts of unlabeled rBPI23 or rLBP25 in a 50 μL volume were then added and the wells were incubated overnight at 4° C. in D-PBS/T. Twenty microliters of 125I-rLBP25 (0.65×106 cpm, specific activity 5.29 μCi/μg) were added directly to each well and further incubated for one hour at 4° C. After three washes in D-PBS/T, wells were counted. FIG. 10 shows that although rLBP25 is able to compete with 125I-rLBP25 for binding to lipid A, rBPI23 is a better competitor. These results are consistent with the difference in relative affinity as shown in Example 9.
  • EXAMPLE 11
  • [0120]
    Competition by rBPI23 and by rLBP for the Binding of 125I-rLBP to Immobilized Lipid A
  • [0121]
    In this example, the inhibition of 125I-labeled rLBP binding to E. coli J5 lipid A by rBPI23 and rLBP was determined. Specifically, E. coli J5 lipid A was diluted in methanol to a concentration of 1 μg/mL and 100 μL aliquots were allowed to evaporate in wells overnight at 37° C. Following incubation, the wells were blocked in D-PBS/1% BSA. Increasing amounts of unlabeled rBPI23 or rLBP mixed with a fixed amount of 125I-rLBP (1.45×106 cpm, specific activity 1.74 μCi/μg) were added to wells in a 100 μL volume and incubated overnight at 4° C. in D-PBS/BSA. After three washes in D-PBS/BSA, wells were counted. FIG. 11 shows the results wherein increasing amounts of both rLBP and rBPI23 compete with radiolabeled rLBP binding for the immobilized lipid A. These results show that rBPI23 was more potent than rLBP at competing for rLBP (FIG. 11) binding to lipid A consistent with the difference in relative affinity as shown in Example 9.
  • EXAMPLE 12
  • [0122]
    Ability of rLBP25 and rLBP to Inhibit the LAL Assay
  • [0123]
    In this example, the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP were compared for their ability to inhibit the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. Specifically, increasing concentrations of the LPS binding proteins were incubated in the presence of 2 ng/mL of E. coli 0113 LPS (60 μL volume) for three hours at 37° C. The samples were then diluted with PBS to bring the LPS concentration to 333 pg/mL and the amount of LPS activity was determined in the chromogenic LAL assay (Whittaker Bioproducts, Inc.). The results shown in FIG. 12 show that rLBP25 and the rLBP protein products had comparable endotoxin neutralizing activity in the LAL assay.
  • EXAMPLE 13
  • [0124]
    Effect of LBP Molecules on Binding/Uptake of 125I-Labeled LPS and on TNF Production by THP-1 Cells
  • [0125]
    In this example, the effect of rLBP25 and rLBP on binding/uptake of LPS and TNF production by a human monocyte cell line bearing CD14 receptors on its cell surface was determined. Specifically, THP-1 human monocyte cells (obtained from the American Type Culture Collection Tumor Immunology Bank, 12301 Parklawn Dr., Rockville, Md. 20852) were grown to a density of 3.5×105/mL in RPMI 1640 media (Gibco Laboratories, Grand Island, N.Y.) supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (Hyclone Laboratories, Logan, Utah), 1 mM glutamine, 1 mM pyruvate (Gibco), and 10 U/mL penicillin and streptomycin (Gibco). The cells were transferred at the same density into the above medium supplemented with 100 nM 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (Biomol Research Laboratories, Plymouth Meeting, Pa.) and allowed to grow for another 3 days before use. Tubes containing 2×106 cells in 1 mL of RPMI/0.1% BSA were incubated in the presence of 20 ng/mL of 125I-labeled Ra LPS (List Biological Laboratories, Campbell Calif.) with various concentrations of rLBP25, or rLBP. Nonspecific uptake was determined by adding a 2000-fold excess of unlabeled RaLPS for one hour at 37° C. At the end of the incubation time, the cells were removed from the binding medium by centrifugation through a layer of dibutyl/dioctyl phthalate oil and counted. Supernatants were sampled at the end of the assay to determine TNF production.
  • [0126]
    The presence of rLBP stimulated both the uptake of 125I-labeled LPS (FIG. 13) and the release of TNF (FIG. 14) by the THP-1 cells. In contrast, if the cells are incubated with rLBP25, there was no significant uptake of 125I-labeled LPS (FIG. 13) and no significant TNF production (FIG. 14).
  • EXAMPLE 14
  • [0127]
    Effect of LBP Molecules on TF and TNT Production in PBMCs
  • [0128]
    In this example, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy human donors were used in a model system to determine the effects of rLBP25 and rLBP on LPS-mediated effects. PBMCs include approximately 20% monocytes which are known to produce tissue factor (TF) which is a cell surface protein responsible for initiating blood clotting and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) when stimulated by LPS Tissue Factor if assembled with factor VII initiates the blood coagulation cascades. TF activity induced by LPS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which is a major complication of gram-negative sepsis. Bone, Annals Int. Med. 115:457 (1991).
  • [0129]
    According to the experimental protocol, PBMCs were prepared from buffy coat from the blood of healthy human donors by separation over Ficoll-Hypaque. The percentage of monocytes (15-25%) in different PBMC preparations was determined by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis based on the expression of CD14 antigen. The PBMCs (2×106/mL) were incubated in 1 mL Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium containing 25 mM HEPES, at 37° C., 5% CO2 for 4 hours. During this incubation, LPS in varying concentrations is present with varying concentrations of rLBP or rLBP25 or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). After incubation the cells and media were separated by centrifugation. The cells were washed with Tris-NaCl buffer (0.1 M Tris, 0.15M NaCl, 0.1% bovine serum albumin, pH7.4) then lysed in the same buffer by adding 15 mM octyl-beta-D-glycopyranoside and incubated at 37° C. for 30 minutes.
  • [0130]
    To determine TNF production by the PBMCs incubated as described above, the supernatant of the PBMCs was assayed for TNF by ELISA (T Cell Sciences, Cambridge, Mass.).
  • [0131]
    To determine TF production, total cellular TF activity was determined in the PBMC lysate using a two-stage anmidolytic assay, similar to that described by Moore et al., J. Clin. Invest. 79:124-130 (1987). In the first stage, the PBMC lysate was mixed with coagulation factor VII and factor X, in order to combine TF with factor VII, which in turn, activated factor X. In the second stage the activity of factor Xa was measured using a chromogenic peptide substrate. Factor VII, factor X and this synthetic peptide substrate (Spectrozyme FXa [MeO—CO-D-CHG-Gly-Arg-pNA)] were the products of American Diagnostica, Greenwich, Conn. TF activity was calculated by reference to standard curves obtained with dilutions of rabbit brain thromboplastin (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.) in the amidolytic assay.
  • [0132]
    For this assay in a 96 well microtiter plate, cell lysate (containing 103-104 monocytes) or different dilutions of the thromboplastin standard (corresponding to 0.1 to 1 μl buffer (0.1 M Tris, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 7.4) containing 7 mM CaCl2. The mixture was incubated at room temperature for 20 min. Then 50 μl of Spectrozyme FXa, (synthetic substrate for factor Xa; 1.4 mg/ml) was added and the rate of absorbance increase at 405 nm was measured using a kinetic plate reader (Molecular Devices, Menlo Park, Calif.).
  • [0133]
    According to one experiment, varying amounts of recombinant rLBP (produced according to the method of Example 3) and 100 or 1000 pg/ml of E. coli LPS were contacted with the isolated PBMCs to determine the effect of rLBP on the appearance of TF in the cell lysate and on TNF release. The results in FIGS. 15a and 15 b show that rLBP greatly stimulates the LPS-mediated synthesis of TF and TNF. Similarly, incubation of LPS (100 or 1000 pg/ml) and 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS) also resulted in TF and TNF synthesis. Since LBP is present in serum, the bar-graphs at the right of FIGS. 15a and 15 b show that serum also mediates LPS mediated responses of TF and TNF production. To determine whether the effects of LPS are mediated by the CD14 antigen present on the surface of monocytes, antibodies to this determinant were included in the incubation mixture in other experiments. Addition of anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody (MY4; Coulter Immunology, Hialeah, Fla.) in the presence of serum or rLBP inhibited the induction of both tissue factor activity and TNF release. The extent of inhibition diminished at higher LPS concentrations.
  • [0134]
    The use of the PBMC model to determine TF and TNF production was then repeated to compare the effect of rLBP25 with that of recombinant rLBP on LPS-induced TF and TNF production. The results with varying concentrations of LPS shown in FIG. 16 compare administration of 20% FBS with serum-free media containing various concentrations of recombinant rLBP. These results again demonstrate that rLBP potentiates TNF release. The results shown in FIG. 17 with varying concentrations of LPS compare administration of 20% FBS with varying concentrations of rLBP25 in serum-free media. In contrast to the results with rLBP, these results demonstrate that rLBP25 does not have an immunostimulatory effect and therefore does not potentiate the release of TNF.
