US20030134259A1 - Method of teaching through exposure to relevant perspective - Google Patents

Method of teaching through exposure to relevant perspective Download PDF

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US20030134259A1
US20030134259A1 US10378772 US37877203A US20030134259A1 US 20030134259 A1 US20030134259 A1 US 20030134259A1 US 10378772 US10378772 US 10378772 US 37877203 A US37877203 A US 37877203A US 20030134259 A1 US20030134259 A1 US 20030134259A1
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student
perspective
mechanism
behavior
skill
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US10378772
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Tony Adams
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Tony Adams
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B19/00Teaching not covered by other main groups of this subclass
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • A63B69/3667Golf stance aids, e.g. means for positioning a golfer's feet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • A63B69/3676Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf for putting
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/38Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for tennis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0003Analysing the course of a movement or motion sequences during an exercise or trainings sequence, e.g. swing for golf or tennis
    • A63B24/0006Computerised comparison for qualitative assessment of motion sequences or the course of a movement
    • A63B2024/0012Comparing movements or motion sequences with a registered reference
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B71/0619Displays, user interfaces and indicating devices, specially adapted for sport equipment, e.g. display mounted on treadmills
    • A63B71/0622Visual, audio or audio-visual systems for entertaining, instructing or motivating the user
    • A63B2071/0638Displaying moving images of recorded environment, e.g. virtual environment
    • A63B2071/0644Displaying moving images of recorded environment, e.g. virtual environment with display speed of moving landscape controlled by the user's performance
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/70Measuring or simulating ambient conditions, e.g. weather, terrain or surface conditions

Abstract

A method of teaching a skill, such as, for example, hunting, tracking, or game-playing technique, whereby the student is exposed to the perspective of a relevant person, animal, or object, such as, for example, a game player, animal, or ball, whose identity is determined by the nature of the skill, and wherein a mechanism, such as, for example, video, computer animation, virtual reality, or role-playing, is used to impart the perspective. The method broadly comprises the steps of identifying a behavior of the thing, wherein the behavior is related to the skill; modeling a perspective of the thing related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student; implementing the model using a suitable mechanism; and introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is able to experience the perspective of the thing and to thereby better understand the behavior and the skill.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority benefit, with regard to all common subject matter, of non-provisional application titled “METHOD OF TEACHING THROUGH EXPOSURE TO RELEVANT PERSPECTIVE”, Ser. No. 09/990,649, filed Nov. 20, 2001, which is hereby incorporated into the present application by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to methods of teaching wherein the student is exposed to or experiences the perspective of a relevant person, animal, or object. More particularly, the present invention concerns a method of teaching a skill, such as, for example, hunting, tracking, or game-playing technique, whereby the student is exposed to or otherwise experiences the perspective of a relevant person, animal, or object, such as, for example, a game player, animal, or ball, whose identity is determined by the nature of the skill, and wherein a mechanism, such as, for example, prerecorded video, computer animation, virtual reality, role-playing, or a similar mechanism, is used to impart the perspective to the student.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Prior Art
  • [0005]
    It is often helpful when learning a skill to consider and appreciate the environment and context in which the skill is performed. A hunter learning proper duck hunting techniques, for example, must learn to properly camouflage a blind or other concealed shelter or area from which the hunter will observe and shoot; arrange duck decoys in a realistic and effective pattern on a pond or other body of water; and make realistic and appropriate duck calls at the proper times. Unfortunately, the hunter will typically be taught such techniques from a two-dimensional human perspective which may provide inadequate insight into the efficacy of the hunter's endeavors and any actual effects stemming therefrom.
  • [0006]
    Similarly, a golfer, for example, may intellectually comprehend a need to account for wind shear when driving or to account for ground contours when putting, but may lack a fundamental understanding or appreciation of potential forces which might act on the ball. Without such understanding, the golfer can never fully learn or appreciate proper driving or putting techniques.
  • [0007]
    Due to the above-identified and other problems and disadvantages in the art, a need exists for an improved method of teaching a skill such as hunting or sporting techniques.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    The present invention provides a distinct advance in the art of teaching. More particularly, the present invention concerns a method of teaching a skill, such as, for example, hunting, tracking, or game-playing technique, whereby a student is exposed to or otherwise experiences a perspective of a relevant thing, whether person, animal, or object, such as, for example, a game player, animal, or ball, whose identity is determined by the nature of the skill, and wherein a mechanism, such as, for example, prerecorded video, computer animation, virtual reality, role-playing, or a similar mechanism, is used to impart the perspective to the student.
