US20030101623A1 - Adjustable snowshoes - Google Patents

Adjustable snowshoes Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030101623A1
US20030101623A1 US10/164,300 US16430002A US2003101623A1 US 20030101623 A1 US20030101623 A1 US 20030101623A1 US 16430002 A US16430002 A US 16430002A US 2003101623 A1 US2003101623 A1 US 2003101623A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
snowshoe
floatation
binding
wearer
strap
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/164,300
Inventor
Joseph Settelmayer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Watermark PaddleSports Inc
Original Assignee
Watermark PaddleSports Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to WOPCT/US01/45274 priority Critical
Priority to PCT/US2001/045274 priority patent/WO2002043516A1/en
Application filed by Watermark PaddleSports Inc filed Critical Watermark PaddleSports Inc
Priority to US10/164,300 priority patent/US20030101623A1/en
Assigned to YAKIMA PRODUCTS, INC. reassignment YAKIMA PRODUCTS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SETTELMAYER, JOSEPH J.
Publication of US20030101623A1 publication Critical patent/US20030101623A1/en
Assigned to WATERMARK PADDLESPORTS, INC. reassignment WATERMARK PADDLESPORTS, INC. CERTIFICATE OF OWNERSHIP AND MERGER Assignors: YAKIMA PRODUCTS, INC.
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C13/00Snow shoes
    • A63C13/001Bindings therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/06Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-spurs, ice-cleats, ice-creepers, crampons; Climbing devices or attachments, e.g. mountain climbing irons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C13/00Snow shoes
    • A63C13/005Frames therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C13/00Snow shoes
    • A63C13/006Shoe support thereof, e.g. plate, movable relative to the frame
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C13/00Snow shoes
    • A63C13/003Means thereof for preventing slipping, e.g. crampons, e.g. on frame or shoe plate
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C13/00Snow shoes
    • A63C13/008Adjustable heel support therefor, e.g. climbing wedge

