US20030136496A1 - Use of an air-permeable/adhesive-permeable cloth to hold insulation material - Google Patents

Use of an air-permeable/adhesive-permeable cloth to hold insulation material Download PDF

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Publication number
US20030136496A1
US20030136496A1 US10/377,329 US37732903A US2003136496A1 US 20030136496 A1 US20030136496 A1 US 20030136496A1 US 37732903 A US37732903 A US 37732903A US 2003136496 A1 US2003136496 A1 US 2003136496A1
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cloth
adhesive
permeable
air
cavity
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US10/377,329
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Ralph Sweany
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Sweany Ralph S.
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Priority to US10/377,329 priority patent/US20030136496A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F21/00Implements for finishing work on buildings
    • E04F21/02Implements for finishing work on buildings for applying plasticised masses to surfaces, e.g. plastering walls
    • E04F21/06Implements for applying plaster, insulating material, or the like
    • E04F21/08Mechanical implements
    • E04F21/085Mechanical implements for filling building cavity walls with insulating materials
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/76Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to heat only
    • E04B1/7604Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to heat only fillings for cavity walls
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings

Abstract

A method of supporting loose fill insulation in a wall cavity with a flexible cloth. The cloth is secured to the wall cavity frame by initially fastening the upper and lower edges of the cloth to the upper and lower plates, and then permanently gluing the cloth to the vertical studs with a flowable adhesive. A small punch hole is made in the cloth to accommodate an installation tube, which is preferably angled at its end to facilitate reaching into small spaces and cracks. Loose fill insulation is blown into the cavity behind the cloth after inserting the installation tube through the punch hole in the cloth. The quality of the adhesion of the cloth to the studs can be assessed by observing the color of the studs through the cloth.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to methods for providing loose fill insulation in the walls of a building, and more particularly to a method of using an air-permeable and adhesive-permeable cloth to support loose fill cellulose insulation in the wall of a building. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Loose fill cellulose insulation is known to be a superior insulating material from both a cost and efficiency standpoint. While other insulating materials such as fiberglass batts, etc., may alternatively be used, the low cost and high efficiency properties of loose fill cellulose make it ideal for many insulating needs, particularly for new home construction. [0002]
  • Most commonly, the cellulose insulation is blown into the space that will be between the outer wall material and the inner wall material before the inner wall material is installed. Thus, when the insulation is blown in, that space is defined by the outer wall material and the four sides of the wall frame—normally the upper and lower wall joists and the vertical studs. Because this space is open to the front where the inner wall material will go, it is necessary to provide some support for the insulation material until the inner wall is installed. Because the insulation material is typically blown in, the material used to support the insulation must also permit the exit of air as the insulation material fills the space. [0003]
  • The use of air-permeable materials to hold loose fill cellulose insulation in place before the inner wall is installed is known. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,697,198 to Ponder et al. describes an effective method of using cloth material to support cellulose insulation in framed walls during construction. That method improved upon the earlier method described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,712,347 and 5,287,674, both to Sperber, which also related to the use of cloth material to support loose-fill insulation before the inner wall is installed. In addition to the use of cloth, U.S. Pat. No. 5,287,674 to Sperber also discloses the use of a polypropylene filter material. [0004]
  • One problem that was not satisfactorily addressed by the Sperber patents though, is the problem of “bowing” or “bulging” of the insulation material out of the wall cavity. This is due, perhaps, to the type and/or amount of insulation used by Sperber, which is likely loose fill or particulate fiberglass that is commonly used at a density of about 1.0 to 1.8 pounds per cubic foot. With that insulation, Sperber states that bowing of about 0.5 to 1.0 inches is desired as an indicator that the appropriate insulation density has been achieved. Moreover, Sperber finds that the bowing from fiberglass insulation does not interfere with the installation of the inner wall. See, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 4,712,347, at col. 4, lines 45-51. [0005]
  • With loose fill cellulose however, bowing or bulging of the insulation material can be a significant problem. In particular, it has been found that bulging of 0.5 inches can cause problems during installation of the drywall, due to the greater density at which loose fill cellulose is used. Whereas the loose fill fiberglass used by Sperber is used at a density of about one pound per cubic foot, loose fill cellulose is used at a density of at least about three pounds per cubic foot. Thus, the prior art method of Sperber, (commercially called the “Blow-In-Blanket” or “BIB” system) does not address the fact that loose fill cellulose bulges at recommended insulation densities making it difficult to install the inner drywall or paneling flush over the insulated space. [0006]
  • The prior art method of Ponder et al. addresses the bulging problem by using a flowable adhesive to secure the netting to the stud face. That method does a pretty good job of preventing bulging, but it is not as fast to use as many installers would prefer. Additionally, improvements in the strength of the support material, and in the strength of its attachment to the stud face, are still desired. [0007]
  • A need therefore exists for a method of installing loose fill cellulose insulation that prevents bulging of the installed insulation material, yet is strong and fast to install. The present invention addresses that need. [0008]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Briefly describing one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method of using an air-permeable and adhesive-permeable “cloth” material to hold loose fill insulation in position in a wall cavity until the inner wall material can be installed. The inventive method is faster and stronger than prior art methods using netting or similar materials. [0009]
  • The preferred method uses polypropylene cloth as the air-permeable/adhesive-permeable material. The cloth is preferably installed by initially securing its upper and lower edges to the upper and lower wall joists with staples. (When metal studs are encountered, double-stick adhesive tape may be used instead of staples.) Then, the cloth material is glued to each of the vertical studs with a flowable adhesive that is applied with a roller. The use of the cloth material and the roller makes a more secure attachment since the adhesive covers the entire stud face when applied with a roller, and since the number of strands of material that are glued to the stud face is increased with this relatively dense-woven cloth. [0010]
  • One object of the present invention is to provide a method of supporting loose fill insulation in a wall cavity before the interior drywall or paneling is installed. [0011]
  • A further object of the present invention is to provide an inexpensive method of insulating all cavities of a house with cellulose and foam during construction without interfering with any of the established construction sequence of events and practices. [0012]
  • Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description. [0013]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a wall that is partially insulated with loose fill cellulose insulation according to one preferred embodiment of the present invention. [0014]
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a wall being insulated with loose fill cellulose insulation according to one preferred embodiment of the present invention. [0015]
  • FIG. 3 shows the adhesive material after it has been applied, covering the entire width of the stud. [0016]
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • For the purpose of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to preferred embodiments and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the illustrated device, and such further applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated therein being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates. [0017]
  • As previously indicated, the present invention uses an air-permeable and adhesive-permeable “cloth” material to hold loose fill insulation in position in a wall cavity until the inner wall material can be installed. The cloth is preferably installed by gluing it to the vertical studs with a flowable adhesive that is applied with a roller. [0018]
  • Referring to the Figures, FIG. 1 shows the support skeleton for the inner walls of a building structure. The structure includes a number of vertically extending studs [0019] 1 mounted between lower joists 2 and upper joists 3. The studs 1 are typically spaced uniformly from one another except where windows or corners interrupt the even spacing. When this happens, small cavities 4 are created. In either case though, a number of wall spaces opening toward the interior are formed between each adjoining pair of vertical studs.
  • After the outer wall material [0020] 6 has been installed, it is desirable to place insulation in the wall spaces before the inner wall material 7 is installed. With this method, there is no need to remove part of the inner wall to install the insulation.
  • To support the insulation before the inner wall is installed however, a support material must be placed where the inner wall will be. The support material must keep the insulation material completely back in the wall cavity, so that the inner wall may be installed flush against the studs. Even ½ inch of bowing of the insulation may mean that the drywall cannot be installed properly. [0021]
  • Further, the support material should allow air to escape from the cavity as the insulation material is being blown in. This also helps to keep the insulation material from extending outward from the wall cavity. [0022]
  • To accomplish these goals, an air-permeable and adhesive-permeable “cloth” material [0023] 8 is used to hold the loose fill insulation in position until the inner wall material can be installed. The cloth is secured to the studs using a flowable adhesive that can be “painted” on with a roller. The adhesive is painted onto the areas of cloth that overlie the stud face. As it soaks through the cloth and dries, it secures the cloth to the stud face.
  • More specifically describing the cloth material, a polypropylene cloth is preferably used as the air-permeable/adhesive-permeable material. The most preferred material is a polypropylene encapsulated material sold under the trade name INSULWEB®. [0024]
  • The air-permeable/adhesive-permeable material preferably weighs between about 1.0 and 1.5 ounces per square yard, with a weight of 1.25 ounces per square yard being most preferred. The material preferably has a thickness of between 6 and 10 mils, with a thickness of 8 mils being most preferred. The danier per filament is preferably 6-10, and is most preferably 8. [0025]
  • The most preferred cloth material has a Mullen burst of at least about 35 psi. The sheet grab tensile MD, and the sheet grab tensile XD are both preferably at least about 35 lbs., while the trapezoid tear MD and the trapezoid tear XD are both preferably at least about 18 lbs. The probe is preferably at least about 12 lbs., and the melting point is preferably at least about 300 F, and is most preferably between 325 and 335 F. The specific gravity is preferably about 0.90. [0026]
  • The cloth is secured to the stud faces using a flowable adhesive that is applied with a roller. The adhesive is preferably a latex adhesive that can be applied like latex paint. Most preferably, a latex fabric adhesive such as Bridges-Smith fabric adhesive D is used. That adhesive dries in 20 to 45 minutes, depending on humidity, etc., and holds with a force of at least about 4 psi after 10 minutes of drying time, a force of at least about 8 psi after 25 minutes of drying time (at 90% humidity), and a force of at least about 14 psi when fully dry. [0027]
  • In cold weather it may be preferable to use a hydrocarbon adhesive such as Capital Adhesive product #3004. [0028]
  • The cloth is preferably installed by initially securing its upper and lower edges to the upper and lower wall plates with staples, nails, tacks, tape, glue, or some other fastener that can be installed quickly. Then, the cloth material is “permanently” secured to each of the vertical studs by “painting” the adhesive onto the cloth (where it covers the stud face) with a brush or roller, and allowing the adhesive to begin drying. The use of the cloth material and the brush or roller makes a more secure attachment since the adhesive covers the entire stud face when applied that way, and since the number of strands of material that are glued to the stud face is increased with this relatively dense-woven cloth. [0029]
  • In the most preferred embodiment, the air-permeable and adhesive-permeable cloth [0030] 8 is first stapled in the upper right corner to the top plate (joist) 3 using standard construction staples 9. It is preferred to allow several inches excess past the corner so that excess cloth is provided on each end to provide a handhold for stretching and to compensate for cutting errors. The cloth is stapled across the top plate 3 every two to six inches pulling the cloth tight on the go. The top of the cloth is kept in alignment with top plate 3.
  • When tape is used to secure the cloth (such as with metal studs), a piece of tape is used every foot or so. Preferably the tape is double-stick (also referred to as double-backed or double-sided tape) adhesive tape, although single-sided tape may alternatively be used. [0031]
  • Once the cloth is stapled to top plate [0032] 3, it is stretched taunt in the middle towards the bottom plate 2 and stapled there. Then the cloth is stapled to the bottom plate 2 every 2 to 6 inches, stretching on the go and working from the middle out to the corners.
  • After the upper and lower edges have been secured to the upper and lower plates, it is preferred to also secure the cloth to at least some of the vertical studs to initially hold the cloth in place. Most preferably, the corner vertical studs are stapled every 4 to 12 inches stretching from the middle upward and downward. [0033]
  • The foregoing method is preferably used on each wall to be insulated, covering the whole wall. Once the cloth is in place it is easily cut to uncover any aperture areas required such as windows, doors, electrical boxes, plumbing, etc. [0034]
  • After cloth [0035] 8 has been stapled to plates 2 and 3, and to some of studs 1, the cloth is glued to the face of the vertical studs 1 for the whole length of the stud. The adhesive should be applied to that it is substantially smooth and flat relative to the stud face. This can be accomplished by applying the adhesive with a common paint roller. The adhesive is allowed to begin drying, usually for about 10-30 minutes, depending on temperature, humidity, etc.
  • One advantage of the present invention is that it provides feedback as to the quality of the bond between the cloth and the stud. Specifically, where the adhesive is securely holding the cloth to the stud (i.e., the cloth is in intimate contact with the stud and the adhesive is dry), the cloth and adhesive will be substantially transparent and the installer will see the wood-colored stud surface very clearly through the cloth. Alternatively, when the bond is not good (such as where adhesive was not applied, or where the adhesive is not dry), the installer will not clearly see the wood-colored stud surface, but will instead see the milky-white color of the cloth and adhesive. Thus, one can look at the color of the cloth along the studs, and can easily see if and where there is poor adhesion. Touch-ups can then be made where necessary before the wall is installed. [0036]
  • Cellulose insulation [0037] 10 is blown into the cavities formed by the studs and cloth, preferably through a hose with a “wand” (hereinafter referred to as an installation tube) attached to the end. In the most preferred embodiments the installation tube is an aluminum tube approximately 2 inches in diameter (inner diameter), and about 48 inches long. The four-foot length is preferred since it is easy to maneuver, yet also allows the installer to stand on the floor and still insulate above windows, doors, etc., although a shorter tube may be preferred for some areas. The tube is preferably beveled at the end, such as a 45 bevel.
  • Using the installation tube, an aperture [0038] 11 is punched into cloth 8 a little off-center of each cavity. In one preferred embodiment the punch hole (aperture) is positioned about 40 inches off the floor. Although the height off the floor will depend in part on operator height and preference, it has been found that placing the aperture about 40 inches off the floor generally works best for an eight foot tall cavity.
  • The cellulose is propelled to the cavity by any suitable blowing means, preferably an air blower [0039] 12 with a hose 13 for directing and placing the insulation, as noted above. Hose 13 may be virtually any length and diameter consistent with the delivery rate of the cellulose blowing machine being used.
  • More specifically describing the preferred mode of installation, the installation tube is inserted into the cavity through the punch hole and is pushed downward to within a few inches of the bottom plate. The angled end of the tube is turned away from the operator and the blowing means is started. As the cellulose material is delivered, the hose is withdrawn with a series of small upward and downward jerks as each layer beneath the end of the hose is filled. If during withdrawal, pockets form that are not fully packed (sometimes vertical runs of wire [0040] 5 will cause this), the tube can be pushed into those areas to complete the filling.
  • When the punched hole is reached, the hose is turned upward and pushed about six inches above the hole and paused until enough cellulose has been delivered to effect a filter function. Then the installation tube is pushed to the top of the cavity and withdrawn in a series of small downward and upward jerks. As described above, any pockets that form are filled by pushing the tube into them. [0041]
  • For cavities that are too small for the installation tube to be used effectively (typically one to two inches in width or height), a one inch nozzle is placed on the end of the hose. The nozzle is inserted through the cloth in as many positions as needed to fill the cavity. For cavities that are too small for the one-inch diameter nozzle, a foam-in-place insulation material may be used. [0042]
  • It is to be appreciated that the present invention provides a method of supporting the insulation that minimizes bulging and therefore keeps the insulation material from extending beyond the vertical stud face. Additionally, the smoothed and flattened adhesive [0043] 20 totally excludes cellulose from the faces of the studding. Thus, with this method a denser pack of insulation may be used, improving insulating efficiency while still allowing a flush fit of the interior drywall.
  • It is also to be appreciated that the present invention provides for a faster installation, making the process more efficient and economical. The use of rollers to apply the adhesive saves substantial time from the caulking gun method of the prior art. [0044]
  • Lastly, the strength of the bond between the cloth and the stud is improved over the strength of the bond when netting and a “caulking gun adhesive” were used. The area being held by the adhesive is greater since the adhesive more completely covers the stud face, and the number of strands of material being secured (per square inch) is greater with the cloth than it was with the netting. [0045]
  • While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only the preferred embodiment has been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the invention are desired to be protected. [0046]

Claims (17)

What is claimed is:
1. A method of installing loose fill insulation in a wall cavity having a rear wall, a bottom surface, and two side studs, wherein each of said side studs has a face coplanar with the open side of the wall cavity; said method comprising:
(a) covering the open side of the cavity with an air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth;
(b) initially securing said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth in its covering position;
(c) permanently securing said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth in its covering position by using an absorbent roller to spread a flowable adhesive over the portion of the cloth that covers the faces of the side studs, thereby providing sufficient flowable adhesive to pass through the cloth and adhere to the faces of the side walls, thereby securing the cloth to the stud faces; and
(d) blowing loose fill insulation into the cavity.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is polypropylene cloth.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said absorbent roller is a paint roller.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said flowable adhesive is a latex adhesive.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein said latex adhesive is a latex fabric adhesive.
6. The method of claim 2 wherein said polypropylene cloth is Insulweb™ polypropylene cloth.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is initially secured with staples.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is initially secured with tape.
9. A method of installing loose fill insulation in a wall cavity having a rear wall, a bottom surface, and two side studs, wherein each of said side studs has a face coplanar with the open side of the wall cavity; said method comprising:
(a) covering the open side of the cavity with an air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth;
(b) spreading a flowable adhesive over the portion of the cloth that covers the faces of the side studs, wherein said flowable adhesive is not transparent when wet, but is substantially transparent when dry and in intimate contact with the stud surface;
(c) observing the color of the stud/cloth interface to see where the cloth appears to be transparently fixed to the stud, and where the cloth does not appear to be transparently fixed to the stud;
(d) further securing the cloth to the stud in places where the cloth does not appear to be transparently fixed to the stud; and
(e) blowing loose fill insulation into the cavity.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is polypropylene cloth.
11. The method of claim 9 wherein said flowable adhesive is spread using a paint roller.
12. The method of claim 9 wherein said flowable adhesive is a latex adhesive.
13. The method of claim 12 wherein said latex adhesive is a latex fabric adhesive.
14. The method of claim 10 wherein said polypropylene cloth is Insulweb™ polypropylene cloth.
15. The method of claim 9 and further including initially securing said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth in its covering position.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is initially secured with staples.
17. The method of claim 15 wherein said air-permeable, adhesive-permeable cloth is initially secured with tape.
US10/377,329 2000-08-08 2003-02-28 Use of an air-permeable/adhesive-permeable cloth to hold insulation material Abandoned US20030136496A1 (en)