  • [0135]
    Although rLBP25 could not mediate the CD14-dependent LPS stimulation of monocytes to produce TF or TNF, the ability of rLBP25 to compete with rLBP and inhibit the LPS-mediated appearance of TF on the PBMC cell surface was tested. Specifically, rLBP25 produced according to the method of Example 4 was added in concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 μg/mL to PMBCs that were incubated with a constant amount of rLBP (2 μg/ml) and stimulated with either 20 pg/mL or 200 pg/mL LPS. The results shown in FIG. 18 demonstrate that not only does rLBP25 not mediate LPS-stimulated TF production similar to rLBP but also it effectively competes with rLBP to substantially reduce the LPS-induced TF production. Similar effects were obtained for TNF production.
  • EXAMPLE 15
  • [0136]
    Effect of rLBP25 on LPS Induction of Endothelial Cell Adhesiveness for Neutrophils
  • [0137]
    In this example, the effect of rLBP25 on LPS induction of endothelial cell adhesiveness for neutrophils was studied in an in vitro adherence assay. Human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in a 48-well plate and incubated for 4 hours at 37° C. with 10 ng/mL LPS (E. coli 0113) in M199 supplemented with 2% FCS, or with the medium only. rLBP25 was added to the LPS-containing wells at concentrations varying from 0.1 to about 100 μg/mL to determine its ability to neutralize the LPS-induced increase in the adhesiveness of endothelial cells. Following the four hour incubation, HUVEC monolayers were washed three times, and 2.5×105 51Cr-labeled human blood neutrophils in 0.2 mL RMPI-2% FCS were added to each well. The plate was incubated at 37° C. for 30 minutes. After the incubation, the supernatant was aspirated and each well was washed with 1 mL of warm medium to remove non-adherent neutrophils. The cells remaining in each well were solubilized with 0.2 mL of 0.25N NaOH and the lysates were counted in a gamma counter. Percent neutrophil adherence was calculated as 100×cpm lysate/cpm added. The data presented in FIG. 19 on the mean of percent neutrophil adherence of four replicates per group. The results shown in FIG. 19 demonstrate that rLBP25 at 100 μg/ml completely inhibits the LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion. Under the conditions of this assay, 10 or 1 μg/mL of rLBP25 inhibits 71% and 51%, respectively, of the LPS-stimulated adherence, while 0.1 μg/mL of rLBP25 had no significant inhibitory effect.
  • EXAMPLE 16
  • [0138]
    Effect of rLBP and rLBP25 on Bacteria Binding to Monocytes
  • [0139]
    In this example, the effect of rLBP25 on bacterial binding to monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was compared with that of rLBP. White blood cells (WBC) were isolated by lysis with NH4Cl of acid-citrate-dextran treated blood and red blood cell ghosts removed by washing. Bacteria were cultured overnight in Trypticase soy broth, washed extensively, incubated for 1 hour at room temperature with 1 mg/ml fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and washed. Most strains were then incubated for 30 minutes at 60° C. and washed again. The concentration of bacterial cells was then determined turbidometrically.
  • [0140]
    In order to measure bacterial binding and uptake by WBC, WBC adjusted to 107/ml in pooled normal human serum (NHS) were mixed with a 5-fold excess of bacteria in NHS and incubated. Experiments were terminated by transferring the tubes to 4° C. and/or adding cytochalasin B. Cells were then washed extensively with ice cold DPBS and analyzed immediately on a FACScan (Becton Dickinson, San Jose, Calif.). Binding is defined as the percent of cells with bacteria at time zero. Uptake is defined as the percent of cells with bacteria after 15 minutes at 37° C. minus the percent of cells with bacteria at time zero.
  • [0141]
    For the determination of the effect of rLBP and rLBP25 on bacterial binding to monocytes, isolated WBC in 100% allogeneic human serum mixed with E. coli J5 bacteria that had been pretreated with various concentrations of rLBP or rLBP25. As shown in FIGS. 20 and 21, there was minimal binding (<10%) to either monocytes or PMNs by the bacteria in the absence of rLBP or rLBP25. rLBP mediated a concentration-dependent binding of bacteria to monocytes, that reached 30% at 100 μg/mL rLBP (FIG. 20). This rLBP-enhanced binding of bacteria to monocytes was shown to be inhibited by an anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody (mAb MY4) but not by an isotype-matched control (mAb 5C2). In striking contrast, rLBP25 was unable to mediate such a CD14-dependent enhanced binding to monocytes as induced by rLBP (FIG. 21). No comparable increase in binding to PMNs is mediated by either rLBP or rLBP25. This finding is consistent with the much lower levels of CD14 on PMNs as opposed to monocytes.
  • EXAMPLE 17
  • [0142]
    LBP Sandwich ELISA
  • [0143]
    An LBP sandwich ELISA has been developed which utilizes a rabbit anti-rLBP antibody on solid-phase with a biotin-labeled rabbit anti-rLBP as the detector. Both rLBP and rLBP25 were detected by this ELISA (FIG. 22). The linear range of the rLBP standard curve was 40 to 800 pg/mL.
  • [0144]
    In this assay, rBPI produced a signal which was approximately 5 orders of magnitude lower than that of rLBP. For example, the signal produced by 100,000 ng/mL of rBPI was equivalent to the signal produced by 0.7 ng/mL of rLBP. Therefore, endogenous BPI will have a negligible effect on the accurate measurement of LBP.
  • [0145]
    Fifty microliters of affinity purified rabbit anti-rLBP antibody (1 μg/mL in PBS) were incubated overnight at 2-8° C. (or alternatively, 1 hour at 37° C.) in the wells of Immulon 2 (Dynatech Laboratories Inc., Chantilly, Va.) microtiter plates. The antibody solution was removed and 200 μL of 1% non-fat milk in PBS (blocking agent) was added to all wells. After blocking the plates for one hour at room temperature, the wells were washed three times with 300 μL of wash buffer (PBS/0.05% Tween-20). Standards, samples and controls were diluted in triplicate with PBS containing 1% bovine serum albumin, 0.05% Tween 20 (PBS-BSA/Tween) and 10 units/mL of sodium heparin (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.) in separate 96-well plates. rLBP or rLBP25 standard solutions were prepared as serial two-fold dilutions from 100 to 0.012 ng/mL. Each replicate and dilution of the standards, samples and controls (50 μL) was transferred to the blocked microtiter plates and incubated for one hour at 37° C. After the primary incubation, the wells were washed three times with wash buffer. Biotin-labeled rabbit anti-rLBP antibody was diluted 1/4000 in PBS:BSA/Tween and 50 μL was added to all wells. The plates were then incubated for one hour at 37° C. Subsequently, all wells were washed 3 times with wash buffer. Alkaline phosphatase-labeled streptavidin (Zymed Laboratories Inc., San Francisco, Calif.) was diluted 1/2000 in PBS-BSA/Tween and 50 μL was added to all wells. After incubation for 15 minutes at 37° C., all wells were washed three times with wash buffer and 3 times with deionized water and the substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate (1 mg/mL in 10% diethanolamine buffer) was added in a volume of 50 μL to all wells. Color development was allowed to proceed for one hour at room temperature, after which 50 μL of 1 N NaOH was added to stop the reaction. The absorbance at 405 nm was determined for all wells using a Vmax Plate Reader (Molecular Devices Corp., Menlo Park, Calif.).
  • [0146]
    The mean absorbance at 405 nm (A405) for all samples and standards (in triplicate) were corrected for background by subtracting the mean A405 of wells receiving only sample dilute buffer (no BPI) in the primary incubation step. A standard curve was then plotted as A405 versus ng/ml of rLBP or rLBP25. The linear range was selected, a linear regression analysis was performed and concentrations were determined for samples and controls by interpolation from the standard curve.
  • EXAMPLE 18
  • [0147]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of LBP Derivatives
  • [0148]
    An LBP derivative was constructed in which the alanine residue at position 131 was mutated to cysteine. This position is analogous to cysteine 132 in the BPI sequence, which appears to be the cysteine involved in homodimer formation. By placing a cysteine in the same position in the LBP sequence, the expressed protein may also have the ability to dimerize via interchain disulfide bond formation through cysteine 131, and the resultant dimer may have increased biological potency as is observed for the BPI dimer. To construct the LBP (1-197) (Cys131) derivative, two complementary oligonucleotides containing the desired mutation were used to replace a portion of the LBP sequence between BpmI and PstI restriction sites, corresponding to the amino acid sequence from residue 127 to residue 133. These oligonucleotides were LBP15: 5′-CCCACAGTCACGTGCTCCAGCTGCA-3′[SEQ ID NO: 15], and LBP16: 5′-GCTGGAGCACGTGACTGTGGGCC-3′[SEQ ID NO: 16]. These 2 annealed oligonucleotides were ligated to two fragments from pML116: the −409 bp HindIII-BpmI fragment and the −3033 bp PstI-HindIII fragment, to generate plasmid pML136. Plasmid pML116 is a vector for use in an in vitro transcription/translation system encoding LBP (1-197) which corresponds to mammalian vectors pING4505 and pING4508 described above. Plasmid pML136 is then expressed in an in vitro transcription/translation system as described above to produce LBP (1-197) (Cys 131). A corresponding vector for expression in mammalian cells can be constructed according to the methods described previously.
