US20030154627A1 - Boot liner - Google Patents

Boot liner Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030154627A1
US20030154627A1 US10/076,956 US7695602A US2003154627A1 US 20030154627 A1 US20030154627 A1 US 20030154627A1 US 7695602 A US7695602 A US 7695602A US 2003154627 A1 US2003154627 A1 US 2003154627A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
thermoformable
boot liner
liner according
non
section
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/076,956
Inventor
Shuichi Hirayama
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Shimano Inc
Original Assignee
Shimano Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Shimano Inc filed Critical Shimano Inc
Priority to US10/076,956 priority Critical patent/US20030154627A1/en
Assigned to SHIMANO INC. reassignment SHIMANO INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HIRAYAMA, SHUICHI
Publication of US20030154627A1 publication Critical patent/US20030154627A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/04Ski boots; Similar boots
    • A43B5/0405Linings, paddings, insertions; Inner boots
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/18Joint supports, e.g. instep supports
    • A43B7/20Ankle-joint supports or holders
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C1/00Shoe lacing fastenings

Abstract

A boot liner basically includes a sole portion, an upper portion and a tightening device. A tongue part is preferably mounted in a slit formed in the upper portion. The upper portion has a thermoformable layer with first and second non-thermoformable members located on an inner side and an outer side of the ankle section. The first and second non-thermoformable members are banana-shaped or L-shaped pads that are preferably formed of a polyurethane. The first and second non-thermoformable members are preferably located below and rearwardly the portions of the tibia and fibula that form the ankle of a foot corresponding to the size of the boot liner.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention [0001]
  • This invention generally relates to a boot liner. More specifically, the present invention relates a sport boot liner or snowboard boot liner that is comfortable to wear. [0002]
  • 2. Background Information [0003]
  • Many cold weather footwear have an internal boot liner that is separate from the outer shell of the footwear. For example, hiking boots, ski boots, snowboard boots and the like often have a boot liner. The boot liner provides thermal insulation, shock absorption, comfort, etc. for the wearer's foot and/or the lower part of the wearer's leg. The boot liner is typically formed with a sole and an upper portion. The upper portion is often formed with a central opening or slit. Some times a tongue is formed on a lower end of the opening or slit, the tongue extending between the sides of the central opening or slit. [0004]
  • It is important to keep the liner in contact with the wearer's foot. Thus, the boot liner is sometimes provided with a tightening device. The tightening device is typically positioned on the sides of the central slit and usually includes loops or eyelets with a lace extending through the loops or eyelets. The lace typically extends through the loops or eyelets in a criss-cross manner, e.g., going from side to side through the loops and eyelets. Typically the eyelets or loops are formed on opposite sides of the opening in equal numbers at equally spaced apart intervals, defining pairs of eyelets or loops. [0005]
  • Boot liners are formed of a variety of materials such as woven fabrics, sponge like materials or rubber, or various combinations of these materials. Some boot liners are provided with a tightening device that can tighten the boot liner around wearer's foot. [0006]
  • One example of a boot liner with a tightening device is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,937,542, assigned to Solomon S. A. This patent discloses a tightening device for a boot liner that uses a single cord and a plurality of straps to tighten the boot liner about the wearer's foot. [0007]
  • Recently, the boot liner has been redesigned to provide the wearer with a more comfortable fit. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,924,218 assigned to Salomon S. A. discloses a boot liner that utilizes thermo forming material to provide a better fit. [0008]
  • In view of the above, there exists a need for snowboard boot liner which is comfortable to wear. This invention addresses this need in the prior art as well as other needs, which will become apparent to those skilled in the art from this disclosure. [0009]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • One object of the present invention is to provide a snowboard boot liner that is comfortable to wear. [0010]
  • Another object of the present invention is to provide boot liner, which is securely tighten about the wears ankle. [0011]
  • The foregoing objects can basically be attained by providing a snowboard boot liner comprising a sole portion and an upper portion. The upper portion has a foot section fixedly coupled to the sole portion, an ankle section extending upwardly from the foot section and a leg section extending upwardly from the ankle section. The upper portion includes a thermoformable layer located on an inner side and an outer side of the ankle section and a first non-thermoformable member located in one of the inner and outer sides of the ankle section. [0012]