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US10/746,729 US20040140038A1 (en) 2000-08-08 2003-12-26 Use of an air-permeable/adhesive-permeable cloth to hold insulation material

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2333198B1 (en) * 2009-12-03 2016-05-04 isofloc AG Method and device for blowing insulation into insulation chambers
CN106320672A (en) * 2016-10-25 2017-01-11 徐洪恩 Intelligent wall painting robot
CN108005361A (en) * 2017-12-01 2018-05-08 泉州速创时代工业设计有限公司 A kind of putty plastering machine of recoverable
CN108487595A (en) * 2018-03-26 2018-09-04 佛山汇众森泰科技有限公司 A kind of paint can with paint brush

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DE102005009434A1 (en) 2005-03-02 2006-09-07 Lignotrend Ag Framework made from wood used in the construction of self-supporting outer walls has and delimiting elements arranged opposite each other, in which one of the elements has air-permeable regions with a filter-like retaining element
CN102777018A (en) * 2012-08-18 2012-11-14 王博 Inner wall whitewashing machine
CN106245889B (en) * 2014-10-23 2018-09-21 泉州一锋机械有限公司 A kind of high-effect cement mortar flush coater
CN104790616B (en) * 2015-03-27 2017-01-25 海盐县通元弗斯特工艺品厂 Device for attaching building decorative panel moving leftwards and rightwards under driving of air pressure and using method thereof
CN109723206A (en) * 2019-01-26 2019-05-07 温州乐成装饰设计有限公司 A kind of levelling trowel that building finishing uses
CN110593537A (en) * 2019-10-15 2019-12-20 中南林业科技大学 Novel paste coating machine

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US4734307A (en) * 1984-12-14 1988-03-29 Phillips Petroleum Company Compositions with adhesion promotor and method for production of flocked articles
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US5660119A (en) * 1996-06-28 1997-08-26 Plastic Systems, Inc. Lightweight structural beam

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US4712347A (en) * 1986-10-31 1987-12-15 Sperber Henry V Method and apparatus for containing insulation using netting
US5287674A (en) * 1991-08-13 1994-02-22 Henry Sperber Method and apparatus for containing insulation using a barrier assembly
US5697198A (en) * 1995-04-19 1997-12-16 Regal Industries Inc. Use of netting material to support cellulose insulation in framed walls during construction

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US3770547A (en) * 1971-05-14 1973-11-06 Sloane Mfg Co R & G Color bond surveillance system
US4734307A (en) * 1984-12-14 1988-03-29 Phillips Petroleum Company Compositions with adhesion promotor and method for production of flocked articles
US5143757A (en) * 1989-03-17 1992-09-01 SKINNER George Encapsulating a substrate
US5660119A (en) * 1996-06-28 1997-08-26 Plastic Systems, Inc. Lightweight structural beam

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2333198B1 (en) * 2009-12-03 2016-05-04 isofloc AG Method and device for blowing insulation into insulation chambers
CN106320672A (en) * 2016-10-25 2017-01-11 徐洪恩 Intelligent wall painting robot
CN108005361A (en) * 2017-12-01 2018-05-08 泉州速创时代工业设计有限公司 A kind of putty plastering machine of recoverable
CN108487595A (en) * 2018-03-26 2018-09-04 佛山汇众森泰科技有限公司 A kind of paint can with paint brush

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