  • EXAMPLE 19
  • [0149]
    Vectors for Expression of LBP-IgG Hybrid Fusion Proteins
  • [0150]
    Portions of the LBP protein can be included in fusions with the Fc region of human IgG1 according to the general methods of co-owned and copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/064,693 filed May 19, 1993, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference, which teaches the construction of BPI-IgG fusion proteins. These LBP hybrid proteins may include truncated forms of LBP, such as 1-197, and may also include LBP derivatives containing the alanine 131 to cysteine mutation. These LBP hybrid proteins may be expected to form dimers upon recombinant production and may also have improved pharmacokinetics.
  • EXAMPLE 20
  • [0151]
    In Vitro Transcription/Translations of Truncated LBP Fragments and Determination of Their Ability to Mediate LPS Stimulation of TNF Activity
  • [0152]
    While rLBP25 and rLBP interact similarly with lipid A/LPS, rLBP and not rLBP25 can stimulate the uptake of LPS and release the TNF by THP-1 cells. These data suggest that the region of LBP responsible for mediation of LPS activity via the CD14 receptor lies between positions 197 and 456 (the end) of the LBP protein sequence. To define this region more precisely, plasmid pML130 containing the entire 456 amino acid sequence of LBP (including silent mutations to introduce a ClaI restriction site at position 197-198), was constructed for in vitro transcription/translation experiments. Plasmid pML130 corresponds generally to mammalian vector pING4539 described previously. The LBP insert in pML130 is under the control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter, which efficiently transcribes RNA from linear DNA templates. Therefore, deletions of the LBP sequence generated via restriction digests of plasmid pML130 in the region between residues 197 and 456 as set out in Table 5 below are used as templates in the in vitro transcription/translation reaction to generate truncated LBP protein fragments. The biological activity of these LBP protein fragments are then tested to determine the region of the LBP sequence necessary for mediating the interaction of LPS with the CD14 receptor with the LBP (1-456) holoprotein acting as a positive control for CD14 activity and the rLBP25 (1-197) fragment acting as a negative control. Mammalian vectors for expression of the LBP derivatives are produced and the derivatives are expressed according to the methods disclosed previously.
    TABLE 5
    Restriction enzyme LBP fragment size
    digest (amino acids)
    HindIII 456
    Eco47III 400
    BsiHKAI 342
    Bam1105I 298
    Bsu36I 244
    ClaI 196
  • EXAMPLE 21
  • [0153]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of LBP Hybrid Proteins
  • [0154]
    A number of vectors were constructed to express LBP hybrid proteins containing both BPI and LBP sequences derived from the amino-terminal domains of each protein. Such proteins are expected to retain LPS binding activity since the LPS binding domain exists within the amino-terminal region of both BPI and LBP. It is further expected that the hybrid proteins comprising amino terminal portions of both LBP and BPI would be unable to mediate LPS effects via interaction with CD14 receptor. Such proteins may further have advantageous biologic or pharmacokinetic properties. Vectors constructed as intermediates or for use in the in vitro transcription/translation system have the designation “pIC” or “pML” followed by a number while vectors intended for expression in mammalian cells have the designation “pING” followed by a number.
  • [0155]
    A vector encoding an LBP hybrid protein combining the elements of pML105 [LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-199)] and pML103 [BPI (1-159)/LBP (158-197)], namely pML134, was constructed to encode LBP (1-43)/BPI (44-159)/LBP (158-197). The construction of pML134 was accomplished by ligating the −458 bp NheI-EcoRI fragment of pML105 to the −3011 bp EcoRI-NheI fragment of pML103. In addition to pING4526 already described, another vector for expression of BPI(1-159)/LBP(158-197) in mammalian cells was constructed which contained optimized elements including Kozak initiation sequence, human kappa poly A/Mouse Kappa genomic transcription termination and CMV promoter as described in coowned and co-pending U.S. application Ser. No. 08/013,801 filed Feb. 2, 1993 the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference. The mammalian vector was designated pING4168.
  • [0156]
    Two other BPI/LBP hybrids, pML117 and pML118, were constructed by taking advantage of common PstI restriction sites contained in the coding region sequence of both proteins. The starting plasmids for these constructs were pIC127, which contains an insert encoding BPI (1-199), and pIC106, which contains an insert encoding LBP (1-197). pML117, containing an insert encoding BPI (1-137)/LBP (137-197), was constructed by replacing the −200 bp PstI-XhoI fragment of BPI in pIC127 with the corresponding LBP fragment from pIC106. pML118, encoding BPI (1-25) LBP (26-135) BPI (137-199) was constructed by replacing an −600 bp PstI-PstI fragment within the BPI coding region of pIC127 with the corresponding LBP fragment from pIC106. The resulting plasmids are used as templates in the in vitro transcription/translation reaction method according to Example 7 in order to generate LBP hybrid proteins. Constructs pML103, pML105, pML116, pML117, pML118, pML134 were expressed in the transcription/translation system and the products were all detected by ELISA using appropriate reagents. All the products bound well to Lipid A with the exception of BPI (1-25)/LBP(26-134)/BPI(135-199) which bound poorly. Three products exhibited superior Lipid A binding activity. They were BPI(1-159)/LBP(158-197), BPI(1-135)/LBP(135-197), and LBP(1-43)/BPI(44-159)/LBP(158-197).
  • [0157]
    Mammalian vectors for expression of the LBP hybrid proteins are produced and the derivatives are expressed according to the methods disclosed previously.
  • EXAMPLE 22
  • [0158]
    Construction of Vectors for Expression of LBP Hybrid Proteins Comprising BPI/LBP Active Domain Replacement Mutants
  • [0159]
    rBPI23 possesses three biological activities, LPS binding, heparin binding and bactericidal activity, which have been localized to specific domains of the protein defined by synthetic peptides as disclosed by co-owned and copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/209,762 filed Mar. 11, 1994 which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/183,222 filed Jan. 14, 1994, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/093,292 filed Jul. 15, 1993; which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/030,644 filed Mar. 12, 1993 the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference. Domain I of BPI includes the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 17 to about position 45 having the sequence: BPI Domain I ASQQGTAALQKELKRIKPDYSDSFKIKH (SEQ ID NO: 17); Domain II of BPI includes the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 65 to about position 99 having the sequence BPI Domain II SSQISMVPNVGLKFSISNANIKISGKWKAQKRFLK (SEQ ID NO: 18) while Domain III of BPI includes the amino acid sequence of human BPI from about position 142 to about position 169 having the sequence BPI Domain III VHVHISKSKVGWLIQLFHKKIESALRNK (SEQ ID NO: 19) The corresponding domain I of LBP includes the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 17 to about position 45 having the sequence LBP Domain I AAQEGLLALQSELLRITLPDFTGDLRIPH (SEQ IS NO: 20); Domain II of LBP includes the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 65 to about position 99 having the sequence LBP Domain II HSALRPVPGQGLSLSISDSSIRVQGRWKVRKSFFK (SEQ ID NO: 21); while Domain III of LBP includes the amino acid sequence of human LBP from about position 141 to about position 167 having the sequence LBP Domain III VEVDMSGDLGWLLNLFHNQIESKFQKV (SEQ ID NO: 22).
  • [0160]
    Several plasmids encoding LBP hybrid proteins were constructed for in vitro transcription/translation studies in which sequences selected from Domains II and/or III of BPI were inserted to replace the corresponding region of LBP25. Conversely, other plasmids were constructed in which sequences selected from Domains II and/or III of LBP were inserted to replace sequences from the corresponding region of BPI23.
  • [0161]
    First, plasmid pML131 was constructed comprising silent mutations in Domain II of BPI23. Specifically, the nucleotide sequence between AflII and BsrBI restriction sites in the BPI23 coding region of pIC127 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-66: 5′-TTAAATTTTCGATATCCAACGCCAATATTAAGATCTCCGGAAAATGGA AGGCACAAAAGCGCTTCCTTAAGATGAG-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 23) and BPI-67: 5′-CTCATCTTAAGGAAGCGCTTTTGTGCCTTCCATTTTCCGGAGATCTTA ATATTGGCGTTGGATATCGAAAAT (SEQ ID NO: 24). This replacement changed the nucleotide sequence but not the amino acid sequence in the region between residues 77 and 100, and introduced additional restriction sites which could be used for site-directed mutagenesis (EcoRV, SspI, BglII, BspEI, Eco47III, and relocated AflII).