  • These and other objects, features, aspects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, which, taken in conjunction with the annexed drawings, discloses a preferred embodiment of the present invention.[0013]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Referring now to the attached drawings which form a part of this original disclosure: [0014]
  • FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of a boot liner in accordance with the present invention; [0015]
  • FIG. 2 is a front perspective view of the boot liner illustrated in FIG. 1; [0016]
  • FIG. 3 is an enlarged, partial cross-sectional view of the boot liner illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 as viewed along section line [0017] 3-3 of FIG. 2;
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged, partial cross-sectional view of the boot liner illustrated in FIGS. [0018] 1-3 as viewed along section line 4-4 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a partial cross-sectional view of a portion of the boot liner illustrated in FIGS. [0019] 1-4 as viewed along section line 5-5 of FIG. 4; and
  • FIG. 6 is a partial cross-sectional view of a portion of the boot liner illustrated in FIGS. [0020] 1-5 as viewed along section line 6-6 of FIG. 4.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring initially to FIGS. 1 and 2, a boot liner [0021] 10 is illustrated in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. The boot liner 10 is preferably designed to be used with a sport boot (not shown) or the like. More specifically, the boot liner 10 is designed to be inserted into a shell of a sport boot such as a snowboard boot (not shown). The boot liner 10 allows for a tight fit around the foot and lower leg of the wearer. More specifically, the boot liner 10 of the present invention allows a tight fit around the ankle area of the wearer.
  • It would be apparent to the one skilled in the art from this disclosure that the boot liner [0022] 10 can come in a variety of sizes to accommodate various sizes of feet. In other words, the boot liner 10 is so dimensioned to correspond to a particular size of foot for a particular size of boot liner. As explained below, the boot liner 10 is especially constructed to provide a tight fit around the ankle area of the wearer. Thus, for a given size of foot, the boot liner 10 is shaped to snuggly fit the ankle joint A which is basically comprised of three bones, i.e., the tibia which forms the inside or medial portion of the ankle joint, the fibula which forms the lateral or outside portion of the ankle joint and the talus that forms the underneath of the ankle joint. The boot liner 10 of the present invention is designed based on the average location of the ankle joint A formed by the tibia and the fibula portions of the ankle joint A to a particular size of foot.
  • The boot liner [0023] 10 basically includes a sole portion 12, an upper portion 14 coupled to the sole portion 12 and a tightening device T coupled to the upper portion 14 for drawing opposite lateral sides of the upper portion 14 together via a lace or cord L. As used herein, the following directional terms “forward, rearward, above, downward, vertical, horizontal, below and transverse” as well as any other similar directional terms refer to those directions of the boot liner 10 in the normal upright position. Accordingly, these terms, as utilized to describe the present invention should be interpreted relative to a wearer's foot with the boot liner 10 in the normal upright position.
  • As best seen in FIG. 4, the sole portion [0024] 12 is preferably a separate element that is coupled to the upper portion 14 in a conventional manner such as by sewing the two portions together. Preferably, the sole portion 12 is preferably different from the upper portion 14. The sole portion 12 is preferably a two part construction with each part being constructed of two layers of flexible material. Specifically, the sole portion 12 has an outer sole section 15 that is sewn to the upper portion 14 and an inner sole section 16 the removably overlies the outer sole section 15.
  • More specifically, as seen in FIG. 4, the outer sole section [0025] 15 should have a bottom outer layer 15 a and an inner layer 15 b. This layered configuration is preferably bonded together in a conventional manner such as with adhesives. In the drawings, the thickness of each of the layers 15 a and 15 b is not drawn to scale. Rather, the thickness of the layer 15 a has been exaggerated for purposes of illustration.
  • The outer layer [0026] 15 a of the outer sole section 15 is constructed of a material having a high coefficient of friction. In other words, when the boot liner 10 is located within the boot (not shown) the sole portion 12 will frictionally contact the inner surface of the boot to limit relative movement therebetween. The outer layer 15 a of the outer sole section 15 is preferably constructed of a flexible rubber material such as a synthetic rubber, a polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ethyl vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) or leather or any other suitable material. The bottom surface of the outer layer 15 a of the outer sole section 15 is preferably textured to increase the non-slip characteristics thereof. The inner layer 15 b of the outer sole section 15 is preferably formed of a thermoformable material such as ULTRALON, which can conformed the bottom of the foot. In other words, the thermoformable inner layer 15 b of the outer sole section 15 has thermoplastic qualities rendering capable of being adjusted and/or adapted after being heated at its thermoforming temperature, to the specific volume of the wearer's foot.