  • [0009]
    In a preferred embodiment, the method broadly comprises the general steps of identifying a behavior of the thing, wherein the behavior is related to the skill; modeling a perspective of the thing related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student; implementing the model using an appropriate mechanism; and introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is exposed to or otherwise experiences the perspective of the thing and is thereby better able to understand the behavior. It will be appreciated that an understanding or better understanding of the behavior will result in the learning of or improvement in performance of the skill.
  • [0010]
    As mentioned, in prior art teaching methods the student is faced with learning the skill without truly understanding or developing a fundamental appreciation of why certain things are done the way they are. The present invention advantageously provides exposure to and appreciation of a perspective which is helpful to the student in performing the skill. In duck hunting, for example, it is advantageous to understand the behaviors and perspectives of a duck. Similarly, in the game of golf it is advantageous to understand the behaviors and perspectives of a skilled player.
  • [0011]
    These and other important features of the present invention are more fully described in the section titled DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT, below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    A preferred embodiment of the present invention is described in detail below with reference to the attached drawing figures, wherein:
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 1 is a flowchart showing a sequence of general steps in a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 2 is a perspective view looking down on an area of land associated with duck hunting, wherein the perspective is that of a flying duck;
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 3 is a flowchart showing a sequence of example-specific steps based upon the general steps of FIG. 1; and
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 4 is a perspective view looking down on an area of land associated with putting a golf ball, wherein the perspective is that of a golfer.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0017]
    The present invention concerns a method of teaching a skill, such as, for example, hunting, tracking, or game-playing technique, whereby a student is exposed to or otherwise experiences a perspective of a relevant thing, whether person, animal, or object, such as, for example, a game player, animal, or ball, whose identity is determined by the nature of the skill, and wherein a mechanism, such as, for example, prerecorded video, computer animation, virtual reality, role-playing, or a similar mechanism, is used to impart the perspective.
  • [0018]
    Referring to FIG. 1, the method broadly comprises the general steps of identifying a behavior of the thing, wherein the behavior is related to the skill, as depicted in box 10; modeling the perspective of the thing related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student, as depicted in box 12; implementing the model using an appropriate mechanism, as depicted in box 14; and introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is exposed to or otherwise experiences the perspective of the thing and is thereby better able to understand the behavior, as depicted in box 16. It will be appreciated that an understanding or better understanding of the behavior will result in the learning of or improvement in the performance of the skill.
  • [0019]
    The step of identifying the behavior of the thing, wherein the behavior is related to the skill, as depicted in box 10, involves identifying one or more actions or reactions or other behaviors exhibited by the thing in relation to the skill. It is this behavior that the student must experience and understand in order to improve in the skill. For example, referring also to FIG. 2, if the skill to be taught is duck hunting, including creating and camouflaging a blind 20 and lying-in-wait near a pond 22 or other potential landing area, then the thing is a duck 24 and the behavior is the duck's behavior in relation to the blind 20 and the hunter's efforts at lying-in-wait. This behavior might include, for example, the duck's propensity to circle the pond 22 prior to landing; the duck's propensity to call to one or more decoys 26 it perceives to be other live ducks; and the duck's reactions to certain duck calls made by the hunter.
  • [0020]
    The step of modeling the perspective of the thing related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student, as depicted in box 12, involves generating or obtaining a model operable to accurately describe the perspective, particularly visual, audible, tactile, and olfactory sensory cues, of the thing with regard to the behavior of interest. The model may take any form which is appropriate and suitable for communicating the perspective of the thing to the student given the mechanism for implementing the model. In some cases, the model will dictate the nature of the mechanism, as, for example, when the model relates to visual perspectives, in which case the mechanism must have a display component; in other cases, the mechanism will dictate the nature of the model, as, for example, when the only cost effective mechanism is prerecorded video, in which case the model must be adapted to a provide a presentation using only a visual and audible format.
  • [0021]
    Referring also to FIG. 2, continuing the duck hunting example, the duck 24, while circling the pond 22 or other potential landing area, may see a variety of views of the blind 20, including a backside, rather than just a side of the blind 20 facing the pond 22. If the student does not know of the duck's circling behavior, then he or she may not anticipate a need to camouflage all sides of the blind 20. Similarly, being familiar with only a two-dimensional human perspective, it may not occur to the hunter to camouflage a top side of the blind 20. Furthermore, when calling to the numerous decoys 26, the duck may hear only one return call coming from the blind 20 rather than from the decoys 26. If the student does not appreciate the duck's changing perspective as it circles, then he or she may not anticipate that the duck 24 may locate the return call as being from a source or location other than the decoys 26. Additionally, if the student does not know of the significance associated with decoy numbers and arrangement, then he or she may not anticipate the duck's reaction to the decoys 26. Additionally, the duck's call may have a particular meaning which is incompatible with the return call, or the return call may be inappropriate for the situation. If the student does not appreciate the variety and complexity of the duck's calls, then he or she may not understand that an incompatible or inappropriate return call may be interpreted by the duck 24 as an indication of danger. Thus, the student stands to gain great insight into duck behavior by exposure to the duck's perspective, and, through such insight and understanding, improve tremendously in hunting skill and technique.
  • [0022]
    The step of implementing the model using an appropriate mechanism, as depicted in box 14, involves selecting an appropriate mechanism, based potentially upon a variety of considerations, and implementing the model using the mechanism such that the perspective may be effectively communicate to the student. Thus, it is through the mechanism that the student experiences and gains a better understanding of the thing's perspective, thereby improving the student's skill. As mentioned, the nature of the mechanism may depend at least partly upon the nature of the model, but may also depend upon or be dictated by a variety of other considerations, including, for example, cost, space, location, and student ability. Potential mechanisms include, for example, prerecorded video, computer animation, virtual reality, and role-playing.
  • [0023]
    Continuing the duck hunting example, the duck 24 and one or more simulated hunting environments may be created using computer animation and presented as an interactive computer-based presentation. An interactive ability allows the student a measure of control over the presentation, thereby increasing its efficacy. The student may, for example, be provided with an ability to skip, speed up, or review sections of the presentation. In more complex computer-based presentations, the student may be provided with an ability to change features of the hunting environment, including, for example, tree and vegetation density, land contour, and pond shape; re-arrange or add to or subtract from the decoys 26; and return different calls in response to the duck's calls, thereby adapting the presentation to more accurately reflect an actual hunting area and allowing the student to test a variety of scenarios.
  • [0024]
    The step of introducing the student to the mechanism such that through the mechanism, the student is exposed to and can experience the perspective of the thing and thereby better understand the behavior, as depicted in box 16, involves immersing the student in the perspective of the thing so that the student gains a better understanding of the behavior of the thing through first-hand experience. This step will depend greatly on the nature of the mechanism. Prerecorded video, relatively simple computer animation, and, in some cases, role-playing mechanisms may be provided to the student for use without further instruction or interaction. Relatively complex computer animation and virtual reality mechanisms may require that the student be introduced to the mechanism at a special facility where additional instruction or interaction may be provided.
  • [0025]
    Continuing the duck hunting example, the interactive computer-based presentation may be provided to the student via a local area network or a wide area network, such as the Internet. A computer program underlying the computer-based presentation may comprise a combination of code segments written in any suitable programming language, such as, for example, Java or C++, and stored in or on any suitable computer-readable memory medium, such as, for example, a hard drive or compact disk on a conventional server for access via the network by a conventional personal computer. This allows students, wherever they may be, to logon to the presentation and benefit therefrom.
  • [0026]
    Referring also to FIGS. 3 and 4, in another example, given the general steps heretofore described, the method may be used to teach a skill involving an aspect of playing a game, such as, for example, golf, tennis, or poker, whereby the student experiences the perspective of a player 121 concerning the aspect of playing the game. Implementation of the method begins by identifying a behavior of the player 121 related to the aspect of playing the game. For example, where the game is golf and the aspect is putting, the behavior may include kneeling or lying down in order to better inspect the contours of the land 123 over which a golf ball 125 must travel, as depicted in box 110. The behavior may then progress to adopting an appropriate stance given the contours of the land 123 and other considerations, as depicted in box 111.
  • [0027]
    Once the behavior is identified, the player's perspective must be modeled in terms understandable by the student. Thus, a player's-eye-view of the contours of the land 123 may first be shown, and then, once the player has adopted the proper stance, a player's-eye-view of the golf ball 125, the player's shoes 127, the player's grip 129; a golf club 131, and a cup 133 may be shown, as depicted in boxes 112 and 113.
  • [0028]
    Next, an appropriate mechanism must be selected and used to implement the model, wherein the mechanism is suitable for imparting to the student the perspective of the player 121. A video mechanism, for example, may be used to show the views discussed above, as depicted in box 114. Optionally, while watching the video the student may be required to role-play wherein the student adopts the behaviors to result in the student having the same perspectives shown on the video. Thus, in this latter embodiment, student will adjust his or her stance until he or she sees the same view as the player 121, as shown on the video, as depicted in box 115.
  • [0029]
    Lastly, the student must be introduced to the mechanism so that, through the mechanism, the student is able to experience the perspective of the player and to thereby better understand the behavior. Where the mechanism is a simple video, the student may watch it and learn in the privacy of their own home and at their own convenience. Alternatively, the student may travel to a facility wherein an instructor is able to assist the student while watching the video, as depicted in box 116.
  • [0030]
    For the preceding description, it will be appreciated that the present invention provides a method of teaching a skill whereby a student is exposed to or otherwise experiences a perspective of a relevant thing, whether person, animal, or object, as determined by the nature of the skill, and wherein a mechanism is used to impart the perspective, thereby advantageously providing a better understanding of the behavior and an improvement in performance of the skill.
  • [0031]
    Although the invention has been described with reference to the preferred embodiments illustrated in the attached drawings, it is noted that equivalents may be employed and substitutions made herein without departing from the scope of the invention as recited in the claims. For example, as mentioned, suitable and appropriate mechanisms, such as prerecorded video, computer animation, virtual reality, and role-playing, may be employed for conveying to the student the perspective of the thing, and the present invention is generally independent of any particular mechanism.

Claims (18)

    Having thus described the preferred embodiment of the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent includes the following:
  1. 1. A method of teaching a skill to a student, whereby the student is exposed to a perspective of a thing whose identity is determined by the skill, the method comprising the steps of:
    (a) identifying a behavior of the thing, wherein the behavior is related to the skill;
    (b) modeling a perspective of the thing related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student;
    (c) implementing the model using a mechanism suitable for imparting to the student the perspective of the thing; and
    (d) introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is able to experience the perspective of the thing and to thereby better understand the behavior and the skill.
  2. 2. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein the thing is an animal.
  3. 3. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein the thing is a person.
  4. 4. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein the thing is an object.
  5. 5. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein a video recording is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting the perspective of the thing.
  6. 6. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein a computer program involving computer animation is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting the perspective of the thing.
  7. 7. The method as set forth in claim 1, wherein a role-playing scenario is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting the perspective of the thing.
  8. 8. A method of teaching a skill to a student, wherein the skill involves an aspect of hunting an animal, whereby the student is exposed to a perspective of the animal, the method comprising the steps of:
    (a) identifying a behavior of the animal, wherein the behavior is related to the aspect of hunting;
    (b) modeling a perspective of the animal related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student;
    (c) implementing the model using a mechanism suitable for imparting to the student the perspective of the animal; and
    (d) introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is able to experience the perspective of the animal and to thereby better understand the behavior and the skill.
  9. 9. The method as set forth in claim 8, wherein the animal is a duck, and the aspect of hunting involves preparing a blind and lying-in-wait for the duck, arranging duck decoys, and responding to duck calls, and the perspective involves visual and audible and other sensory cues to the duck.
  10. 10. The method as set forth in claim 8, wherein the animal is a deer, and the aspect of hunting involves stalking the deer, and the perspective involves visual and audible and other sensory cues to the deer.
  11. 11. The method as set forth in claim 8, wherein a video recording is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the animal.
  12. 12. The method as set forth in claim 8, wherein a computer program involving computer animation is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the animal.
  13. 13. The method as set forth in claim 8, wherein a role-playing scenario is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the animal.
  14. 14. A method of teaching a skill to a student, wherein the skill involves an aspect of playing a game, whereby the student is exposed to a perspective of a player concerning the aspect of playing the game, the method comprising the steps of:
    (a) identifying a behavior of the player, wherein the behavior is related to the aspect of playing the game;
    (b) modeling a perspective of the player related to the behavior in terms understandable by the student;
    (c) implementing the model using a mechanism suitable for imparting to the student the perspective of the player; and
    (d) introducing the student to the mechanism such that, through the mechanism, the student is able to experience the perspective of the player and to thereby better understand the behavior and the skill.
  15. 15. The method as set forth in claim 14, wherein the player is a golfer, and the aspect of playing the game involves driving and putting, and the perspective involves visual and other sensory cues to the player.
  16. 16. The method as set forth in claim 14, wherein a video recording is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the player.
  17. 17. The method as set forth in claim 14, wherein a computer program involving computer animation is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the player.
  18. 18. The method as set forth in claim 14, wherein a role-playing scenario is the mechanism for implementing the model and imparting to the student the perspective of the player.
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