  • [0162]
    In addition plasmid pML140 was constructed comprising silent mutations in Domain III of BPI23. Specifically, the nucleotide sequence between PmlI and BstBI restriction sites in the BPI23 coding region of pIC127 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-78: 5′-GTGCACATTTCGAAGAGCAAAGTGGGGTGGCTGATCCAATTGTTCCA CAAAAAAATTGAGAGCGCGCTG-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 25) and BPI-79: 5′-CGCAGCGCGCTCTCAATTTTTTTGTGGAACAATTGGATCAGCCACCCC ACTTTGCTCTTCGAAATGTGCAC-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 26). This replacement changed the nucleotide sequence but not the amino acid sequence in the region between residues 146 and 163, and introduced additional restriction sites which could be used for site-directed mutagenesis (relocated BstBI, MunI, and BssHII).
  • [0163]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [LBP(1-87)/BPI (88-100)/LBP(101-197)] was constructed in which a portion of Domain II of BPI replaced the corresponding LBP sequence. The hybrid protein comprised the first 87 amino acid residues of LBP, amino acid residues 88-100 of BPI and amino acid residues 101-197 of LBP. The nucleotide sequence between AvaII and BanII restriction sites in the LBP25 coding region of pML116 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-74: 5′-GTCAGCGGGAAATGGAAGGCACAAAAGAGATTTTTAAAAATGCAGGG CT-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 27) and BPI-75: 5′-CTGCATTTTTAAAAATCTCTTTTGTGCCTTCCATTTCCCGCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 28). This replacement essentially changed the amino acid sequence of residues 88-100 of LBP25 from QGRWKVRKSFFKL (SEQ ID NO: 29) to SGKWKAQKRFLKM (SEQ ID NO: 30). Tile resulting plasmid was designated pML135.
  • [0164]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [LBP(1-146)/BPI (148-161)/LBP(160-197)] was constructed in which a portion of Domain III of BPI replaced the corresponding LBP sequence. The hybrid protein comprised the first 146 amino acid residues of LBP, amino acid residues 148-161 of BPI and amino acid residues 160-197 of LBP. Specifically, the nucleotide sequence between AFlIII and ScaI restriction sites in the LBP25 coding region of pML116 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-76: 5′-CATGTCGAAGAGCAAAGTGGGGTGGCTGATCCAACTCTTCCACAAAA AAATTGAGTCCAAATTTCAGAAAGT-3′(SEQ ID NO: 31) and BPI-77: 5′-ACTTTCTGAAATTTGGACTCAATTTTTTTGTGGAAGAGTTGGATCAGC CACCCCACTTTGCTCTTCGA-3′(SEQ ID NO: 32). This replacement essentially changed the amino acid sequence of residues 147-159 of LBP25 from GDLGWLLNLFHNQ (SEQ ID NO: 33) to the corresponding BPI sequence KSKVGWLIQLFHKK (SEQ ID NO: 34). This plasmid was designated pML137.
  • [0165]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [LBP(1-87)/BPI(88-100)/LBP(101-146)/BPI(148-161)/LBP(160-197)] was constructed in which portions of Domains II and III of BPI replaced the corresponding LBP sequences. The hybrid protein comprised the first 87 amino acid residues of LBP, amino acid residues 88-100 of BPI, amino acid residues 101-146 of LBP, amino acid residues 148-161 of BPI and amino acid residues 160-197 of LBP. Plasmid pML138 was constructed from pML135 and pML137 by replacing an ˜292 bp BanII-XhoI fragment of the coding region of pML135 with the corresponding fragment from pML137 to introduce the domain III mutations into the plasmid already containing the domain II mutations.
  • [0166]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [BPI(1-85)/LBP(86-99)/BPI(100-199)] was constructed in which a portion of Domain II of LBP replaced the corresponding BPI sequence. The hybrid protein comprised the first 85 amino acid residues of BPI, amino acid residues 86-99 of LBP and amino acid residues 100-199 of BPI. Specifically, the nucleotide sequence between SspI and AflII restriction sites in the BPI23 coding region of pML131 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-80: 5′-ATTCGTGTACAGGGCAGGTGGAAGGTGCGCAAGTCATTCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 35) and BPI-81: 5′-TTAAAGAATGACTTGCGCACCTTCCACCTGCCCTGTACACGAAT-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 36). This replacement essentially changed the amino acid sequence of residues 86-99 of BPI23 from KISGKWKAQKRFLK (SEQ ID NO: 37) to the corresponding LBP sequence RVQGRWKVRKSFFK. This plasmid was designated pML141 (SEQ ID NO: 38).
  • [0167]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [BPI(1-147/LBP(147-159)/BPI(162-199)] was constructed in which a portion of Domain III of LBP replaced the corresponding BPI sequence. The hybrid protein comprised the first 147 amino acid residues of BPI, amino acid residues 147-159 of LBP and amino acid residues 162-199 of BPI. The nucleotide sequence between BstBI and BssHII restriction sites in the BPI23 coding region of pML140 was replaced with the annealed oligonucleotides BPI-82: 5′-CGGGAGACTTGGGGTGGCTGTTGAACCTCTTCCACAACCAGATTGAG AG-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 39) and BPI-83: 5′-CGCGCTCTCAATCTGGTTGTGGAAGAGGTTCAACAGCCACCCCAAGT CTCC-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 40). This replacement essentially changed the amino acid sequence of residues 148-161 of BPI23 from KSKVGWLIQLFHKK (SEQ ID NO: 41) to the corresponding LBP sequence GDLGWLLNLFHNQ (SEQ ID NO: 42). This plasmid was designated pML142.
  • [0168]
    A plasmid for in vitro transcription/translation studies encoding the LBP hybrid protein [BPI(1-85)/LBP(86-99)/BPI(100-147)/LBP(147-159)/BPI(162-199)] was constructed in which portions of Domains II and III of LBP replaced the corresponding BPI sequences. The hybrid protein comprised the first 85 amino acid residues of BPI, amino acid residues 86-99 of LBP, amino acid residues 100-147 of BPI, amino acid residues 147-159 of LBP and amino acid residues 162-199 of BPI. pML143 can be constructed from pML141 and pML142 by replacing an ˜175 bp PmlI-XhoI fragment in the coding region of pML141 with the corresponding fragment from pML142 to introduce the domain m mutations into the plasmid already containing the domain II mutations. This plasmid was designated pML143.
  • [0169]
    The resulting plasmids are used as templates in the in vitro transcription/translation reaction to generate LBP hybrid proteins. Mammalian vectors for expression of the LBP hybrid proteins are produced and the derivatives are expressed according to the methods disclosed previously. The biological activities of these LBP hybrid proteins are then tested according to the methods set out above.
  • EXAMPLE 23
  • [0170]
    LBP derivatives in the form of synthetic LBP peptides were prepared according to the methods of Merrifield, J. Am, Chem, Soc. 85: 2149 (1963) and Merrifield, Anal Chem. 38: 1905-1914 (1966) using an Applied Biosystems, Inc. Model 432 synthesizer. The resulting derivatives comprised portions of the LBP sequence corresponding to either of BPI Domain II or III. The LBP derivative designated LBP-1 consisted of residues 73 through 99 of LBP having the sequence GQGLSLSISDSSIRVQGRWKVRKSFFK (SEQ ID NO: 43). The LBP derivative designated LBP-2 consisted of residues 140 through 161 of LBP and had the sequence DVEVDMSGDSGWLLNLFHNQIE (SEQ ID NO: 44). The LBP derivatives were subjected to an Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay using a quantiative chromogenic LAL kit (Whitaker Bioproducts, Inc., Walkersville, Md.) to determine neutralization of LPS. LBP-1 was found to neutralize endotoxin in the LAL assay while LBP-2 did not.
  • [0171]
    Numerous modifications and variations in the practice of the invention are expected to occur to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the foregoing description of the presently preferred embodiments thereof. Consequently, the only limitations which should be placed upon the scope of the present invention are those which appear in the appended claims.