Abstract

A snowshoe having a floatation structure and a binding configured to secure a wearer's foot to the snowshoe. The floatation structure is adapted to distribute the weight of the wearer over an area larger than the wearer's foot. The snowshoe may include a pivot adjuster secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure. The pivot adjuster typically is configured to enable operation by the wearer while wearing the snowshoe. Additionally, or alternatively, the snowshoe may include a pivot limiter configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure. In addition to or instead of these features, the snowshoe may include an extension configured for selective attachment to the floatation structure so as to permit selective variation of the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. § 120 from PCT Application Ser. No. PCT/US01/45274 filed Nov. 30, 2001 which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety for all purposes.[0001]
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to snowshoes, and more particularly to snowshoes that may be adjusted to perform differently under varied loads, snow conditions and terrain. [0002]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Snowshoes are widely used to facilitate travel over snow-covered terrain. Snowshoe designs vary considerably, but commonly employ some form of a binding configured to secure the wearer's foot in place. The binding typically is attached to a floatation structure, which distributes weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot to provide the desired floatation effect. The attachment between the binding and floatation structure normally allows for some amount of pivotal motion to occur between the two components. This enables the wearer to walk in a more natural manner than would be possible without the pivoting. [0003]
  • The ability of a given snowshoe design to provide a desired level of performance depends on a number of factors. One significant factor is the load placed on the shoe. A snowshoe that performs well for a 150-pound user will probably perform poorly when used by a 200-pound person carrying a 50-pound backpack. Snow quality and terrain are also important factors. For example, the floatation performance of a given snowshoe will diminish with lighter, more powdery snow. Designs well suited for trekking on relatively flat terrain may not be as well suited to rolling terrain or steeper inclines. The particular activity is also important to snowshoe design. Lightweight, small snowshoes typically are preferable for running or jogging on packed snow, while larger shoes are preferred for multi-day backcountry trips where one is likely to encounter deep powder. The pivoting characteristics of the connection between the binding and floatation structure will also affect performance in a given setting. [0004]
  • Many different snowshoe designs exist, with the vast majority being best suited for a relatively narrow range of uses and/or conditions. More specifically, the floatation and pivot characteristics of most designs are fixed and cannot be adjusted. Thus, while these designs perform adequately in some contexts, users often experience poor performance in other settings. Accordingly, manufacturers tend to produce and sell many different snowshoe models at significant expense in order to provide a product line that covers a wide range of contemplated uses and users. [0005]
  • Certain snowshoe designs provide some degree of adjustment, allowing performance to be modified by the user of the snowshoe, though the known adjustable designs suffer from various disadvantages. Some of these designs require the wearer to remove the snowshoe and/or operate complex mechanisms in order to make the adjustments. Tools are often required to make the adjustments. Complicated structures and/or mechanisms with multiple moving parts are often employed to provide the adjustment capability, increasing manufacturing costs. In addition to these disadvantages, many of the designs provide only a limited range of adjustment. [0006]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, the present invention provides a snowshoe having a binding secured to a floatation structure, which is configured to distribute the weight of the wearer over an area larger than the wearer's foot. The snowshoe may also include a pivot adjuster secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure. The pivot adjuster typically is configured to be operable by the wearer while wearing the snowshoe. Additionally, or alternatively, the snowshoe may include a pivot limiter configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure. In addition to or instead of these features, the snowshoes of the present invention may include an extension configured to be selectively secured to and removed from the floatation structure so as to selectively vary the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe.[0007]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a snowshoe according to the present invention, including a binding, floatation structure and a plurality of different sized extensions that may be selectively attached to the base floatation structure. [0008]