  • As seen in FIG. 4, the inner sole section [0027] 16 is preferably a removable insert that overlies the outer sole section 15. The inner sole section 16 is preferably constructed of a bottom layer 16 a and an upper layer 16 b. This layered configuration is preferably bonded together in a conventional manner such as with adhesives. In the drawings, the thickness of each of the layers 16 a and 16 b is not drawn to scale. Rather, the thickness of the layer 16 b has been exaggerated for purposes of illustration. The bottom layer 16 a of the inner sole section 16 is preferably constructed of a compressible, flexible material such as an ethyl vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) that provides a cushion for the wearer's foot. The upper layer 16 a of the inner sole section 16 is preferably formed of a polyester fabric or textile material.
  • The upper portion [0028] 14 is preferably constructed of two parts, e.g., a main part 17 and a tongue part 18. These parts 17 and 18 are sewn together by stitching 19 to form a foot section 20, an ankle section 21 and a leg section 22. The foot section 20 is fixedly coupled to the sole portion 12 in a conventional manner, preferably by stitching 21. The ankle section 21 is located in the area between the foot section 20 and the leg portion 22. The leg portion 22 extends upwardly from the foot section 20 with a longitudinal slit 24 formed in both the foot section 20 and the ankle section 21. The longitudinal slit 24 is substantially located along the middle or median plane of the boot liner 10. Thus, the longitudinal slit 24 is defined by a pair of opposite lateral sides 26 a and 26 b of the upper portion 14. Preferably, the longitudinal slit 24 extends along both the foot section 20 and the leg section 22.
  • As seen in FIGS. [0029] 3-6, each of the parts 17 and 18 of the upper portion 14 is constructed of four layers of flexible materials as best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6. More specifically, the upper portion 14 has an outermost layer 28 a, an outer intermediate or thermoformable layer 28 b, an inner intermediate or spongy layer 28 c and an innermost layer 28 d. This layered configuration is preferably bonded together in a conventional manner such as with adhesives. In the drawings, the thickness of each of the layers 28 a-28 d is not drawn to scale. Rather, the thickness of each of the layers 28 a and 28 d has been exaggerated for purposes of illustration.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the outermost layer [0030] 28 a is preferably constructed of an elastane material such as spandex. The outermost layer 28 a preferably has a lateral thickness or dimension of approximately 0.3 millimeters to approximately 0.5 millimeters. The outer intermediate (thermoformable) layer 28 b is preferably constructed of a thermoformable material such as ULTRALON. The thermoformable layer 28 b has thermoplastic qualities rendering capable of being adjusted and/or adapted after being heated at its thermo forming temperature, to the specific volume of the wearer's foot. The thermoformable layer 28 b preferably has a lateral thickness or dimension of approximately 7 millimeters. The inner intermediate (spongy) layer 28 c is preferably constructed of a conventional foam or sponge material such as an open cell polyurethane. The inner intermediate layer 28 c preferably has a lateral thickness or dimension of approximately 3.5 millimeters. The innermost layer 28 d is preferably constructed of a cloth material such as a NYLEX® polymer knit fabric. The innermost layer 28 d preferably has a lateral thickness or dimension of approximately 0.3 millimeters to approximately 0.5 millimeters. Of course, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art from this disclosure that the upper portion 14 can be constructed of other suitable flexible materials that will carry out the present invention.
  • As seen in FIG. 3, the ankle section [0031] 21 has a pair of non-thermoformable members 29 located in the inner and outer sides of the ankle section 21. As seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, the first and second non-thermoformable members 29 are preferably located between the thermoformable layer 28 b and the inner spongy layer 28 c. The first and second non-thermoformable members 29 are banana-shaped or L-shaped pads that are preferably formed of a polyurethane material. The first and second non-thermoformable members 29 form a pair of banana-shaped or L-shaped bulges B that extend laterally towards each other.
  • As seen in FIG. 4, each of the first and second non-thermoformable members [0032] 29 has a vertical height or dimension D1 of approximately 70 millimeters and a horizontal length or dimension D2 of approximately 70 millimeters. The non-thermoformable members 29 preferably have a lateral thickness or dimension D3 of approximately 11.5 millimeters. The tightening device T is arranged and configured on the upper portion 14 such that first and second strap portions overlie parts of the non-thermoformable members 29 as best seen in FIG. 4.
  • The non-thermoformable members [0033] 29 are positioned just rearwardly of an average location of the fibula and tibia that form portions of the ankle joint. In other words, the non-thermoformable members 29 basically cradle or support the ankle joint at the bottom and rearward sides of the ankle joint A. Of course, it would be apparent to those skilled in the art from this disclosure that for each size of boot liner 10, the location of the non-thermoformable members 29 should be located based on the average location of the ankle joint A for a wearer's foot that is sized for the particular size of boot liner 10.