  • 1 57 591 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA CDS 1..591 misc_feature “rLBP25” 1 GCC AAC CCC GGC TTG GTC GCC AGG ATC ACC GAC AAG GGA CTG CAG TAT 48 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Tyr 1 5 10 15 GCG GCC CAG GAG GGG CTA TTG GCT CTG CAG AGT GAG CTG CTC AGG ATC 96 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile 20 25 30 ACG CTG CCT GAC TTC ACC GGG GAC TTG AGG ATC CCC CAC GTC GGC CGT 144 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Arg 35 40 45 GGG CGC TAT GAG TTC CAC AGC CTG AAC ATC CAC AGC TGT GAG CTG CTT 192 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Leu 50 55 60 CAC TCT GCG CTG AGG CCT GTC CCT GGC CAG GGC CTG AGT CTC AGC ATC 240 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile 65 70 75 80 TCC GAC TCC TCC ATC CGG GTC CAG GGC AGG TGG AAG GTG CGC AAG TCA 288 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser 85 90 95 TTC TTC AAA CTA CAG GGC TCC TTT GAT GTC AGT GTC AAG GGC ATC AGC 336 Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Ser 100 105 110 ATT TCG GTC AAC CTC CTG TTG GGC AGC GAG TCC TCC GGG AGG CCC ACA 384 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Thr 115 120 125 GTT ACT GCC TCC AGC TGC AGC AGT GAC ATC GCT GAC GTG GAG GTG GAC 432 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val Asp 130 135 140 ATG TCG GGA GAC TTG GGG TGG CTG TTG AAC CTC TTC CAC AAC CAG ATT 480 Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Ile 145 150 155 160 GAG TCC AAG TTC CAG AAA GTA CTG GAG AGC AGG ATT TGC GAA ATG ATC 528 Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Ile 165 170 175 CAG AAA TCG GTG TCC TCC GAT CTA CAG CCT TAT CTC CAA ACT CTG CCA 576 Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pro 180 185 190 GTT ACA ACA GAG ATT 591 Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 197 amino acids amino acid linear protein misc_feature “rLBP25” 2 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Tyr 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Arg 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Leu 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Ser 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Thr 115 120 125 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val Asp 130 135 140 Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Ile 145 150 155 160 Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Ile 165 170 175 Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pro 180 185 190 Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 1443 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA CDS 1..1443 mat_peptide 76..1443 misc_feature “rLBP” 3 ATG GGG GCC TTG GCC AGA GCC CTG CCG TCC ATA CTG CTG GCA TTG CTG 48 Met Gly Ala Leu Ala Arg Ala Leu Pro Ser Ile Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu -25 -20 -15 -10 CTT ACG TCC ACC CCA GAG GCT CTG GGT GCC AAC CCC GGC TTG GTC GCC 96 Leu Thr Ser Thr Pro Glu Ala Leu Gly Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala -5 1 5 AGG ATC ACC GAC AAG GGA CTG CAG TAT GCG GCC CAG GAG GGG CTA TTG 144 Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Tyr Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu 10 15 20 GCT CTG CAG AGT GAG CTG CTC AGG ATC ACG CTG CCT GAC TTC ACC GGG 192 Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly 25 30 35 GAC TTG AGG ATC CCC CAC GTC GGC CGT GGG CGC TAT GAG TTC CAC AGC 240 Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Arg Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser 40 45 50 55 CTG AAC ATC CAC AGC TGT GAG CTG CTT CAC TCT GCG CTG AGG CCT GTC 288 Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Leu His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val 60 65 70 CCT GGC CAG GGC CTG AGT CTC AGC ATC TCC GAC TCC TCC ATC CGG GTC 336 Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val 75 80 85 CAG GGC AGG TGG AAG GTG CGC AAG TCA TTC TTC AAA CTA CAG GGC TCC 384 Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser 90 95 100 TTT GAT GTC AGT GTC AAG GGC ATC AGC ATT TCG GTC AAC CTC CTG TTG 432 Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Ser Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu 105 110 115 GGC AGC GAG TCC TCC GGG AGG CCC ACA GTT ACT GCC TCC AGC TGC AGC 480 Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Thr Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser 120 125 130 135 AGT GAC ATC GCT GAC GTG GAG GTG GAC ATG TCG GGA GAC TTG GGG TGG 528 Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val Asp Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp 140 145 150 CTG TTG AAC CTC TTC CAC AAC CAG ATT GAG TCC AAG TTC CAG AAA GTA 576 Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val 155 160 165 CTG GAG AGC AGG ATT TGC GAA ATG ATC CAG AAA TCG GTG TCC TCC GAT 624 Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp 170 175 180 CTA CAG CCT TAT CTC CAA ACT CTG CCA GTT ACA ACA GAG ATT GAC AGT 672 Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile Asp Ser 185 190 195 TTC GCC GAC ATT GAT TAT AGC TTA GTG GAA GCC CCT CGG GCA ACA GCC 720 Phe Ala Asp Ile Asp Tyr Ser Leu Val Glu Ala Pro Arg Ala Thr Ala 200 205 210 215 CAG ATG CTG GAG GTG ATG TTT AAG GGT GAA ATC TTT CAT CGT AAC CAC 768 Gln Met Leu Glu Val Met Phe Lys Gly Glu Ile Phe His Arg Asn His 220 225 230 CGT TCT CCA GTT ACC CTC CTT GCT GCA GTC ATG AGC CTT CCT GAG GAA 816 Arg Ser Pro Val Thr Leu Leu Ala Ala Val Met Ser Leu Pro Glu Glu 235 240 245 CAC AAC AAA ATG GTC TAC TTT GCC ATC TCG GAT TAT GTC TTC AAC ACG 864 His Asn Lys Met Val Tyr Phe Ala Ile Ser Asp Tyr Val Phe Asn Thr 250 255 260 GCC AGC CTG GTT TAT CAT GAG GAA GGA TAT CTG AAC TTC TCC ATC ACA 912 Ala Ser Leu Val Tyr His Glu Glu Gly Tyr Leu Asn Phe Ser Ile Thr 265 270 275 GAT GAG ATG ATA CCG CCT GAC TCT AAT ATC CGA CTG ACC ACC AAG TCC 960 Asp Glu Met Ile Pro Pro Asp Ser Asn Ile Arg Leu Thr Thr Lys Ser 280 285 290 295 TTC CGA CCC TTC GTC CCA CGG TTA GCC AGG CTC TAC CCC AAC ATG AAC 1008 Phe Arg Pro Phe Val Pro Arg Leu Ala Arg Leu Tyr Pro Asn Met Asn 300 305 310 CTG GAA CTC CAG GGA TCA GTG CCC TCT GCT CCG CTC CTG AAC TTC AGC 1056 Leu Glu Leu Gln Gly Ser Val Pro Ser Ala Pro Leu Leu Asn Phe Ser 315 320 325 CCT GGG AAT CTG TCT GTG GAC CCC TAT ATG GAG ATA GAT GCC TTT GTG 1104 Pro Gly Asn Leu Ser Val Asp Pro Tyr Met Glu Ile Asp Ala Phe Val 330 335 340 CTC CTG CCC AGC TCC AGC AAG GAG CCT GTC TTC CGG CTC AGT GTG GCC 1152 Leu Leu Pro Ser Ser Ser Lys Glu Pro Val Phe Arg Leu Ser Val Ala 345 350 355 ACT AAT GTG TCC GCC ACC TTG ACC TTC AAT ACC AGC AAG ATC ACT GGG 1200 Thr Asn Val Ser Ala Thr Leu Thr Phe Asn Thr Ser Lys Ile Thr Gly 360 365 370 375 TTC CTG AAG CCA GGA AAG GTA AAA GTG GAA CTG AAA GAA TCC AAA GTT 1248 Phe Leu Lys Pro Gly Lys Val Lys Val Glu Leu Lys Glu Ser Lys Val 380 385 390 GGA CTA TTC AAT GCA GAG CTG TTG GAA GCG CTC CTC AAC TAT TAC ATC 1296 Gly Leu Phe Asn Ala Glu Leu Leu Glu Ala Leu Leu Asn Tyr Tyr Ile 395 400 405 CTT AAC ACC TTC TAC CCC AAG TTC AAT GAT AAG TTG GCC GAA GGC TTC 1344 Leu Asn Thr Phe Tyr Pro Lys Phe Asn Asp Lys Leu Ala Glu Gly Phe 410 415 420 CCC CTT CCT CTG CTG AAG CGT GTT CAG CTC TAC GAC CTT GGG CTG CAG 1392 Pro Leu Pro Leu Leu Lys Arg Val Gln Leu Tyr Asp Leu Gly Leu Gln 425 430 435 ATC CAT AAG GAC TTC CTG TTC TTG GGT GCC AAT GTC CAA TAC ATG AGA 1440 Ile His Lys Asp Phe Leu Phe Leu Gly Ala Asn Val Gln Tyr Met Arg 440 445 450 455 GTT 1443 Val 481 amino acids amino acid linear protein misc_feature “rLBP” 4 Met Gly Ala Leu Ala Arg Ala Leu Pro Ser Ile Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu -25 -20 -15 -10 Leu Thr Ser Thr Pro Glu Ala Leu Gly Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala -5 1 5 Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Tyr Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu 10 15 20 Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly 25 30 35 Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Arg Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser 40 45 50 55 Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Leu His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val 60 65 70 Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val 75 80 85 Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser 90 95 100 Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Ser Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu 105 110 115 Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Thr Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser 120 125 130 135 Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val Asp Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp 140 145 150 Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val 155 160 165 Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp 170 175 180 Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile Asp Ser 185 190 195 Phe Ala Asp Ile Asp Tyr Ser Leu Val Glu Ala Pro Arg Ala Thr Ala 200 205 210 215 Gln Met Leu Glu Val Met Phe Lys Gly Glu Ile Phe His Arg