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of another snowshoe according to the present invention, including depiction of a pivot adjuster configured to adjust the pivotal motion occurring between the binding and floatation structure of the snowshoe. [0009]
  • FIG. 2B is an enlarged partial view of the pivot adjuster shown in FIG. 2. [0010]
  • FIG. 3 is an isometric view showing traction devices that may be used on the snowshoes of the present invention. [0011]
  • FIG. 4 is an isometric view showing further traction devices that may be used on the snowshoes of the present invention. [0012]
  • FIG. 5 is a bottom view of a pair of snowshoes, and depicts a cutout configuration that may be employed with the snowshoe floatation structures of the present invention.[0013]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIG. 1 depicts a snowshoe [0014] 10 according to the present invention. Snowshoe 10 includes a binding 12 for securing a wearer's foot to the snowshoe. Binding 12 is secured to floatation structure 14, which generally surrounds and extends outward from the binding. Floatation structure 14 typically is larger than binding 12, so as to distribute the wearer's weight over an area larger than the foot and provide the desired floatation effect when used on snow. As will be described in more detail below, snowshoe 10 may be adjustable and/or easily placed in alternate configurations by the end user, so as to provide optimal performance under varied loads, snow conditions, and terrain.
  • Floatation structure [0015] 14 may be configured in any desired shape but typically includes a tip or toe 16, sides 18 and 20, and a tail 22, as depicted in FIG. 1. The outer perimeter of the floatation structure may be formed as a frame 24, with the area bounded by the frame being spanned by decking material 26. Frame 24 typically is metal and formed to have a lightweight tubular construction, though other materials and frame configurations may be used, provided they are sufficiently sturdy. Decking material 26 may be leather, rubber, molded plastic or any other suitable material, and may be disposed over the area bounded by frame 24 as an unbroken expanse or in a configuration having holes or gaps. For example, in the depicted snowshoe, the decking material is a flexible vinyl-type material that spans frame 24 so as to cover substantially the entire area bounded by the frame. The outer edge of the decking material includes a number of flaps 26 a that are wrapped around the tubular frame and secured in place via rivets 28 or like structures.
  • Yet another option for the floatation structure is to omit the frame-type construction altogether, and instead provide floatation with a rigid or semi-rigid frameless structure. For example, floatation structure [0016] 14 may be configured as a frameless, unitary platform formed via injection molding or other fabrication methods.
  • The dimensions of the floatation structure will vary according to a number of factors. Larger floatation structures will be needed for higher anticipated load ranges, or where snow is particularly light and powdery. Smaller structures are better suited to activities requiring quick foot movements, such as jogging. As will be discussed in more detail below, the snowshoes of the present invention may be easily adjusted by the wearer to vary the size of the floatation structure, and thus to vary the area over which the user's weight is distributed by the snowshoe. [0017]
  • Referring still to FIG. 1, binding [0018] 12 is configured to receive and secure the user's foot to the snowshoe. Binding 12 includes a rigid or semi-rigid footbed 30 sized to extend along at least a portion of the user's foot. As indicated, the upper surface of the footbed may include ridges 32 or like structures to improve the contact between the user's foot (e.g., a boot sole) and the binding, so as to reduce slipping or other undesired foot movement relative to the binding.
  • Binding [0019] 12 further includes an upper portion, which typically has various adjustable structures for tightly securing the user's foot to the snowshoe. For example, the depicted upper includes a toe portion 34 adapted to wrap over the toe of the user's foot and up along the top of the user's foot toward the ankle. Binding 12 further includes a pair of straps 36 and 38 received through slits in toe portion 34 and arranged in diagonal crisscross fashion. A heel strap 40 is provided at the rear of footbed 30. Thus, when a user's foot is received within binding 12, toe portion 12 and heel strap 40 cooperate to prevent fore-and-aft movement of the foot, and straps 36 and 38 hold the foot firmly down onto footbed 30. Straps 36, 38 and 40 typically are adjustable via operation of buckles or like structures 42. As depicted with reference to straps 36 and 38, adjustment mechanisms may be provided at both ends of the straps. The adjustment mechanisms may alternatively be provided in any other suitable location.
