US20030176888A1 - Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease - Google Patents

Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030176888A1
US20030176888A1 US10361217 US36121703A US2003176888A1 US 20030176888 A1 US20030176888 A1 US 20030176888A1 US 10361217 US10361217 US 10361217 US 36121703 A US36121703 A US 36121703A US 2003176888 A1 US2003176888 A1 US 2003176888A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
filter
intraluminal
releasable retainer
configuration
elements
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10361217
Inventor
Paul O'Connell
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
B Braun Medical SAS
Original Assignee
B Braun Medical SAS
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/01Filters implantable into blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/848Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents having means for fixation to the vessel wall, e.g. barbs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/01Filters implantable into blood vessels
    • A61F2002/016Filters implantable into blood vessels made from wire-like elements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/01Filters implantable into blood vessels
    • A61F2002/018Filters implantable into blood vessels made from tubes or sheets of material, e.g. by etching or laser-cutting
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2210/00Particular material properties of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2210/0004Particular material properties of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof bioabsorbable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0002Two-dimensional shapes, e.g. cross-sections
    • A61F2230/0004Rounded shapes, e.g. with rounded corners
    • A61F2230/0006Rounded shapes, e.g. with rounded corners circular
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0002Two-dimensional shapes, e.g. cross-sections
    • A61F2230/0028Shapes in the form of latin or greek characters
    • A61F2230/005Rosette-shaped, e.g. star-shaped
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0063Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2230/0067Three-dimensional shapes conical
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0063Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2230/0069Three-dimensional shapes cylindrical
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0063Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2230/0073Quadric-shaped
    • A61F2230/0078Quadric-shaped hyperboloidal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0063Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2230/0073Quadric-shaped
    • A61F2230/008Quadric-shaped paraboloidal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2250/00Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2250/0058Additional features; Implant or prostheses properties not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2250/0071Additional features; Implant or prostheses properties not otherwise provided for breakable or frangible