  • The density of the thermoformable material forming the thermoformable layer [0034] 28 b is preferably around 50 kg/m3 and has a hardness of approximately 35-40 on a rubber hardness tester C scale of the Japan Rubber Association. On the other hand, the polyurethane material of the non-thermoformable members 29 preferably have a hardness of 20 on the rubber hardness tester C scale of the Japan Rubber Association. The polyurethane material of the non-thermoformable members 29 is denser such that the non-formable members 29 are not as compressible as the spongy layer 28 c. Thus, the thermoformable layer 28 b is harder than the inner intermediate layer 28 c and the non-thermoformable members 29. The non-thermoformable members 29 are preferably harder than the spongy layer 28 c. Preferably, both the spongy layer 28 c and the non-thermoformable members 29 are formed of a polyurethane material. However, the non-thermoformable members 29 are not as dense as the thermoformable layer 28 b such that the non-thermoformable members 29 are more compressible in the lateral direction than the thermoformable layer 28 b.
  • As seen in FIG. 3, the tongue part [0035] 18 is arranged to span the longitudinal slit 24 as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2. The tongue part 18 is preferably constructed of four layers 30 a, 30 b, 30 c and 30 d. Preferably, the materials of the layers 30 a, 30 b, 30 c and 30 d corresponds to the same materials used for the layers 28 a, 28 b, 28 c and 28 d of the main part 17 of the upper portion 14, respectively. Accordingly, the tongue part 18 is constructed of a flexible cushioned material, which is preferably the same flexible cushioning materials used for the main part 17 of the upper portion 14. This layered configuration is preferably bonded together in a conventional manner such as with adhesives. In the drawings, the thickness of each of the layers 30 a-30 d is not drawn to scale. Rather, the thickness of each of the layers 30 a and 30 d has been exaggerated for purposes of illustration.
  • The tightening device T is coupled to the upper portion [0036] 14 for drawing opposite lateral sides 26 a and 26 b of the upper portion 14 towards one another. The tightening device T basically includes an upper lacing member 32 and a lower lacing member 34. The upper and lower lacing members 32 and 34 are sewn via stitching to the upper portion 14 at four rearwardly located points 35 (only two points shown in FIG. 1). The lower lacing member 34 also has its two lateral bottom portions glued to the outer sole section 15 at side points 36 (only one point shown in FIG. 1). The upper lacing member 32 includes four (two pairs) upper strap or lacing portions 41, 42, 43 and 44, while the lower lacing member 34 includes a pair of lower strap or lacing portions 45 and 46. The upper lacing member 32 primarily tightens the leg section 22 of the upper portion 14, while the lower lacing member 34 primarily tightens the ankle section 21, which is located at the intersection of the foot section 20 and the leg section 22. Of course, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art from this disclosure that depending upon the size of the boot liner 10 and its desired used, fewer or more primary lacing portions can be utilized to carry out the present invention.
  • The strap or lacing portions [0037] 41-46 are preferably constructed of conventional strap material that is commonly used in the art. The strap or lacing portions 41-46 are constructed of a flexible material such as leather, nylon or any other suitable material. Of course, a variety of arrangements can be utilized. For example, the lacing portions 41-46 can be merely eyelets or holes formed directly in the upper portion 14. Alternatively, the lacing portions 41-46 can be formed as hooks and/or rigid ring members.
  • The tightening device T is positioned on the sides of the central slit [0038] 24 with the cord L extending through the looped members formed by the lacing portions 4146. The cord L typically extends through the looped members formed by the lacing portions 41-46 in a criss-cross manner, e.g., going from side to side through the loops. Typically, the looped members formed by the lacing portions 41-46 are located on opposite sides of the central slit 24 in equal numbers at equally spaced apart intervals so as to define pairs of looped members.
  • The terms of degree such as “substantially”, “about” and “approximately” as used herein mean a reasonable amount of deviation of the modified term such that the end result is not significantly changed. These terms should be construed as including a deviation of at least ±5% of the modified term if this deviation would not negate the meaning of the word it modifies. [0039]
  • While only selected embodiments have been chosen to illustrate the present invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art from this disclosure that various changes and modifications can be made herein without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. Furthermore, the foregoing description of the embodiments according to the present invention are provided for illustration only, and not for the purpose of limiting the invention as defined by the appended claims and their equivalents. [0040]