  • The connection between floatation structure [0020] 14 and binding 12 typically is adapted to allow some degree of pivoting to occur between the structures. Typically, the permitted pivoting occurs along the short axis of the floatation structure, near the ball of the user's foot. This prevents the floatation structure from interfering with the natural “rocking” motion of the user's foot, by allowing the heel to rise off the ground without bringing the floatation structure with it. Without such pivoting, the leverage required to rock the entire snowshoe makes it very difficult to walk in a natural manner.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 2, 2B, [0021] 3 and 4, the pivotable connection between the binding and floatation structure will be described in more detail. In the depicted embodiment, pivoting is achieved via a pivot rod or axle 50, which is received through a sleeve-like bracket 52 mounted to the bottom of footbed 30. The axle may be extended between opposing sides of frame 24, as depicted, or secured to the snowshoe in any other suitable configuration. Typically, the axle and bracket are provided near the ball of the user's foot. The precise location of the pivot axis may be varied according to user preference and/or the intended use of the snowshoe.
  • The characteristics of the pivoting connection can affect the performance of the snowshoe and/or the desirability of a given design for use in a particular setting. For example, some snowshoe designs allow low-friction pivoting between the binding and floatation structure over a relatively large range of angular displacement. Such snowshoes are poorly suited to jogging or running, because the floatation structure tends to flop around and interfere significantly with the movement of the wearer's feet. Unrestricted pivoting can also result in the toe portion of the floatation structure rotating around to a point where it strikes the shin of the wearer. [0022]
  • Accordingly, the snowshoe embodiments of the present invention may include a pivot adjuster [0023] 54 configured to selectively vary the pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure. Pivot adjuster 54 may include a pivot limiter such as strap 56, which is configured to enable the user to selectively adjust the permitted range of pivoting that may occur between binding 12 and floatation structure 14. Strap 56 typically has a first end connected to heel end 30 a of footbed 30. The opposite end of the strap is secured to floatation structure 14.
  • As heel end [0024] 30 a of footbed 30 pivots upward and away from plane 58 defined by floatation structure 14 (FIG. 2), the slack in strap 56 is taken in. Eventually the strap becomes taut, as depicted in FIG. 2, so as to prevent further pivoting of the binding relative to the floatation structure. It will thus be appreciated that the range of permitted pivotal motion varies with the operative length of the strap. “Operative length” means the length of the strap between its two connection points to the snowshoe. The longer the operative length, the greater the range of permitted pivotal motion.
  • As indicated in FIGS. 2 and 2B, a protrusion [0025] 60 extends from floatation structure 14 and is configured to cooperate with one of a number of holes 62 (FIG. 2B) provided along the length of strap 56. The operative length of the strap may be varied by disengaging the strap from protrusion 60 and re-engaging the strap using a different one of holes 62. In addition to, or instead of this arrangement, plural protrusions may be provided on floatation structure 14, such that a given one of the holes may be engaged selectively with any of the protrusions in order to vary the operative length of the strap.
  • It will often be desirable to configure the pivot adjuster so that adjustment may be made by a wearer of the snowshoe without having to remove the snowshoe. For example, on a given outing, the wearer may encounter sufficient variation in snow and terrain conditions to justify frequent adjustments to the pivoting characteristics. [0026]
  • The pivot adjuster of the depicted embodiment allows adjustments to be made easily and without requiring removal of the snowshoe. At least a portion of the pivot adjuster is accessible to a wearer of the snowshoe so that the adjuster may be operated without having to take off the snowshoe. More specifically, the depicted strap (i.e., strap [0027] 56) extends away from heel end 30 a of footbed 30, and passes through one or more slits or openings in decking material 26, such that opposite end 56 a of the strap is accessible from the top side of the decking material in a location to the rear of the user's heel. This end of the strap may be easily gripped and manipulated by the wearer while the snowshoe is still secured to the wearer's foot, allowing the user to quickly and easily vary the operative length of the strap, and thus vary the permitted range of pivoting. Manipulation may be further facilitated by forming an enlarged handle area 64 at the end of the strap, as indicated.
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 depict various traction devices that may be used with the snowshoe embodiments of the present invention. As indicated on both snowshoe [0028] 10′ and snowshoe 10″, a forefoot crampon 70 may be provided in the region of pivot axle 50. Forefoot crampon 70 includes three rows of teeth: two parallel rows 70 a and 70 b extending 15 downward from opposing sides of the bottom of footbed 30, and row 70 c parallel to and forward of pivot axle 50.