Abstract

A filter is provided that is convertible from a filter configuration to an open, stent-like configuration. The filter includes a plurality of intraluminal filter elements (filter legs) that may be formed into a single cone or dual cone filter structure. A retainer secures the filter legs in the filter configuration upon initial deployment within a vessel. The retainer is then either self-releasing or removable to permit the filter legs to expand from the filter configuration into what may generally be described as an open or stent-like configuration. A filter web extends, at least in part, between the filter legs.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 09/304,111, filed May 3, 1999.[0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention [0002]
  • The invention relates generally to devices for the treatment vascular disease and, more particularly, the invention relates to a filter device for placement within a blood vessel that is operable to catch and retain embolic material dislodged during the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. [0003]
  • 2. Description of the Related Technology [0004]
  • Atherosclerotic disease in the coronary and carotid vasculature is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Atherosclerotic disease can cause insufficient circulation of oxygenated blood due to luminal narrowing caused by formation of atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, atherosclerotic disease can cause thromboembolism. [0005]
  • Atherosclerosis is a progressive, degenerative arterial disease that leads to occlusion of affected blood vessels, thereby reducing vessel patency, and hence, blood flow through them. During the course of this vascular disease, plaques develop on the inner lining of the arteries narrowing the lumen of the blood vessels. Sometimes these plaques become hardened by calcium deposits, resulting in a form of atherosclerosis called arteriosclerosis or “hardening of the arteries.” Atherosclerosis attacks arteries throughout the body, but the most serious consequences involve damage to the vessels of the brain and heart. In the brain, atherosclerosis is the primary cause of strokes, whereas in the heart, when total blockage of an artery occurs, portions of heart muscle can die and disrupt the electrical impulses that make the heart beat. [0006]
  • The internal carotid artery is an artery often affected by atherosclerosis. When atherosclerosis is detected in the carotid artery, physicians need to remove the plaque, thereby restoring circulation to the brain and preventing a cerebral vascular accident. [0007]
  • Treatment for atherosclerosis ranges from preventive measures such as lowering fat intake and medication to endarterectomy, balloon angioplasty or atherectomy. In endarterectomy, the affected artery is surgically opened and plaque deposits are removed from the lining of the arterial wall. Occasionally during endarterectomy, large pieces of plaque break away from the arterial walls and enter the blood stream. Additionally, thrombotic material may develop if damage to the arterial wall occurs from the removal of plaque. Dislodged plaque deposits and thrombotic material, causing a condition called thromboembolism, may occlude smaller vessels downstream resulting in a vascular problems and potentially death. Thus, it is common practice by one skilled in the art to capture dislodged plaque, or any thrombotic material, by using a vacuuming procedure throughout the duration of the endarterectomy procedure. Although a significant percentage of plaque and thrombotic material is captured by this vacuuming procedure, pieces of plaque as well as thrombotic material inevitably escape. [0008]
  • Balloon angioplasty is a another method of treating atherosclerosis. In balloon angioplasty, a balloon-tipped catheter is inserted through the skin into the vessel and maneuvered to the lesion in the artery. The balloon tipped catheter is threaded through the lesion and inflated, increasing the vessel lumen to improve blood flow at the site. After deflating the balloon, stents are often inserted to keep the lumen of the vessel open, maintain blood flow and provide a scaffolding for tissue growth. Although balloon angioplasty and stenting are alternative methods of treatment, recent studies have documented adverse side effects associated with carotid stenting and, therefore, such procedures may not be as desirable as endarterectomy. [0009]
  • An additional method of treatment, atherectomy, is a procedure during which the plaque in coronary arteries is ground into minuscule particles that the body can clean from the bloodstream. Occasionally, during such procedures, large pieces of plaque break away from the arterial walls and enter the blood stream. As described above, this plaque debris can not be processed by the body and, therefore, must be vacuumed from the bloodstream to prevent the plaque from clogging arteries in the brain or elsewhere. [0010]
  • The primary use of blood filters historically has been to prevent pulmonary embolism. Blood filters are implanted within a vein, typically the inferior vena cava, and are intended to trap large blood clots while allowing blood to pass freely through the filter around the clot. In most cases trapped blood clots will normally dissolve over time. [0011]
  • Most often, blood filters are implanted within the inferior vena cava from a variety of peripheral vein access sites, for example, the jugular or femoral veins. An early example of such a filter was the Mobin-Uddin (MU) umbrella filter, which was developed and made available by American Edwards Laboratories in Santa Monica, Calif. in the 1970s. The Mobin-Uddin umbrella was composed of six flat ELGILOY spokes radiating from a hub and partially covered by a web designed to capture blood clots. MU filters were introduced into the body via a cutdown of the jugular or femoral vein and subsequent passing of a catheter through the access site to the filter implant site in the infrarenal inferior vena cava. While this method was an improvement over previous methods, the MU filter was associated with a high incidence of occlusion of the inferior vena cava, in which blood flow through the vena cava was completely obstructed. [0012]
  • In the mid-197's, the Kimray-Greenfield (KG) vena cava filter was introduced. The original KG filter is conical in shape and is composed of six stainless steel wires equally spaced with its apex cephalad. Although the filter was originally placed using a local cutdown of the jugular or femoral vein, it was later adapted to be inserted percutaneously. The KG filter is designed to capture clots 7 mm or greater in diameter, holding the clots in the infrarenal vena cava until the body's own lytic system dissolves the clot. The principal drawbacks of the KG filter are the possibility of tilting and filter migration, often related to a failure to open, or untimely ejection of the filter from the introducer. [0013]
  • Subsequent versions of the so-called Greenfield filter were developed to reduce the size of the introducer catheter to facilitate percutaneous introduction. Other vena cava filters were introduced in the United States in the late 1980s, including the Vena Tech—LGM vena cava filter, the Bird's Nest vena cava filter, and the Simon-Nitinol vena cava filter. The Vena Tech—LGM filter is a conical filter made from the PHYNOX alloy, with longitudinal stabilizing legs in addition to the intraluminal cone. The Bird's Nest filter is a “nest” of stainless steel wire which is wound into the vena cava, while the Simon Nitinol filter is a two-stage filter made from nickel-titanium alloy with a conical lower section and a petal-shaped upper section. All of these devices are permanent implants which cannot be removed from the body without a major surgical intervention. [0014]
  • Among numerous vena cava filters introduced in Europe but never brought to the United States was the optimal central trapping (OPCETRA) filter. The OPCETRA filter has two main parts: a main basket with ten, long stainless steel wire arms and a distal basket with five, short stainless steel wire arms. This design gives the filter an hourglass shape which provides a self-orienting structure for the filter within the lumen of a blood vessel. The OPCETRA filter was also a permanently implanted vena cava filter. [0015]
  • All of the above-identified vena cava filters are inserted into the body by passing the filter through a catheter to the site of deployment in the infrarenal inferior vena cava. After ejection from the catheter, these filters open or are manually deployed until the filter anchoring elements engage the vessel wall. These filters often have hooks or some other means by which the filter becomes fixed permanently to the vessel wall. [0016]
  • For an important subset of patients, in particular young trauma patients and patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery, the risk of embolism is short-term and limited to a definable period of time. Because of the long-term risks associated with implantation of a permanent blood filter, including venous stasis due to caval occlusion and its related complications, patients whose risk period is limited are not considered good candidates for permanent blood filters. The search for an appropriate temporary therapy for such patients lead to the development of temporary, tethered removable filters. [0017]
  • Tethered temporary filters are attached to a catheter and are implanted in the infrarenal vena cava with the tethering catheter extending out of the puncture site in the neck or groin, or buried subcutaneously within the soft tissues in the patient's neck. The tether remains coupled to the filter after deployment. The tether is then used to retrieve the filter. The potential for septic complications associated with the tethering catheter exiting the neck or groin require removal of such devices within fourteen days of placement. Risk periods for embolism in such patients, however, can extend up to twenty-one weeks. [0018]
  • Temporary retrievable filters which are not attached to a tethering catheter have a construction similar to some versions of permanent filters. A hook or similar grasping structure is provided to allow a snare to engage the filter during the retrieval procedure. The filter in its entirety is then retrieved using a snare by drawing it into a catheter. However, to ensure the filter does not migrate with the vessel, barbs, anchors or similar structures must be used to engage the filter with the interior wall of the vessel for retaining it in place. These anchors make removal without injuring the vessel difficult. Moreover, after a relatively short period of time the portion of the filter legs in contact with the vessel wall are incorporated by endothelial tissue making retrieval difficult or impossible. [0019]
  • More recently, it has been proposed to provide a removable filter in two parts. An anchoring part of the filter engages the vessel walls, and become incorporated by endothelial tissue. A filter part is releasably coupled to the anchoring part. After the risk of embolism has passed, the filter part may be retrieved using a snare and catheter. [0020]
  • Thus, there is a need for a temporary, convertible blood filter that can be inserted into a vessel to treat vascular disease. Additionally, there is a need for a temporary, convertible blood filter to catch and retain biological debris during procedures such as endarterectomy, angioplasty, or atherectomy, yet be openable to fully restore vessel patency following the treatment. [0021]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention provides a filter arranged to be disposed within a blood vessel. The filter includes intraluminal filter elements and is convertible from a filter configuration to an open, stent-like configuration. [0022]
  • The invention also provides a method of treating embolism and atherosclerotic disease using a filter constructed in accordance with the invention. [0023]
  • In a preferred embodiment, the filter device includes a plurality of elements formed into a single cone or dual cone filter structure. A retainer secures the elements in an intraluminal filter configuration upon initial deployment within a vessel. The retainer is then either self-releasing or removable to permit the legs to expand from the filter configuration into what may generally be described as an open or stent-like configuration substantially, totally reopening the lumen. [0024]
  • To maintain stability within the lumen, superior and/or inferior ends of the filter can be formed with a small barb or hook that engages the interior wall of the vessel. [0025]
  • A single cone filter in accordance with the invention includes a plurality of intraluminal filter elements, the superior ends of which are joined by a releasable retainer. In one preferred embodiment, a filter web extends between the plurality of intraluminal elements. In another preferred embodiment, the single cone filter has filter legs which are constrained in the filter configuration. In yet another preferred embodiment, a spring member couples to the legs of the single cone filter to urge them radially outward and revert the filter to an open or stent-like configuration. When in the open configuration, the lumen is substantially unobstructed by the filter. [0026]
  • A dual cone filter in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention has intraluminal filter elements joined by a releasable retainer at a location between their superior and inferior ends. In one embodiment, a filter web extends between the intraluminal filter elements. This dual cone shape advantageously improves the self-orienting mechanism of the filter. A spring may join the legs to urge them from the dual cone or hourglass shape into a stent-like configuration upon release of the retainer. Alternatively, the legs may be formed to provide the restoring force. [0027]
  • In still another embodiment, the filter device has intraluminal elements made of a biodegradable material. [0028]
  • In yet another embodiment, the filter device has a releasable retainer joining both ends of the of the intraluminal elements to create a basket-like configuration. The retainer may be self-releasing or removable to permit the intraluminal filter elements to expand from a basket-like configuration into a single cone configuration and subsequently into what may generally be described as an open or stent-like configuration.[0029]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention will be described with reference to the following detailed description of several preferred embodiments with reference to the drawings wherein like reference numerals are used to represent like elements, and in which: [0030]
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration within a blood vessel and having a dual cone structure in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention; [0031]
  • FIG. 2 is a view of an intraluminal filter element of the filter shown in FIG. 1 shown in an open configuration; [0032]
  • FIG. 3 is a detailed view of the small barb or hook on the end of the intraluminal filter element of FIG. 1; [0033]
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-section view taken along line [0034] 4-4 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a view of the mesh of wires forming the filter illustrated in FIG. 1; [0035]
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of the filter illustrated in FIG. 1 and further shown in an open, stent-like configuration; [0036]
  • FIG. 7 is a side view of a filter similar to that shown in FIG. 1 and illustrating a releasable retainer restraining the plurality of intraluminal filter elements in a filter configuration at a location between the superior and inferior ends of the elements; [0037]
  • FIG. 8 is an bottom view of the filter shown in FIG. 6; [0038]
  • FIG. 9 is an enlarged side view of a actively releasable retainer that may be used with the filter illustrated in FIG. 1; [0039]
  • FIG. 10 is a cross-section view taken along line [0040] 10-10 of FIG. 9;
  • FIG. 11 is a detailed view of the intraluminal filter elements and tubular apertures of FIG. 10; [0041]
  • FIG. 12 is a side view of a single cone filter in a filter configuration, the filter including axially extending orientation members; [0042]
  • FIG. 13 is a side view of an actively releasable retainer with a hook that may be used with the filter shown in FIG. 12; [0043]
  • FIG. 14 is a side view of a passively releasable retainer that may be used with the filter shown in FIG. 12; [0044]
  • FIG. 15 is a top cross-sectional view of the restrained intraluminal filter elements contained within the releasable retainer shown in FIG. 13; [0045]
  • FIG. 16 is a top cross-sectional view of the restrained intraluminal filter elements contained within the releasable retainer shown in FIG. 14; [0046]
  • FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view taken along line [0047] 17-17 or FIG. 12;
  • FIG. 18 is a top view of the filter shown in FIG. 12 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0048]
  • FIG. 19 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration having axially extending orientation members; [0049]
  • FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view taken along line [0050] 20-20 or FIG. 19;
  • FIG. 21 is a top view of the filter shown in FIG. 19 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0051]
  • FIG. 22 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration having axially extending orientation members; [0052]
  • FIG. 23 is a side view of the filter shown in FIG. 22 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0053]
  • FIG. 24 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration having a plurality of intraluminal filter elements that include a corrugated structure; [0054]
  • FIG. 25 is a cross-sectional view taken along line [0055] 25-25 or FIG. 24;
  • FIG. 26 is a top view of the filter shown in FIG. 24 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0056]
  • FIG. 27 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration with a plurality of intraluminal filter elements having axially extending orientation members; [0057]
  • FIG. 28 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration with adjacent intraluminal filter elements joined by axially extending orientation members; [0058]
  • FIG. 29 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration having adjacent intraluminal filter elements joined by a wire mesh and having axially extending orientation members; [0059]
  • FIG. 30 is a top view of the filter shown in FIG. 29; [0060]
  • FIG. 31 is a top view of the filter shown in FIG. 29 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0061]
  • FIG. 32 is a side view of a device inserted into the lumen near a filter in a filter configuration in accordance with the invention for releasing the retainer; [0062]
  • FIG. 33 is a side view of the filter shown in FIG. 32 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0063]
  • FIG. 34 is a side view of a filter having two retainers which form a basket-type filter structure; [0064]
  • FIG. 35 is a side view of the filter in FIG. 34 in a single cone configuration; [0065]
  • FIG. 36 is a side view of the filter in FIG. 34 in an open, stent-like configuration; [0066]
  • FIG. 37 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration within a blood vessel and having a dual cone structure in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention; [0067]
  • FIG. 38 is a side view of a filter in a filter configuration having adjacent intraluminal filter elements joined by a filter web and having axially extending orientation members; [0068]
  • FIG. 39 is a side view of an actively releasable retainer that may used with the filter shown in FIG. 38; [0069]
  • FIG. 39A is a cross-section view of an actively releasable retainer similar to the retainer shown in FIG. 10; [0070]
  • FIG. 40 is a top view of the intraluminal filter elements connected by the filter web shown in FIG. 38 in a closed, filter configuration; [0071]
  • FIG. 41 is a side view of a filter shown in FIG. 38 position superior to the plaque in an arterial blood vessel; [0072]
  • FIG. 42 is a side view of the filter shown in FIG. 38 retaining dislodged plaque and thrombotic material; [0073]
  • FIG. 43 is a side view of the filter shown in FIG. 41 after plaque has been removed from the filter; and [0074]
  • FIG. 44 is a side view of the filter shown in FIG. 41 in an open, stent-like configuration.[0075]
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring generally to FIGS. [0076] 1-11, and particularly to FIG. 1, a dual cone blood clot filtration device (filter) 10 in a filter configuration includes a plurality of intraluminal filter elements (filter legs) 12, which may be formed using a suitable wire. As used herein, the term “filter configuration” is used to refer to a filter according to the invention where the intraluminal filter elements are joined by a releasable retainer so as to form a filter structure within the lumen. The term “open configuration” or “stent-like configuration” is used to refer to a filter according to the invention where the releasable retainer has been removed, and the intraluminal filter elements are disposed substantially adjacent an interior wall of the lumen.
  • With continued reference then to FIG. 1, the filter legs [0077] 12 each have a blunted superior end 16 and inferior end 18. Superior and inferior are used in their ordinary sense to refer to the filter's position within the body. The superior ends 16 are positioned upstream relative to blood flow, and the inferior ends 18 are positioned downstream relative to blood flow. The direction of blood flow is indicated in FIG. 1 by the arrow 20. The filter legs 12 are joined by a releasable retainer 22 at some location between the superior ends 16 and the inferior ends 18. In FIG. 1, the releasable retainer 22 secures the filter legs 12 in a dual cone filter configuration. The filter 10 may have a first spring 24 adjacent the superior ends 16 to urge them radially outwardly and a second spring 26 adjacent the inferior ends 18 to likewise urge them radially outward. Alternatively, the filter 10 may have a plurality of annular, horizontal members joining the filter legs 12. The releasable retainer 22 retains the filter legs 12 in the intraluminal dual cone filter configuration, e.g., resists the force exerted on the filter legs 12 by the first spring 24 and the second spring 26. The first spring 24 and the second spring 26 are each shown as an expanding annular spring, however, alternative spring configurations may be used, and several are described in connection with alternate preferred embodiments of the invention described below.
  • The filter [0078] 10 in FIG. 1 is shown inserted into a blood vessel 28 by a physician using the commonly practiced Seldinger technique. For percutaneous insertion of the filter 10, a vein is punctured with a needle, and a guidewire is advanced into the blood vessel 28 through the needle beyond the desired implantation site. A catheter consisting of an inner, dilating cannula within an outer sheath, up to 14 French in diameter, is then advanced into the vein, over the guidewire. When the desired implantation site is reached, the inner dilating cannula and guidewire are removed, leaving the sheath behind. The sheath acts as a conduit to permit the insertion of the filter. The filter 10, in a collapsed configuration, is introduced into the sheath and advanced to the implantation site. Once the filter 10 is in an appropriate position, the filter 10 is pushed out of the sheath or uncovered using a pushing catheter. Upon discharge, the filter legs 12 open and engage the interior wall of the blood vessel 28.
  • The filter legs [0079] 12 may be a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, the wires are metallic and round. In such an embodiment, the wires are preferably a radiopaque and non-ferromagnetic metal which has been certified for use in permanently implanted medical devices by the International Standards Organization (ISO). The wires may, in particular, be a high cobalt, low ferrous alloy, such as that known as and sold under the registered trademarks of “PHYNOX” or “ELGILOY” which may have the composition, by weight percent: cobalt 42%, chromium 21.5%, nickel 18%, iron 8.85%, molybdenum 7.5%, manganese 2% with the balance made up of carbon and beryllium having a maximum of 0.15% carbon and 0.001% beryllium. The wires may also be composed of 316L stainless steel or alloys of nickel and titanium known to be shape-memory metals which are sold and manufactured under the trademark “NITINOL” or an alloy of tantalum. Filter devices 10 constructed from metals will preferably withstand twelve million respiratory cycles without mechanical failure and will be non-thrombogenic.
  • FIG. 2 shows a single filter leg [0080] 12 of the filter 10. The filter 10, and each filter leg 12 are constructed so as to eliminate the possibility of entrapping a guide wire during insertion of the filter 10 into the lumen of a blood vessel. When not being restrained by the releasable retainer 22, each filter leg 12 is relatively straight, running parallel to the axis of the vessel wall 28. Each blunted superior end 16 and inferior end 18 end is flattened and has a small hook or barb 32, best seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4, that engages the interior wall of the blood vessel 28, which retain the filter 10 at a desired position within the blood vessel 28. Each filter leg 12 also includes a partially corrugated portion 34. Within a relatively short period of time after implantation, the small hooks or barbs 32 on the superior ends 16 and inferior ends 18 of the filter legs 12, which are in contact with the interior wall of the vessel 28, become permanently connected with the interior wall of the blood vessel 28. The corrugated portion 34 permits outward expansion of the filter leg 12 after release of the releasable retainer 22 without displacement of the superior end 16 or the inferior end 18 as the filter is converted to the stent-like configuration. This arrangement of the filter leg 12 prevents ripping or tearing of the interior wall of the blood vessel 28 upon opening of the filter 10 from the filter configuration shown in FIG. 1 to the open, stent-like configuration shown in FIG. 6. If the filter leg 12 did not included corrugated portion 34 upon release of the releasable retainer 22 and as the filter leg 12 tries to regain its original substantially straight shape, and with each superior end 16 and interior end 18 engaging the blood vessel 28, this movement of the filter leg 12 may cause the superior end 16 and inferior end 18 to be pulled away from the interior wall of the vessel 28 resulting in injury to the vessel wall.
  • FIG. 5 shows a plurality of filter legs [0081] 12 joined by horizontal connecting members 36 such as by laser welding. Alternatively, a mesh of wires 38 may be formed by the cutting application of a laser micro machining tool. In FIG. 6, the mesh of wires 38 is formed into a stent-like, cylindrical configuration when the ends of the mesh of wires 38 are permanently laser welded together. In a preferred embodiment, the filtration device 10 must be openable to a diameter of not less than “d”, preferably about 3.0 cm, yet collapsible to a diameter of less than 12F (4.0 mm) for percutaneous delivery via a catheter introducer system. In a preferred embodiment, the filtration device will be of length “1”, preferably about 6-7 cm. As mentioned, the dual cone filter device 10 is self-anchoring on the interior of the vessel wall 28 because of the small hook or barb 32 located on the superior ends 16 and inferior ends 18, yet the blood filter device 10 will have sufficient longitudinal flexibility to pass through fifty-five (55) degrees of angulation and will not substantially distort the vessel after deployment.
  • In a preferred embodiment of the filter device [0082] 10, the dual cone filter configuration converts into an open or stent-like configuration by actively removing the releasable retainer 22. As depicted in FIG. 9, the releasable retainer 40 has a hook 42 with which it can be captured by a snare or other capturing device and pulled through a catheter for removal from the body. In this embodiment, the releasable retainer 40 is cylindrical having axially extending tubular apertures 44 extending its length into which the filter legs 12 are slidably secured until removal of the retainer 40. The releasable retainer 40 joins the filter legs 12 to form the conical filter configuration. FIG. 10 shows a cross-section of the releasable retainer 40 with the filter legs 12 secured within the apertures 44. FIG. 11 is an enlargement of the cross-sectional view of the filter leg 12 within the tubular aperture 44 of the releasable retainer 40. The diameter of the filter leg 12 is less than the diameter of the tubular aperture 44 which enables the filter leg to be slidably released from the releasable retainer 40 when the retainer 40 is snared. It will be appreciated that this construction of the filter 10 offers the possibility of providing a permanent filter, i.e., by leaving the releasable retainer 40 in place, or converting the filter 10 to the open configuration, and hence, substantially completely reopening the lumen by removing the releasable member 40.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, the releasable retainer [0083] 22 may comprise a band of biodegradable material. Examples of such materials are polylactic acid material or polyglycolic acid suture material commonly used. The advantage of making the releasable retainer 22 from a biodegradable material is that over time the releasable retainer 22 will sufficiently degrade so as to permit the filter legs 12 to move to the open configuration. Thus, the filter device 10 passively converts from a filter configuration to a stent-like configuration. Advantageously, this conversion occurs without a subsequent invasive surgical procedure.
  • With reference now to FIG. 12, an alternate embodiment of the invention is shown in a single cone filtration device (filter) [0084] 100. The filtration device 100 may again be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or any other commonly practiced and federally approved method of insertion.
  • FIG. 12 shows the single cone filtration device [0085] 100 in its expanded position and having a plurality of intraluminal filter elements (filter legs) 102. The filter legs 102 are a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, the wires are metallic and may be round or flattened wire. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals described with respect to filter 10. In the filter 100 shown in FIG. 12, the filter legs 102 are made of a flattened wire. Each leg 102 has a blunted superior end 104, as discussed in the aforementioned paragraphs describing the superior and inferior positioning within the body, and has a small hook or barb 32 as seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4.
  • The filter [0086] 100 has a releasable retainer 106 that joins the superior ends 104 of the filter legs 102 forming a single, conical filter configuration as shown in FIG. 12. In one preferred embodiment, the retainer 106 is rounded or cap-shaped, however alternative retainer configurations could be used. Two preferred releasable filter embodiments are shown in FIG. 13 and FIG. 14. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 13, the cap-shaped releasable retainer 106 includes a hook 108 which allows the retainer 106 to be actively removed at any time. The hook 106 may be grasped by a snare or other capturing device and the releasable retainer 106 removed from the body, thereby converting the single cone filter 100 to an open, tubular stent-like configuration. The embodiment shown in FIG. 14 has a annular ring-shaped, releasable retainer 106′ which may also be removed using a snare device.
  • As is seen in FIGS. 15 and 16, the releasable retainer [0087] 106 has a hollow interior for receiving and retaining the blunted superior ends 104 of the filter legs 102. Upon release of the retainer 106, the filter legs 102 are released converting the filter 100 into an open or stent-like configuration. As seen in FIG. 15 and FIG. 16, the interior of the cap-shaped, releasable retainer 106 is hollow and holds the blunted superior ends 104 of the filter legs 102 by frictional engagement.
  • Referring again to FIG. 12, the releasable retainer [0088] 106 may be a band of biodegradable material such as polylactic acid material or polyglycolic acid suture material. Similar advantages as with filter device 10 are gained by making the releasable retainer 22 from a biodegradable material. Namely, the filter device 100 can be made to passively convert from a filter configuration to a stent-like configuration. Advantageously, this conversion occurs without a subsequent invasive surgical procedure.
  • In FIG. 12, the single cone filter [0089] 100 includes axially extending orientation members 110 to ensure centering of the filter in the vessel and to securely engage the filter with the interior wall of the blood vessel 28. Each orientation member 110 appears to be an appendix on each inferior end 112 of each filter leg 102 which folds substantially toward the closed end of the cone 113 and is substantially aligned with an axis “a” of the filter 100. In one embodiment, each orientation member 110 may be welded or otherwise permanently connected the blunted inferior end 112 of each filter leg 102. In another embodiment, the orientation members 110 may be formed from the same wire as the filter legs 102 by forming the wire so that an acute angle is created between the filter leg portion of the wire 102 and the orientation member portion of the wire 110. Each axially extending orientation member 110 may have one or more small hook or barbs 32 located along the length of the leg 110 for engaging the interior wall of the vessel to maintain the stability and positioning of the filter 100.
  • As seen in FIG. 12, the filter [0090] 100 may have a spring 114 adjacent the superior ends 104 to urge them radially outward, thereby reverting the filter 100 to its stent-like configuration. The spring force required to urge the filter legs 102 to the open configuration, however, is most preferably provided by the formation of the legs themselves in combination with the respective orientation member 110. The releasable retainer 106 resists the force exerted in the legs 102 by either the spring 114, or the energy stored in the filter leg 102 itself, to retain the filtration device 100 in the single cone filter configuration. In a configuration of filter 100 not including a spring 114, an additional member may be provided to join and retain the legs together.
  • Referring now to FIG. 19, another embodiment of the invention is shown in a single cone filtration device (filter) [0091] 200. The filter 200 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or by any other commonly practiced and federally approved method of insertion.
  • FIG. 19 shows the filter [0092] 200 in its expanded position having a plurality of intraluminal elements (filter legs) 202. In this embodiment, the filter legs 202 are a flexible wire and may be metallic and round. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals. Each filter leg 202 has a blunted superior end 204, and has a small hook or barb 32 as seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4.