Claims (25)

What is claimed is:
1. A boot liner comprising:
a sole portion; and
an upper portion having a foot section fixedly coupled to said sole portion, an ankle section extending upwardly from said foot section and a leg section extending upwardly from said ankle section, said upper portion including a thermoformable layer located on an inner side and an outer side of said ankle section and a first non-thermoformable member located in one of said inner and outer sides of said ankle section.
2. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said first non-thermoformable member is located in said inner side of said ankle section.
3. The boot liner according to claim 2, wherein
said first non-thermoformable member is located in said outer side of said ankle section.
4. The boot liner according to claim 3, wherein
said upper portion includes a second non-thermoformable member located in said inner side of said ankle section.
5. The boot liner according to claim 4, wherein
said first a nd second non-thermoformable members are banana-shaped pads.
6. The boot liner according to claim 5, wherein
said first and second non-thermoformable members are formed of a polyurethane.
7. The boot liner according to claim 5, wherein
each of said first and second non-thermoformable members has a height of approximately 70 millimeters and a length of approximately 70 millimeters.
8. The boot liner according to claim 7, wherein
said upper portion includes a tightening device with a first strap portion overlying a part of said first non-thermoformable member and a second strap portion overlying a part of said second non-thermoformable member.
9. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said thermoformable layer further extends along said foot section.
10. The boot liner according to claim 9, wherein
said thermoformable layer further extends along and a leg section
11. The boot liner according to claim 10, wherein
said upper portion includes a foam layer overly an exteriorly facing surface of said thermoformable layer.
12. The boot liner according to claim 11, wherein
said upper portion includes an outer layer overly an exteriorly facing surface of said thermoformable layer.
13. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said upper portion includes an inner layer overly an interiorly facing surface of said thermoformable layer with said first and second non-thermoformable members located between said thermoformable layer and said inner layer.
14. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said first non-thermoformable member is a banana-shaped pad.
15. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said first and non-thermoformable member is formed of a polyurethane.
16. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said first non-thermoformable member has a height of approximately 70 millimeters and a length of approximately 70 millimeters.
17. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said sole portion is a separate member that is coupled to said foot section of said upper portion.
18. The boot liner according to claim 17, wherein
said sole portion is constructed of flexible materials.
19. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said sole portion includes an outer sole section that is fixedly coupled to said foot section of said upper portion.
20. The boot liner according to claim 19, wherein
said outer sole section of said sole portion includes an exterior layer of a polyvinyl chloride material.
21. The boot liner according to claim 20, wherein
said outer sole section of said sole portion further includes an interior thermoformable layer.
22. The boot liner according to claim 21, wherein
said sole portion further includes an inner sole section that overlies said outer sole section of said sole portion.
23. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said sole portion further includes an thermoformable layer.
24. The boot liner according to claim 1, wherein
said upper portion includes a tongue portion coupled to said upper portion and arranged to span a longitudinal slit formed in said leg section, and a tightening device coupled to said upper portion for drawing opposite lateral sides of said upper portion that define said slit towards one another.
25. The boot liner according to claim 19, wherein
said tightening device includes a first strap portion overlying a part of said first non-thermoformable member and a second strap portion overlying a part of said second non-thermoformable member.
US10/076,956 2002-02-19 2002-02-19 Boot liner Abandoned US20030154627A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/076,956 US20030154627A1 (en) 2002-02-19 2002-02-19 Boot liner