Asn His 220 225 230 Arg Ser Pro Val Thr Leu Leu Ala Ala Val Met Ser Leu Pro Glu Glu 235 240 245 His Asn Lys Met Val Tyr Phe Ala Ile Ser Asp Tyr Val Phe Asn Thr 250 255 260 Ala Ser Leu Val Tyr His Glu Glu Gly Tyr Leu Asn Phe Ser Ile Thr 265 270 275 Asp Glu Met Ile Pro Pro Asp Ser Asn Ile Arg Leu Thr Thr Lys Ser 280 285 290 295 Phe Arg Pro Phe Val Pro Arg Leu Ala Arg Leu Tyr Pro Asn Met Asn 300 305 310 Leu Glu Leu Gln Gly Ser Val Pro Ser Ala Pro Leu Leu Asn Phe Ser 315 320 325 Pro Gly Asn Leu Ser Val Asp Pro Tyr Met Glu Ile Asp Ala Phe Val 330 335 340 Leu Leu Pro Ser Ser Ser Lys Glu Pro Val Phe Arg Leu Ser Val Ala 345 350 355 Thr Asn Val Ser Ala Thr Leu Thr Phe Asn Thr Ser Lys Ile Thr Gly 360 365 370 375 Phe Leu Lys Pro Gly Lys Val Lys Val Glu Leu Lys Glu Ser Lys Val 380 385 390 Gly Leu Phe Asn Ala Glu Leu Leu Glu Ala Leu Leu Asn Tyr Tyr Ile 395 400 405 Leu Asn Thr Phe Tyr Pro Lys Phe Asn Asp Lys Leu Ala Glu Gly Phe 410 415 420 Pro Leu Pro Leu Leu Lys Arg Val Gln Leu Tyr Asp Leu Gly Leu Gln 425 430 435 Ile His Lys Asp Phe Leu Phe Leu Gly Ala Asn Val Gln Tyr Met Arg 440 445 450 455 Val 29 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP-Bsm” 5 GAATGCAGCC AACCCCGGCT TGGTCGCCA 29 28 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP-2” 6 CTCGAGCTAA ATCTCTGTTG TAACTGGC 28 24 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP-3” 7 CATGTCGACA CCATGGGGGC CTTG 24 25 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP-4” 8 CATGCCGCGG TCAAACTCTC ATGTA 25 15 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP 241-245” 9 GTCATGAGCC TTCCT 15 5 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “LBP 241-245” 10 Val Met Ser Leu Pro 1 5 1813 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA CDS 31..1491 mat_peptide 124..1491 misc_feature “BPI” 11 CAGGCCTTGA GGTTTTGGCA GCTCTGGAGG ATG AGA GAG AAC ATG GCC AGG GGC 54 Met Arg Glu Asn Met Ala Arg Gly -31 -30 -25 CCT TGC AAC GCG CCG AGA TGG GTG TCC CTG ATG GTG CTC GTC GCC ATA 102 Pro Cys Asn Ala Pro Arg Trp Val Ser Leu Met Val Leu Val Ala Ile -20 -15 -10 GGC ACC GCC GTG ACA GCG GCC GTC AAC CCT GGC GTC GTG GTC AGG ATC 150 Gly Thr Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile -5 1 5 TCC CAG AAG GGC CTG GAC TAC GCC AGC CAG CAG GGG ACG GCC GCT CTG 198 Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Tyr Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu 10 15 20 25 CAG AAG GAG CTG AAG AGG ATC AAG ATT CCT GAC TAC TCA GAC AGC TTT 246 Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Ile Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe 30 35 40 AAG ATC AAG CAT CTT GGG AAG GGG CAT TAT AGC TTC TAC AGC ATG GAC 294 Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Lys Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp 45 50 55 ATC CGT GAA TTC CAG CTT CCC AGT TCC CAG ATA AGC ATG GTG CCC AAT 342 Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pro Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn 60 65 70 GTG GGC CTT AAG TTC TCC ATC AGC AAC GCC AAT ATC AAG ATC AGC GGG 390 Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Ile Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly 75 80 85 AAA TGG AAG GCA CAA AAG AGA TTC TTA AAA ATG AGC GGC AAT TTT GAC 438 Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Arg Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp 90 95 100 105 CTG AGC ATA GAA GGC ATG TCC ATT TCG GCT GAT CTG AAG CTG GGC AGT 486 Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Ser Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser 110 115 120 AAC CCC ACG TCA GGC AAG CCC ACC ATC ACC TGC TCC AGC TGC AGC AGC 534 Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pro Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser 125 130 135 CAC ATC AAC AGT GTC CAC GTG CAC ATC TCA AAG AGC AAA GTC GGG TGG 582 His Ile Asn Ser Val His Val His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp 140 145 150 CTG ATC CAA CTC TTC CAC AAA AAA ATT GAG TCT GCG CTT CGA AAC AAG 630 Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Lys Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys 155 160 165 ATG AAC AGC CAG GTC TGC GAG AAA GTG ACC AAT TCT GTA TCC TCC AAG 678 Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Glu Lys Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys 170 175 180 185 CTG CAA CCT TAT TTC CAG ACT CTG CCA GTA ATG ACC AAA ATA GAT TCT 726 Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Thr Leu Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile Asp Ser 190 195 200 GTG GCT GGA ATC AAC TAT GGT CTG GTG GCA CCT CCA GCA ACC ACG GCT 774 Val Ala Gly Ile Asn Tyr Gly Leu Val Ala Pro Pro Ala Thr Thr Ala 205 210 215 GAG ACC CTG GAT GTA CAG ATG AAG GGG GAG TTT TAC AGT GAG AAC CAC 822 Glu Thr Leu Asp Val Gln Met Lys Gly Glu Phe Tyr Ser Glu Asn His 220 225 230 CAC AAT CCA CCT CCC TTT GCT CCA CCA GTG ATG GAG TTT CCC GCT GCC 870 His Asn Pro Pro Pro Phe Ala Pro Pro Val Met Glu Phe Pro Ala Ala 235 240 245 CAT GAC CGC ATG GTA TAC CTG GGC CTC TCA GAC TAC TTC TTC AAC ACA 918 His Asp Arg Met Val Tyr Leu Gly Leu Ser Asp Tyr Phe Phe Asn Thr 250 255 260 265 GCC GGG CTT GTA TAC CAA GAG GCT GGG GTC TTG AAG ATG ACC CTT AGA 966 Ala Gly Leu Val Tyr Gln Glu Ala Gly Val Leu Lys Met Thr Leu Arg 270 275 280 GAT GAC ATG ATT CCA AAG GAG TCC AAA TTT CGA CTG ACA ACC AAG TTC 1014 Asp Asp Met Ile Pro Lys Glu Ser Lys Phe Arg Leu Thr Thr Lys Phe 285 290 295 TTT GGA ACC TTC CTA CCT GAG GTG GCC AAG AAG TTT CCC AAC ATG AAG 1062 Phe Gly Thr Phe Leu Pro Glu Val Ala Lys Lys Phe Pro Asn Met Lys 300 305 310 ATA CAG ATC CAT GTC TCA GCC TCC ACC CCG CCA CAC CTG TCT GTG CAG 1110 Ile Gln Ile His Val Ser Ala Ser Thr Pro Pro His Leu Ser Val Gln 315 320 325 CCC ACC GGC CTT ACC TTC TAC CCT GCC GTG GAT GTC CAG GCC TTT GCC 1158 Pro Thr Gly Leu Thr Phe Tyr Pro Ala Val Asp Val Gln Ala Phe Ala 330 335 340 345 GTC CTC CCC AAC TCC TCC CTG GCT TCC CTC TTC CTG ATT GGC ATG CAC 1206 Val Leu Pro Asn Ser Ser Leu Ala Ser Leu Phe Leu Ile Gly Met His 350 355 360 ACA ACT GGT TCC ATG GAG GTC AGC GCC GAG TCC AAC AGG CTT GTT GGA 1254 Thr Thr Gly Ser Met Glu Val Ser Ala Glu Ser Asn Arg Leu Val Gly 365 370 375 GAG CTC AAG CTG GAT AGG CTG CTC CTG GAA CTG AAG CAC TCA AAT ATT 1302 Glu Leu Lys Leu Asp Arg Leu Leu Leu Glu Leu Lys His Ser Asn Ile 380 385 390 GGC CCC TTC CCG GTT GAA TTG CTG CAG GAT ATC ATG AAC TAC ATT GTA 1350 Gly Pro Phe Pro Val Glu Leu Leu Gln Asp Ile Met Asn Tyr Ile Val 395 400 405 CCC ATT CTT GTG CTG CCC AGG GTT AAC GAG AAA CTA CAG AAA GGC TTC 1398 Pro Ile Leu Val Leu Pro Arg Val Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Lys Gly Phe 410 415 420 425 CCT CTC CCG ACG CCG GCC AGA GTC CAG CTC TAC AAC GTA GTG CTT CAG 1446 Pro Leu Pro Thr Pro Ala Arg Val Gln Leu Tyr Asn Val Val Leu Gln 430 435 440 CCT CAC CAG AAC TTC CTG CTG TTC GGT GCA GAC GTT GTC TAT AAA 1491 Pro His Gln Asn Phe Leu Leu Phe Gly Ala Asp Val Val Tyr Lys 445 450 455 TGAAGGCACC AGGGGTGCCG GGGGCTGTCA GCCGCACCTG TTCCTGATGG GCTGTGGG 1551 ACCGGCTGCC TTTCCCCAGG GAATCCTCTC CAGATCTTAA CCAAGAGCCC CTTGCAAA 1611 TCTTCGACTC AGATTCAGAA ATGATCTAAA CACGAGGAAA CATTATTCAT TGGAAAAG 1671 CATGGTGTGT ATTTTAGGGA TTATGAGCTT CTTTCAAGGG CTAAGGCTGC AGAGATAT 1731 CCTCCAGGAA TCGTGTTTCA ATTGTAACCA AGAAATTTCC ATTTGTGCTT CATGAAAA 1791 AACTTCTGGT TTTTTTCATG TG 1813 487 amino acids amino acid linear protein misc_feature “BPI” 12 Met Arg Glu Asn Met Ala Arg Gly Pro Cys Asn Ala Pro Arg Trp Val -31 -30 -25 -20 Ser Leu Met Val Leu Val Ala Ile Gly Thr Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Val -15 -10 -5 1 Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Tyr Ala 5 10 15 Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Ile Lys 20 25 30 Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Lys Gly 35 40 45 His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pro Ser 50 55 60 65 Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Ile Ser 70 75 80 Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Arg Phe 85 90 95 Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Ser Ile 100 105 110 Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pro Thr 115 120 125 Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Val His 130 135 140 145 Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Lys 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Glu Lys 165 170 175 Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Thr Leu 180 185 190 Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile Asp Ser Val Ala Gly Ile Asn Tyr Gly Leu 195 200 205 Val Ala Pro Pro Ala Thr Thr Ala Glu Thr Leu Asp Val Gln Met Lys 210 215 220 225 Gly Glu Phe Tyr Ser Glu Asn His His Asn Pro Pro Pro Phe Ala Pro 230 235 240 Pro Val Met Glu Phe Pro Ala Ala His Asp Arg Met Val Tyr Leu Gly 245 250 255 Leu Ser Asp Tyr Phe Phe Asn Thr Ala Gly Leu Val Tyr Gln Glu Ala 260 265 270 Gly Val Leu Lys Met Thr Leu Arg Asp Asp Met Ile Pro Lys Glu Ser 275 280 285 Lys Phe Arg Leu Thr Thr Lys Phe Phe Gly Thr Phe Leu Pro Glu Val 290 295 300 305 Ala