  • The filter [0093] 200 includes a releasable retainer 206 that joins the superior ends 204 of the filter legs 202 forming a single, conical filter configuration as shown in FIG. 19. In one preferred embodiment, the releasable retainer 206 is rounded or cap-shaped, however alternative retainer configurations could be used. Two preferred releasable retainers are releasable retainers 106 and 106′ described above in connection with FIG. 13 and FIG. 14. Equally preferred is the use of a biodegradable retainer as discussed above. Upon release of the retainer 206, either actively with a snaring or other capturing device or passively after sufficient degradation of the biodegradable material, the filter legs 202 are released converting the filter 200 into an open or stent-like configuration.
  • In FIG. 19, the single cone filter [0094] 200 includes axially extending orientation members 208 to ensure centering of the filter in the vessel and to securely engage the filter with the interior wall of the blood vessel 28. Each orientation member 208 appears to be an appendix on the each inferior end 210 of each filter leg 202 which folds substantially backwards toward the tip or closed end of the cone 211. In one embodiment, each orientation member 208 may be welded or otherwise permanently connected to the blunted inferior end 210 of each filter leg 202. In another embodiment, the orientation members 208 may be formed from the same wire as the filter legs 202 by forming the wire so that an acute angle is created between the filter leg portion of the wire 202 and the orientation member portion of the wire 208. Neighboring or adjacent orientation members 208 are joined creating a wishbone-like configuration. Such a configuration assists in maintaining filter stability within the lumen. Each axially extending orientation member 208 may have one or more small hook or barbs 32 located along the length of the leg 208 for engaging the interior wall of the vessel to maintain the stability and positioning of the filter 200. In FIG. 19, the single cone filtration device 200 may have a spring 212 adjacent the superior ends 204 to urge them radially outward. Alternatively, and more preferably, the configuration of the filter legs 202 themselves in conjunction with the respective orientation member 208 provides the energy to urge the filter legs 202 to the open configuration.
  • The releasable retainer [0095] 206 resists the force exerted in the legs 202 by either the spring 212 or the filter legs themselves, to retain the filtration device 200 in the single cone filter configuration. FIG. 20 shows in cross-sectional view the spring 212 attached to and joining the filter legs 202 where the releasable retainer 206 still retains the legs keeping them in a conical configuration. FIG. 21 shows a cross-sectional view of the spring 212 urging the legs radially outwardly into an open and stent-like configuration when the releasable retainer 206 is removed. The small hook 32 on each blunted superior end 204 engages the wall of the vessel for securely fixing the expanded filter within the blood vessel.
  • Referring now to FIG. 22, in still another alternate preferred embodiment, the filtration device is a single cone filtration device [0096] 200. The filtration device 300 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or any other commonly practiced and federally approved method of insertion not listed herein.
  • FIG. 22 shows the single cone filtration device [0097] 300 in its expanded position having a plurality of filter legs 302. The legs 302 are a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, the wires are metallic and round. In another embodiment, the wires may be flattened. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals. As shown in FIG. 22, each neighboring or adjacent filter leg 302 is joined at its superior end 304. The filter 300 includes a releasable retainer 306 that joins the superior ends 304 of the filter legs 302 forming a single, conical filter configuration as shown in FIG. 22. In one preferred embodiment, the retainer 306 is rounded or cap-shaped, however alternative retainer configurations could be used as discussed above. Upon release of the retainer 306, either actively with a snaring or other capturing device or passively after sufficient degradation of the biodegradable retainer, the filter legs 302 are released converting the filter 300 into an open or stent-like configuration.
  • In FIG. 22, the single cone filter [0098] 300 includes axially extending orientation members 308 to ensure centering of the filter in the vessel and to securely engage the filter with the interior wall of the blood vessel 28. Each orientation member 308 appears to be an appendix on the each inferior end 310 of each filter leg 302 which folds substantially backwards toward the tip or closed end of the cone 311 and is substantially aligned with an axis “a” of the filter 300. In one embodiment, each orientation member 308 may be welded or otherwise permanently connected to the blunted inferior end 310 of each filter leg 302. In another embodiment, the orientation members 308 may be formed from the same wire as the filter legs 302 by forming the wire so that an acute angle is created between the filter leg portion of the wire 302 and the orientation member portion of the wire 308. Each axially extending orientation member 308 may have one or more small hook or barb 32 located along the length of the leg 308 for engaging the interior wall of the vessel to maintain the stability and positioning of the filter 300. Preferably the force necessary to move the filter legs 302 is provide by the configuration of the filter legs 302 in conjunction with the orientation members 308. However, in FIG. 22, the single cone filtration device 300 may have a spring 312 adjacent the superior ends 304 to restore the filter to its stent-like configuration by urging the filter legs 302 radially outward. The releasable retainer 306 resists the force attempting to return the filter legs 302 to the open configuration and retains the filtration device 300 in the single cone filter configuration. FIG. 23 shows the spring 312 urging the legs 302 radially outwardly into an open and stent-like configuration after the releasable retainer 306 has been removed. The small hook 32 of each blunted superior end 304 engages the interior wall of the vessel 28 to securely hold the converted filter against the wall of the vessel 28.
  • Referring to FIG. 24, in another alternate embodiment, the filtration device is a single cone filtration device [0099] 400. The filtration device 400 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or any other commonly practiced and federally approved method of insertion not listed herein.
  • FIG. 24 shows the single cone filtration device [0100] 400 in its expanded position having a plurality of filter legs 402. The legs 402 are a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, the wires are metallic and round. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals. The wire filter legs 402 are corrugated to enhance filtering of blot clots. Each leg 402 has a blunted superior end 404, as discussed in the aforementioned paragraphs describing the superior and inferior positioning within the body, and has a small hook or barb 32 as seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4. The filter 400 includes a releasable retainer 406 that joins the superior ends 404 of the filter legs 202 forming a single, conical filter configuration as shown in FIG. 24. In one preferred embodiment, the retainer 406 is rounded or cap-shaped, however alternative retainer configurations could be used as discussed above. Upon release of the retainer 406, either actively with a snaring or other capturing device or passively after sufficient degradation of the biodegradable retainer, the filter legs 402 are released converting the filter 400 into an open or stent-like configuration.
  • In FIG. 24, the single cone filter [0101] 400 may be configured to include axially extending orientation members 408 to ensure centering of the filter in the vessel and to securely engage the filter with the interior wall of the blood vessel 28. Each orientation member 408 appears to be an appendix on the each inferior end 410 of each filter leg 402 which folds substantially toward the closed end of the cone 411. In one embodiment, each orientation member 408 may be welded or otherwise permanently connected to the blunted inferior end 410 of each filter leg 402. In another embodiment, the orientation members 408 may be formed from the same wire as the filter legs 402 by forming the wire so that an acute angle is created between the filter leg portion of the wire 402 and the orientation member portion of the wire 408. Each axially extending orientation member 408 may have one or more small hook or barbs 32 located along the length of the leg 408 for engaging the interior wall of the vessel to maintain the stability and positioning of the filter 400. The configuration of the legs 402 and orientation members 408 may provide the force necessary to revert the filter legs 402 to the open configuration. In FIG. 24, the single cone filtration device 400 may have a spring 412 adjacent the superior ends 204 to revert the filter legs 402 to the open configuration. The releasable retainer 406 resists the force exerted in the legs 402 to retain the filtration device 400 in the single cone filter configuration. FIG. 25 shows a cross-sectional view of the spring 412 attached to and joining the filter legs 402 where the releasable retainer 406 still retains the legs keeping them in a conical configuration. FIG. 26 shows a cross-sectional view of the spring 412 urging the legs radially outwardly thereby reverting them into an open and stent-like configuration when the releasable retainer 406 is removed. The small hook 32 on each blunted superior end 404 engages the wall of the vessel for securely fixing the expanded filter within the blood vessel.
  • In certain preferred embodiments of a filter device described above a spring in not needed to urge the filter legs radially outwardly to restore the filter to its open configuration. In FIG. 27, the single cone filter [0102] 500 is formed substantially the same way as the single cone filter 100 shown in FIG. 12. The filter legs, releasable retainer, and orientation members are in accordance with the foregoing discussion associated with single cone filter 100. In FIG. 28, the single cone filter 600 is formed substantially the same way as single cone filter 200 shown in FIG. 19. The filter legs, releasable retainer, and orientation members are in accordance with the discussion associated with single cone filter 200. When the releasable retainer is removed from the single cone filter 500 and single cone filter 600, the filters are self-opening. Each filter leg and orientation member of filter 500 and filter 600 is formed from a single wire. The wire is bent forming a hair-pin configuration. The energy stored in wires causes the filter legs to self-open upon release of the retainer and thereby create an open or stent-like configuration.
  • In FIG. 29, the single cone filter [0103] 700 is constructed similarly to the aforementioned blood filters. In filter 700, each neighboring or adjacent filter legs is connected at is superior end and each neighboring or adjacent orientation member is connected. Thus, filter 700 is formed from one continuous piece of wire that has been formed into a stent-like configuration and then retained by a releasable retainer in a filter configuration. If the wire of filter 700 were broken at one point and the wire laid flat, the shape of the wire may appear similar to a sinusoidal wave. In filter 700, between each adjacent and connected filter leg, the filter legs may have a mesh of wires to enhance filtering during embolization. The meshed wires 703 are seen in FIG. 29.
  • In accordance with the preferred embodiments, the filter legs of filters [0104] 500, 600 and 700 are retained in a releasable retainer while in the single cone configuration. The releasable retainer resists the force restoring the filter legs to the open configuration and thus retains the filter legs in the single cone filter configuration. FIG. 30 shows a cross-sectional view of the filter legs of filters 500, 600 and 700 joined or retained by a releasable retainer. FIG. 31 shows a cross-sectional view of the filter legs of filters 500, 600 and 700 expanding radially outwardly into an open and stent-like configuration when the releasable retainer is removed. A small hook 32 on each blunted superior end of each filter leg engages the wall of the vessel to securely fix the expanded filter within the blood vessel. In this expanded position, the interior of the blood vessel lumen is open for the free-flow of blood.
  • As mentioned previously, the releasable retainer in each of the aforementioned embodiments can be actively or passively removed. FIG. 32 shows filter legs [0105] 800 that are restrained by a releasable retainer 802 in the form of a band. The filter legs 800 form a conical filter configuration. In FIG. 32, the releasable retainer 802 is a band the engages each of the filter legs. This retainer 802 is generally biologically stabile, i.e., does not degrade within the body, until being exposed to an energy stimulus or a chemical stimulus. The waves 804 shown in FIG. 32 represent an energy stimulus. An emitter 806 is depicted by the rod-like structure in FIG. 32, but is not limited to such a structure configuration. The waves 804 given off by the emitter 806 may be an ultrasonic energy or an electrical current. In another embodiment, the emitter 806 may release waves 804 of a chemical stimulus that breaks or dissolves the retaining band 800. Preferably the band remains structurally stable until it is exposed to the either the mechanical, electrical or chemical stimulus. For example, a polymer material responsive to ultrasound energy to initiate a degradation process is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,657,543, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference. In an alternative embodiment, the retainer 802 is a stainless steel material that may be electrolytically disintegrated as is known in the art. After exposure to the energy stimulus, the retainer 802 begins to degrade similar to the above-described biodegradable releasable retainers or otherwise sufficiently structurally weakens so as to permit the release of the filter legs 800. Upon release, as shown in FIG. 33, the filter legs 800 expand to form the an open or stent-like configuration when the retainer 802 degrades as a result of exposure to either an energy stimulus or a chemical stimulus.
  • In FIG. 34, the basket-type filter [0106] 810 is constructed similarly to the aforementioned single cone filters except that the releasable retainer joins both ends of the filter 810. In this embodiment, the releasable retainer may be a first releasable retainer 812 and a second releasable retainer 814. The filter 810 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or any other commonly practiced and approved method of insertion. The intraluminal filter elements (filter legs) 811 are a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, may be round or flattened wire. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals described with respect to filter 10. The filter legs 811 are gathered at one end by releasable retainer 812 and at the other end by releasable retainer 814. A filter web 816 extends between the filter legs 811. The filter web 816 may be made of woven metal or may be a plurality individual members extending between the filter legs 811. Because of the symmetric configuration of the basket-type filter 810, the filter 810 does not have designated superior and inferior ends as described previously in connection with the single and dual cone filter configurations. For this reason, the filter 810 may be implanted in the vena cava from above or below. Each retainer 812, 814 of filter 810 includes a hook 813, 815 which allows the respective retainer 812, 814 to be actively removed at any time like the retainer depicted in FIG. 13. The hooks 813, 815 may be grasped by a snare or other capturing device and the retainer 812, 814 removed from the body. As is shown in FIG. 35, the basket-type filter 810 converts to a single cone filter configuration when the inferiorly positioned one of the retainers 812, 814 is removed. When the remaining superiorly positioned one of the retainers 812, 814 is removed, the single cone configuration converts to an open, stent-like configuration as is depicted in FIG. 36. The superior retainer is the one of the retainers positioned upstream relative to blood flow, and the inferior retainer is the other of the retainers positioned downstream relative to blood flow. In alterative embodiments of the invention, the basket-type filter 810 may include biodegradable retainers which, advantageously, allow the conversion to occur without a subsequent invasive surgical procedure. In additional embodiments of the invention, the basket-type filter 810 may include retainers that are releasable upon exposure to a form of mechanical, electrical or chemical stimulus.
  • In accordance with additional preferred embodiments of the invention, a filter is placed in an artery downstream from the diseased portion of the arterial vessel to prevent large pieces dislodged plaque as well as any other potentially harmful embolic material from occluding smaller vessels. A filter inserted downstream catches plaque dislodged by during the treatment procedure, such as endarterectomy, and retains it until the plaque is removed from the filter by a vacuuming procedure. In addition to catching dislodged plaque, the filters catches harmful blood clots in the bloodstream. Such blood clots may develop as a result of damage to the normal healthy lining of the blood vessel caused by the plaque removal. For example, when blood platelets come into contact with the site of vessel damage, they become activated, adhering to the site and initiate the formation of a blood clot or thrombus. The thrombus may enlarge until it blocks the vessel at the site, or the continued flow of blood past the thrombus may cause it to dislodge. Thromboembolism may have serious consequences for patients suffering from atherosclerosis if the free floating clot, or embolus, completely plugs a smaller vessel as it migrates downstream. Thus, it is desirable to place filters in the bloodstream to catch any potentially harmful pieces of plaque or other embolic material. [0107]
  • Similarly, with balloon angioplasty, plaque may dislodge from the arterial wall and enter the blood stream. As mentioned previously, it would be desirable to catch the plaque in a filter and remove it from the body before a cerebral vascular accident occurs. [0108]
  • With reference to FIG. 37, a filter [0109] 820, in accordance with an alternate preferred embodiment of the invention, is shown. The filter 820 has a dual cone configuration and includes a plurality of intraluminal filter elements (filter legs) 822. The filter 820 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or any other commonly practiced and approved method of insertion. The filter legs 822 are a flexible wire and, in one preferred embodiment, may be round or flattened wire. The wires may be made from a radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. The wires may, in particular, consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals described with respect to filter 10. The filter legs 822 each have a blunted superior end 824 and inferior end 826. Superior and inferior are used in their ordinary sense to refer to the filter's position within the body. The superior ends 824 are positioned upstream relative to blood flow, and the inferior ends 826 are positioned downstream relative to blood flow. The direction of blood flow is indicated in FIG. 37 and FIG. 38 by the arrow 828.
  • In FIG. 37, the filter legs [0110] 822 are joined by a releasable retainer 830 at a location between the superior ends 824 and the inferior ends 826. The releasable retainer 830 secures the filter legs 822 in the dual cone configuration. The filter 820 may have a first member 832 adjacent the superior ends 824 and a second member 834 adjacent the inferior ends 826. The first member 832 and the second member 834 support the filter legs 822 radially and axially.
  • The filter [0111] 820 has a filter web 836 extending between the portion of the filter legs 822 that is disposed between the releasable retainer 830 and the inferior ends 826. The filter web 836 is shown only extending between two of the plurality of filter legs 822, but it should be understood that in a preferred embodiment of the invention the filter web 836 may extend between all of the filter legs 822, or some portion of the filter legs 822. The filter web 836 may be made of woven metal or may be a plurality of individual members extending between the filter legs 822. The filter web 836 enhances the effectiveness of the filter 820 to retain pieces of dislodged plaque and thrombotic material.
  • The releasable retainer [0112] 830 retains the filter legs 822 in the intraluminal dual cone filter configuration, e.g., resists the tendency of the filter legs 822 to return to an open configuration. That is, the first member 832 and the second member 834 maintain the relative spacing of the filter legs 822, and in general, retain the filter legs 822 in a cylindrical or stent-like configuration (similar to that of the filter 10 shown in FIG. 6). The releasable retainer 830, by engaging the filter legs 822, restricts the central portion of the filter legs 822 and retains the filter legs 822 in the dual cone filter configuration. By withdrawing the releasable retainer 830 from the filter legs 822, the filter legs 822 are permitted to completely open into the cylindrical configuration. The first member 832 and the second member 834 are each shown as an expanding annular spring; however, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that alternative configurations may be used.
  • Each of the filter legs [0113] 822 of the filter 820 may be constructed similar to the single filter leg 12 of the filter 10 as depicted in FIG. 2. Each blunted superior end 824 and inferior end 826 is flattened and may include a small hook or barb (such as barb 32, best seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4) that engages the interior wall of the blood vessel 838. These barbs help secure the filter 820 within the lumen of an arterial blood vessel 838 and resist the pressures of the blood pumping through the arterial system. It is not necessary that each end, 824 and 826, of each filter leg 822 include a barb. Instead, the barbs may be disposed on alternating ends, or may be disposed on preselected ones of the ends. Such an arrangement of the filter 820, with barbs disposed on alternating ends of the filter legs 822, may enhance deployment of the filter into the vessel. In a filter having barbs disposed on the end of each filter leg, it is possible that, as the filter is discharged from the introducer catheter, the barbs of adjoining filter legs may engage the vessel wall before they have expanded to their full radial extension. The result is the filter may not fully deploy. By providing barbs on alternating filter leg ends, or even fewer ends, the tendency for the barbs to improperly engage the vessel is reduced.
  • Each filter leg [0114] 822 may also include a partially corrugated portion along its length (similar to the corrugated portion 34 of the filter 10 illustrated in FIG. 2). Within a relatively short period of time after implantation, the barbs on the superior ends 824 and inferior ends 826 of the filter legs 822, which are in contact with the interior wall of the vessel 838, become permanently connected with the interior wall of the blood vessel 838. The corrugated portion permits outward expansion of the filter leg 822 after release of the releasable retainer 830 without displacement of the superior end 824 or the inferior end 826 as the filter is converted to the stent-like configuration. This arrangement of the filter leg 822 reduces the likelihood of damaging the interior wall of the blood vessel 838 upon opening of the filter 820 from the filter configuration to the open, stent-like configuration.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the filtration device [0115] 820 must be openable to a diameter of not less than “d”, about 2-10 mm, and preferably about 4 mm, yet collapsible to a diameter of less than 8F (2.6 mm) for percutaneous delivery via a catheter introducer system. In a preferred embodiment, the filtration device will be of length “1”, preferably about 2-10 mm. As mentioned, the dual cone filter device 820 is self-anchoring on the interior of the vessel wall 838 because of the barbs located on the superior ends 824 and inferior ends 826, yet the blood filter device 820 will have sufficient longitudinal flexibility to pass through fifty-five (55) degrees of angulation and will not substantially distort the vessel after deployment.
  • In a preferred embodiment of the filter device [0116] 820, the dual cone filter configuration converts into an open or stent-like configuration by actively removing the releasable retainer 830. This conversion to a stent-like configuration is especially desirable when treating atherosclerotic disease as described above. For example, after a balloon angioplasty procedure, stents are often inserted into the treated region of an artery to keep the lumen open, maintain blood flow and provide a scaffolding for tissue growth.
  • The releasable retainer [0117] 830 may be constructed similar to the retainer 40 depicted in FIG. 9 and include a hook 842 with which it can be captured by a snare or other capturing device and pulled through a catheter for removal from the body. Like the retainer in FIG. 9, the releasable retainer 830 may be cylindrical having axially extending tubular apertures extending its length into which the filter legs 822 are slidably secured until removal of the retainer 830. As shown in FIG. 37, the releasable retainer 830 is a band, for example of suture material, that may be cut and removed via a catheter. Alternatively, the releasable retainer 830 may be a band of biodegradable material. Examples of such materials are polylactic acid material or polyglycolic acid suture material commonly used. The advantage of making the releasable retainer 830 from a biodegradable material is that over time the releasable retainer 830 will sufficiently degrade so as to permit the filter legs 822 to move to the open configuration. Thus, the filter device 820 passively converts from a filter configuration to a stent-like configuration, advantageously occuring without a subsequent invasive surgical procedure.
  • Referring now to FIG. 38, in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention, a single cone filtration device (filter) [0118] 900 is shown. The filter 900 may be inserted percutaneously into the body using the aforementioned Seldinger technique or by any other commonly practiced and approved method of insertion.
  • FIG. 38 shows the filter [0119] 900 in its expanded position having a plurality of intraluminal elements (filter legs) 902. In this embodiment, the filter legs 902 are constructed from flexible wire that may be metallic and round. The wires are preferably radiopaque, non-thrombogenic, and non-ferromagnetic metal meeting the certifications for permanently implanted medical devices according to the ISO and will preferably be able to withstand twelve million respiratory cycles. In particular, the wire may consist essentially of any of the aforementioned metals.
  • Each filter leg [0120] 902 has a blunted inferior end 904, and each inferior end 904 may be formed to include a barb. Other embodiments of filter 900 may include alternating ends formed with a barb, or each end of selected ones of the filter legs 902 including a barb. The single cone filter illustrated in FIG. 38 may be formed substantially the same way as single cone filter 200. As such, the filter legs 902, and orientation members 906 are formed in accordance with the discussion associated with single cone filter 200.
  • The filter [0121] 900 shown in FIG. 38 has a releasable retainer 908 that joins the superior ends of the filter legs 902 forming a single, conical configuration as shown. In one preferred embodiment, the retainer 908 is rounded or cap-shaped, however alternate retainer configurations could be used. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 39, the cap-shaped releasable retainer 908 includes a hook 909 which allows the retainer 908 to be actively removed at any time. The hook 909 may be grasped by a snare or other capturing device and the releasable retainer 908 removed from the body, thereby converting the single cone filter 900 to an open, tubular, stent-like configuration. As shown in FIG. 39A, the releasable retainer 908 may be formed to include axially extending tubular apertures 903 into which the filter legs 902 are slidably engaged similar to those shown in connection with retainer 40 of FIG. 9.
  • When the releasable retainer [0122] 908 is removed from the single cone filter 900, the filter is self-opening to an open, stent-like configuration. Each filter leg 902 and orientation member 906 may be formed from a single wire that is formed into a hairpin-like configuration as shown in FIG. 38. Alternatively, all the filter legs 902 and orientation members 906 may be formed from a continuous piece of wire and retained by the releasable retainer 908 in a filter configuration. Upon release of the retainer 908 from the filter, the elastic energy stored in the wire(s) causes the filter legs to self-open and thereby create an open or stent-like configuration.
  • In accordance with the preferred embodiments of the invention, the filter legs [0123] 902 are connected by a filter web 910 that consists of a wire mesh. This filter web enhances the effectiveness of the filter 900 for retaining small pieces of plaque during the treatment of vascular disease. As is best illustrated in FIG. 40, when single cone filter 900 is in the filter configuration the filter web 910 fills the lumen of the blood vessel, contacting the interior wall of the arterial blood vessel 838, to catch migrating pieces of dislodged plaque and thrombotic material in the bloodstream.
  • In accordance with a method of treating atherosclerotic disease by endarterectomy, balloon angioplasty, atherectomy or other interventional methods, a filter, e.g., a filter [0124] 820 or a filter 900, may be inserted into the vessel being treated and downstream, relative to the direction of blood flow (indicated by arrow 828 in FIGS. 41-44), from the area of the vessel being treated. As shown in FIG. 41, a filter 900 may be placed downstream from deposits of atherosclerotic plaque 912 that have accumulated on the interior lining of an arterial blood vessel 838. As shown in FIG. 42, the filter 900 catches harmful debris 914 in the bloodstream including plaque dislodged by the treatment procedure as well as thrombotic material. The filter 900 retains this debris 914 until the debris 914 is removed from the filter 900 by a vacuuming procedure known by one skilled in the art. Some residual atherosclerotic plaque 916 may remain on the interior lining of the arterial blood vessel 838. In FIG. 43, at the completion of the treatment, the residual plaque 916 is removed from the interior lining (traces of plaque may still line the arterial wall yet are not depicted in FIGS. 43 and 44) of the arterial blood vessel 838 and all debris 914 is removed from the filter 900. Finally, as depicted in FIG. 44, the filter 900 may convert to its open, stent-like configuration if of the releasable retainer is removed, either passively or actively as described above in connection with the vena cava filters. The filter 900 in the open, stent-like configuration restores vessel patency, keeps the lumen open and provides a scaffolding for the growth of new tissue on the interior lining of the arterial blood vessel 838. While it is not anticipated that the filter will be left for extended periods in the filter configuration, and instead it is likely the filter will be converted to the open, stent-like configuration shortly after completing the treatment, such methods of treatment utilizing a filter as shown herein are within the scope of the invention.
  • In an alternate embodiment, any of the aforementioned filters may be made both passively self-opening and entirely biodegradable based upon the materials selected to form the filter structure. The filter itself, and particularly the intraluminal elements (filter legs), the orientation members and the filter web, where necessary, may be formed of a biodegradable material which degrades within the body after a specified period of time. Such materials are biocompatible with the body which means that they are physiologically tolerable. Preferably, such biocompatible materials do not cause undesirable physiological conditions that may result in changes in the structure and function of living tissues in the body. In one preferred embodiment, the filter may be composed essentially of the biodegradable and biocompatible material polylactic acid (pla). An alternate preferred material is the copolymer of L-lactide and .ε.-caprolactone as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,670,161, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference. The releasable retainer used in conjunction with the filters composed substantially of biodegradable materials is made of a second biodegradable and biocompatible material. In one preferred embodiment, the releasable retainer is made of the biodegradable material polyglycolic acid (pga). The biodegradable material selected for the filter structure has a degradation rate (d1) preferably slower than a degradation rate (d2) of the biodegradable material selected for the releasable retainer(s). Thus, the releasable retainer(s) will degrade or dissolve first thereby releasing the filter legs and converting the filter into a stent-like configuration. The filter legs then move into contact with the lumen walls and in relatively short period of time are incorporated by endothelial tissue. After a further period of time, i.e., the difference between the filter degradation rate (d1) and the retainer degradation rate (d2), the filter will begin to degrade within the body. A preferred first degradation rate (d1) may be up to one year while a preferred second degradation rate (d2) may be approximately 21 weeks. Advantageously, because of the biodegradable composition of the filter and the retainer, none of the filter materials will remain in the body. Thus, a filter constructed in accordance with this embodiment of the invention may be particularly preferred by surgeon wherein the risk of embolism is transient. It will be further appreciated that the foregoing described biodegradable materials, equivalent materials, and improvements to such materials, suitable for use in forming a filter structure are contemplated to be within the scope of the invention. [0125]
  • The invention has been described in terms of several preferred embodiments. The description of these embodiments should in no way be considered limiting of the broad scope of the invention set forth in the following claims. [0126]