  • In addition to, or instead of the above traction devices, other traction devices may be provided to the rear of pivot axle [0029] 50, in the heel region of floatation structure 14. For example, snowshoe 10″ includes a heel crampon 72 secured to the underside of floatation structure 14. Similar to forefoot crampon 70, heel crampon 72 has two generally parallel rows of teeth. Snowshoe 10′ includes an alternative heel-region traction device, including studs 74. Studs 74 may be provided in pairs, as depicted, and typically are fixed within bracing structure 76 secured to the underside of floatation structure 14. The depicted stud traction structures may be used alone in either the forefoot or heel region, or may be used in combination with the tooth-type crampon structures.
  • As discussed above, the floatation effect provided by a snowshoe is determined in part by the area over which the user's weight is distributed by the snowshoe. In general, the larger the area, the greater the floatation. Significant floatation can be desirable and/or necessary in the case of heavy loads or snow that is particularly light and powdery. However, large snowshoes can be bulky and unwieldy to use. Therefore, it is normally desirable that the floatation structure be no larger than necessary to provide the desired floatation. [0030]
  • Accordingly, as depicted in FIG. 1, the snowshoes of the present invention may be provided with one or more extensions, such as removable tail pieces [0031] 80 (designated individually as 80 a, 80 b and 80 c). Each of tail pieces 80 snaps onto the rear of floatation structure 14 and is secured in place via operation of a resilient latch mechanism 82. Latch mechanism 82 includes a depressible tab 84 which releases the latch mechanism to allow removal of the mounted tail piece. In embodiments employing such removable tail pieces, the floatation structure may be configured to allow the snowshoe to be operated whether or not a tail piece is attached. Adding, removing and/or changing tail pieces varies the area over which the snowshoe distributes the user's weight, and thus changes the floatation properties of the snowshoe. Typically, tail pieces 80 are provided in various sizes, as in the depicted embodiment, allowing the floatation characteristics of the snowshoe to be easily tailored to a given user of the snowshoe, or to particular snow and terrain conditions.
  • Whether or not removable tail pieces are employed, the tail region of the floatation structure may include a rudder device [0032] 86, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4. In certain terrain and snow conditions, rudder device 86 can facilitate tracking of the snowshoe as the floatation structure drags along the snow surface.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, the snowshoe embodiments of the present invention may be equipped with a heel riser [0033] 90. Heel riser 90 is disposed on floatation structure 14 in the heel region and, when engaged, prevents the wearer's heel from rotating down level with the plane of floatation structure 14. Essentially, heel riser sets a minimum angle between binding footbed 30 and floatation structure 14. When deployed in this manner, heel riser 90 can reduce calf strain and otherwise facilitate travel, particularly when the snowshoe is used to ascend inclines. Typically, heel riser 90 is configured so that the wearer may easily retract the riser from the engaged position (e.g., by flipping it out of the way) without having to remove the snowshoe.
  • FIG. 5 depicts a pair of snowshoes [0034] 100 having alternately configured floatation structures 102. Specifically, each floatation structure has a cutout 104 located toward the rear of the snowshoe in the instep region. Cutouts 104 facilitate a more natural walking motion, by allowing the wearer to employ a narrower walking stance than would be possible without the cutouts. This is illustrated in the figure, which shows the pair of snowshoes with one in front of the other, as would occur during walking or jogging. The dashed line near the front shoe cutout indicates a possible profile of the floatation structure were the cutout omitted, illustrating that snowshoes without cutouts require a wider, exaggerated stance to prevent the individual shoes from striking or otherwise interfering with each other during use. It will be appreciated from this that the cutouts minimize the bulkiness of the design, and allow for a narrower, more natural stance when walking or running.
  • While the present invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the foregoing preferred embodiments, those skilled in the art will understand that many variations may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims. The description of the invention should be understood to include all novel and non-obvious combinations of elements described herein, and claims may be presented in this or a later application to any novel and non-obvious combination of these elements. Where the claims recite “a” or “a first” element or the equivalent thereof, such claims should be understood to include incorporation of one or more such elements, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements. [0035]