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/076,956 US20030154627A1 (en) 2002-02-19 2002-02-19 Boot liner
JP2003005666A JP3752490B2 (en) 2002-02-19 2003-01-14 Boot liner

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030154627A1 true US20030154627A1 (en) 2003-08-21

Family

ID=27732557

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/076,956 Abandoned US20030154627A1 (en) 2002-02-19 2002-02-19 Boot liner

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20030154627A1 (en)
JP (1) JP3752490B2 (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040111923A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2004-06-17 Brooks Jeffrey S. Footwear
US20050044749A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-03-03 K-2 Corporation Boot liner with ankle and heel volume control
US20060196083A1 (en) * 2003-02-11 2006-09-07 K-2 Corporation Snowboard boot with liner harness
US20070044346A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2007-03-01 Ungari Joseph L Article of footwear with solar panel assembly
US20070169377A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2007-07-26 Roger Neiley Articulating footwear for sports activity
US20100263236A1 (en) * 2009-04-16 2010-10-21 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear for Snowboarding
US20100287793A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2010-11-18 K-2 Corporation Sports boot construction
US8302329B2 (en) 2009-11-18 2012-11-06 Nike, Inc. Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US20130340289A1 (en) * 2011-03-04 2013-12-26 Salomon S.A.S. Shoe having an improved upper
US8857077B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2014-10-14 Nike, Inc. Footwear with internal harness

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3925916A (en) * 1973-10-04 1975-12-16 Carlo Garbuio Foot-fitting insert for ski boot or the like
US4385456A (en) * 1981-03-06 1983-05-31 Jean Livernois Preformed lining component for skate boots and the like
US5269078A (en) * 1989-07-31 1993-12-14 Robert G. Carter Apparatus for supplying supporting force
US5738937A (en) * 1996-11-12 1998-04-14 Baychar; Waterproof/breathable liner and in-line skate employing the liner
US5746015A (en) * 1994-11-10 1998-05-05 Salomon S.A. Comfort liner for ski boot
US5775006A (en) * 1994-12-14 1998-07-07 Truckee Winter Sports, Inc. Insulated winter weather boot having an adjustable strap closure
US5893222A (en) * 1997-02-28 1999-04-13 Donnelly; Peter Heat moldable boot liner
US5946827A (en) * 1998-08-03 1999-09-07 Shimano Inc. Snowboard boot ankle and heel support
US5950335A (en) * 1995-07-12 1999-09-14 Shimano, Inc. Snowboard boots
US6035558A (en) * 1996-10-23 2000-03-14 Shimano, Inc. Snowboard boot
US6073370A (en) * 1998-02-23 2000-06-13 Shimano Inc. Snowboard boot power lacing configuration

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3925916A (en) * 1973-10-04 1975-12-16 Carlo Garbuio Foot-fitting insert for ski boot or the like
US4385456A (en) * 1981-03-06 1983-05-31 Jean Livernois Preformed lining component for skate boots and the like
US5269078A (en) * 1989-07-31 1993-12-14 Robert G. Carter Apparatus for supplying supporting force
US5746015A (en) * 1994-11-10 1998-05-05 Salomon S.A. Comfort liner for ski boot
US5775006A (en) * 1994-12-14 1998-07-07 Truckee Winter Sports, Inc. Insulated winter weather boot having an adjustable strap closure
US5950335A (en) * 1995-07-12 1999-09-14 Shimano, Inc. Snowboard boots
US6035558A (en) * 1996-10-23 2000-03-14 Shimano, Inc. Snowboard boot
US5738937A (en) * 1996-11-12 1998-04-14 Baychar; Waterproof/breathable liner and in-line skate employing the liner
US5893222A (en) * 1997-02-28 1999-04-13 Donnelly; Peter Heat moldable boot liner
US6073370A (en) * 1998-02-23 2000-06-13 Shimano Inc. Snowboard boot power lacing configuration
US5946827A (en) * 1998-08-03 1999-09-07 Shimano Inc. Snowboard boot ankle and heel support