Lys Lys Phe Pro Asn Met Lys Ile Gln Ile His Val Ser Ala Ser 310 315 320 Thr Pro Pro His Leu Ser Val Gln Pro Thr Gly Leu Thr Phe Tyr Pro 325 330 335 Ala Val Asp Val Gln Ala Phe Ala Val Leu Pro Asn Ser Ser Leu Ala 340 345 350 Ser Leu Phe Leu Ile Gly Met His Thr Thr Gly Ser Met Glu Val Ser 355 360 365 Ala Glu Ser Asn Arg Leu Val Gly Glu Leu Lys Leu Asp Arg Leu Leu 370 375 380 385 Leu Glu Leu Lys His Ser Asn Ile Gly Pro Phe Pro Val Glu Leu Leu 390 395 400 Gln Asp Ile Met Asn Tyr Ile Val Pro Ile Leu Val Leu Pro Arg Val 405 410 415 Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Lys Gly Phe Pro Leu Pro Thr Pro Ala Arg Val 420 425 430 Gln Leu Tyr Asn Val Val Leu Gln Pro His Gln Asn Phe Leu Leu Phe 435 440 445 Gly Ala Asp Val Val Tyr Lys 450 455 18 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “BPI-18” 13 AAGCATCTTG GGAAGGGG 18 24 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “BPI-11” 14 TATTTTGGTC ATTACTGGCA GAGT 24 25 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP15” 15 CCCACAGTCA CGTGCTCCAG CTGCA 25 23 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA misc_feature “LBP16” 16 GCTGGAGCAC GTGACTGTGG GCC 23 28 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “BPI Domain I” 17 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Ile 1 5 10 15 Lys Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His 20 25 35 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “BPI Domain II” 18 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Ile 1 5 10 15 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Arg 20 25 30 Phe Leu Lys 35 28 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “BPI Domain III” 19 Val His Val His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu 1 5 10 15 Phe His Lys Lys Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys 20 25 29 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “LBP Domain I” 20 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile 1 5 10 15 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His 20 25 35 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “LBP Domain II” 21 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile 1 5 10 15 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser 20 25 30 Phe Phe Lys 35 27 amino acids amino acid single linear protein misc_feature “LBP Domain III” 22 Val Glu Val Asp Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe 1 5 10 15 His Asn Gln Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val 20 25 76 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 23 TTAAATTTTC GATATCCAAC GCCAATATTA AGATCTCCGG AAAATGGAAG GCACAAAAGC 60 GCTTCCTTAA GATGAG 76 72 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 24 CTCATCTTAA GGAAGCGCTT TTGTGCCTTC CATTTTCCGG AGATCTTAAT ATTGGCGTTG 60 GATATCGAAA AT 72 69 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 25 GTGCACATTT CGAAGAGCAA AGTGGGGTGG CTGATCCAAT TGTTCCACAA AAAAATTGAG 60 AGCGCGCTG 69 71 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 26 CGCAGCGCGC TCTCAATTTT TTTGTGGAAC AATTGGATCA GCCACCCCAC TTTGCTCTTC 60 GAAATGTGCA C 71 49 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 27 GTCAGCGGGA AATGGAAGGC ACAAAAGAGA TTTTTAAAAA TGCAGGGCT 49 42 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 28 CTGCATTTTT AAAAATCTCT TTTGTGCCTT CCATTTCCCG CT 42 13 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 29 Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser Phe Phe Lys Leu 1 5 10 13 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 30 Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Arg Phe Leu Lys Met 1 5 10 72 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 31 CATGTCGAAG AGCAAAGTGG GGTGGCTGAT CCAACTCTTC CACAAAAAAA TTGAGTCCAA 60 ATTTCAGAAA GT 72 68 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 32 ACTTTCTGAA ATTTGGACTC AATTTTTTTG TGGAAGAGTT GGATCAGCCA CCCCACTTTG 60 CTCTTCGA 68 13 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 33 Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln 1 5 10 14 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 34 Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Lys 1 5 10 40 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 35 ATTCGTGTAC AGGGCAGGTG GAAGGTGCGC AAGTCATTCT 40 44 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 36 TTAAAGAATG ACTTGCGCAC CTTCCACCTG CCCTGTACAC GAAT 44 14 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 37 Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Arg Phe Leu Lys 1 5 10 14 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 38 Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser Phe Phe Lys 1 5 10 49 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 39 CGGGAGACTT GGGGTGGCTG TTGAACCTCT TCCACAACCA GATTGAGAG 49 51 base pairs nucleic acid single linear cDNA 40 CGCGCTCTCA ATCTGGTTGT GGAAGAGGTT CAACAGCCAC CCCAAGTCTC C 51 14 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 41 Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Lys 1 5 10 13 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 42 Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln 1 5 10 27 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 43 Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln 1 5 10 15 Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser Phe Phe Lys 20 25 22 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 44 Asp Val Glu Val Asp Met Ser Gly Asp Ser Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu 1 5 10 15 Phe His Asn Gln Ile Glu 20 197 amino acids amino acid linear protein misc_feature “rLBP25” 45 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Tyr 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Ile 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Arg 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Leu 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Ile 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Ser 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Ser 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Thr 115 120 125 Val Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val Asp 130 135 140 Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Ile 145 150 155 160 Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Ile 165 170 175 Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pro 180 185 190 Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 199 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 46 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Ly 145 150 155 160 Lys Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Gl 165 170 175 Lys Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Th 180 185 190 Leu Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195 199 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 47 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His As 145 150 155 160 Gln Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Gl 165 170 175 Met Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Th 180 185 190 Leu Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 199 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 48 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His As 145 150 155 160 Gln Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Gl 165 170 175 Met Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Th 180 185 190 Leu Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 49 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Va 130 135 140 Asp Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gl 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Me 165 170 175 Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 50 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Ar 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Le 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Se 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Th 115 120 125 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Val Hi 130 135 140 Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Ly 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Glu Ly 165 170 175 Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195 197 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 51 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Ar 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Le 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Th 115 120 125 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val As 130 135 140 Met Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gln Il 145 150 155 160 Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Met Il 165 170 175 Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Leu Pr 180 185 190 Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 52 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Ar 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Le 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Se 