Claims (58)

    I claim:
  1. 1. A filter adapted for use in treating vascular disease, the filter comprising:
    a plurality of interconnected intraluminal filter elements, the intraluminal filter elements arranged to be disposed in a filter configuration within the lumen of a blood vessel,
    a releasable retainer joining the intraluminal filter elements in the filter configuration, and
    wherein upon release of the releasable retainer the intraluminal filter elements convert to an open configuration.
  2. 2. The filter of claim 1, further comprising a spring formed integrally with the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  3. 3. The filter of claim 1, further comprising a filter web interconnecting the filter elements
  4. 4. The filter of claim 3, wherein the filter web extends between each adjacent intraluminal filter element.
  5. 5. The filter of claim 3, wherein the filter web is formed integrally with the intraluminal filter elements.
  6. 6. The filter of claim 1, further comprising means for passively releasing the releasable retainer.
  7. 7. The filter of claim 1, further comprising means for releasing the releasable retainer after a predetermined time period.
  8. 8. The filter of claim 1, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a biodegradable material.
  9. 9. The filter of claim 1, further comprising means for actively releasing the releasable retainer.
  10. 10. The filter of claim 1, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a coupling formed with a plurality of catches, each of the catches respectively engaged with one of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  11. 11. The filter of claim 1, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a breakable band engaging each of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  12. 12. The filter of claim 1, further comprising means for releasing the releasable retainer responsive to an energy stimulus.
  13. 13. The filter of claim 1, further comprising means for releasing the releasable retainer responsive to a chemical stimulus.
  14. 14. A filter for use in treating vascular disease comprising:
    a plurality of interconnected intraluminal filter elements each having a superior end and an inferior end,
    a plurality of orienting members secured to and extending from respective ones of the intraluminal filter elements,
    a releasable retainer joining the superior ends in a filter configuration, and
    wherein upon release of the releasable retainer the intraluminal filter elements convert to an open configuration.
  15. 15. The filter of claim 14, further comprising a plurality of members joined to the intraluminal filter elements to restore the superior ends to an open configuration upon release of the retainer.
  16. 16. The filter of claim 14, further comprising a filter web interconnecting the intraluminal filter elements.
  17. 17. The filter of claim 16, where in the filter web extends between each adjacent intraluminal filter element.
  18. 18. The filter of claim 16, wherein the filter web is formed integrally with the intraluminal filter elements.
  19. 19. The filter of claim 14, wherein each orienting member is formed integrally with a respective intraluminal filter element.
  20. 20. The filter of claim 14, wherein each orienting member comprises a portion of the respective intraluminal filter element extending substantially parallel to an axis of filtration.
  21. 21. The filter of claim 14, wherein each orienting member comprises an elongate portion of the respective intraluminal filter element extending from the respective superior end and radially outwardly from the retainer.
  22. 22. The filter of claim 14, wherein each orienting member comprises a loop extending between the inferior ends of adjacent intraluminal filter elements.
  23. 23. The filter of claim 14, further comprising means for passively releasing the releasable retainer.
  24. 24. The filter of claim 14, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a biodegradable material.
  25. 25. The filter of claim 14, further comprising means for actively releasing the releasable retainer.
  26. 26. The filter of claim 14, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a coupling formed with a plurality of catches, each of the catches respectively engaged with one of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  27. 27. The filter of claim 14, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a breakable band engaging each of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  28. 28. The filter of claim 14, further comprising means for releasing the releasable retainer responsive to an energy stimulus.
  29. 29. The filter of claim 14, further comprising means for releasing the releasable retainer responsive to a chemical stimulus.
  30. 30. A filter for the treatment of vascular disease comprising:
    a plurality of interconnected intraluminal filter elements each having a superior end and an inferior end,
    a releasable retainer securing the intraluminal filter elements in a filter configuration, the releasable retainer being disposed at a location along the intraluminal filter elements between the superior and inferior ends, and
    wherein upon release of the releasable retainer the intraluminal filter elements convert to an open configuration.
  31. 31. The filter of claim 30, further comprising a first member secured to the intraluminal filter elements adjacent the superior ends for retaining the superior ends.
  32. 32. The filter of claim 31, further comprising a second member secured to the intraluminal filter elements adjacent the inferior ends for retaining the inferior ends.
  33. 33. The filter of claim 30, further comprising a filter web interconnecting the intraluminal filter elements.
  34. 34. The filter of claim 33, wherein the filter web extends between each adjacent intraluminal filter element.
  35. 35. The filter of claim 33, wherein the filter web is formed integrally with the intraluminal filter elements.
  36. 36. A filter adapted for use in treating vascular disease, the filter comprising:
    a plurality of interconnected intraluminal filter elements, the intraluminal filter elements each having a first end and a second end and arranged to be disposed in a basket-type configuration within the lumen of a blood vessel,
    a releasable retainer joining the first ends and the second ends of each intraluminal filter element, and
    wherein upon release of the releasable retainer the intraluminal filter elements convert to an open configuration.
  37. 37. The filter of claim 36, further comprising a plurality of members joined to the plurality of intraluminal filter elements which upon release of the releasable retainer join the intraluminal filter elements in an open configuration.
  38. 38. The filter of claim 36, further comprising a filter web interconnecting the intraluminal filter elements.
  39. 39. The filter of claim 38, wherein the filter web extends between each adjacent intraluminal filter element.
  40. 40. The filter of claim 36, wherein the releasable retainer comprises a first releasable retainer and a second releasable retainer.
  41. 41. The filter of claim 40, further comprising means for releasing the first releasable retainer after a first predetermined time period and a means for releasing the second releasable retainer after a second predetermined time period.
  42. 42. The filter of claim 40, wherein the first releasable retainer comprises a biodegradable material.
  43. 43. The filter of claim 40, wherein the second releasable retainer comprises a biodegradable material.
  44. 44. The filter of claim 40, wherein the first releasable retainer comprises a first biodegradable material and the second releasable retainer comprises a second biodegradable material.
  45. 45. The filter of claim 40, wherein the first releasable retainer comprises a coupling formed with a plurality of catches, each of the catches respectively engaged with one of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  46. 46. The filter of claim 40, wherein the second releasable retainer comprises a coupling formed with a plurality of catches, each of the catches respectively engaged with one of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  47. 47. The filter of claim 40, wherein the first releasable retainer comprises a breakable band engaging each of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  48. 48. The filter of claim 40, wherein the second releasable retainer comprises a breakable band engaging each of the plurality of intraluminal filter elements.
  49. 49. The filter of claim 40, further comprising means for releasing the first and second releasable retainers responsive to an energy stimulus.
  50. 50. The filter of claim 40, further comprising means for releasing the second releasable retainer responsive to an energy stimulus.
  51. 51. The filter of claim 40, further comprising means for releasing the first and second releasable retainers responsive to a chemical stimulus.
  52. 52. The filter of claim 40, further comprising means for releasing the second releasable retainer responsive to a chemical stimulus.
  53. 53. A method for treating atherosclerosis comprising the steps of:
    operatively disposing a filter within an artery,
    treating the artery to remove plaque from an interior wall thereof,
    collecting embolic and plaque material in the filter,
    removing embolic and plaque material collected within the filter, and
    converting the filter, in situ, to an open configuration.
  54. 54. The method of claim 53, wherein the step of converting comprises, actively releasing a retainer member securing the filter in the filter configuration.
  55. 55. The method of claim 53, wherein the step of converting comprises, providing a passively releasable retainer securing the filter in the filter configuration.
  56. 56. A method for treating vascular disease comprising the steps of:
    operatively disposing a filter within a vessel,
    treating the vascular disease,
    collecting the biological debris in the filter,
    removing the biological material from the filter, and
    converting the filter, in situ, to an open configuration.
  57. 57. The method of claim 56, wherein the step of converting comprises, actively releasing a retainer member securing the filter in the filter configuration.
  58. 58. The method of claim 56, wherein the step of converting comprises, providing a passively releasable retainer securing the filter in the filter configuration.
US10361217 1999-05-03 2003-02-10 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease Abandoned US20030176888A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09304311 US6267776B1 (en) 1999-05-03 1999-05-03 Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US09564141 US6517559B1 (en) 1999-05-03 2000-05-03 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease
US10361217 US20030176888A1 (en) 1999-05-03 2003-02-10 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10361217 US20030176888A1 (en) 1999-05-03 2003-02-10 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09564141 Continuation US6517559B1 (en) 1999-05-03 2000-05-03 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030176888A1 true true US20030176888A1 (en) 2003-09-18