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040111923A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2004-06-17 Brooks Jeffrey S. Footwear
US7028419B2 (en) 2000-08-04 2006-04-18 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US7386947B2 (en) * 2003-02-11 2008-06-17 K-2 Corporation Snowboard boot with liner harness
US20060196083A1 (en) * 2003-02-11 2006-09-07 K-2 Corporation Snowboard boot with liner harness
US20050044749A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-03-03 K-2 Corporation Boot liner with ankle and heel volume control
US7219444B2 (en) * 2003-08-26 2007-05-22 K-2 Corporation Boot liner with ankle and heel volume control
WO2005055753A1 (en) * 2003-12-08 2005-06-23 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US20070044346A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2007-03-01 Ungari Joseph L Article of footwear with solar panel assembly
US20070169377A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2007-07-26 Roger Neiley Articulating footwear for sports activity
US8499475B2 (en) * 2006-01-13 2013-08-06 Flow Sports, Inc. Articulating footwear for sports activity
US20110197476A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2011-08-18 Roger Neiley Articulating footwear for sports activity
US7891119B2 (en) * 2006-01-13 2011-02-22 Flow Sports, Inc. Articulating footwear for sports activity
US8667711B2 (en) 2009-04-16 2014-03-11 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for snowboarding
US8215033B2 (en) 2009-04-16 2012-07-10 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for snowboarding
US9420846B2 (en) 2009-04-16 2016-08-23 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for snowboarding
US20100263236A1 (en) * 2009-04-16 2010-10-21 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear for Snowboarding
US20100287793A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2010-11-18 K-2 Corporation Sports boot construction
US8656612B2 (en) 2009-11-18 2014-02-25 Nike, Inc. Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US8302329B2 (en) 2009-11-18 2012-11-06 Nike, Inc. Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US8857077B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2014-10-14 Nike, Inc. Footwear with internal harness
US10278454B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2019-05-07 Nike, Inc. Footwear with internal harness
US20130340289A1 (en) * 2011-03-04 2013-12-26 Salomon S.A.S. Shoe having an improved upper

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP2003235601A (en) 2003-08-26
JP3752490B2 (en) 2006-03-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3583081A (en) Upper material for shoes
US3545107A (en) Boot and shoe construction
EP1163860B1 (en) Ventilated shoe
US3138880A (en) Athletic shoe
EP3017713B1 (en) Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
EP2443950B1 (en) Article of footwear for snowboarding
US7578076B2 (en) Modular shoe
US9681708B2 (en) Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
EP1954154B1 (en) Flexible shank for an article of footwear
US4282657A (en) Heel restraint with an adjustable and flexible closure assembly for shoes
US6014823A (en) Inflatable sole lining for shoes and boots
US5555650A (en) Laceless athletic shoe
EP2582260B1 (en) Dual rigidity shoe sole
US5410821A (en) Shoe with interchangable soles
EP0102842B1 (en) Shoe with adjustable strap fastening mechanism
AU656022B2 (en) Upper for an athletic shoe and method for manufacturing the same
US7757408B2 (en) Shoe having improved Opanka stitching
US4402146A (en) Running shoe sole with heel tabs
US6857203B2 (en) Pleatless ballet slipper
US6253376B1 (en) Knee pad
US6754983B2 (en) Article of footwear including a tented upper
US9538798B2 (en) Articles of apparel including auxetic materials
CN104799484B (en) Article of footwear with footwear front panel
US4519148A (en) Exercise shoe
KR101754366B1 (en) Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with interior layer features

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SHIMANO INC., JAPAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HIRAYAMA, SHUICHI;REEL/FRAME:012727/0404

Effective date: 20020326

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO PAY ISSUE FEE