US20030155328A1 - Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same - Google Patents

Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030155328A1
US20030155328A1 US10/076,467 US7646702A US2003155328A1 US 20030155328 A1 US20030155328 A1 US 20030155328A1 US 7646702 A US7646702 A US 7646702A US 2003155328 A1 US2003155328 A1 US 2003155328A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
substrate
laser beam
method
laser
assist gas
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/076,467
Inventor
Mark Huth
Jeffrey Pollard
Graeme Scott
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Hewlett Packard Development Co LP
Original Assignee
Hewlett Packard Development Co LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Hewlett Packard Development Co LP filed Critical Hewlett Packard Development Co LP
Priority to US10/076,467 priority Critical patent/US20030155328A1/en
Assigned to HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY reassignment HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HUTH, MARK, POLLARD, JEFFREY R., SCOTT, GRAEME
Assigned to HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P. reassignment HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY
Publication of US20030155328A1 publication Critical patent/US20030155328A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/12Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring in a special atmosphere, e.g. in an enclosure
    • B23K26/123Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring in a special atmosphere, e.g. in an enclosure in an atmosphere of particular gases
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/12Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring in a special atmosphere, e.g. in an enclosure
    • B23K26/123Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring in a special atmosphere, e.g. in an enclosure in an atmosphere of particular gases
    • B23K26/125Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring in a special atmosphere, e.g. in an enclosure in an atmosphere of particular gases of mixed gases
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/14Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring using a fluid stream, e.g. a jet of gas, in conjunction with the laser beam; Nozzles therefor
    • B23K26/142Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring using a fluid stream, e.g. a jet of gas, in conjunction with the laser beam; Nozzles therefor for the removal of by-products
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K26/00Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring
    • B23K26/14Working by laser beam, e.g. welding, cutting or boring using a fluid stream, e.g. a jet of gas, in conjunction with the laser beam; Nozzles therefor
    • B23K26/1462Nozzles; Features related to nozzles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/16Production of nozzles
    • B41J2/1601Production of bubble jet print heads
    • B41J2/1603Production of bubble jet print heads of the front shooter type
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/16Production of nozzles
    • B41J2/1621Production of nozzles manufacturing processes
    • B41J2/1626Production of nozzles manufacturing processes etching
    • B41J2/1628Production of nozzles manufacturing processes etching dry etching
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/16Production of nozzles
    • B41J2/1621Production of nozzles manufacturing processes
    • B41J2/1626Production of nozzles manufacturing processes etching
    • B41J2/1629Production of nozzles manufacturing processes etching wet etching
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/16Production of nozzles
    • B41J2/1621Production of nozzles manufacturing processes
    • B41J2/1632Production of nozzles manufacturing processes machining
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J2/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed
    • B41J2/005Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the printing or marking process for which they are designed characterised by bringing liquid or particles selectively into contact with a printing material
    • B41J2/01Ink jet
    • B41J2/135Nozzles
    • B41J2/16Production of nozzles
    • B41J2/1621Production of nozzles manufacturing processes
    • B41J2/1632Production of nozzles manufacturing processes machining
    • B41J2/1634Production of nozzles manufacturing processes machining laser machining