Family

ID=23175966

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09304311 Active US6267776B1 (en) 1999-05-03 1999-05-03 Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US09564141 Active US6517559B1 (en) 1999-05-03 2000-05-03 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease
US10361217 Abandoned US20030176888A1 (en) 1999-05-03 2003-02-10 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09304311 Active US6267776B1 (en) 1999-05-03 1999-05-03 Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US09564141 Active US6517559B1 (en) 1999-05-03 2000-05-03 Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (3) US6267776B1 (en)
EP (1) EP1175185B1 (en)
JP (1) JP2002542879A (en)
CA (1) CA2372189C (en)
DE (1) DE60042736D1 (en)
ES (1) ES2331404T3 (en)
WO (1) WO2000066031A1 (en)

Cited By (69)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050107822A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-05-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Intravascular filter with bioabsorbable centering element
US20050267514A1 (en) * 2004-04-16 2005-12-01 Osborne Thomas A Removable vena cava filter
US20060004402A1 (en) * 2004-06-30 2006-01-05 Virgil Voeller Intravascular filter
US20060100660A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2006-05-11 Cook Incorporated Blood clot filter configured for a wire guide
US20070032816A1 (en) * 2005-04-04 2007-02-08 B.Braun Medical Removable Filter Head
US20070112372A1 (en) * 2005-11-17 2007-05-17 Stephen Sosnowski Biodegradable vascular filter
US20080015578A1 (en) * 2006-07-12 2008-01-17 Dave Erickson Orthopedic implants comprising bioabsorbable metal
US20080027481A1 (en) * 2006-07-19 2008-01-31 Paul Gilson Vascular filter
US20080245371A1 (en) * 2007-04-06 2008-10-09 William Harwick Gruber Systems, methods and devices for performing gynecological procedures
US20080255605A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-16 C.R. Bard, Inc. Migration resistant embolic filter
US20080294189A1 (en) * 2007-05-23 2008-11-27 Moll Fransiscus L Vein filter
US20090024139A1 (en) * 2007-07-18 2009-01-22 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval device radially deployable from a collapsed position to a snare or cauterization loop
US20090105747A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2009-04-23 C.R. Bard, Inc. Vena Cava Filter with Stent
US20090187208A1 (en) * 2008-01-18 2009-07-23 William Cook Europe Aps Introduction catheter set for a self-expandable implant
US20090248060A1 (en) * 2008-03-19 2009-10-01 Schneider M Bret Electrostatic vascular filters
WO2010025775A1 (en) 2008-09-05 2010-03-11 Christoph Andreas Binkert Blood filter
US7699867B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2010-04-20 Cook Incorporated Removable vena cava filter for reduced trauma in collapsed configuration
US7704267B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2010-04-27 C. R. Bard, Inc. Non-entangling vena cava filter
US20100185227A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan Vascular filter
US20100185229A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan Vascular filter device
US20100185230A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan vascular filter device
US7766934B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-08-03 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device with an integral basket and bag
US7771452B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-08-10 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device with a filter bag that disengages from a basket
US20100228281A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-09-09 Paul Gilson Vascular filter system
US7794473B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2010-09-14 C.R. Bard, Inc. Filter delivery system
US7850708B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2010-12-14 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device having a reticulated body with staggered struts
US20110152919A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-23 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible Vascular Filter Devices and Methods for Using Same
US7967838B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2011-06-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US7972353B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2011-07-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter with anchoring feature for reduced trauma
US8043322B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2011-10-25 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter having inwardly positioned anchoring hooks in collapsed configuration
US8062327B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2011-11-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter and delivery system
US20110301633A1 (en) * 2009-12-04 2011-12-08 Patrick Muck Controlled release mechanism for blood vessel filtration device
US8105349B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2012-01-31 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter having primary struts for enhanced retrieval and delivery
US8109962B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2012-02-07 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Retrievable device having a reticulation portion with staggered struts
US8133251B2 (en) 1998-09-25 2012-03-13 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removeable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US8152831B2 (en) 2005-11-17 2012-04-10 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Foam embolic protection device
US8167901B2 (en) * 2004-09-27 2012-05-01 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter comprising struts having axial bends
US8182508B2 (en) 2005-10-04 2012-05-22 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8187298B2 (en) 2005-08-04 2012-05-29 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device having inflatable frame
US8216269B2 (en) 2005-11-02 2012-07-10 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device having reduced profile
US8221446B2 (en) 2005-03-15 2012-07-17 Cook Medical Technologies Embolic protection device
US8246672B2 (en) 2007-12-27 2012-08-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Endovascular graft with separately positionable and removable frame units
US8246648B2 (en) 2008-11-10 2012-08-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter with improved leg
US8252018B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2012-08-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Helical embolic protection device
US8252017B2 (en) 2005-10-18 2012-08-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Invertible filter for embolic protection
US8267954B2 (en) 2005-02-04 2012-09-18 C. R. Bard, Inc. Vascular filter with sensing capability
US20120277787A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Mitchell Donn Eggers Vascular Filter Stent
US8377092B2 (en) 2005-09-16 2013-02-19 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8388644B2 (en) 2008-12-29 2013-03-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device and method of use
US8419748B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2013-04-16 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Helical thrombus removal device
US8613754B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2013-12-24 C. R. Bard, Inc. Tubular filter
US8632562B2 (en) 2005-10-03 2014-01-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US20140094842A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2014-04-03 C.R. Bard Inc. Embolus blood clot filter with floating filter basket
US8795315B2 (en) 2004-10-06 2014-08-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Emboli capturing device having a coil and method for capturing emboli
US8945169B2 (en) 2005-03-15 2015-02-03 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8986283B2 (en) 2011-05-18 2015-03-24 Solo-Dex, Llc Continuous anesthesia nerve conduction apparatus, system and method thereof
US8999364B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2015-04-07 Nanyang Technological University Implantable article, method of forming same and method for reducing thrombogenicity
US9101342B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2015-08-11 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval apparatus and method with semi-rigidly extendable and collapsible basket
US9131999B2 (en) 2005-11-18 2015-09-15 C.R. Bard Inc. Vena cava filter with filament
US9138307B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2015-09-22 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Expandable device for treatment of a stricture in a body vessel
US9204956B2 (en) 2002-02-20 2015-12-08 C. R. Bard, Inc. IVC filter with translating hooks
US9295393B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-03-29 Elwha Llc Embolism deflector
US9326842B2 (en) 2006-06-05 2016-05-03 C. R . Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter utilizable with a single delivery system or a single retrieval system in one of a femoral or jugular access
US9603693B2 (en) 2012-08-10 2017-03-28 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Dual net vascular filtration devices and related systems and methods
US9668654B2 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-06-06 Sundar Rajendran Ultrasound monitored continuous anesthesia nerve conduction apparatus and method by bolus injection
US9901434B2 (en) 2007-02-27 2018-02-27 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device including a Z-stent waist band
US9908143B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2018-03-06 Amaranth Medical Pte. Stent fabrication via tubular casting processes
US9907639B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2018-03-06 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Apparatus and methods for in situ embolic protection
US10022212B2 (en) 2011-01-13 2018-07-17 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Temporary venous filter with anti-coagulant delivery method