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Leu Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Th 115 120 125 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val As 130 135 140 Met Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Ly 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Me 165 170 175 Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 53 Ala Asn Pro Gly Leu Val Ala Arg Ile Thr Asp Lys Gly Leu Gln Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Gln Glu Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Leu Arg Il 20 25 30 Thr Leu Pro Asp Phe Thr Gly Asp Leu Arg Ile Pro His Val Gly Ar 35 40 45 Gly Arg Tyr Glu Phe His Ser Leu Asn Ile His Ser Cys Glu Leu Le 50 55 60 His Ser Ala Leu Arg Pro Val Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asp Ser Ser Ile Arg Val Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Gln Gly Ser Phe Asp Val Ser Val Lys Gly Ile Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Val Asn Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Glu Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Th 115 120 125 Val Thr Ala Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asp Ile Ala Asp Val Glu Val As 130 135 140 Met Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Lys Ly 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Ser Arg Ile Cys Glu Me 165 170 175 Ile Gln Lys Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Gln Pro Tyr Leu Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Thr Thr Glu Ile 195 199 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 54 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Se 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Ly 145 150 155 160 Lys Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Gl 165 170 175 Lys Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Th 180 185 190 Leu Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 55 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gl 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Glu Ly 165 170 175 Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195 198 amino acids amino acid single linear peptide 56 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Arg Val Gln Gly Arg Trp Lys Val Arg Lys Se 85 90 95 Phe Phe Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Gly Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Leu Asn Leu Phe His Asn Gl 145 150 155 160 Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Glu Ly 165 170 175 Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Thr Le 180 185 190 Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195 199 amino acids amino acid single linear protein 57 Val Asn Pro Gly Val Val Val Arg Ile Ser Gln Lys Gly Leu Asp Ty 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Gln Gln Gly Thr Ala Ala Leu Gln Lys Glu Leu Lys Arg Il 20 25 30 Lys Ile Pro Asp Tyr Ser Asp Ser Phe Lys Ile Lys His Leu Gly Ly 35 40 45 Gly His Val Ser Phe Tyr Ser Met Asp Ile Arg Glu Phe Gln Leu Pr 50 55 60 Ser Ser Gln Ile Ser Met Val Pro Asn Val Gly Leu Lys Phe Ser Il 65 70 75 80 Ser Asn Ala Asn Ile Lys Ile Ser Gly Lys Trp Lys Ala Gln Lys Ar 85 90 95 Phe Leu Lys Met Ser Gly Asn Phe Asp Leu Ser Ile Glu Gly Met Se 100 105 110 Ile Ser Ala Asp Leu Lys Leu Gly Ser Asn Pro Thr Ser Gly Lys Pr 115 120 125 Thr Ile Thr Cys Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser His Ile Asn Ser Val His Va 130 135 140 His Ile Ser Lys Ser Lys Val Gly Trp Leu Ile Gln Leu Phe His Ly 145 150 155 160 Lys Ile Glu Ser Ala Leu Arg Asn Lys Met Asn Ser Gln Val Cys Gl 165 170 175 Lys Val Thr Asn Ser Val Ser Ser Glu Leu Gln Pro Tyr Phe Gln Th 180 185 190 Leu Pro Val Met Thr Lys Ile 195

Claims (32)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. An LBP protein derivative having an ability to bind to LPS and lacking CD14-mediated immunostimulatory properties.
  2. 2. The derivative according to claim 1 which has a molecular weight of about 25 kD.
  3. 3. The derivative according to claim 1 consisting of a portion of the amino-terminal half of LBP.
  4. 4. The derivative according to claim 3 consisting of amino acids 1 through 197 of SEQ ID NO: 1.
  5. 5. The derivative according to claim 1 which is LBP (1-197) (Cys131).
  6. 6. A pharmaceutical composition comprising an LBP protein derivative according claim 1 and a pharmaceutically acceptable diluent, adjuvant or carrier.
  7. 7. A DNA sequence encoding an LBP derivative according to claim 1.
  8. 8. A DNA vector comprising the DNA sequence according to claim 7.
  9. 9. A host cell stably transformed or transfected with a DNA sequence according to claim 7 in a manner allowing expression in the host cell of the protein encoded thereby.
  10. 10. A method of treating a gram-negative bacterial infection and the sequelae thereof comprising administering an LBP protein derivative according to claim 1.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10 wherein the LBP protein derivative is administered at a dosage of from about 0.1 mg/kg to about 100 mg/kg of body weight.
  12. 12. An LBP derivative hybrid protein having an ability to bind to LPS and lacking CD14-mediated immunostimulatory properties and characterized by the presence of at least a portion of an LPS binding domain of BPI selected from the group consisting of:
    ASQQGTAALQKELKRIKPDYSDSFKIKH (SEQ ID NO: 17);
    SSQISMVPNVGLKFSISNANIKISGKWKAQKRFLK (SEQ ID NO: 18); and
    VHVHISKSKVGWLIQLFHKKIESALRNK (SEQ ID NO: 19).
  13. 13. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 characterized by the presence of at least a portion of an LPS binding domain of LBP selected from the group consisting of:
    AAQEGLLALQSELLRITLPDFTGDLRIPH (SEQ IS NO: 20);
    HSALRPVPGQGLSLSISDSSIRVQGRWKVRKSFFK (SEQ ID NO: 21); and
    VEVDMSGDLGWLLNLFHNQIESKFQKV (SEQ ID NO: 22).
  14. 14. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 consisting of a portion of the amino-terminal half of LBP/and a portion of the amino-terminal half of BPI.
  15. 15. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is LBP(1-43)/BPI(44-199).
  16. 16. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is BPI(1-159)/LBP(158-197).
  17. 17. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is LBP(1-43)/BPI(44-159)/LBP(158-197).
  18. 18. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is BPI(1-137)/LBP(137-197).
  19. 19. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is BPI(1-25)/LBP(26-135)/BPI(137-199).
  20. 20. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [LBP(1-87)/BPI (88-100)/LBP(101-197)].
  21. 21. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [LBP(1-146)/BPI (148-161)/LBP(160-197)].
  22. 22. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [LBP(1-87)/BPI(88-100)/LBP(101-146)/BPI(148-161)/LBP(160-197)].
  23. 23. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [BPI(1-85)/LBP(86-99)/BPI(100-199)].
  24. 24. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [BPI(1-147/LBP(147-159)/BPI(162-199)].
  25. 25. The hybrid protein according to claim 12 which is [BPI(1-85)/LBP(86-99)/BPI(100-147)/LBP(147-159)/BPI(162-199)].
  26. 26. An LBP derivative hybrid protein having an ability to bind LPS and lacking CD-14 mediated immunostimulatory properties which is an LBP/IgG fusion protein.
  27. 27. A pharmaceutical composition comprising an LBP derivative hybrid protein according to claim 12 or 26 and a pharmaceutically acceptable diluent, adjuvant or carrier.
  28. 28. A DNA sequence encoding an LBP derivative hybrid protein according to claim 12 or 26.
  29. 29. A DNA vector comprising the DNA sequence according to claim 28.
  30. 30. A host cell stably transformed or transfected with a DNA sequence according to claim 29 in a manner allowing expression in the host cell of the protein encoded thereby.
  31. 31. A method of treating a gram-negative bacterial infection and the sequelae thereof comprising administering an LBP derivative hybrid protein of claim 12 or 26.
  32. 32. The method of claim 31 wherein the LBP derivative hybrid protein is administered at a dosage of from about 0.1 mg/kg to about 100 mg/kg of body weight.
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US09280909 US6376462B1 (en) 1993-06-17 1999-03-29 Lipopolysaccharide binding protein derivatives
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US20090110756A1 (en) * 2006-11-02 2009-04-30 Mccray Jr Paul B Methods and Compositions Related to PLUNC Surfactant Polypeptides

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US5652332A (en) * 1993-03-12 1997-07-29 Xoma Biologically active peptides from functional domains of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and uses thereof
US5731415A (en) * 1993-06-17 1998-03-24 Xoma Corporation Lipopolysaccharide binding protein derivatives
US5891618A (en) 1994-01-24 1999-04-06 Xoma Corporation Method for quantifying LBP in body fluids
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