Abstract

The described embodiments relate to methods and systems for laser micromachining a substrate. One exemplary embodiment positions a substrate in an open air environment. The substrate has a thickness defined by opposing first and second surfaces. The substrate can be cut by directing a laser beam at the first surface of the substrate and introducing an assist gas proximate to a region of the substrate contacted by the laser beam.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • The market for electronic devices continually demands increased performance at decreased costs. In order to meet these requirements, the components which comprise various electronic devices must be made ever more efficiently and to closer tolerances. [0001]
  • Laser micromachining is a common production method for controlled, selective removal of material. However, existing laser micromachining technologies are hindered by several deficiencies, such as a lack of uniformity in the cut they produce, as well as variations in removal speed as the laser cuts deeper into a substrate. Other laser micromachining technologies have attempted to address these problems, but are impractical for production techniques. [0002]
  • Accordingly, the present invention arose out of a desire to provide fast, economical methods of laser micromachining various substrates.[0003]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The same components are used throughout the drawings to reference like features and components. [0004]
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a print cartridge in accordance with one exemplary embodiment. [0005]
  • FIG. 2 shows a cross-sectional view of a portion of a print cartridge in accordance with one exemplary embodiment. [0006]
  • FIG. 3 shows a top view of a print head in accordance with one exemplary embodiment. [0007]
  • FIG. 4 shows a front elevational view of a laser machining apparatus in accordance with one exemplary embodiment. [0008]
  • FIGS. 5[0009] a-5 c show a cross-sectional view of a substrate in accordance with one exemplary embodiment.
  • FIGS. 6[0010] a-6 b show a cross-sectional view of a substrate in accordance with one exemplary embodiment.
  • FIGS. 7[0011] a-7 b show a cross-sectional view of a substrate in accordance with one exemplary embodiment.
  • FIG. 8 shows a flow chart showing steps in accordance with one exemplary embodiment.[0012]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OVERVIEW
  • The embodiments described below pertain to methods and systems for laser micromachining a substrate. Laser micromachining is a common production method for controlled, selective removal of material. In embodiments of the present invention, laser micromachining includes processes such as cutting, slotting, dicing, singulating, via drilling and 3-dimensional machining in a variety of substrate materials. This can include the machining of features either partially or completely through the substrate's thickness. [0013]
  • In one exemplary embodiment, the laser micromachining process utilizes a laser machine that can generate a laser beam for energizing and otherwise removing substrate material in an open, ambient environment. Energizing can comprise melting, vaporizing, exfoliating, phase explosion, and/or ablating among other processes. In some embodiments, the energizing can occur within an interface region surrounding the laser beam and the substrate material which the laser beam contacts. In further embodiments, the efficiency of the energizing process can be improved by supplying a halogen containing assist gas to the interface area. The assist gas can be provided by a gas supply nozzle that directs the assist gas to the interface area. In some embodiments, the assist gas can react with energized substrate material to form compounds that are more readily removed and/or dissipated than could otherwise be achieved. By supplying the assist gas to the interface region, the speed and efficiency of the laser machining process can be improved without the need to operate in controlled conditions. The exemplary laser machining apparatus works in an open air environment without the need for chambers or other containment vessels, and is therefore well suited for production techniques. [0014]
  • One exemplary embodiment of the laser machining process will be described in the context of forming slots in a substrate. Such slots can be used for, among other things, fluid feed slots. In one exemplary embodiment, a substrate containing fluid feed slots can be incorporated into a print head or other fluid ejecting device. As commonly used in print head dice, the substrate can comprise a semiconductor substrate that has microelectronics incorporated within and supported by the substrate. In one exemplary embodiment, the fluid feed slot(s) allow a fluid such as ink to be supplied to fluid ejecting elements contained in ejection chambers within the print head. The fluid ejection elements commonly comprise firing resistors that heat ink causing increased pressure in the ejection chamber. A portion of that ink can be ejected through a firing nozzle with the ink being replaced by ink from the ink feed slot. [0015]
  • Although exemplary embodiments included herein are described in the context of providing dice for use in ink jet printers, it is recognized and understood that the techniques described herein can be applicable to other applications where micromachining a substrate is desired. For example, the described embodiments can be used for quickly and efficiently dicing or singulating semiconductor wafers. [0016]
  • The various components described below may not be illustrated accurately as far as their size is concerned. Rather, the included figures are intended as diagrammatic representations to illustrate to the reader various inventive principles that are described herein. [0017]
  • Exemplary Products [0018]
  • FIG. 1 shows an exemplary print cartridge [0019] 142. The print cartridge is comprised of the print head 144 and the cartridge body 146. Other exemplary configurations will be recognized by those of skill in the art.
  • FIG. 2 shows a cross-sectional representation of a portion of the exemplary print cartridge [0020] 142 taken along line a-a in FIG. 1. It shows the cartridge body 146 containing ink 202 for supply to the print head 144. In this embodiment, the print cartridge is configured to supply one color of ink to the print head, though other exemplary configuration can supply multiple colors and/or black ink. A number of different ink feed slots are provided, with three exemplary slots being shown at 204 a, 204 b, and 204 c. Other exemplary embodiments can utilize more or less ink feed slots. Some exemplary embodiments can divide the ink supply so that each of the three ink feed slots 204 a-204 c receives a separate ink supply.
  • The various ink feed slots pass through portions of a substrate [0021] 206. In some embodiments, silicon can be a suitable substrate. In some of these embodiments, the substrate 206 comprises a crystalline substrate such as single crystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon. Examples of other suitable substrates include, among others, gallium arsenide, glass, silica, ceramics or a semi conducting material. The substrate can comprise various configurations as will be recognized by one of skill in the art. In this exemplary embodiment, the substrate comprises a base layer, shown here as silicon substrate 208.
  • The silicon substrate has a first surface [0022] 210 and a second surface 212. Positioned above the silicon substrate are the independently controllable ink energizing elements or firing elements that, in this embodiment, comprise firing resistors 214. In this exemplary embodiment, the resistors are part of a stack of thin film layers on top of the silicon substrate 208. The thin film layers can further comprise a barrier layer 216. In some embodiments, the barrier layer can comprise, among other things, a photo-resist polymer substrate. Above the barrier layer can be an orifice plate 218 that can comprise, but is not limited to a nickel substrate. In an additional embodiment, the barrier layer 216 and the orifice plate 218 are integral, formed of the same material.
  • In some embodiments, the orifice plate has a plurality of nozzles [0023] 219 through which ink heated by the various resistors can be ejected for printing on a print media (not shown). The various layers can be formed or deposited upon the preceding layers. The configuration given here is but one possible configuration.
  • The exemplary print cartridge shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is upside down from the common orientation during usage. When positioned for use, ink can flow from the cartridge body [0024] 146 into one or more of the slots 204 a-204 c. From the slots, the ink can travel through an ink feed passageway 220 that leads to a firing chamber 222. In some embodiments, the firing chamber can be comprised of a firing resistor, a nozzle, and a given volume of space adjacent thereto. Other configurations are also possible. When an electrical current is passed through the resistor in a given firing chamber, the ink is heated and expands to eject a portion of the ink from the nozzle 219. The ejected ink can then be replaced by additional ink from the ink feed passageway 220.
  • FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of a view from above the thin-film surface of a substrate incorporated into a print head. The substrate is covered by the orifice plate [0025] 218 with underlying structures of the print head indicated in dashed lines. The orifice plate is shown with numerous nozzles 219. Below each nozzle lies a firing chamber 222 that is connected to an ink feed passageway 220 and then to slot 204 a-c. The slots are illustrated in this embodiment as an elliptical configuration when viewed from above the first surface of the substrate. Other exemplary geometries include rectangular among others.
  • Exemplary Systems [0026]
  • FIG. 4 shows an exemplary apparatus or laser machine [0027] 402 capable of micromachining a substrate 206 a in accordance with one exemplary embodiment. The laser machine can be configured for use in an open air environment or region 403. The laser machine can have a laser source 404 capable of emitting a laser beam 406. The laser beam can contact, or otherwise be directed at, the substrate 206 a. In some exemplary embodiments, the substrate can be positioned on a fixture 407 in the open air environment.
  • Exemplary laser machines are commercially available. One such exemplary laser machine is the Xise 200 laser Machining Tool, manufactured by Xsil ltd. of Dublin, Ireland. [0028]
  • Exemplary laser machines can utilize various laser sources. A laser source has a crystal or other structure that when energized can emit the laser beam. An exemplary laser source is the Coherent AVIA 355-4500 which contains Crystalline Nd. YVO4 (also known as Vanadate). Other exemplary crystals include among others, Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF. [0029]
  • Each of these materials can produce a laser beam with a fundamental wavelength of about 1064 nanometers (nm) in one embodiment. Laser beams of various wavelengths can provide satisfactory embodiments. For example, some embodiments can have a wavelength in the range of less than about 550 nm. [0030]
  • In some exemplary embodiments, the wavelength of the laser beam can be modified within the laser source [0031] 404. For example, one embodiment can utilize the AVIA 355, where the frequency is tripled to yield a laser beam wavelength of 355 nm. Another exemplary embodiment can utilize a laser source with a wavelength of 532 nm. For example, the Lambda Physik PG532-15 can be utilized as a laser source that can provide a laser beam that has such a wavelength. Other exemplary embodiments can utilize laser beams having wavelengths ranging from less than 100 nm to more than 1500 nm. Other satisfactory embodiments can be achieved with laser beams having various properties as will be discussed in more detail below.
  • Various exemplary embodiments can utilize one or more lens (es) [0032] 408 to focus or expand the laser beam. In some of these exemplary embodiments, the laser beam can be focused in order to increase its energy density to more effectively machine the substrate. In these exemplary embodiments, the laser beam can be focused with one or more lenses 408 to achieve a desired diameter where the laser beam contacts the substrate 206 a. In some of these embodiments, this diameter can range from about 1 micron to more than 100 microns. In one embodiment, the diameter is about 20 microns. Also, the laser beam can be pointed directly from the laser source 404 to the substrate 206 a, or indirectly through the use of one or more mirror(s) 410.