Claims (31)

We claim:
1. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a foot of a wearer;
a floatation structure to which the binding is pivotably secured, the floatation structure being configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot; and
a pivot adjuster secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure, where the pivot adjuster is configured to be operable by the wearer without the wearer having to remove the snowshoe.
2. The snowshoe of claim 1, where the pivot adjuster includes a limiter configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
3. The snowshoe of claim 2, where the limiter includes a strap connected between the binding and floatation structure, the strap having a variable operative length that determines the permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
4. The snowshoe of claim 3, where the operative length of the strap is variable via selective engagement of a protrusion on the floatation structure with one of a plurality of spaced apart holes defined through the strap.
5. The snowshoe of claim 3, where the strap extends aftward from the binding and is configured to enable manipulation of the strap from an upper side of the snowshoe.
6. The snowshoe of claim 1, further comprising a floatation structure extension configured to be selectively secured to and removed from the floatation structure so as to selectively vary the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe.
7. The snowshoe of claim 1, further comprising a heel riser secured to the snowshoe and selectively movable between an enabled and a disabled position, where the heel riser is configured to maintain a minimum pivotal displacement between the wearer's foot and the floatation structure when in the enabled position.
8. The snowshoe of claim 1, where the floatation structure includes a perimeter frame spanned at least partially by decking material.
9. The snowshoe of claim 1, where the floatation structure includes an instep cutout configured to permit the wearer to employ a narrower stance when walking or running.
10. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a foot of a wearer;
a floatation structure to which the binding is pivotably secured, the floatation structure being configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot; and
a pivot limiter secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
11. The snowshoe of claim 10, where the pivot limiter is configured to enable the wearer to adjust the permitted range of pivoting while wearing the snowshoe.
12. The snowshoe of claim 10, where the pivot limiter includes a strap connected between the binding and floatation structure, the strap having a variable operative length that determines the permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
13. The snowshoe of claim 12, where the strap extends aftward from the binding and is configured to enable manipulation of the strap from an upper side of the snowshoe.
14. The snowshoe of claim 12, where the operative length of the strap is variable via selective engagement of a protrusion on the floatation structure with one of a plurality of spaced apart holes defined through the strap.
15. The snowshoe of claim 12, where the snowshoe is configured to enable the wearer to adjust the operative length of the strap while wearing the snowshoe.
16. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a foot of a wearer;
a floatation structure to which the binding is pivotably secured, the floatation structure being configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot;
a floatation structure extension configured to be selectively secured to and removed from the floatation structure so as to selectively vary the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe; and
a pivot adjuster secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure, where the pivot adjuster is configured to be operable by the wearer without the wearer having to remove the snowshoe.
17. The snowshoe of claim 16, where the pivot adjuster includes a limiter configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
18. The snowshoe of claim 17, where the limiter includes a strap connected between the binding and floatation structure, the strap having a variable operative length that determines the permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
19. The snowshoe of claim 18, where the operative length of the strap is variable via selective engagement of a protrusion on the floatation structure with one of a plurality of spaced apart holes defined through the strap.
20. The snowshoe of claim 18, where the strap extends aftward from the binding and is configured to enable manipulation of the strap from an upper side of the snowshoe.
21. The snowshoe of claim 16, where the floatation structure includes a perimeter frame spanned at least partially by decking material.
22. The snowshoe of claim 16, where the floatation structure extension is a removable tail piece configured for selective attachment to and removal from an aft portion of the floatation structure.
23. The snowshoe of claim 22, where the removable tail piece is one of a plurality of different sized removable tail pieces, such that the binding, floatation structure and removable tail pieces define a snowshoe kit permitting end-user assembly of plural different snowshoe configurations.
24. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a foot of a wearer;
a floatation structure to which the binding is pivotably secured, the floatation structure being configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot;
a floatation structure extension configured to be selectively secured to and removed from the floatation structure so as to selectively vary the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe; and
a pivot limiter secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of a permitted range of pivoting between the binding and floatation structure.
25. The snowshoe of claim 24, where the pivot limiter is configured to enable the wearer to adjust the permitted range of pivoting while wearing the snowshoe.
26. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a foot of a wearer;
a floatation structure to which the binding is pivotably secured, the floatation structure being configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot;
a pivot adjuster secured to the snowshoe and configured to enable selective adjustment of pivotal movement occurring between the binding and the floatation structure; and
a heel riser secured to the snowshoe and selectively movable between an enabled and a disabled position, where the heel riser is configured to maintain a minimum pivotal displacement between the wearer's foot and the floatation structure when in the enabled position.
27. A snowshoe, comprising:
a binding configured to receive a wearer's foot;
a floatation structure to which the binding is secured, where the floatation structure is configured to distribute weight over an area larger than the wearer's foot; and
a floatation structure extension configured to be selectively secured to and removed from the floatation structure so as to selectively vary the area over which weight is distributed by the snowshoe.
28. The snowshoe of claim 27, where the floatation structure includes a perimeter frame spanned at least partially by decking material.
29. The snowshoe of claim 27, where the floatation structure extension is a removable tail piece configured for selective attachment to and removal from an aft portion of the floatation structure.
30. The snowshoe of claim 29, where the removable tail piece is attachable to and removable from the floatation structure via operation of a latch mechanism including a depressible release tab provided on the floatation structure.
31. The snowshoe of claim 29, where the removable tail piece is one of a plurality of different sized removable tail pieces, such that the binding, floatation structure and removable tail pieces define a snowshoe kit permitting end-user assembly of plural different snowshoe configurations.
US10/164,300 2000-12-01 2002-06-03 Adjustable snowshoes Abandoned US20030101623A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
WOPCT/US01/45274 2001-11-30
PCT/US2001/045274 WO2002043516A1 (en) 2000-12-01 2001-11-30 Adjustable snowshoes
US10/164,300 US20030101623A1 (en) 2001-11-30 2002-06-03 Adjustable snowshoes