Families Citing this family (239)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070203520A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2007-08-30 Dennis Griffin Endovascular filter
US7073504B2 (en) * 1996-12-18 2006-07-11 Ams Research Corporation Contraceptive system and method of use
US20010041900A1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2001-11-15 Ovion, Inc. Occluding device and method of use
DE69830340D1 (en) 1997-02-03 2005-06-30 Angioguard Inc vascular filters
US6991641B2 (en) * 1999-02-12 2006-01-31 Cordis Corporation Low profile vascular filter system
US20020138094A1 (en) * 1999-02-12 2002-09-26 Thomas Borillo Vascular filter system
DE29880158U1 (en) * 1997-11-07 2000-11-30 Salviac Ltd Embolic protection device
US7491216B2 (en) 1997-11-07 2009-02-17 Salviac Limited Filter element with retractable guidewire tip
US20040167567A1 (en) * 2001-03-23 2004-08-26 Cano Gerald G. Method and apparatus for capturing objects beyond an operative site in medical procedures
FR2779340B1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2000-12-29 Delab An implantable intraluminal device
US7044134B2 (en) * 1999-11-08 2006-05-16 Ev3 Sunnyvale, Inc Method of implanting a device in the left atrial appendage
US6267776B1 (en) * 1999-05-03 2001-07-31 O'connell Paul T. Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US6964672B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2005-11-15 Salviac Limited Support frame for an embolic protection device
WO2000067666A1 (en) * 1999-05-07 2000-11-16 Salviac Limited Improved filter element for embolic protection device
US6918921B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2005-07-19 Salviac Limited Support frame for an embolic protection device
JP2002543877A (en) * 1999-05-07 2002-12-24 サルヴィアック・リミテッド The embolic protection device
US6440077B1 (en) * 1999-06-02 2002-08-27 Matthew T. Jung Apparatus and method for the intravascular ultrasound-guided placement of a vena cava filter
US6645152B1 (en) 1999-06-02 2003-11-11 Matthew T. Jung Apparatus for the intravascular ultrasound-guided placement of a vena cava filter
US7229463B2 (en) * 1999-07-30 2007-06-12 Angioguard, Inc. Vascular filter system for cardiopulmonary bypass
US7229462B2 (en) * 1999-07-30 2007-06-12 Angioguard, Inc. Vascular filter system for carotid endarterectomy
US7169187B2 (en) * 1999-12-22 2007-01-30 Ethicon, Inc. Biodegradable stent
US6338739B1 (en) * 1999-12-22 2002-01-15 Ethicon, Inc. Biodegradable stent
US6402771B1 (en) 1999-12-23 2002-06-11 Guidant Endovascular Solutions Snare
US6575997B1 (en) 1999-12-23 2003-06-10 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Embolic basket
US6660021B1 (en) 1999-12-23 2003-12-09 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Intravascular device and system
US6540722B1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2003-04-01 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic protection devices
US6695813B1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2004-02-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic protection devices
US7918820B2 (en) 1999-12-30 2011-04-05 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Device for, and method of, blocking emboli in vessels such as blood arteries
US6342063B1 (en) * 2000-01-26 2002-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Device and method for selectively removing a thrombus filter
US6540767B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2003-04-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Recoilable thrombosis filtering device and method
WO2001062184A3 (en) * 2000-02-23 2002-03-07 Boston Scient Ltd Intravascular filtering devices and methods
US6517573B1 (en) * 2000-04-11 2003-02-11 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Hook for attaching to a corporeal lumen and method of manufacturing
GB0127195D0 (en) * 2000-04-20 2002-01-02 Salviac Ltd An embolic protection system
US6468290B1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2002-10-22 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Two-planar vena cava filter with self-centering capabilities
US6964670B1 (en) 2000-07-13 2005-11-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic protection guide wire
US6599307B1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-07-29 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Filter device for embolic protection systems
US6537294B1 (en) * 2000-10-17 2003-03-25 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Delivery systems for embolic filter devices
US6582447B1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2003-06-24 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US6893451B2 (en) * 2000-11-09 2005-05-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus for capturing objects beyond an operative site utilizing a capture device delivered on a medical guide wire
US6843802B1 (en) * 2000-11-16 2005-01-18 Cordis Corporation Delivery apparatus for a self expanding retractable stent
US6623509B2 (en) 2000-12-14 2003-09-23 Core Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for sealing vascular punctures
US6890343B2 (en) * 2000-12-14 2005-05-10 Ensure Medical, Inc. Plug with detachable guidewire element and methods for use
US6846319B2 (en) * 2000-12-14 2005-01-25 Core Medical, Inc. Devices for sealing openings through tissue and apparatus and methods for delivering them
US6896692B2 (en) 2000-12-14 2005-05-24 Ensure Medical, Inc. Plug with collet and apparatus and method for delivering such plugs
US8083768B2 (en) * 2000-12-14 2011-12-27 Ensure Medical, Inc. Vascular plug having composite construction
US6506203B1 (en) 2000-12-19 2003-01-14 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Low profile sheathless embolic protection system
US6506205B2 (en) 2001-02-20 2003-01-14 Mark Goldberg Blood clot filtering system
US6613077B2 (en) 2001-03-27 2003-09-02 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent with controlled expansion
US7101379B2 (en) * 2001-04-02 2006-09-05 Acmi Corporation Retrieval basket for a surgical device and system and method for manufacturing same
US6645223B2 (en) * 2001-04-30 2003-11-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Deployment and recovery control systems for embolic protection devices
US7211107B2 (en) * 2001-05-07 2007-05-01 Rafael Medical Technologies, Inc. Intravascular platforms and associated devices
FR2824726B1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-09-26 Braun Medical Convertible Filter perfected opening
US6991634B2 (en) * 2001-05-23 2006-01-31 Pentax Corporation Clip device of endoscope
US6929652B1 (en) * 2001-06-01 2005-08-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Delivery and recovery systems having steerability and rapid exchange operating modes for embolic protection systems
JP4294470B2 (en) * 2001-06-14 2009-07-15 クック インコーポレイテッド Intravascular filter
EP1399083A2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2004-03-24 Rex Medical, L.P. Removable vein filter
US8282668B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2012-10-09 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US6793665B2 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-09-21 Rex Medical, L.P. Multiple access vein filter
US6783538B2 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-08-31 Rex Medical, L.P Removable vein filter
US7179275B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2007-02-20 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US6623506B2 (en) 2001-06-18 2003-09-23 Rex Medical, L.P Vein filter
US7338510B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2008-03-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Variable thickness embolic filtering devices and method of manufacturing the same
CN100409818C (en) 2001-07-06 2008-08-13 周 星;王晓白 Reusable temporary thrombus filter
WO2003003948A1 (en) * 2001-07-06 2003-01-16 Tricardia, L.L.C. Anti-arrhythmia devices and methods of use
US20030032941A1 (en) * 2001-08-13 2003-02-13 Boyle William J. Convertible delivery systems for medical devices
US6638294B1 (en) 2001-08-30 2003-10-28 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Self furling umbrella frame for carotid filter
US6592606B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2003-07-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Hinged short cage for an embolic protection device
US6863683B2 (en) 2001-09-19 2005-03-08 Abbott Laboratoris Vascular Entities Limited Cold-molding process for loading a stent onto a stent delivery system
US8262689B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2012-09-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic filtering devices
US6939362B2 (en) * 2001-11-27 2005-09-06 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Offset proximal cage for embolic filtering devices
EP1455686A2 (en) * 2001-12-21 2004-09-15 Salviac Limited A support frame for an embolic protection device
US7241304B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2007-07-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Flexible and conformable embolic filtering devices
US6958074B2 (en) 2002-01-07 2005-10-25 Cordis Corporation Releasable and retrievable vascular filter system
WO2003073961A1 (en) * 2002-03-05 2003-09-12 Salviac Limited System with embolic filter and retracting snare
US7029440B2 (en) * 2002-03-13 2006-04-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Distal protection filter and method of manufacture
US20030187495A1 (en) * 2002-04-01 2003-10-02 Cully Edward H. Endoluminal devices, embolic filters, methods of manufacture and use
DK1494598T3 (en) * 2002-04-15 2009-04-14 Wilson Cook Medical Inc Hemostatic clip device
US6881218B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2005-04-19 Angiodynamics, Inc. Blood clot filter
US8070769B2 (en) * 2002-05-06 2011-12-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Inverted embolic protection filter
US20030220683A1 (en) * 2002-05-22 2003-11-27 Zarouhi Minasian Endoluminal device having barb assembly and method of using same
WO2004000915A3 (en) 2002-06-24 2004-12-09 Univ Tufts Silk biomaterials and methods of use thereof
US6887258B2 (en) * 2002-06-26 2005-05-03 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic filtering devices for bifurcated vessels
US7172614B2 (en) * 2002-06-27 2007-02-06 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Support structures for embolic filtering devices
US7303575B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2007-12-04 Lumen Biomedical, Inc. Embolism protection devices
WO2004024032A1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-03-25 Cook Incorporated Retrievable filter
US20040064099A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2004-04-01 Chiu Jessica G. Intraluminal needle injection substance delivery system with filtering capability
US7331973B2 (en) * 2002-09-30 2008-02-19 Avdanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Guide wire with embolic filtering attachment
US7252675B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2007-08-07 Advanced Cardiovascular, Inc. Embolic filtering devices
US20040093012A1 (en) 2002-10-17 2004-05-13 Cully Edward H. Embolic filter frame having looped support strut elements
US6989021B2 (en) * 2002-10-31 2006-01-24 Cordis Corporation Retrievable medical filter
US20040088000A1 (en) * 2002-10-31 2004-05-06 Muller Paul F. Single-wire expandable cages for embolic filtering devices
EP2345380B1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2018-01-10 Medtronic, Inc. Cardiac valve procedure devices
US20040111110A1 (en) * 2002-12-05 2004-06-10 Melker Richard J Temporary peripheral blood filtration methods to reduce or prevent post-surgery related cognitive dysfunction
WO2004058110A3 (en) * 2002-12-24 2004-11-25 Ovion Inc Contraceptive device and delivery system
WO2004071343A3 (en) * 2003-02-11 2004-09-30 Cook Inc Removable vena cava filter
US20040172055A1 (en) * 2003-02-27 2004-09-02 Huter Scott J. Embolic filtering devices
US8591540B2 (en) 2003-02-27 2013-11-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Embolic filtering devices
US9398967B2 (en) * 2004-03-02 2016-07-26 Syntach Ag Electrical conduction block implant device
EP1605875A3 (en) * 2003-03-03 2005-12-28 Sinus Rhythm Technologies, Inc. Electrical block positioning devices and methods of use therefor
EP1605866B1 (en) 2003-03-03 2016-07-06 Syntach AG Electrical conduction block implant device
US7163550B2 (en) * 2003-03-26 2007-01-16 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Method for manufacturing medical devices from linear elastic materials while maintaining linear elastic properties
CA2562415C (en) 2003-04-10 2015-10-27 Tufts University Concentrated aqueous silk fibroin solutions free of organic solvents and uses thereof
WO2004098511A3 (en) * 2003-05-01 2008-04-03 Sinus Rhythm Technologies Inc Methods and devices for creating electrical block at specific targeted sites in cardia tissue
EP1648340B1 (en) * 2003-05-19 2010-03-03 SeptRx, Inc. Tissue distention device and related methods for therapeutic intervention
US20040249412A1 (en) * 2003-06-04 2004-12-09 Snow Brent W. Apparatus and methods for puncture site closure
CA2530397C (en) * 2003-06-27 2011-12-20 Ovion, Inc. Methods and devices for occluding body lumens and/or for delivering therapeutic agents
US7879062B2 (en) * 2003-07-22 2011-02-01 Lumen Biomedical, Inc. Fiber based embolism protection device
US8048042B2 (en) * 2003-07-22 2011-11-01 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Medical articles incorporating surface capillary fiber
US20050049669A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Jones Donald K. Self-expanding stent and stent delivery system with distal protection
US20050049670A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Jones Donald K. Self-expanding stent and stent delivery system for treatment of vascular disease
US20050049668A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Jones Donald K. Self-expanding stent and stent delivery system for treatment of vascular stenosis
US20050055045A1 (en) * 2003-09-10 2005-03-10 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Composite medical devices
US7192435B2 (en) * 2003-09-18 2007-03-20 Cardia, Inc. Self centering closure device for septal occlusion
US8852229B2 (en) * 2003-10-17 2014-10-07 Cordis Corporation Locator and closure device and method of use
US7361183B2 (en) 2003-10-17 2008-04-22 Ensure Medical, Inc. Locator and delivery device and method of use
US7266414B2 (en) * 2003-10-24 2007-09-04 Syntach, Ag Methods and devices for creating electrical block at specific sites in cardiac tissue with targeted tissue ablation
US7892251B1 (en) 2003-11-12 2011-02-22 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Component for delivering and locking a medical device to a guide wire
US7056286B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2006-06-06 Adrian Ravenscroft Medical device anchor and delivery system
RU2372052C2 (en) * 2003-11-17 2009-11-10 Зинтах Аг Device, kit and method for treating disturbances of heart rhythm regulation system
US20050149109A1 (en) * 2003-12-23 2005-07-07 Wallace Michael P. Expanding filler coil
WO2005070186A3 (en) * 2004-01-14 2007-12-13 Univ Texas Filtering devices
US8211140B2 (en) 2004-01-22 2012-07-03 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US7704266B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2010-04-27 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US8500774B2 (en) 2004-01-22 2013-08-06 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US8162972B2 (en) 2004-01-22 2012-04-24 Rex Medical, Lp Vein filter
US8062326B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2011-11-22 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US20110208233A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2011-08-25 Mcguckin Jr James F Device for preventing clot migration from left atrial appendage
US9510929B2 (en) 2004-01-22 2016-12-06 Argon Medical Devices, Inc. Vein filter
US7976562B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2011-07-12 Rex Medical, L.P. Method of removing a vein filter
US7338512B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2008-03-04 Rex Medical, L.P. Vein filter
US10076401B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2018-09-18 Argon Medical Devices, Inc. Vein filter
US9713549B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2017-07-25 Bayer Healthcare Llc Contraceptive with permeable and impermeable components
CN101627938B (en) * 2004-02-02 2011-12-21 孕体有限公司 Contraceptives with the permeable and impermeable components
WO2005077303A3 (en) * 2004-02-09 2005-12-01 Us Gov Health & Human Serv Venous filter with detachable fixation members and a venous filter with adjustable biodegradability
US7323003B2 (en) * 2004-02-13 2008-01-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Centering intravascular filters and devices and methods for deploying and retrieving intravascular filters
US7678129B1 (en) 2004-03-19 2010-03-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Locking component for an embolic filter assembly
EP1740133A2 (en) * 2004-04-28 2007-01-10 AMS Research Corporation Endoscopic delivery of medical devices
US8998944B2 (en) * 2004-06-10 2015-04-07 Lifescreen Sciences Llc Invertible intravascular filter
DK1799147T3 (en) * 2004-09-20 2012-05-14 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Antitrombe filter having improved identification properties
JP5086080B2 (en) 2004-09-27 2012-11-28 レックス メディカル リミテッド パートナーシップ Vascular filter
WO2006042246A3 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-11-30 Richard Cornelius Two-stage scar generation for treating atrial fibrillation
US7959645B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-06-14 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Retrievable vena cava filter
US20060149312A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Edward Arguello Distal protection device with improved wall apposition
WO2006074163A3 (en) 2005-01-03 2006-08-31 Crux Biomedical Inc Retrievable endoluminal filter
US8029529B1 (en) 2005-01-19 2011-10-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Retrievable filter
US20060190024A1 (en) * 2005-02-24 2006-08-24 Bei Nianjiong Recovery catheter apparatus and method
US7785291B2 (en) 2005-03-01 2010-08-31 Tulip Medical Ltd. Bioerodible self-deployable intragastric implants
US7998164B2 (en) * 2005-03-11 2011-08-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Intravascular filter with centering member
US20060224175A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Vrba Anthony C Methods and apparatuses for disposition of a medical device onto an elongate medical device
US9259305B2 (en) 2005-03-31 2016-02-16 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Guide wire locking mechanism for rapid exchange and other catheter systems
US8961585B2 (en) 2005-04-25 2015-02-24 Covidien Lp Controlled fracture connections for stents
US8025668B2 (en) * 2005-04-28 2011-09-27 C. R. Bard, Inc. Medical device removal system
US20060259132A1 (en) * 2005-05-02 2006-11-16 Cook Incorporated Vascular stent for embolic protection
US8926654B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2015-01-06 Cordis Corporation Locator and closure device and method of use
US8088144B2 (en) * 2005-05-04 2012-01-03 Ensure Medical, Inc. Locator and closure device and method of use
US7967747B2 (en) * 2005-05-10 2011-06-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Filtering apparatus and methods of use
DK1895933T3 (en) * 2005-06-08 2010-02-15 Imv Technologies A device for collection of animal semen, said device can be adapted to an artificial vagina
CA2609800A1 (en) * 2005-07-19 2007-01-25 Stout Medical Group L.P. Embolic filtering method and apparatus
US20070088382A1 (en) * 2005-10-13 2007-04-19 Bei Nianjiong J Embolic protection recovery catheter assembly
US20070100372A1 (en) * 2005-11-02 2007-05-03 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device having a filter
JP2009519049A (en) * 2005-12-02 2009-05-14 シー・アール・バード・インコーポレイテツド Spiral vena cava filter
CA2633848A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2007-07-12 C.R. Bard Inc. Embolus blood clot filter with post delivery actuation
CA2633866A1 (en) 2005-12-30 2007-07-12 C.R. Bard Inc. Embolus blood clot filter removal system and method
US8317818B2 (en) * 2005-12-30 2012-11-27 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removable blood clot filter with edge for cutting through the endothelium
EP1965851A2 (en) * 2005-12-30 2008-09-10 C.R.Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter delivery system
US9107733B2 (en) * 2006-01-13 2015-08-18 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Removable blood conduit filter
CA2631295A1 (en) * 2006-01-20 2007-07-26 Angiodynamics, Inc. Retrievable blood clot filter
JP5175833B2 (en) * 2006-03-10 2013-04-03 クック メディカル テクノロジーズ エルエルシーCook Medical Technologies Llc Medical device is drawn a target tissue in the clip arm receiving chamber
US8235047B2 (en) * 2006-03-30 2012-08-07 Conceptus, Inc. Methods and devices for deployment into a lumen
US7846175B2 (en) * 2006-04-03 2010-12-07 Medrad, Inc. Guidewire and collapsable filter system
CA2654004C (en) * 2006-06-01 2012-01-10 Wilson-Cook Medical, Inc. Release mechanisms for a clip device
US8333000B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2012-12-18 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods for improving stent retention on a balloon catheter
US8425412B2 (en) * 2006-07-14 2013-04-23 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Papilla spreader
US8647349B2 (en) 2006-10-18 2014-02-11 Hologic, Inc. Systems for performing gynecological procedures with mechanical distension
US9392935B2 (en) 2006-11-07 2016-07-19 Hologic, Inc. Methods for performing a medical procedure
DE602007009915D1 (en) * 2006-11-20 2010-12-02 Septrx Inc A device for preventing the unwanted flow of the Embolis from the veins to the arteries
US8152822B2 (en) * 2006-12-05 2012-04-10 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Combination therapy hemostatic clip
EP1958598A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-20 Universität Zürich Growable tubular support implant
JP2010522583A (en) 2007-02-27 2010-07-08 トラスティーズ オブ タフツ カレッジ Tissue engineering-produced silk organs
US9095366B2 (en) 2007-04-06 2015-08-04 Hologic, Inc. Tissue cutter with differential hardness
US20090270895A1 (en) 2007-04-06 2009-10-29 Interlace Medical, Inc. Low advance ratio, high reciprocation rate tissue removal device
EP2150181A1 (en) * 2007-05-31 2010-02-10 Rex Medical, L.P. Closure device for left atrial appendage
US8216209B2 (en) 2007-05-31 2012-07-10 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method and apparatus for delivering an agent to a kidney
US9017362B2 (en) * 2007-06-13 2015-04-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Occluding device
US7867273B2 (en) 2007-06-27 2011-01-11 Abbott Laboratories Endoprostheses for peripheral arteries and other body vessels
US20090024138A1 (en) * 2007-07-18 2009-01-22 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval device radially deployable from collapsed position to a snare or cauterization loop
US9808557B2 (en) 2007-08-10 2017-11-07 Trustees Of Tufts College Tubular silk compositions and methods of use thereof
US20090259280A1 (en) * 2007-10-15 2009-10-15 Kevin Wilkin Electrical stimulation lead with bioerodible anchors and anchor straps
US9668848B2 (en) * 2007-11-02 2017-06-06 Argon Medical Devices, Inc. Method of inserting a vein filter
US20090149946A1 (en) * 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Cook Incorporated Stent having at least one barb and methods of manufacture
US20090187211A1 (en) * 2007-12-21 2009-07-23 Abbott Laboratories Vena cava filter having hourglass shape
US8206412B2 (en) * 2008-06-23 2012-06-26 Lumen Biomedical, Inc. Embolic protection during percutaneous heart valve replacement and similar procedures
DE102008031299B4 (en) * 2008-07-02 2014-10-30 Acandis Gmbh & Co. Kg Filter for a blood vessel
US20100016881A1 (en) * 2008-07-16 2010-01-21 Cook Incorporated Biodegradable filter
US8025675B2 (en) * 2008-08-14 2011-09-27 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Temporary filter device
EP2349023B1 (en) * 2008-11-26 2017-03-15 Cook Medical Technologies LLC Vascular occlusion device
EP2668934B1 (en) 2008-12-12 2017-05-10 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises Limited Process for loading a stent onto a stent delivery system
US20120035647A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2012-02-09 Rainer Bregulla Body lumen filters with large surface area anchors
US9504551B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2016-11-29 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises Limited Apparatus for filtering a body lumen
US9060849B2 (en) * 2008-12-17 2015-06-23 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises Limited Implantable lumen filter with enhanced durability
US9326843B2 (en) 2009-01-16 2016-05-03 Claret Medical, Inc. Intravascular blood filters and methods of use
EP2480165B1 (en) 2009-09-21 2017-08-23 Claret Medical, Inc. Intravascular blood filters
US20100211094A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 Cook Incorporated Umbrella distal embolic protection device
US9060891B2 (en) 2009-04-07 2015-06-23 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Implantable temporary flow restrictor device
US8888836B2 (en) * 2009-04-07 2014-11-18 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Implantable temporary flow restrictor device
US20100274277A1 (en) * 2009-04-27 2010-10-28 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device with maximized flow-through
US8052737B2 (en) * 2009-05-05 2011-11-08 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Implantable temporary flow restrictor device
US8753370B2 (en) * 2009-07-27 2014-06-17 Claret Medical, Inc. Dual endovascular filter and methods of use
US20110106234A1 (en) * 2009-10-30 2011-05-05 Axel Grandt Interluminal medical treatment devices and methods
US9649211B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2017-05-16 Confluent Medical Technologies, Inc. Alternating circumferential bridge stent design and methods for use thereof
WO2011088090A1 (en) * 2010-01-12 2011-07-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Visual stabilizer on anchor legs of vena cava filter
US8926681B2 (en) * 2010-01-28 2015-01-06 Covidien Lp Vascular remodeling device
WO2011097402A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Stryker Nv Operations Limited Multimode occlusion and stenosis treatment apparatus and method of use
EP2637577B1 (en) 2010-11-09 2017-10-18 Cook Medical Technologies LLC Clip system having tether segments for closure
US9055997B2 (en) 2010-12-30 2015-06-16 Claret Medical, Inc. Method of isolating the cerebral circulation during a cardiac procedure
CA2828480A1 (en) * 2011-02-28 2012-09-07 Adient Medical, Inc. Absorbable vascular filter
US9364255B2 (en) 2011-11-09 2016-06-14 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical cutting devices and methods of use
EP2805515A4 (en) 2012-01-17 2015-08-26 Lumen Biomedical Inc Aortic arch filtration system for carotid artery protection
US20130197297A1 (en) * 2012-01-27 2013-08-01 Kurt J. Tekulve Magnetic clot disrupter
US9061088B2 (en) * 2012-02-02 2015-06-23 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Guide wire core wire made from a substantially titanium-free alloy for enhanced guide wire steering response
EP2827884A4 (en) 2012-03-20 2015-09-16 Tufts College Silk reservoirs for drug delivery
JP2015512944A (en) 2012-04-13 2015-04-30 トラスティーズ・オブ・タフツ・カレッジTrustees Of Tufts College Methods and compositions for the preparation of a silk microspheres
WO2014002088A1 (en) * 2012-06-26 2014-01-03 V.V.T. Med Ltd. Biodegradable blood vessel occlusion and narrowing
US10034945B2 (en) 2012-07-13 2018-07-31 Trustees Of Tufts College Silk powder compaction for production of constructs with high mechanical strength and stiffness
US9308007B2 (en) 2012-08-14 2016-04-12 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Devices and systems for thrombus treatment
US10076398B2 (en) * 2012-12-27 2018-09-18 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Biodegradable filter
US9636485B2 (en) 2013-01-17 2017-05-02 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods for counteracting rebounding effects during solid state resistance welding of dissimilar materials
WO2014140088A3 (en) * 2013-03-15 2015-02-12 Novate Medical Limited A vascular filter device
US9345564B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-05-24 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter having primary and secondary struts
US20160046679A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-02-18 Trustees Of Tufts College Low molecular weight silk compositions and stabilizing silk compositions
JP5738926B2 (en) * 2013-06-05 2015-06-24 クック・メディカル・テクノロジーズ・リミテッド・ライアビリティ・カンパニーCook Medical Technologies Llc Blood filter
US10004512B2 (en) * 2014-01-29 2018-06-26 Cook Biotech Incorporated Occlusion device and method of use thereof
US9289280B2 (en) * 2014-06-19 2016-03-22 The Regents Of The University Of California Bidirectional vascular filter and method of use
GB201418873D0 (en) * 2014-10-23 2014-12-03 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Implantable medical device exhibiting diminishing radical force
US9566144B2 (en) 2015-04-22 2017-02-14 Claret Medical, Inc. Vascular filters, deflectors, and methods
CN106491238A (en) * 2015-09-07 2017-03-15 微创心脉医疗科技(上海)有限公司 Filtering device
CN106491239A (en) * 2015-09-08 2017-03-15 微创心脉医疗科技(上海)有限公司 Filter device
GB201518450D0 (en) * 2015-10-19 2015-12-02 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Biodegradable vascular filter
GB201612653D0 (en) 2016-07-21 2016-09-07 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Implantable medical device and method

Citations (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US344141A (en) * 1886-06-22 Drain-tile protector
US2281448A (en) * 1941-09-17 1942-04-28 Scully Signal Co Device for partially obstructing pipes
US3334629A (en) * 1964-11-09 1967-08-08 Bertram D Cohn Occlusive device for inferior vena cava
US3540431A (en) * 1968-04-04 1970-11-17 Kazi Mobin Uddin Collapsible filter for fluid flowing in closed passageway
US3868956A (en) * 1972-06-05 1975-03-04 Ralph J Alfidi Vessel implantable appliance and method of implanting it
US3952747A (en) * 1974-03-28 1976-04-27 Kimmell Jr Garman O Filter and filter insertion instrument
US4425908A (en) * 1981-10-22 1984-01-17 Beth Israel Hospital Blood clot filter
US4494531A (en) * 1982-12-06 1985-01-22 Cook, Incorporated Expandable blood clot filter
US4643184A (en) * 1982-09-29 1987-02-17 Mobin Uddin Kazi Embolus trap
US4657543A (en) * 1984-07-23 1987-04-14 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Ultrasonically modulated polymeric devices for delivering compositions
US4688553A (en) * 1984-11-29 1987-08-25 L. G. Medical S.A. Filter, particularly for trapping blood clots
US4727873A (en) * 1984-04-17 1988-03-01 Mobin Uddin Kazi Embolus trap
US4781177A (en) * 1986-11-17 1988-11-01 Promed Blood clots filtering device
US4817600A (en) * 1987-05-22 1989-04-04 Medi-Tech, Inc. Implantable filter
US4832055A (en) * 1988-07-08 1989-05-23 Palestrant Aubrey M Mechanically locking blood clot filter
US4873978A (en) * 1987-12-04 1989-10-17 Robert Ginsburg Device and method for emboli retrieval
US4990156A (en) * 1988-06-21 1991-02-05 Lefebvre Jean Marie Filter for medical use
US5035706A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-07-30 Cook Incorporated Percutaneous stent and method for retrieval thereof
US5059205A (en) * 1989-09-07 1991-10-22 Boston Scientific Corporation Percutaneous anti-migration vena cava filter
US5108418A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-04-28 Lefebvre Jean Marie Device implanted in a vessel with lateral legs provided with antagonistically oriented teeth
US5133733A (en) * 1989-11-28 1992-07-28 William Cook Europe A/S Collapsible filter for introduction in a blood vessel of a patient
US5152777A (en) * 1989-01-25 1992-10-06 Uresil Corporation Device and method for providing protection from emboli and preventing occulsion of blood vessels
US5160342A (en) * 1990-08-16 1992-11-03 Evi Corp. Endovascular filter and method for use thereof
US5242462A (en) * 1989-09-07 1993-09-07 Boston Scientific Corp. Percutaneous anti-migration vena cava filter
US5324304A (en) * 1992-06-18 1994-06-28 William Cook Europe A/S Introduction catheter set for a collapsible self-expandable implant
US5344427A (en) * 1992-08-07 1994-09-06 Celsa L.G. (Societe Anonyme) Filter with triangular fingers
US5370657A (en) * 1993-03-26 1994-12-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Recoverable thrombosis filter
US5375612A (en) * 1992-04-07 1994-12-27 B. Braun Celsa Possibly absorbable blood filter
US5383887A (en) * 1992-12-28 1995-01-24 Celsa Lg Device for selectively forming a temporary blood filter
US5415630A (en) * 1991-07-17 1995-05-16 Gory; Pierre Method for removably implanting a blood filter in a vein of the human body
US5443478A (en) * 1992-09-02 1995-08-22 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Multi-element intravascular occlusion device
US5484424A (en) * 1992-11-19 1996-01-16 Celsa L.G. (Societe Anonyme) Blood filtering device having a catheter with longitudinally variable rigidity
US5514154A (en) * 1991-10-28 1996-05-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable stents
US5527338A (en) * 1992-09-02 1996-06-18 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Intravascular device
US5540680A (en) * 1990-03-13 1996-07-30 The Regents Of The University Of California Endovascular electrolytically detachable wire and tip for the formation of thrombus in arteries, veins, aneurysms, vascular malformations and arteriovenous fistulas
US5601595A (en) * 1994-10-25 1997-02-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Remobable thrombus filter
US5618563A (en) * 1992-09-10 1997-04-08 Children's Medical Center Corporation Biodegradable polymer matrices for sustained delivery of local anesthetic agents
US5624449A (en) * 1993-11-03 1997-04-29 Target Therapeutics Electrolytically severable joint for endovascular embolic devices
US5630801A (en) * 1993-10-05 1997-05-20 B. Braun Celsa Device for implanting a medical prosthesis in a duct of a human or animal body
US5634942A (en) * 1994-04-21 1997-06-03 B. Braun Celsa Assembly comprising a blood filter for temporary or definitive use and a device for implanting it
US5669905A (en) * 1994-03-03 1997-09-23 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Endovascular embolic device detachment detection method and apparatus
US5670161A (en) * 1996-05-28 1997-09-23 Healy; Kevin E. Biodegradable stent
US5713853A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-02-03 Interventional Innovations Corporation Methods for treating thrombosis
US5725550A (en) * 1995-08-10 1998-03-10 B. Braun Celsa (Societe Anonyme) Filtration unit for retaining blood clots
US5743905A (en) * 1995-07-07 1998-04-28 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Partially insulated occlusion device
US5755790A (en) * 1995-04-14 1998-05-26 B. Braun Celsa Intraluminal medical device
US5792400A (en) * 1988-11-10 1998-08-11 Biocon Oy Method of manufacturing biodegradable surgical implants and devices
US5800457A (en) * 1997-03-05 1998-09-01 Gelbfish; Gary A. Intravascular filter and associated methodology
US5810874A (en) * 1996-02-22 1998-09-22 Cordis Corporation Temporary filter catheter
US5836969A (en) * 1993-10-01 1998-11-17 Boston Scientific Corporation Vena cava filter
US5836968A (en) * 1996-07-17 1998-11-17 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US5843118A (en) * 1995-12-04 1998-12-01 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Fibered micro vaso-occlusive devices
US5853420A (en) * 1994-04-21 1998-12-29 B. Braun Celsa Assembly comprising a blood filter for temporary or definitive use and device for implanting it, corresponding filter and method of implanting such a filter
US5893869A (en) * 1997-02-19 1999-04-13 University Of Iowa Research Foundation Retrievable inferior vena cava filter system and method for use thereof
US5911734A (en) * 1997-05-08 1999-06-15 Embol-X, Inc. Percutaneous catheter and guidewire having filter and medical device deployment capabilities
US6007558A (en) * 1998-09-25 1999-12-28 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US6102932A (en) * 1998-12-15 2000-08-15 Micrus Corporation Intravascular device push wire delivery system
US6214025B1 (en) * 1994-11-30 2001-04-10 Boston Scientific Corporation Self-centering, self-expanding and retrievable vena cava filter
US6241766B1 (en) * 1998-10-29 2001-06-05 Allergan Sales, Inc. Intraocular lenses made from polymeric compositions
US6241746B1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2001-06-05 Cordis Corporation Vascular filter convertible to a stent and method
US6267776B1 (en) * 1999-05-03 2001-07-31 O'connell Paul T. Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US6306163B1 (en) * 1998-08-04 2001-10-23 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Assembly for collecting emboli and method of use
US6342062B1 (en) * 1998-09-24 2002-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Retrieval devices for vena cava filter
US6342063B1 (en) * 2000-01-26 2002-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Device and method for selectively removing a thrombus filter
US6391044B1 (en) * 1997-02-03 2002-05-21 Angioguard, Inc. Vascular filter system
US6540767B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2003-04-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Recoilable thrombosis filtering device and method
US6582447B1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2003-06-24 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US6702834B1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2004-03-09 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic protection devices
US20050015974A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2005-01-27 Kris Frutschy Bridge clip with reinforced stiffener
US6881218B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2005-04-19 Angiodynamics, Inc. Blood clot filter
US20050159771A1 (en) * 2004-01-20 2005-07-21 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Retrievable blood clot filter with retractable anchoring members
US6972030B2 (en) * 2002-09-17 2005-12-06 Lee Don W Stent with combined distal protection device
US20060015137A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-01-19 Wasdyke Joel M Retrievable intravascular filter with bendable anchoring members

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2718950B1 (en) 1994-04-21 1997-02-07
FR2768326B1 (en) 1997-09-18 1999-10-22 De Bearn Olivier Despalle Temporary blood filter
US6171327B1 (en) 1999-02-24 2001-01-09 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Intravascular filter and method
US6080178A (en) * 1999-04-20 2000-06-27 Meglin; Allen J. Vena cava filter

Patent Citations (83)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US344141A (en) * 1886-06-22 Drain-tile protector
US2281448A (en) * 1941-09-17 1942-04-28 Scully Signal Co Device for partially obstructing pipes
US3334629A (en) * 1964-11-09 1967-08-08 Bertram D Cohn Occlusive device for inferior vena cava
US3540431A (en) * 1968-04-04 1970-11-17 Kazi Mobin Uddin Collapsible filter for fluid flowing in closed passageway
US3868956A (en) * 1972-06-05 1975-03-04 Ralph J Alfidi Vessel implantable appliance and method of implanting it
US3952747A (en) * 1974-03-28 1976-04-27 Kimmell Jr Garman O Filter and filter insertion instrument
US4425908A (en) * 1981-10-22 1984-01-17 Beth Israel Hospital Blood clot filter
US4643184A (en) * 1982-09-29 1987-02-17 Mobin Uddin Kazi Embolus trap
US4494531A (en) * 1982-12-06 1985-01-22 Cook, Incorporated Expandable blood clot filter
US4727873A (en) * 1984-04-17 1988-03-01 Mobin Uddin Kazi Embolus trap
US4657543A (en) * 1984-07-23 1987-04-14 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Ultrasonically modulated polymeric devices for delivering compositions
US4688553A (en) * 1984-11-29 1987-08-25 L. G. Medical S.A. Filter, particularly for trapping blood clots
US4781177A (en) * 1986-11-17 1988-11-01 Promed Blood clots filtering device
US4817600A (en) * 1987-05-22 1989-04-04 Medi-Tech, Inc. Implantable filter
US4873978A (en) * 1987-12-04 1989-10-17 Robert Ginsburg Device and method for emboli retrieval
US4990156A (en) * 1988-06-21 1991-02-05 Lefebvre Jean Marie Filter for medical use
US4832055A (en) * 1988-07-08 1989-05-23 Palestrant Aubrey M Mechanically locking blood clot filter
US5792400A (en) * 1988-11-10 1998-08-11 Biocon Oy Method of manufacturing biodegradable surgical implants and devices
US5152777A (en) * 1989-01-25 1992-10-06 Uresil Corporation Device and method for providing protection from emboli and preventing occulsion of blood vessels
US5059205A (en) * 1989-09-07 1991-10-22 Boston Scientific Corporation Percutaneous anti-migration vena cava filter
US5242462A (en) * 1989-09-07 1993-09-07 Boston Scientific Corp. Percutaneous anti-migration vena cava filter
US5035706A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-07-30 Cook Incorporated Percutaneous stent and method for retrieval thereof
US5133733A (en) * 1989-11-28 1992-07-28 William Cook Europe A/S Collapsible filter for introduction in a blood vessel of a patient
US5540680A (en) * 1990-03-13 1996-07-30 The Regents Of The University Of California Endovascular electrolytically detachable wire and tip for the formation of thrombus in arteries, veins, aneurysms, vascular malformations and arteriovenous fistulas
US5108418A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-04-28 Lefebvre Jean Marie Device implanted in a vessel with lateral legs provided with antagonistically oriented teeth
US5160342A (en) * 1990-08-16 1992-11-03 Evi Corp. Endovascular filter and method for use thereof
US5415630A (en) * 1991-07-17 1995-05-16 Gory; Pierre Method for removably implanting a blood filter in a vein of the human body
US5514154A (en) * 1991-10-28 1996-05-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable stents
US5626605A (en) * 1991-12-30 1997-05-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Thrombosis filter
US5375612A (en) * 1992-04-07 1994-12-27 B. Braun Celsa Possibly absorbable blood filter
US5324304A (en) * 1992-06-18 1994-06-28 William Cook Europe A/S Introduction catheter set for a collapsible self-expandable implant
US5344427A (en) * 1992-08-07 1994-09-06 Celsa L.G. (Societe Anonyme) Filter with triangular fingers
US5693067A (en) * 1992-09-02 1997-12-02 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Intravascular device
US5527338A (en) * 1992-09-02 1996-06-18 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Intravascular device
US5443478A (en) * 1992-09-02 1995-08-22 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Multi-element intravascular occlusion device
US5618563A (en) * 1992-09-10 1997-04-08 Children's Medical Center Corporation Biodegradable polymer matrices for sustained delivery of local anesthetic agents
US5484424A (en) * 1992-11-19 1996-01-16 Celsa L.G. (Societe Anonyme) Blood filtering device having a catheter with longitudinally variable rigidity
US5383887A (en) * 1992-12-28 1995-01-24 Celsa Lg Device for selectively forming a temporary blood filter
US5370657A (en) * 1993-03-26 1994-12-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Recoverable thrombosis filter
US5836969A (en) * 1993-10-01 1998-11-17 Boston Scientific Corporation Vena cava filter
US5630801A (en) * 1993-10-05 1997-05-20 B. Braun Celsa Device for implanting a medical prosthesis in a duct of a human or animal body
US5624449A (en) * 1993-11-03 1997-04-29 Target Therapeutics Electrolytically severable joint for endovascular embolic devices
US5669905A (en) * 1994-03-03 1997-09-23 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Endovascular embolic device detachment detection method and apparatus
US5853420A (en) * 1994-04-21 1998-12-29 B. Braun Celsa Assembly comprising a blood filter for temporary or definitive use and device for implanting it, corresponding filter and method of implanting such a filter
US5634942A (en) * 1994-04-21 1997-06-03 B. Braun Celsa Assembly comprising a blood filter for temporary or definitive use and a device for implanting it
US5746767A (en) * 1994-10-25 1998-05-05 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Removable thrombus filter
US5601595A (en) * 1994-10-25 1997-02-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Remobable thrombus filter
US6214025B1 (en) * 1994-11-30 2001-04-10 Boston Scientific Corporation Self-centering, self-expanding and retrievable vena cava filter
US5755790A (en) * 1995-04-14 1998-05-26 B. Braun Celsa Intraluminal medical device
US5713853A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-02-03 Interventional Innovations Corporation Methods for treating thrombosis
US5743905A (en) * 1995-07-07 1998-04-28 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Partially insulated occlusion device
US5725550A (en) * 1995-08-10 1998-03-10 B. Braun Celsa (Societe Anonyme) Filtration unit for retaining blood clots
US5843118A (en) * 1995-12-04 1998-12-01 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Fibered micro vaso-occlusive devices
US5810874A (en) * 1996-02-22 1998-09-22 Cordis Corporation Temporary filter catheter
US5670161A (en) * 1996-05-28 1997-09-23 Healy; Kevin E. Biodegradable stent
US5836968A (en) * 1996-07-17 1998-11-17 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US6391044B1 (en) * 1997-02-03 2002-05-21 Angioguard, Inc. Vascular filter system
US5893869A (en) * 1997-02-19 1999-04-13 University Of Iowa Research Foundation Retrievable inferior vena cava filter system and method for use thereof
US5800457A (en) * 1997-03-05 1998-09-01 Gelbfish; Gary A. Intravascular filter and associated methodology
US5911734A (en) * 1997-05-08 1999-06-15 Embol-X, Inc. Percutaneous catheter and guidewire having filter and medical device deployment capabilities
US6042598A (en) * 1997-05-08 2000-03-28 Embol-X Inc. Method of protecting a patient from embolization during cardiac surgery
US6267777B1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2001-07-31 Cordis Corporation Vascular filter convertible to a stent and method
US6241746B1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2001-06-05 Cordis Corporation Vascular filter convertible to a stent and method
US6306163B1 (en) * 1998-08-04 2001-10-23 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Assembly for collecting emboli and method of use
US6342062B1 (en) * 1998-09-24 2002-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Retrieval devices for vena cava filter
US6258026B1 (en) * 1998-09-25 2001-07-10 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US6007558A (en) * 1998-09-25 1999-12-28 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US6241766B1 (en) * 1998-10-29 2001-06-05 Allergan Sales, Inc. Intraocular lenses made from polymeric compositions
US6102932A (en) * 1998-12-15 2000-08-15 Micrus Corporation Intravascular device push wire delivery system
US6267776B1 (en) * 1999-05-03 2001-07-31 O'connell Paul T. Vena cava filter and method for treating pulmonary embolism
US6517559B1 (en) * 1999-05-03 2003-02-11 O'connell Paul T. Blood filter and method for treating vascular disease
US6702834B1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2004-03-09 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Embolic protection devices
US6342063B1 (en) * 2000-01-26 2002-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Device and method for selectively removing a thrombus filter
US6540767B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2003-04-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Recoilable thrombosis filtering device and method
US6652558B2 (en) * 2000-10-20 2003-11-25 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US6932832B2 (en) * 2000-10-20 2005-08-23 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US6582447B1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2003-06-24 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US7001424B2 (en) * 2000-10-20 2006-02-21 Angiodynamics, Inc. Convertible blood clot filter
US6881218B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2005-04-19 Angiodynamics, Inc. Blood clot filter
US6972030B2 (en) * 2002-09-17 2005-12-06 Lee Don W Stent with combined distal protection device
US20050015974A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2005-01-27 Kris Frutschy Bridge clip with reinforced stiffener
US20050159771A1 (en) * 2004-01-20 2005-07-21 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Retrievable blood clot filter with retractable anchoring members
US20060015137A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-01-19 Wasdyke Joel M Retrievable intravascular filter with bendable anchoring members

Cited By (117)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9615909B2 (en) 1998-09-25 2017-04-11 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US9351821B2 (en) 1998-09-25 2016-05-31 C. R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US8133251B2 (en) 1998-09-25 2012-03-13 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removeable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US8690906B2 (en) 1998-09-25 2014-04-08 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removeable embolus blood clot filter and filter delivery unit
US9204956B2 (en) 2002-02-20 2015-12-08 C. R. Bard, Inc. IVC filter with translating hooks
US20050234504A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-10-20 Wasdyke Joel M Intravascular filter with bioabsorbable centering element
US6972025B2 (en) 2003-11-18 2005-12-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Intravascular filter with bioabsorbable centering element
US20050107822A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-05-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Intravascular filter with bioabsorbable centering element
US7575584B2 (en) 2003-11-18 2009-08-18 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Intravascular filter with bioabsorbable centering element
US8246651B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2012-08-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter for reduced trauma in collapsed configuration
US7699867B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2010-04-20 Cook Incorporated Removable vena cava filter for reduced trauma in collapsed configuration
US8105349B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2012-01-31 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter having primary struts for enhanced retrieval and delivery
US20050267514A1 (en) * 2004-04-16 2005-12-01 Osborne Thomas A Removable vena cava filter
US7972353B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2011-07-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter with anchoring feature for reduced trauma
US8043322B2 (en) 2004-04-16 2011-10-25 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter having inwardly positioned anchoring hooks in collapsed configuration
US8999364B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2015-04-07 Nanyang Technological University Implantable article, method of forming same and method for reducing thrombogenicity
US20060004402A1 (en) * 2004-06-30 2006-01-05 Virgil Voeller Intravascular filter
US8529595B2 (en) * 2004-06-30 2013-09-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Intravascular filter
US7704267B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2010-04-27 C. R. Bard, Inc. Non-entangling vena cava filter
US9144484B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2015-09-29 C. R. Bard, Inc. Non-entangling vena cava filter
US8628556B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2014-01-14 C. R. Bard, Inc. Non-entangling vena cava filter
US8372109B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2013-02-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Non-entangling vena cava filter
US8167901B2 (en) * 2004-09-27 2012-05-01 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter comprising struts having axial bends
US8795315B2 (en) 2004-10-06 2014-08-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Emboli capturing device having a coil and method for capturing emboli
US20060100660A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2006-05-11 Cook Incorporated Blood clot filter configured for a wire guide
US8992562B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2015-03-31 C.R. Bard, Inc. Filter delivery system
US7794473B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2010-09-14 C.R. Bard, Inc. Filter delivery system
US8267954B2 (en) 2005-02-04 2012-09-18 C. R. Bard, Inc. Vascular filter with sensing capability
US8945169B2 (en) 2005-03-15 2015-02-03 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8221446B2 (en) 2005-03-15 2012-07-17 Cook Medical Technologies Embolic protection device
US20070032816A1 (en) * 2005-04-04 2007-02-08 B.Braun Medical Removable Filter Head
US20110106133A1 (en) * 2005-04-04 2011-05-05 B. Braun Medical Sas Removeable filter head
US8734481B2 (en) * 2005-04-04 2014-05-27 B. Braun Medical Sas Removeable filter head
US8613754B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2013-12-24 C. R. Bard, Inc. Tubular filter
US7967838B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2011-06-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US9017367B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2015-04-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Tubular filter
US9498318B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2016-11-22 C.R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US8574261B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2013-11-05 C. R. Bard, Inc. Removable embolus blood clot filter
US7850708B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2010-12-14 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device having a reticulated body with staggered struts
US8845677B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2014-09-30 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Retrievable device having a reticulation portion with staggered struts
US8109962B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2012-02-07 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Retrievable device having a reticulation portion with staggered struts
US7867247B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2011-01-11 Cook Incorporated Methods for embolic protection during treatment of a stenotic lesion in a body vessel
US7771452B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-08-10 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device with a filter bag that disengages from a basket
US7766934B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2010-08-03 Cook Incorporated Embolic protection device with an integral basket and bag
US8187298B2 (en) 2005-08-04 2012-05-29 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device having inflatable frame
US8062327B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2011-11-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter and delivery system
US9387063B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2016-07-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter and delivery system
US8430903B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2013-04-30 C. R. Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter and delivery system
US8377092B2 (en) 2005-09-16 2013-02-19 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8632562B2 (en) 2005-10-03 2014-01-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8182508B2 (en) 2005-10-04 2012-05-22 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device
US8252017B2 (en) 2005-10-18 2012-08-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Invertible filter for embolic protection
US8216269B2 (en) 2005-11-02 2012-07-10 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device having reduced profile
US8152831B2 (en) 2005-11-17 2012-04-10 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Foam embolic protection device
US20070112372A1 (en) * 2005-11-17 2007-05-17 Stephen Sosnowski Biodegradable vascular filter
WO2007061743A1 (en) * 2005-11-17 2007-05-31 Novate Medical Ltd. Biodegradable vascular filter
US9131999B2 (en) 2005-11-18 2015-09-15 C.R. Bard Inc. Vena cava filter with filament
US20090105747A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2009-04-23 C.R. Bard, Inc. Vena Cava Filter with Stent
US20140094842A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2014-04-03 C.R. Bard Inc. Embolus blood clot filter with floating filter basket
US9326842B2 (en) 2006-06-05 2016-05-03 C. R . Bard, Inc. Embolus blood clot filter utilizable with a single delivery system or a single retrieval system in one of a femoral or jugular access
US20080015578A1 (en) * 2006-07-12 2008-01-17 Dave Erickson Orthopedic implants comprising bioabsorbable metal
US8647360B2 (en) 2006-07-19 2014-02-11 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter
US20080027481A1 (en) * 2006-07-19 2008-01-31 Paul Gilson Vascular filter
US8162970B2 (en) 2006-07-19 2012-04-24 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter
US9907639B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2018-03-06 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Apparatus and methods for in situ embolic protection
US9901434B2 (en) 2007-02-27 2018-02-27 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device including a Z-stent waist band
US8528563B2 (en) * 2007-04-06 2013-09-10 Hologic, Inc. Systems, methods and devices for performing gynecological procedures
US20080245371A1 (en) * 2007-04-06 2008-10-09 William Harwick Gruber Systems, methods and devices for performing gynecological procedures
US9301770B2 (en) 2007-04-06 2016-04-05 Hologic, Inc. Systems, methods and devices for performing gynecological procedures
US20080255605A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-16 C.R. Bard, Inc. Migration resistant embolic filter
US8795351B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2014-08-05 C.R. Bard, Inc. Migration resistant embolic filter
US20080294189A1 (en) * 2007-05-23 2008-11-27 Moll Fransiscus L Vein filter
US8142443B2 (en) * 2007-07-18 2012-03-27 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval device radially deployable from a collapsed position to a snare or cauterization loop
US20090024139A1 (en) * 2007-07-18 2009-01-22 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval device radially deployable from a collapsed position to a snare or cauterization loop
US9138307B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2015-09-22 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Expandable device for treatment of a stricture in a body vessel
US8252018B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2012-08-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Helical embolic protection device
US8419748B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2013-04-16 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Helical thrombus removal device
US9398946B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2016-07-26 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Expandable device for treatment of a stricture in a body vessel
US8246672B2 (en) 2007-12-27 2012-08-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Endovascular graft with separately positionable and removable frame units
US8114116B2 (en) 2008-01-18 2012-02-14 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Introduction catheter set for a self-expandable implant
US20090187208A1 (en) * 2008-01-18 2009-07-23 William Cook Europe Aps Introduction catheter set for a self-expandable implant
US8246649B2 (en) * 2008-03-19 2012-08-21 Schneider M Bret Electrostatic vascular filters
US20090248060A1 (en) * 2008-03-19 2009-10-01 Schneider M Bret Electrostatic vascular filters
US9908143B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2018-03-06 Amaranth Medical Pte. Stent fabrication via tubular casting processes
WO2010025775A1 (en) 2008-09-05 2010-03-11 Christoph Andreas Binkert Blood filter
US9017363B2 (en) * 2008-09-05 2015-04-28 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Blood filter
US20110213404A1 (en) * 2008-09-05 2011-09-01 Christoph Andreas Binkert Blood filter
US8246648B2 (en) 2008-11-10 2012-08-21 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Removable vena cava filter with improved leg
US8388644B2 (en) 2008-12-29 2013-03-05 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device and method of use
US8657849B2 (en) 2008-12-29 2014-02-25 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Embolic protection device and method of use
US9833304B2 (en) * 2009-01-16 2017-12-05 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter device
US8821530B2 (en) 2009-01-16 2014-09-02 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter
US8057507B2 (en) 2009-01-16 2011-11-15 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter
US20100228281A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-09-09 Paul Gilson Vascular filter system
US8668713B2 (en) 2009-01-16 2014-03-11 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter device
US20100185229A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan Vascular filter device
US20100185230A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan vascular filter device
US20100185227A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2010-07-22 Steven Horan Vascular filter
US20170340429A1 (en) * 2009-01-16 2017-11-30 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter system
US9763765B2 (en) 2009-01-16 2017-09-19 Novate Medical Limited Vascular filter
US20110301633A1 (en) * 2009-12-04 2011-12-08 Patrick Muck Controlled release mechanism for blood vessel filtration device
WO2011079287A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-30 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible vascular filter devices and methods for using same
CN102811679A (en) * 2009-12-23 2012-12-05 亭阁医疗创新公司 Reversible Vascular Filter Devices And Methods For Using Same
WO2011079285A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-30 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible vascular filter devices and methods for using same
US20110152918A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-23 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible Vascular Filter Devices and Methods for Using Same
US9456888B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2016-10-04 Kaleidoscope Medical, Llc Reversible vascular filter devices and methods for using same
US20110152919A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-23 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible Vascular Filter Devices and Methods for Using Same
US20110224715A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-09-15 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible Vascular Filter Devices and Methods for Using Same
EP2515795A4 (en) * 2009-12-23 2015-06-24 Pavilion Medical Innovations Reversible vascular filter devices and methods for using same
US10022212B2 (en) 2011-01-13 2018-07-17 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Temporary venous filter with anti-coagulant delivery method
US20120277787A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Mitchell Donn Eggers Vascular Filter Stent
US8986283B2 (en) 2011-05-18 2015-03-24 Solo-Dex, Llc Continuous anesthesia nerve conduction apparatus, system and method thereof
US9668654B2 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-06-06 Sundar Rajendran Ultrasound monitored continuous anesthesia nerve conduction apparatus and method by bolus injection
US9101342B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2015-08-11 Rafic Saleh Surgical retrieval apparatus and method with semi-rigidly extendable and collapsible basket
US9603693B2 (en) 2012-08-10 2017-03-28 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Dual net vascular filtration devices and related systems and methods
US9414752B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-08-16 Elwha Llc Embolism deflector
US9295393B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-03-29 Elwha Llc Embolism deflector

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US6517559B1 (en) 2003-02-11 grant
CA2372189C (en) 2008-01-15 grant
EP1175185A1 (en) 2002-01-30 application
WO2000066031A1 (en) 2000-11-09 application
CA2372189A1 (en) 2000-11-09 application
US6267776B1 (en) 2001-07-31 grant
DE60042736D1 (en) 2009-09-24 grant
ES2331404T3 (en) 2010-01-04 grant
JP2002542879A (en) 2002-12-17 application
EP1175185B1 (en) 2009-08-12 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6592616B1 (en) System and device for minimizing embolic risk during an interventional procedure
US6214026B1 (en) Delivery system for a vascular device with articulation region
US6251122B1 (en) Intravascular filter retrieval device and method
US5549626A (en) Vena caval filter
US6540768B1 (en) Vascular filter system
US6887257B2 (en) Vascular embolic filter exchange devices and methods of use thereof
US5941896A (en) Filter and method for trapping emboli during endovascular procedures
US7534251B2 (en) Retrievable IVC filter
US20070088383A1 (en) Embolic protection device
US20100268264A1 (en) Intravascular guidewire filter system for pulmonary embolism protection and embolism removal or maceration
US8029529B1 (en) Retrievable filter
US6589263B1 (en) Vascular device having one or more articulation regions and methods of use
US20080234722A1 (en) Inferior vena cava filter on guidewire
US20090069840A1 (en) Percutaneous permanent retrievable vascular filter
US20060069406A1 (en) Removable vena cava filter comprising struts having axial bends
US6168604B1 (en) Guide wire device for removing solid objects from body canals
US4793348A (en) Balloon expandable vena cava filter to prevent migration of lower extremity venous clots into the pulmonary circulation
US20060015137A1 (en) Retrievable intravascular filter with bendable anchoring members
US20070088381A1 (en) Vein filter
US7704266B2 (en) Vein filter
US7338512B2 (en) Vein filter
US20030208227A1 (en) Temporary vascular filters and methods
US6391044B1 (en) Vascular filter system
US7329269B2 (en) Intravascular filtering devices and methods
US20030018354A1 (en) Integral vascular filter system with core wire activation