  • Exemplary laser beams can provide sufficient energy to energize substrate material that the laser beam is directed at. Energizing can comprise melting, vaporizing, exfoliating, phase explosion, and/or ablating among others processes. Some exemplary embodiments can energize substrate material equal to or above its material removal threshold. The material removal threshold is the energy density level necessary to remove substrate material by melting, vaporizing, exfoliating, and/or phase explosion. Energy density will be discussed in more detail below. The substrate that the laser beam is directed at and the surrounding region containing energized substrate material is referred to in this document as an interface region [0033] 411.
  • In some exemplary embodiments, the laser machine [0034] 402 can also have a gas supply 412 for supplying an assist gas 414 to the interface region 411. In some exemplary embodiments, the assist gas can be supplied via one or more gas supply nozzles 416.
  • Some exemplary embodiments can also utilize a debris extraction system [0035] 418 that can remove vaporized substrate materials and/or molecules formed from substrate material and a component of the assist gas, as well as various other molecules. In some embodiments, the debris extraction system can comprise a vacuum system and filtration system positioned to evacuate material in proximity to the laser beam and substrate. Exemplary debris extraction systems will be discussed in more detail below.
  • In some embodiments, the assist gas can increase the speed and/or efficiency at which the laser beam cuts or removes substrate material. Various mechanisms can contribute to the increased removal rate. For example, in some embodiments, molecules of the assist gas can be ionized by the laser beam energy. At least some of the resultant ions can react with energized substrate material. Such reactions can form resultant compounds that can be volatile and relatively non-reactive. These properties can allow the resultant compounds to diffuse or otherwise dissipate from the interface region and thus can decrease the incidence of redeposition of substrate material. [0036]
  • This is an advantage over other embodiments of laser machining techniques where a significant amount of the substrate material removed by the laser redeposits back on the substrate. Redeposited material adjacent to the interface region can result in undesired debris or component damage. Redeposited material in the interface region hinders the laser/substrate interaction and reduces the material removal rate. [0037]
  • Further, some embodiments of laser machining processes also lead to the formation of particulate debris typically having dimensions or diameters of 1 micron or less. In these embodiments, this debris can be formed from molten material directly released from the substrate's surface as well as from condensation of the vaporized substrate material. This particulate material or debris can cause scattering and absorption of laser light towards the end of the laser pulse, especially in laser pulses with a duration of longer than 5-10 nanoseconds (nsec), decreasing the amount of useful laser light reaching the target material surface, in this embodiment. Such particulate material can subsequently deposit on the area within or adjacent to the interface region. [0038]
  • Accordingly, these techniques result in redeposition which, in turn, decreases the speed of cutting or machining, as well as the quality of the finished machined substrate. Conversely, some embodiments of the invention described herein can greatly reduce or eliminate redeposition and can produce much cleaner, more uniform, cuts or machining as a result. In some exemplary embodiments, less than about 1.0 percent of removed material is redeposited. In a particular embodiment, less than about 0.5 percent of the removed material is redeposited. [0039]
  • Various mechanisms can contribute to this increased performance, including but not limited to, the following mechanisms. In some embodiments, the assist gas and/or disassociated components of the assist gas can interact with particulate debris generated by the action of the laser beam. This interaction can reduce the dimensions of the debris and allow the debris to be more easily removed by the extraction system. Another of the various mechanisms can increase performance by reacting the assist gas or its components with condensing material in a vapor plume of substrate material in the interface region to reduce the dimensions of any condensed material allowing it to be more easily removed by an extraction system. [0040]
  • FIGS. 5[0041] a-5 c show an exemplary embodiment of cross sections through a substrate 206 b. Here, a feature is being micromachined into the substrate. In this embodiment, the feature is a trench into the substrate that eventually is formed all the way through the substrate to form a via. Other exemplary features can also be formed as will be discussed below.
  • In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 5[0042] a-5 c, the substrate can have a thickness t defined by a first surface 210 and an opposite second surface 212. In further embodiments, the substrate's thickness can range from less than 100 microns to more than 2000 microns. In these exemplary embodiments, the thickness is about 675 microns.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5[0043] a, the laser beam 406 a is shown directed at the substrate 206 b. As shown here, the laser beam is orthogonal to the first surface 210 of the substrate, though other configurations can provide satisfactory embodiments. The laser beam has formed a shallow cut 500 a in the substrate through the first surface 210. In this embodiment, two gas assist nozzles (416 a and 416 b) are shown positioned on opposite sides of the laser beam to supply the assist gas (not shown) to the interface area 411 a. Though two gas assist nozzles are utilized here, other satisfactory embodiments can use more or less nozzles. The term ‘nozzle’ is used to describe the hardware that is used to deliver the assist gas to the interface region of the substrate. In various embodiments, this can include an exit aperture (502 a and 502 b). In some embodiments the exit aperture can be generally circular in transverse cross-section to plane c as shown in FIG. 5b.
  • In other exemplary embodiments, the exit aperture can comprise other configurations. For example, the exit aperture can be in a manifold configuration, an air knife configuration, and a ring shaped annulus configuration, among others. [0044]
  • In one exemplary embodiment, the exit aperture ([0045] 502 a and 502 b) of the gas assist nozzles can be about 12 mm vertically above the first surface 210 and about 3.2 mm horizontally from the laser beam 406, though other satisfactory embodiments position the nozzles at different combinations of distances and angles. The nozzles can be positioned to eject the assist gas from the exit aperture at an angle δ of about 45 to about 90 degrees relative to the first surface of the substrate. In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIGS. 5a-5 b, the angle δ is about 70 degrees.
  • The assist gas can be supplied at various delivery pressures and velocities. For example, in one embodiment, the gas supply nozzle's exit aperture can be a relatively small diameter to produce higher velocities for a given flow rate or the diameter can be relatively large to provide a lower velocity for a given flow rate. In one exemplary embodiment, the diameter is about 1.0 mm. [0046]
  • Exemplary embodiments can utilize various assist gases. In some embodiments, the assist gas can comprise a halide or a halogen containing gas. Exemplary assist gases can comprise, but are not limited to halocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride. [0047]
  • Many exemplary assist gases, including many of the halocarbon gases can have deleterious environmental consequences. Some exemplary embodiments can utilize a filtration system alone, or the filtration system can be used as a component of a debris extraction system [0048] 418 to remove or minimize any gases of environmental concern that could otherwise diffuse into the ambient environment from the interface area. This filtration system can include mechanisms for converting the assist gas and various by-product gases from the interface area into more inert compounds.
  • Other exemplary embodiments can utilize assist gases such as 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane that can be effective assist gases and are understood to be relatively benign to the environment and thus can be advantageous. Other exemplary assist gases can also combine effectiveness in increasing laser machining performance and reduced environmental consequences. Although embodiments utilizing a single assist gas have been described in the exemplary embodiments, other embodiments can utilize multiple assist gases, the combination of which can provide beneficial characteristics. [0049]
  • In one exemplary embodiment the assist gas can comprise a halogen precursor, at least some of the molecules of which can be ionized or disassociated by laser energy in the interface area. In a further exemplary embodiment, the assist gas can dissociate or ionize in an extremely hot environment around the laser energized region and can react with energized substrate material to form, at least in part, one or more volatile compounds. This process can decrease the incidence of redeposition and/or are more easily removed by an extraction system. [0050]
  • In some embodiments, the assist gas can be supplied at a flow rate sufficient to be an excess reagent in the interface region. In one exemplary embodiment, where the assist gas comprises 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane, the gas assist nozzles deliver the assist gas at a flow rate in a range of about 0.08 grams/second (gm/sec) to about 0.5 gm/sec. A further embodiment supplies about 0.33 gm/sec of 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane. Other exemplary flow rates for various exemplary assist gases will be recognized by one of skill in the art. [0051]
  • FIG. 5[0052] b is an exemplary embodiment showing another cross section of the substrate where the laser has cut a trench 500 b most of the way through the thickness of the substrate 206 b. The depth of the trench is indicated as y and can be compared to the substrate's thickness t. In this exemplary embodiment, the assist gas can still be supplied to the interface region 411 b to maintain efficient cutting despite the interface region being at least in part, at the bottom of the trench 500 b. This can allow the laser to cut at generally the rate and efficiency as it did when the trench was shallower, for example as shown in FIG. 5a. This embodiment can also allow the laser to cut a trench of generally uniform diameter d for the entire depth of the trench.
  • FIG. 5[0053] c shows the trench 500 c having been completed through the entire thickness t of the substrate. Thus, the depth y of the trench 500 c equals the thickness t of the substrate 206 b. Such a through hole, also known as a via, can be useful for many aspects of incorporating microelectronics onto a substrate among others. As shown here, the via has a generally consistent diameter d throughout. In these embodiments, the diameter can be less than about 60 microns, though larger diameters can be achieved.
  • Some embodiments can produce trenches and/or vias that have diameters less than or equal to about 30 microns. The efficiencies of these embodiments can allow these trenches or vias to have an aspect ratio (feature depth divided by the feature width) of at least about 10 with further embodiments having aspect ratios greater than 20. Thus, in the trench shown in FIG. 5[0054] b, the feature depth equals y and the feature width equals the diameter d. Referring again to FIG. 5c the depth of the via y equals the substrate's thickness t. So in this embodiment, the aspect ratio equals the substrate's thickness t divided by the diameter d. Although a via is shown here, these embodiments can also form other features, such as trenches, slots and/or cuts, as will be discussed in more detail in relation to FIGS. 6a-6 b and 7 a-7 b.
  • The laser machining apparatus in some embodiments can cut into a specific point on the substrate and can form a trench of less than or about 30 microns through the same substrate without moving the laser or substrate. This not only allows smaller trenches to be made in the substrate, but the trench forming process can be made correspondingly faster and of better quality, while affecting less of the surrounding substrate material than can be achieved with other typical technologies. [0055]