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/164,300 US20030101623A1 (en) 2001-11-30 2002-06-03 Adjustable snowshoes

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030101623A1 true US20030101623A1 (en) 2003-06-05

Family

ID=22593870

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/164,300 Abandoned US20030101623A1 (en) 2000-12-01 2002-06-03 Adjustable snowshoes

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20030101623A1 (en)

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040148802A1 (en) * 2003-01-23 2004-08-05 Soriano Antonio Cutando Perfected device for walking on snow or ice
US6814360B2 (en) * 2002-03-11 2004-11-09 K2 Snowshoes, Inc. Snowshoe binding
US20040250453A1 (en) * 2003-01-28 2004-12-16 Settelmayer Joseph J. Snowshoes
US20050167947A1 (en) * 2002-08-02 2005-08-04 Lane Ekberg Configurable snowshoe and ski device
US20060213089A1 (en) * 2005-03-22 2006-09-28 Faber & Co. Inc. Snowshoe
US20070163155A1 (en) * 2006-01-18 2007-07-19 Emerson Daniel T Snowshoe binding with top buckles
FR2896429A1 (en) * 2006-01-26 2007-07-27 Tsl Sport Equipment Sa Snow shoe boot toe fastener comprises plastic holder with base plate and raised front and side elements connected to single fastening strap
US20080246236A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2008-10-09 Frank Lombano Multiple-Section Recreational Board
US20090172974A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2009-07-09 Guy Faber Snowshoe
US20120151802A1 (en) * 2010-12-17 2012-06-21 Lin Chao-Ming Length-Adjustable Snowshoe
US20120256381A1 (en) * 2011-04-05 2012-10-11 Bradshaw Erik Gawain Exoskeleton and footwear attachment system
US20140123521A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2014-05-08 Jon Johnston Snow climbing plate for use with a crampon

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5309652A (en) * 1993-05-03 1994-05-10 Campbell Lawrence W Snow shoe kit
US5517772A (en) * 1994-05-06 1996-05-21 Sherpa, Inc. Snowshoe having means limiting articulation of binding support plate
US5791070A (en) * 1994-05-10 1998-08-11 Gallay; Philippe Plastic bindings for snow shoes
US5921007A (en) * 1993-10-22 1999-07-13 Mountain Safety Research, Inc. Mountaineering snowshoe
US6012238A (en) * 1998-03-23 2000-01-11 Pride Industries, Inc. Snowshoe heel lift and combination
US6178666B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2001-01-30 Tubbs Snowshoe Company, Llc Molded snowshoe

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5309652A (en) * 1993-05-03 1994-05-10 Campbell Lawrence W Snow shoe kit
US5921007A (en) * 1993-10-22 1999-07-13 Mountain Safety Research, Inc. Mountaineering snowshoe
US6195919B1 (en) * 1993-10-22 2001-03-06 Mountain Safety Research, Inc. Mountaineering snowshoe
US5517772A (en) * 1994-05-06 1996-05-21 Sherpa, Inc. Snowshoe having means limiting articulation of binding support plate
US5791070A (en) * 1994-05-10 1998-08-11 Gallay; Philippe Plastic bindings for snow shoes
US6012238A (en) * 1998-03-23 2000-01-11 Pride Industries, Inc. Snowshoe heel lift and combination
US6178666B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2001-01-30 Tubbs Snowshoe Company, Llc Molded snowshoe