  • Some embodiments of the present invention allow for the formation of trenches and vias having small diameters that are generally consistent for their entire depth. This is achieved, by among other things, maintaining the rate and efficiency of the removal process by reducing redeposition and particle build-up. [0056]
  • In other embodiments, where technologies attempt to use various gases to promote laser function, however, these systems typically require a controlled environment usually achieved through the use of a chamber into which the substrate is placed. In this embodiment, the conditions and constituent gases of the chamber are then altered before commencing laser machining. The constraints imposed by having to open and close and reseal the chamber and then reestablish the controlled environment whenever components are added or removed has prevented such processes from becoming commercially practicable. In contrast, some embodiments described herein, by virtue of the fact that they are configured for use in open air environments, are inherently well adapted to mass production applications such as assembly lines. [0057]
  • FIGS. 6[0058] a-6 b show a laser beam cutting or removing substrate material to form a trench 602. FIG. 6a is a view taken in cross section along the long axis of the trench, while FIG. 6b is a cross section taken transverse the long axis.
  • FIG. 6[0059] a shows a cross section along the length of a trench 602 formed from the laser beam contacting the substrate while the substrate was moved in the x direction relative to the laser beam. In another exemplary embodiment, the laser beam can be moved relative to the substrate in several ways. For example, the laser beam can be moved, in either or both the x and y directions, while the substrate remains stationary. The gas assist nozzles can be moved in conjunction with the laser beam or left stationary. Alternatively, the substrate can be moved and the laser beam kept stationary. For example, in one embodiment, the substrate 206 c can be placed on a fixture 407 that in some embodiments has the capability to move the substrate relative to the laser beam. Other exemplary embodiments can utilize a combination of these techniques, among others, to move the substrate and the laser beam relative to one another.
  • FIG. 6[0060] a further shows two gas assist nozzles 416 c and 416 d adjacent and parallel to the laser beam 406 b so that each of them is orthogonal to the substrate's first surface 210. This is one exemplary configuration that can supply assist gas to the interface area.
  • FIG. 6[0061] b shows an embodiment where the laser beam forms a kerf k in the substrate. The kerf is the width of the cut formed by the laser beam as it is moved relative to the substrate. The kerf width can be affected by several factors including the amount of redeposition of substrate material as well as the laser's parameters and speed at which the laser beam is moved in relation to the substrate.
  • In some exemplary embodiments, the laser parameters can establish a laser beam with a peak power density of greater than 1 GW/cm[0062] 2, with one exemplary embodiment having a peak power density of about 4.78 GW/cm2. The laser machine, in various embodiments, can generate the laser in pulses in any suitable range of values. In some embodiments, pulse values range from about 1 kilohertz (kHz) to about 200 kHz. In one embodiment the pulse rate is about 20 kHz. Other satisfactory embodiments can use rates below and above the range given here. The laser beam pulse width can be about 1 to 100 nanoseconds, with one exemplary embodiment using about 15 nanoseconds.
  • The movement of the laser beam relative to the substrate per unit of time is referred to in this document as the laser scan rate. Exemplary embodiments can utilize a laser scan rate of about 1 to about 1000 millimeters/second (mm/sec). Some exemplary embodiments can utilize a laser scan rate of about 10 to about 300 mm/sec with other exemplary embodiments utilizing about 100 mm/sec. In one embodiment, these parameters can allow a laser to quickly make a cut having a consistent kerf width so that the resultant trench has a surface roughness less than existing technologies. [0063]
  • Maintaining a uniform kerf can result in a better quality trench, slot or other feature that is more uniform along its length and depth and closer to the desired dimensions. The described embodiments improve kerf uniformity, as well as allow for increased cutting speed. [0064]
  • The described embodiments can efficiently form high aspect ratio features while maintaining high cutting efficiency. In one embodiment, aspect ratios in the range of about 4.5 to about 11.25 can be achieved with the laser removing at least about 9,800,000 cubic microns of substrate material per joule of laser energy. In some embodiments, the features can be made with even higher aspect ratios with very little reduction in efficiency. This is in contrast to other embodiments of laser machining technology where efficiency deceases dramatically with increasing feature aspect ratio. [0065]
  • FIGS. 7[0066] a-7 b show an embodiment where the laser has been used in combination with another removal technique to form a slot in the substrate. The slot can comprise a fluid feed slot, and in some embodiments can comprise a fluid feed slot in a substrate that can be incorporated into a fluid ejecting device.
  • Referring now to FIG. 7[0067] a, a laser cut has formed a trench 702 in the substrate 206 d. In this embodiment, the trench has a depth x and a length 1 1. In this example, the trench depth passes through less than the entire thickness t of the substrate. Other examples can be shallower or deeper than shown, or can pass all the way through the thickness of the substrate for at least a portion of its length to form a slot through the substrate.
  • In this embodiment, the trench can be formed from one or more passes of the laser beam over the substrate. As can be seen from this view along the long axis of the trench, the trench has a contoured configuration. Other configurations can include tapered and stepped configurations, among others. [0068]
  • FIG. 7[0069] b shows an embodiment of a cross section taken along the long axis of the substrate and showing a second trench 704 having a length 12 where 12 is less than 11, formed through the second surface 212 to intercept at least portions of the first trench to form a through-slot 204 h. The second trench can be formed utilizing various substrate removal techniques, including but not limited to: sand drilling, dry etching, wet etching, laser micromachining, and mechanical machining. If laser machining is used as the second removal technique, the laser beam can have the same properties as the laser beam used to make the first trench or feature, or the second laser beam can have different properties. For example, in one embodiment a first laser beam having a wavelength of about 1100 nm can be used to cut a first trench followed by a second laser beam having a wavelength of about 355 nm to remove additional material. Such an exemplary embodiment can take advantage of the various cutting properties of different wavelength lasers.
  • In the example given in FIGS. 7[0070] a and 7 b, the first trench or feature is formed first using the laser machining process followed by a subsequent removal process forming the second trench. Such need not be the case, for example in some embodiments, substrate material can be removed from a first side using sand drilling, among others. This process can then be followed by laser machining to remove additional substrate material. In these embodiments, the laser machining process can be conducted from the same side or surface as the sands drilling process or from an opposite second side.
  • Other exemplary embodiments can employ additional intermediary steps to achieve a desired feature. Some intermediary steps can apply or deposit material that is further configured by subsequent removal steps. [0071]
  • The various exemplary embodiments have so far been described in the context of cutting or forming trenches, vias and slots in a substrate. However, the exemplary embodiments can also be used wherever controlled, selective, removal of material is desired. This can include other processes such as cutting, dicing, singulating, and 3 dimensional machining in a variety of substrate materials. This can further include the micromachining of features either partially or completely through the substrate's thickness. [0072]
  • For example, in the semiconductor industry in recent years there has been a drive toward smaller and smaller devices for both size constraints of the product and for cost considerations. The more devices per semiconductor substrate or wafer, the lower the device cost. It is common for a semiconductor substrate to contain a plurality of devices, which require dicing or singulation before being packaged for assembly into an electronic device, such as a fluid ejecting device, ink-jet print head or some other device. [0073]
  • Traditionally in the industry, mechanical dicing saws have been used to singulate or dice these components. The existing technologies are restricted to straight line cuts in the substrate material, whereas the described laser micromachining embodiments can form features or cuts having complex shapes, straight, curved, non-continuous cuts, or any combination thereof. [0074]
  • The described embodiments can also accomplish this with kerf widths of 10 to 15 microns and lower. Conversely, mechanical dicing saws produce minimum kerf widths of 50 to 100 microns, depending on the substrate material and thickness. Smaller kerfs can result in more devices per wafer and therefore can lower device cost. [0075]
  • Further, mechanical dicing is a wet process that typically uses a cooling fluid for the cutting process. The described embodiments eliminate exposing the devices to potential damage from the cooling fluid, and also are very efficient with little or no redeposition of removed debris material. These and other features allow the described embodiments to better perform many micromachining tasks than existing technologies. [0076]
  • Exemplary Methods [0077]
  • FIG. 8 is a flow chart that helps to illustrate the various exemplary methods described herein. [0078]
  • Step [0079] 802 positions a substrate in an open air environment. Various examples of exemplary substrates have been described above. In this embodiment, the substrate can be positioned on a fixture 407 or other suitable structure. Step 804 directs or projects a laser beam at the substrate to energize a portion of the substrate material. Such energizing can cut or remove substrate material in some embodiments. Various exemplary laser machines and laser beams have been described above.
  • Step [0080] 806 introduces or directs an assist gas to a region of the substrate contacted by the laser beam. In some exemplary embodiments the assist gas can be directed to the interface region. Some exemplary embodiments supply the assist gas via one or more gas assist nozzles of various configurations, exemplary embodiments of which are described above. Various assist gases can be directed to the interface area and can increase the performance of the laser beam in cutting substrate material.
  • Conclusion [0081]
  • The described embodiments can utilize a laser beam to cut or micromachine substrates in an open air environment. In several embodiments, the laser beam cuts with greater efficiency and speed by supplying an assist gas to the interface area where the laser beam energizes substrate material. In particular, the laser beam, when supplied with assist gas, can form cuts with higher aspect ratios than existing technologies. Additionally, the cuts can be maintained closer to desired parameters and can have less variation in their dimensions, in some embodiments. Some of the described embodiments can form narrower cuts than present and past technology and the speed and efficiency of those cuts can be maintained through the depth of the cut, while forming a higher quality product than existing technologies. All of this can be achieved utilizing systems and methods that are conducive to production techniques. [0082]
  • Although the invention has been described in language specific to structural features and methodological steps, it is to be understood that the invention defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or steps described. Rather, the specific features and steps are disclosed as preferred forms of implementing the claimed invention. [0083]

Claims (54)

What is claimed is:
1. An apparatus for micromachining a substrate comprising:
an open air region within which substrates can be processed;
a laser source operably positioned relative to the open air region to generate a laser beam configured to energize substrate material of a substrate positioned within the open air region;
a gas supply that supplies a halogen containing assist gas into the open air region wherein at least some substrate material can be energized by the laser beam and wherein at least some of the energized substrate material can chemically react with the assist gas to form one or more compounds that can dissipate into the open air region.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a fixture for positioning the substrate in the open air environment and upon which the substrate can be contacted by the laser beam and wherein the fixture can move the substrate in relation to the laser beam.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a mechanism for moving the laser source relative to the substrate.
4. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a fixture that positions the substrate in the open air environment and upon which the substrate can be contacted by the laser beams and a mechanism that moves the laser source relative to the substrate, wherein the fixture and the mechanism can be used in combination to move the substrate in relation to the laser beam.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the laser beam is capable of energizing substrate material equal to or above a material removal threshold of the substrate.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the gas supply comprises at least one gas supply nozzle positioned to supply the assist gas in proximity to the substrate.
7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein said at least one gas supply nozzle has a circular exit aperture.
8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said circular exit aperture has a diameter of about 1.0 mm.
9. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the halogen containing assist gas comprises a halosulfide.
10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the halogen containing assist gas comprises a halocarbon.
11. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein the halocarbon comprises a fluorocarbon.
12. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein the fluorocarbon comprises 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane.
13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the laser beam has a peak power density of at least about 1 GW/cm2.
14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein less than or equal to about 0.5 percent of the energized substrate material redeposits on the substrate.
15. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the substrate comprises a semiconductor substrate for use in a fluid ejecting device.
16. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the substrate comprises a wafer.
17. An apparatus for micromachining a substrate comprising:
a laser source operably positioned to generate a laser beam configured to make a cut by removing material from a substrate, wherein the laser beam is configurable to make a cut having an aspect ratio ranging from about 4.5 to about 11.25 and at said range of aspect ratios the laser beam removes greater than or equal to about 9,800,000 cubic microns of substrate material per joule of laser energy.
18. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said substrate comprises crystalline silicon.
19. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the laser beam has a wavelength between about 300 nm and about 1100 nm.
20. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the laser beam has a wavelength of about 355 nm.
21. A method of processing a semiconductor substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air region;
energizing a portion of the substrate to promote removal of at least some substrate material; and,
introducing a halogen containing assist gas proximate to an energized portion of the substrate so that the assist gas chemically reacts with energized substrate material to form, at least in part, one or more volatile compounds.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein said act of energizing and said act of introducing form a slot in the substrate.
23. The method of claim 21, wherein said act of energizing and said act of introducing form a fluid feed slot in the substrate.
24. The method of claim 21, wherein said act of energizing and said act of introducing cuts the substrate into multiple pieces.
25. A method of laser micromachining a substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air environment, wherein the substrate has a thickness defined by opposing first and second surfaces; and,
cutting the substrate by directing a laser beam at the first surface of the substrate and introducing an assist gas proximate to a region of the substrate contacted by the laser beam.
26. The method of claim 25, wherein said introducing comprises introducing multiple assist gases.
27. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a slot generally free of redeposited substrate material.
28. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a slot generally free of redeposited substrate material during said act of cutting.
29. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a via having an aspect ratio of at least about 10.
30. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a via having an aspect ratio ranging from about 10 to about 20.
31. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a via having an aspect ratio of at least about 20.
32. The method of claim 25, wherein said cutting forms a slot at least a portion of which is contoured.
33. The method of claim 25 further comprising removing additional material from the substrate that, in combination with said cutting, forms a desired feature in the substrate.
34. The method of claim 33, wherein the removing is accomplished from the second surface of the substrate.
35. The method of claim 33, wherein the removing comprises one or more of:
sand drilling, dry etching, wet etching, and mechanical machining.
36. The method of claim 33, wherein the removing comprises laser machining.
37. The method of claim 36, wherein said laser machining comprises laser machining with a laser beam having a wavelength different from the wavelength of the laser beam utilized in said cutting.
38. A method of processing a substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air environment;
projecting a laser beam at the substrate; and,
directing a halogen containing assist gas toward an area of the substrate contacted by the laser through one or more gas supply nozzles oriented at an angle between about 45 and about 90 degrees relative to a first surface of the substrate.
39. The method of claim 38, wherein said directing supplies sufficient concentrations of the assist gas to maintain the assist gas as an excess reagent.
40. The method of claim 38, wherein said directing supplies the assist gas at a rate of between about 0.08 gm/sec to about 0.5 gm/sec where the assist gas is 1,1,1,2 tetrafluorethane.
41. The method of claim 38, wherein said directing supplies the assist gas at a rate of about 0.33 gm/sec where the assist gas is 1,1,1,2 tetrafluorethane.
42. A method of processing a semiconductor substrate comprising:
directing a laser beam at a print head substrate positioned in an open air environment;
introducing a halogen containing assist gas proximate a region of the substrate at which the laser is directed; and,
wherein the laser beam in the presence of the assist gas forms a cut in the substrate having an aspect ratio of at least about 10.
43. The method of claim 42, wherein said introducing allows the laser beam to maintain a kerf in the substrate of essentially uniform dimensions during the cut.
44. A method of processing a semiconductor substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air region for processing; and,
removing material from the substrate by directing a laser beam and a halogen containing assist gas at a portion of the substrate, wherein less than about 1.0 percent of removed substrate material redeposits on the substrate.
45. A method of laser micromachining a substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate to be contacted by a laser beam; and,
directing a laser beam at the substrate to form a cut having an aspect ratio in a range from about 4.5 to about 11.25, and wherein said directing removes at least about 9,800,000 cubic microns of substrate material per joule of laser energy for said range of aspect ratios.
46. The method of claim 45, wherein said directing comprises directing a laser beam having a wavelength between about 300 nm and about 1100 nm.
47. The method of claim 45, wherein said directing comprises directing a laser beam having a wavelength of about 355 nm.
48. The method of claim 45, wherein said directing removes substrate material at a generally constant removal rate through the depth of the cut.
49. A method of processing a substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air environment;
cutting substrate material by directing a laser beam at the substrate and providing an assist gas to an area of the substrate contacted by the laser beam; and,
wherein said cutting occurs in the open air environment, and wherein said cutting process maintains a generally constant cutting rate for the depth of the cut.
50. The method of claim 49, wherein said cutting dices the substrate into multiple pieces.
51. A method of cutting features on a semiconductor substrate comprising:
positioning a substrate in an open air environment;
supplying an assist gas to an area of the substrate to be cut; and,
cutting a feature into the substrate by directing a laser beam at the substrate in the presence of the assist gas to form a feature having an aspect ratio of greater than or equal to 10.
52. The method of claim 51, wherein said cutting a feature comprises making multiple laser beam passes over the substrate to achieve said feature.
53. One or more computer-readable media having computer readable instructions thereon which, when executed by a computer, cause the computer to:
cause a laser beam to be directed at a substrate positioned in an open air environment; and,
cause an assist gas to be introduced to a region where the laser beam contacts the substrate.
54. A method of processing a semiconductor substrate comprising:
means for positioning a substrate in an open air region;
means for energizing a portion of the substrate to promote removal of at least some substrate material; and,
means for introducing an assist gas proximate an energized portion of the substrate so that the assist gas chemically reacts with energized substrate material to form at least in part one or more volatile compounds.
US10/076,467 2002-02-15 2002-02-15 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same Abandoned US20030155328A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/076,467 US20030155328A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-02-15 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/076,467 US20030155328A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-02-15 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
AU2002327565A AU2002327565A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-08-29 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
PCT/US2002/027456 WO2003070415A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-08-29 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
CNB028281098A CN1319696C (en) 2002-02-15 2002-08-29 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
EP02763563A EP1474267A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-08-29 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
TW091120459A TW583047B (en) 2002-02-15 2002-09-09 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
US11/262,068 US8653410B2 (en) 2002-02-15 2005-10-28 Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/262,068 Continuation-In-Part US8653410B2 (en) 2002-02-15 2005-10-28 Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030155328A1 true US20030155328A1 (en) 2003-08-21

Family

ID=27732503

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/076,467 Abandoned US20030155328A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2002-02-15 Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
US11/262,068 Active 2029-12-03 US8653410B2 (en) 2002-02-15 2005-10-28 Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/262,068 Active 2029-12-03 US8653410B2 (en) 2002-02-15 2005-10-28 Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (2) US20030155328A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1474267A1 (en)
CN (1) CN1319696C (en)
AU (1) AU2002327565A1 (en)
TW (1) TW583047B (en)
WO (1) WO2003070415A1 (en)

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050006136A1 (en) * 2003-06-11 2005-01-13 Arnold Craig B. Laser-based technique for producing and embedding electrochemical cells and electronic components directly into circuit board materials
NL1025786C2 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-09-26 Fico Bv A method and apparatus for using a laser beam, separating electronic components.
US20050250292A1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2005-11-10 Pary Baluswamy Methods for forming backside alignment markers useable in semiconductor lithography
US20060032841A1 (en) * 2004-08-10 2006-02-16 Tan Kee C Forming features in printhead components
US20060049156A1 (en) * 2002-02-15 2006-03-09 Michael Mulloy Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device
WO2006038152A1 (en) 2004-10-05 2006-04-13 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Method for laser dicing of a substrate
US20070075063A1 (en) * 2005-10-03 2007-04-05 Aradigm Corporation Method and system for LASER machining
US20080016689A1 (en) * 2003-08-13 2008-01-24 Barbara Horn Methods and systems for conditioning slotted substrates
US20080135532A1 (en) * 2004-04-27 2008-06-12 Mitsuboshi Diamond Industrial Co., Ltd. Method of and an Apparatus for Forming a Perpendicular Crack in a Brittle Substrate
US7823263B2 (en) 2006-07-11 2010-11-02 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of removing stent islands from a stent
EP2253413A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2010-11-24 National University of Ireland Galway Method for laser ablation
US20110031655A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Fei Company Gas-assisted laser ablation
US7901452B2 (en) 2007-06-27 2011-03-08 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method to fabricate a stent having selected morphology to reduce restenosis
US20110057356A1 (en) * 2009-09-04 2011-03-10 Kevin Jow Setting Laser Power For Laser Machining Stents From Polymer Tubing
US7955381B1 (en) 2007-06-29 2011-06-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer-bioceramic composite implantable medical device with different types of bioceramic particles
CN102151997A (en) * 2011-01-31 2011-08-17 华中科技大学 Method for processing micropore of patch clamp chip
US8128688B2 (en) 2006-06-27 2012-03-06 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Carbon coating on an implantable device
US8535372B1 (en) 2006-06-16 2013-09-17 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Bioabsorbable stent with prohealing layer
US8679394B2 (en) 2010-06-10 2014-03-25 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Laser system and processing conditions for manufacturing bioabsorbable stents
US8752267B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2014-06-17 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of making stents with radiopaque markers
US8803028B1 (en) 2005-04-13 2014-08-12 Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc Apparatus for etching multiple surfaces of luminaire reflector
US20140224776A1 (en) * 2013-02-13 2014-08-14 Lawrence Livermore National Security, Llc Laser-induced gas plasma machining
US9198785B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2015-12-01 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Crush recoverable polymer scaffolds
US9532888B2 (en) 2006-01-04 2017-01-03 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US9827119B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-11-28 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Polymer scaffolds having a low crossing profile
US9999527B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2018-06-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Scaffolds having radiopaque markers

Families Citing this family (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7299151B2 (en) 2004-02-04 2007-11-20 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Microdevice processing systems and methods
US7302309B2 (en) 2004-04-26 2007-11-27 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Laser micromachining methods and systems
US20100181706A1 (en) * 2005-07-13 2010-07-22 Jari Ruuttu Radiation Arrangement
TWI412079B (en) * 2006-07-28 2013-10-11 Semiconductor Energy Lab Method for manufacturing display device
US8148259B2 (en) 2006-08-30 2012-04-03 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Method for manufacturing semiconductor device
US8092739B2 (en) * 2008-11-25 2012-01-10 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Retro-percussive technique for creating nanoscale holes
CN101824654B (en) 2009-03-04 2012-04-11 中国科学院半导体研究所 Method for manufacturing black silicon material
CN101824653B (en) 2009-03-04 2012-03-28 中国科学院半导体研究所 Method for manufacturing black silicon material by scanning and irradiation of light source of broad-pulse laser
US8609512B2 (en) * 2009-03-27 2013-12-17 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Method for laser singulation of chip scale packages on glass substrates
TWI417017B (en) * 2009-07-30 2013-11-21 Unimicron Technology Corp Base material of wiring board and method for drilling thereof
US8623496B2 (en) 2009-11-06 2014-01-07 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Laser drilling technique for creating nanoscale holes
GB2481190B (en) * 2010-06-04 2015-01-14 Plastic Logic Ltd Laser ablation
CN103262654A (en) * 2010-12-17 2013-08-21 龙云株式会社 Patterning method
US9828278B2 (en) 2012-02-28 2017-11-28 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Method and apparatus for separation of strengthened glass and articles produced thereby
KR20140138134A (en) 2012-02-28 2014-12-03 일렉트로 싸이언티픽 인더스트리이즈 인코포레이티드 Method and apparatus for separation of strengthened glass and articles produced thereby
US20140083986A1 (en) * 2012-09-24 2014-03-27 Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. Method and apparatus for machining a workpiece
CN105014383B (en) * 2014-04-23 2017-09-29 大族激光科技产业集团股份有限公司 A laser system and method for blasting
TW201704177A (en) * 2015-06-10 2017-02-01 Corning Inc Methods of etching glass substrates and glass substrates

Citations (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US17514A (en) * 1857-06-09 Portable fence
US40894A (en) * 1863-12-15 Improved apparatus for amalgamating precious metals
US62126A (en) * 1867-02-19 Improvement in axle-box for vehicles
US108938A (en) * 1870-11-01 Improvement in carpet-stretchers
US130116A (en) * 1872-08-06 Improvement in sewing-machines
US170891A (en) * 1875-12-07 Improvement in barbed fence-wires
US3571555A (en) * 1965-10-11 1971-03-23 Nasa Laser machining apparatus
US4532401A (en) * 1982-03-31 1985-07-30 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus and method for cutting a wiring pattern
US4913405A (en) * 1988-02-03 1990-04-03 L'air Liquide, Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges Claude Laser cutting nozzle, cutting head comprising said nozzle and laser cutting method using said elements
US5345057A (en) * 1993-03-25 1994-09-06 Lasag Ag Method of cutting an aperture in a device by means of a laser beam
US5504301A (en) * 1994-03-21 1996-04-02 Laser Cut Images International, Inc. Apparatus and method for laser engraving thin sheet-like materials
US5643472A (en) * 1988-07-08 1997-07-01 Cauldron Limited Partnership Selective removal of material by irradiation
US5669979A (en) * 1993-09-08 1997-09-23 Uvtech Systems, Inc. Photoreactive surface processing
US5760368A (en) * 1994-07-08 1998-06-02 Fanuc, Ltd. Laser beam method using an inactive gas as the assist gas
US5818009A (en) * 1994-10-25 1998-10-06 Fanuc, Ltd Laser beam machining system
US5869803A (en) * 1993-11-02 1999-02-09 Sony Corporation Method of forming polycrystalline silicon layer on substrate and surface treatment apparatus thereof
US5935464A (en) * 1997-09-11 1999-08-10 Lsp Technologies, Inc. Laser shock peening apparatus with a diffractive optic element
US5986234A (en) * 1997-03-28 1999-11-16 The Regents Of The University Of California High removal rate laser-based coating removal system
US6008144A (en) * 1998-02-02 1999-12-28 Industrial Technology Research Window shutter for laser annealing
US6074957A (en) * 1998-02-26 2000-06-13 Micron Technology, Inc. Methods of forming openings and methods of controlling the degree of taper of openings
US6136096A (en) * 1996-05-01 2000-10-24 Nec Corporation Method and apparatus for correcting defects in photomask
US6144010A (en) * 1997-05-12 2000-11-07 Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Method of removing coating film with laser beam and laser processing system
US6204475B1 (en) * 1999-01-04 2001-03-20 Fanuc Limited Laser machining apparatus with transverse gas flow
US6339205B1 (en) * 1999-01-27 2002-01-15 Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. Grid support welding apparatus
US6376797B1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-04-23 Ase Americas, Inc. Laser cutting of semiconductor materials
US6384371B1 (en) * 1998-10-15 2002-05-07 Fanuc Ltd. Laser beam machining apparatus
US6400389B1 (en) * 2000-01-25 2002-06-04 Eastman Kodak Company Apparatus for laser marking indicia on a photosensitive web
US6423928B1 (en) * 2000-10-12 2002-07-23 Ase Americas, Inc. Gas assisted laser cutting of thin and fragile materials
US6448534B1 (en) * 1995-10-27 2002-09-10 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Method and apparatus for laser cutting materials
US6472295B1 (en) * 1999-08-27 2002-10-29 Jmar Research, Inc. Method and apparatus for laser ablation of a target material

Family Cites Families (81)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2841477A (en) 1957-03-04 1958-07-01 Pacific Semiconductors Inc Photochemically activated gaseous etching method
US3364087A (en) 1964-04-27 1968-01-16 Varian Associates Method of using laser to coat or etch substrate
US3866398A (en) * 1973-12-20 1975-02-18 Texas Instruments Inc In-situ gas-phase reaction for removal of laser-scribe debris
US4260649A (en) 1979-05-07 1981-04-07 The Perkin-Elmer Corporation Laser induced dissociative chemical gas phase processing of workpieces
US4332999A (en) 1980-10-09 1982-06-01 Rca Corporation Method for machining a workpiece with a beam of radiant energy assisted by a chemically-reactive gas
US4467168A (en) 1981-04-01 1984-08-21 Creative Glassworks International Method of cutting glass with a laser and an article made therewith
US4331504A (en) 1981-06-25 1982-05-25 International Business Machines Corporation Etching process with vibrationally excited SF6
GB2162207B (en) 1984-07-26 1989-05-10 Hitoshi Abe Semiconductor crystal growth apparatus
US4643799A (en) 1984-12-26 1987-02-17 Hitachi, Ltd. Method of dry etching
US4746935A (en) 1985-11-22 1988-05-24 Hewlett-Packard Company Multitone ink jet printer and method of operation
US4719477A (en) 1986-01-17 1988-01-12 Hewlett-Packard Company Integrated thermal ink jet printhead and method of manufacture
US4731158A (en) 1986-09-12 1988-03-15 International Business Machines Corporation High rate laser etching technique
US4801352A (en) 1986-12-30 1989-01-31 Image Micro Systems, Inc. Flowing gas seal enclosure for processing workpiece surface with controlled gas environment and intense laser irradiation
US5531857A (en) 1988-07-08 1996-07-02 Cauldron Limited Partnership Removal of surface contaminants by irradiation from a high energy source
US4915981A (en) 1988-08-12 1990-04-10 Rogers Corporation Method of laser drilling fluoropolymer materials
EP0365754B1 (en) 1988-10-28 1994-11-09 International Business Machines Corporation Enhandement of ultraviolet laser ablation and etching of organic solids
DE3934587C2 (en) 1989-10-17 1998-11-19 Bosch Gmbh Robert A method for producing generated by laser radiation, high-precision through holes in workpieces
US5362450A (en) 1990-03-29 1994-11-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Laser controlled decomposition of chlorofluorocarbons
US5877392A (en) 1991-02-21 1999-03-02 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Photon controlled decomposition of nonhydrolyzable ambients
US5688715A (en) 1990-03-29 1997-11-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Excimer laser dopant activation of backside illuminated CCD's
US5164324A (en) 1990-03-29 1992-11-17 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Laser texturing
US5266532A (en) 1990-03-29 1993-11-30 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Method for laser-assisted silicon etching using halocarbon ambients
US5322988A (en) 1990-03-29 1994-06-21 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Laser texturing
US5451378A (en) 1991-02-21 1995-09-19 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Photon controlled decomposition of nonhydrolyzable ambients
US5354420A (en) 1990-03-29 1994-10-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Method for laser-assisted etching of III-V and II-VI semiconductor compounds using chlorofluorocarbon ambients
US5493445A (en) 1990-03-29 1996-02-20 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Laser textured surface absorber and emitter
US5385633A (en) 1990-03-29 1995-01-31 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Method for laser-assisted silicon etching using halocarbon ambients
US5469199A (en) 1990-08-16 1995-11-21 Hewlett-Packard Company Wide inkjet printhead
US5105588A (en) 1990-09-10 1992-04-21 Hewlett-Packard Company Method and apparatus for simultaneously forming a plurality of openings through a substrate
US5293025A (en) 1991-08-01 1994-03-08 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Method for forming vias in multilayer circuits
US5397863A (en) 1991-09-13 1995-03-14 International Business Machines Corporation Fluorinated carbon polymer composites
US5211806A (en) 1991-12-24 1993-05-18 Xerox Corporation Monolithic inkjet printhead
US5317346A (en) 1992-03-04 1994-05-31 Hewlett-Packard Company Compound ink feed slot
JP3290495B2 (en) 1992-04-21 2002-06-10 キヤノン株式会社 A method for producing an ink jet recording head
KR0127666B1 (en) 1992-11-25 1997-12-30 모리시다 요이찌 Ceramic electronic device and method of producing the same
DE4241045C1 (en) 1992-12-05 1994-05-26 Bosch Gmbh Robert A method for anisotropic etching of silicon
US5691196A (en) * 1992-12-31 1997-11-25 American Cyanamid Company Recombinant nucleic acid containing a response element
US5387314A (en) 1993-01-25 1995-02-07 Hewlett-Packard Company Fabrication of ink fill slots in thermal ink-jet printheads utilizing chemical micromachining
US5814156A (en) 1993-09-08 1998-09-29 Uvtech Systems Inc. Photoreactive surface cleaning
JPH0864559A (en) 1994-06-14 1996-03-08 Fsi Internatl Inc Method for removing unwanted material from substrate surface
US5531634A (en) 1995-02-03 1996-07-02 Schott; Paul Method of using an abrasive material for blast cleaning of solid surfaces
US5811019A (en) 1995-03-31 1998-09-22 Sony Corporation Method for forming a hole and method for forming nozzle in orifice plate of printing head
JPH08279631A (en) 1995-04-05 1996-10-22 Brother Ind Ltd Manufacture of laminated piezoelectric element
AU5066996A (en) 1995-04-14 1996-10-24 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method for producing liquid ejecting head and liquid ejecting head obtained by the same method
DE19534590A1 (en) 1995-09-11 1997-03-13 Laser & Med Tech Gmbh Scanning ablation of ceramic materials, plastics and biological hydroxylapatite, particular, hard dental substance
US5658471A (en) 1995-09-22 1997-08-19 Lexmark International, Inc. Fabrication of thermal ink-jet feed slots in a silicon substrate
TW350095B (en) 1995-11-21 1999-01-11 Daido Hoxan Inc Cutting method and apparatus for semiconductor materials
GB2311953A (en) 1996-03-23 1997-10-15 British Aerospace Laser beam drilling
US5874011A (en) 1996-08-01 1999-02-23 Revise, Inc. Laser-induced etching of multilayer materials
US6624382B2 (en) 1997-01-30 2003-09-23 Anvik Corporation Configured-hole high-speed drilling system for micro-via pattern formation, and resulting structure
US5870421A (en) 1997-05-12 1999-02-09 Dahm; Jonathan S. Short pulsewidth, high pulse repetition frequency laser system
US6239033B1 (en) 1998-05-28 2001-05-29 Sony Corporation Manufacturing method of semiconductor device
US6331258B1 (en) 1997-07-15 2001-12-18 Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd Method of manufacture of a buckle plate ink jet printer
DE19736370C2 (en) 1997-08-21 2001-12-06 Bosch Gmbh Robert A method for anisotropic etching of silicon
US6055344A (en) * 1998-02-18 2000-04-25 Hewlett-Packard Company Fabrication of a total internal reflection optical switch with vertical fluid fill-holes
US6162589A (en) 1998-03-02 2000-12-19 Hewlett-Packard Company Direct imaging polymer fluid jet orifice
US6507001B1 (en) * 1999-01-19 2003-01-14 Xerox Corporation Nozzles for ink jet devices and laser ablating or precision injection molding methods for microfabrication of the nozzles
JP2000246475A (en) 1999-02-25 2000-09-12 Seiko Epson Corp Machining method by means of laser beams
US6310701B1 (en) 1999-10-08 2001-10-30 Nanovia Lp Method and apparatus for ablating high-density array of vias or indentation in surface of object
US6472125B1 (en) 1999-11-30 2002-10-29 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method for manufacturing ink jet recording head and ink jet recording head manufactured by such method of manufacture
US6238269B1 (en) 2000-01-26 2001-05-29 Hewlett-Packard Company Ink feed slot formation in ink-jet printheads
US6425804B1 (en) 2000-03-21 2002-07-30 Hewlett-Packard Company Pressurized delivery system for abrasive particulate material
AU5117201A (en) 2000-03-30 2001-10-15 Electro Scient Ind Inc Laser system and method for single pass micromachining of multilayer workpieces
WO2001092957A1 (en) 2000-06-01 2001-12-06 Nippon Paper Industries Co., Ltd. Transfer sheet for transferring protective layer for photographic emulsion face and photomask with protective layer
EP1182002B1 (en) 2000-08-05 2004-03-03 Trumpf Werkzeugmaschinen GmbH + Co. KG Laser processing machine with at least an optical element that can be submitted to a flushing elementing medium
EP1180409B1 (en) 2000-08-12 2005-03-30 TRUMPF LASERTECHNIK GmbH Laser processing machine with gas cleaned beam guiding cavity
KR100829876B1 (en) 2000-10-26 2008-05-16 엑스에스아이엘 테크놀러지 리미티드 Control of laser machining
AU1086002A (en) 2000-12-15 2002-06-24 Xsil Technology Ltd Laser machining of semiconductor materials
US6481832B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2002-11-19 Hewlett-Packard Company Fluid-jet ejection device
US20020108938A1 (en) 2001-02-09 2002-08-15 Patel Rajesh S. Method of laser controlled material processing
US20020130115A1 (en) 2001-03-13 2002-09-19 Lawson William E. Debris removal apparatus for use in laser ablation
KR100894088B1 (en) 2001-03-22 2009-04-20 엑스에스아이엘 테크놀러지 리미티드 A laser machining system and method
US20030062126A1 (en) 2001-10-03 2003-04-03 Scaggs Michael J. Method and apparatus for assisting laser material processing
US6641745B2 (en) 2001-11-16 2003-11-04 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method of forming a manifold in a substrate and printhead substructure having the same
US7357486B2 (en) * 2001-12-20 2008-04-15 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method of laser machining a fluid slot
US6979797B2 (en) 2002-01-31 2005-12-27 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Slotted substrates and methods and systems for forming same
US20030155328A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2003-08-21 Huth Mark C. Laser micromachining and methods and systems of same
US6666546B1 (en) 2002-07-31 2003-12-23 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Slotted substrate and method of making
US6648454B1 (en) 2002-10-30 2003-11-18 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Slotted substrate and method of making
US6847004B2 (en) * 2003-01-10 2005-01-25 General Electric Company Process of removing a ceramic coating deposit in a surface hole of a component
US7083267B2 (en) 2003-04-30 2006-08-01 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Slotted substrates and methods and systems for forming same

Patent Citations (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US40894A (en) * 1863-12-15 Improved apparatus for amalgamating precious metals
US62126A (en) * 1867-02-19 Improvement in axle-box for vehicles
US108938A (en) * 1870-11-01 Improvement in carpet-stretchers
US130116A (en) * 1872-08-06 Improvement in sewing-machines
US170891A (en) * 1875-12-07 Improvement in barbed fence-wires
US17514A (en) * 1857-06-09 Portable fence
US3571555A (en) * 1965-10-11 1971-03-23 Nasa Laser machining apparatus
US4532401A (en) * 1982-03-31 1985-07-30 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus and method for cutting a wiring pattern
US4913405A (en) * 1988-02-03 1990-04-03 L'air Liquide, Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges Claude Laser cutting nozzle, cutting head comprising said nozzle and laser cutting method using said elements
US5643472A (en) * 1988-07-08 1997-07-01 Cauldron Limited Partnership Selective removal of material by irradiation
US5345057A (en) * 1993-03-25 1994-09-06 Lasag Ag Method of cutting an aperture in a device by means of a laser beam
US5669979A (en) * 1993-09-08 1997-09-23 Uvtech Systems, Inc. Photoreactive surface processing
US5869803A (en) * 1993-11-02 1999-02-09 Sony Corporation Method of forming polycrystalline silicon layer on substrate and surface treatment apparatus thereof
US5504301A (en) * 1994-03-21 1996-04-02 Laser Cut Images International, Inc. Apparatus and method for laser engraving thin sheet-like materials
US5760368A (en) * 1994-07-08 1998-06-02 Fanuc, Ltd. Laser beam method using an inactive gas as the assist gas
US5818009A (en) * 1994-10-25 1998-10-06 Fanuc, Ltd Laser beam machining system
US6448534B1 (en) * 1995-10-27 2002-09-10 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Method and apparatus for laser cutting materials
US6136096A (en) * 1996-05-01 2000-10-24 Nec Corporation Method and apparatus for correcting defects in photomask
US5986234A (en) * 1997-03-28 1999-11-16 The Regents Of The University Of California High removal rate laser-based coating removal system
US6144010A (en) * 1997-05-12 2000-11-07 Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Method of removing coating film with laser beam and laser processing system
US5935464A (en) * 1997-09-11 1999-08-10 Lsp Technologies, Inc. Laser shock peening apparatus with a diffractive optic element
US6008144A (en) * 1998-02-02 1999-12-28 Industrial Technology Research Window shutter for laser annealing
US6074957A (en) * 1998-02-26 2000-06-13 Micron Technology, Inc. Methods of forming openings and methods of controlling the degree of taper of openings
US6384371B1 (en) * 1998-10-15 2002-05-07 Fanuc Ltd. Laser beam machining apparatus
US6204475B1 (en) * 1999-01-04 2001-03-20 Fanuc Limited Laser machining apparatus with transverse gas flow
US6339205B1 (en) * 1999-01-27 2002-01-15 Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. Grid support welding apparatus
US6472295B1 (en) * 1999-08-27 2002-10-29 Jmar Research, Inc. Method and apparatus for laser ablation of a target material
US6400389B1 (en) * 2000-01-25 2002-06-04 Eastman Kodak Company Apparatus for laser marking indicia on a photosensitive web
US6376797B1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-04-23 Ase Americas, Inc. Laser cutting of semiconductor materials
US6423928B1 (en) * 2000-10-12 2002-07-23 Ase Americas, Inc. Gas assisted laser cutting of thin and fragile materials

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8653410B2 (en) 2002-02-15 2014-02-18 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device
US20060049156A1 (en) * 2002-02-15 2006-03-09 Michael Mulloy Method of forming substrate for fluid ejection device
US6986199B2 (en) * 2003-06-11 2006-01-17 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Laser-based technique for producing and embedding electrochemical cells and electronic components directly into circuit board materials
US20050006136A1 (en) * 2003-06-11 2005-01-13 Arnold Craig B. Laser-based technique for producing and embedding electrochemical cells and electronic components directly into circuit board materials
US20080016689A1 (en) * 2003-08-13 2008-01-24 Barbara Horn Methods and systems for conditioning slotted substrates
NL1025786C2 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-09-26 Fico Bv A method and apparatus for using a laser beam, separating electronic components.
US20080135532A1 (en) * 2004-04-27 2008-06-12 Mitsuboshi Diamond Industrial Co., Ltd. Method of and an Apparatus for Forming a Perpendicular Crack in a Brittle Substrate
US20060226118A1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2006-10-12 Pary Baluswamy Methods for forming backside alignment markers useable in semiconductor lithography
US7223674B2 (en) * 2004-05-06 2007-05-29 Micron Technology, Inc. Methods for forming backside alignment markers useable in semiconductor lithography
US20050250292A1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2005-11-10 Pary Baluswamy Methods for forming backside alignment markers useable in semiconductor lithography
US20060032841A1 (en) * 2004-08-10 2006-02-16 Tan Kee C Forming features in printhead components
US20080096367A1 (en) * 2004-10-05 2008-04-24 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Method for Laser Dicing of a Substrate
WO2006038152A1 (en) 2004-10-05 2006-04-13 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Method for laser dicing of a substrate
US9067280B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2015-06-30 Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc Apparatus for etching multiple surfaces of luminaire reflector
US8803028B1 (en) 2005-04-13 2014-08-12 Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc Apparatus for etching multiple surfaces of luminaire reflector
US20070075063A1 (en) * 2005-10-03 2007-04-05 Aradigm Corporation Method and system for LASER machining
US7767930B2 (en) * 2005-10-03 2010-08-03 Aradigm Corporation Method and system for LASER machining
US10070975B2 (en) 2006-01-04 2018-09-11 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US9532888B2 (en) 2006-01-04 2017-01-03 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US8752267B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2014-06-17 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of making stents with radiopaque markers
US9358325B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2016-06-07 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US9038260B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2015-05-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent with radiopaque markers
US9694116B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2017-07-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US8752268B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2014-06-17 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of making stents with radiopaque markers
US8535372B1 (en) 2006-06-16 2013-09-17 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Bioabsorbable stent with prohealing layer
US8128688B2 (en) 2006-06-27 2012-03-06 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Carbon coating on an implantable device
US7823263B2 (en) 2006-07-11 2010-11-02 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of removing stent islands from a stent
US7901452B2 (en) 2007-06-27 2011-03-08 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method to fabricate a stent having selected morphology to reduce restenosis
US7955381B1 (en) 2007-06-29 2011-06-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer-bioceramic composite implantable medical device with different types of bioceramic particles
EP2253413A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2010-11-24 National University of Ireland Galway Method for laser ablation
US20100301013A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2010-12-02 National University Of Ireland Method for laser ablation
US8524139B2 (en) * 2009-08-10 2013-09-03 FEI Compay Gas-assisted laser ablation
US20110031655A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Fei Company Gas-assisted laser ablation
US20110057356A1 (en) * 2009-09-04 2011-03-10 Kevin Jow Setting Laser Power For Laser Machining Stents From Polymer Tubing
US8435437B2 (en) 2009-09-04 2013-05-07 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Setting laser power for laser machining stents from polymer tubing
US9198785B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2015-12-01 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Crush recoverable polymer scaffolds
US9827119B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-11-28 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Polymer scaffolds having a low crossing profile
US9867728B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2018-01-16 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of making a stent
US9763818B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-09-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of crimping stent on catheter delivery assembly
US9770351B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-09-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Crush recoverable polymer scaffolds
US10123894B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2018-11-13 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of crimping stent on catheter delivery assembly
US9744625B2 (en) 2010-06-10 2017-08-29 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Laser system and processing conditions for manufacturing bioabsorbable stents
US8679394B2 (en) 2010-06-10 2014-03-25 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Laser system and processing conditions for manufacturing bioabsorbable stents
CN102151997A (en) * 2011-01-31 2011-08-17 华中科技大学 Method for processing micropore of patch clamp chip
US20140224776A1 (en) * 2013-02-13 2014-08-14 Lawrence Livermore National Security, Llc Laser-induced gas plasma machining
US9790090B2 (en) * 2013-02-13 2017-10-17 Lawrence Livermore National Security, Llc Laser-induced gas plasma machining
US9999527B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2018-06-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Scaffolds having radiopaque markers

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
TW583047B (en) 2004-04-11
CN1620354A (en) 2005-05-25
CN1319696C (en) 2007-06-06
EP1474267A1 (en) 2004-11-10
AU2002327565A1 (en) 2003-09-09
US20060049156A1 (en) 2006-03-09
WO2003070415A1 (en) 2003-08-28
US8653410B2 (en) 2014-02-18

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
CN101585655B (en) Substrate dividing apparatus and method for dividing substrate
CA2445644C (en) Surface modification
US7364986B2 (en) Laser beam processing method and laser beam machine
US6376797B1 (en) Laser cutting of semiconductor materials
US6737606B2 (en) Wafer dicing device and method
EP0370776B1 (en) Method of fabricating ink jet printheads
US20060088984A1 (en) Laser ablation method
US20070193990A1 (en) Laser machining of a workpiece
CA1334068C (en) Manufacture of nozzles for ink jet printers
US6841482B2 (en) Laser machining of semiconductor materials
US5000811A (en) Precision buttable subunits via dicing
US3626141A (en) Laser scribing apparatus
US20030006221A1 (en) Method and apparatus for cutting a multi-layer substrate by dual laser irradiation
US20060169677A1 (en) Method and apparatus for via drilling and selective material removal using an ultrafast pulse laser
US20020190435A1 (en) Laser segmented cutting
US4356376A (en) Pulse laser pretreated machining
US5189437A (en) Manufacture of nozzles for ink jet printers
US6621045B1 (en) Workpiece stabilization with gas flow
Chang et al. Precision micromachining with pulsed green lasers
EP1018395B1 (en) Laser machining apparatus
EP0450313B1 (en) Laser etching of materials in liquids
JP5432285B2 (en) How to laser processing a glass into a shape having a chamfered end
US20100248451A1 (en) Method for Laser Singulation of Chip Scale Packages on Glass Substrates
CN1788916B (en) Laser segmented cutting
US5744780A (en) Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY, COLORADO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HUTH, MARK;POLLARD, JEFFREY R.;SCOTT, GRAEME;REEL/FRAME:012720/0546

Effective date: 20020411

AS Assignment

Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P., COLORAD

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:013776/0928

Effective date: 20030131

Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P.,COLORADO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:013776/0928

Effective date: 20030131