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6814360B2 (en) * 2002-03-11 2004-11-09 K2 Snowshoes, Inc. Snowshoe binding
US7150464B2 (en) * 2002-08-02 2006-12-19 Lane Ekberg Configurable snowshoe and ski device
US20050167947A1 (en) * 2002-08-02 2005-08-04 Lane Ekberg Configurable snowshoe and ski device
US7308767B2 (en) * 2003-01-23 2007-12-18 Antonio Cutando Soriano Perfected device for walking on snow or ice
US20040148802A1 (en) * 2003-01-23 2004-08-05 Soriano Antonio Cutando Perfected device for walking on snow or ice
US20040250453A1 (en) * 2003-01-28 2004-12-16 Settelmayer Joseph J. Snowshoes
US20080246236A1 (en) * 2003-12-31 2008-10-09 Frank Lombano Multiple-Section Recreational Board
US7194825B2 (en) * 2005-03-22 2007-03-27 Faber & Co. Ltd. Snowshoe
US20060213089A1 (en) * 2005-03-22 2006-09-28 Faber & Co. Inc. Snowshoe
US20070163155A1 (en) * 2006-01-18 2007-07-19 Emerson Daniel T Snowshoe binding with top buckles
WO2007084712A3 (en) * 2006-01-18 2008-02-28 K2 Snowshoes Inc Snowshoe binding with top buckles
US7497034B2 (en) 2006-01-18 2009-03-03 K-2 Corporation Snowshoe binding with top buckles
US20070193069A1 (en) * 2006-01-26 2007-08-23 Philippe Gallay Device for retaining a boot on a snowshoe
EP1815895A1 (en) * 2006-01-26 2007-08-08 TSL Sport Equipment Binding device for holding a shoe on a snow shoe
FR2896429A1 (en) * 2006-01-26 2007-07-27 Tsl Sport Equipment Sa Snow shoe boot toe fastener comprises plastic holder with base plate and raised front and side elements connected to single fastening strap
US20090172974A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2009-07-09 Guy Faber Snowshoe
US7937855B2 (en) * 2008-01-08 2011-05-10 Faber & Co. Inc. Snowshoe
US20120151802A1 (en) * 2010-12-17 2012-06-21 Lin Chao-Ming Length-Adjustable Snowshoe
US8544194B2 (en) * 2010-12-17 2013-10-01 Chao-ming Lin Length-adjustable snowshoe
US20120256381A1 (en) * 2011-04-05 2012-10-11 Bradshaw Erik Gawain Exoskeleton and footwear attachment system
US8876123B2 (en) * 2011-04-05 2014-11-04 Erik Gawain BRADSHAW Exoskeleton and footwear attachment system
US20140123521A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2014-05-08 Jon Johnston Snow climbing plate for use with a crampon
US9393482B2 (en) * 2012-11-02 2016-07-19 Jon Johnston Snow climbing plate for use with a crampon

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8776400B2 (en) Flex groove sole assembly with biasing structure
US9603412B2 (en) Athletic positioning apparatus and applications thereof
US9526295B2 (en) Adjustable shoe
US8516723B2 (en) Midfoot insert construction
EP0936884B1 (en) Footwear apparatus with grinding plate and method of making same
US7788824B2 (en) Shoe apparatus with improved efficiency
JP4166873B2 (en) Golf shoes with arranged traction friction members
US10251442B2 (en) Footwear device
US6237249B1 (en) Convertible slide and method
US7347012B2 (en) Shoe with lacing
US4223455A (en) Shoe sole containing discrete air-chambers
US5794362A (en) Size adjustable athletic boot
CA2344916C (en) Equine multi-purpose protector boot
US5475935A (en) Jumping assist system
US6035554A (en) Asymmetrical reversible article of footwear
US4943075A (en) Pair of wheeled skate-skis with brakes usable on most terrains
CA2355803C (en) Anti-slip shoe
US7207126B2 (en) Movable cover for rigidifying and/ or protecting the front face of an article of footwear, such as a snowboard boot
US4559723A (en) Sports shoe
FI92460C (en) Sports footwear with elastic heel inserts
US6102412A (en) Skate with a molded boot
ES2398710T3 (en) Footwear that has independently articulated toes portions
CN102715708B (en) There are the article of retractable traction elements
US7464944B2 (en) Wheeled skate
US5592757A (en) Shoe with walking sole

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: YAKIMA PRODUCTS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SETTELMAYER, JOSEPH J.;REEL/FRAME:013631/0881

Effective date: 20021218

AS Assignment

Owner name: WATERMARK PADDLESPORTS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CERTIFICATE OF OWNERSHIP AND MERGER;ASSIGNOR:YAKIMA PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:014438/0882

Effective date: 20021220

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION