US20030093689A1 - Security router - Google Patents

Security router Download PDF

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US20030093689A1
US20030093689A1 US10/002,407 US240701A US2003093689A1 US 20030093689 A1 US20030093689 A1 US 20030093689A1 US 240701 A US240701 A US 240701A US 2003093689 A1 US2003093689 A1 US 2003093689A1
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classification
routing
object
security
system
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US10/002,407
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Ofer Elzam
Shimon Gruper
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Aladdin Knowledge Systems Ltd
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Aladdin Knowledge Systems Ltd
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Priority to US10/002,407 priority Critical patent/US20030093689A1/en
Assigned to ALADDIN KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS LTD. reassignment ALADDIN KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS LTD. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ELZAM, OFER, GRUPER, SHIMON
Publication of US20030093689A1 publication Critical patent/US20030093689A1/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/10Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for controlling access to network resources
    • H04L63/104Grouping of entities

Abstract

A security routing methodology and system including sensing information contained in an object, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and routing the object to at least one address selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to routing apparatus and methodologies generally. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The following U.S. Patents are believed to represent the state of the art: U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,835,726; 5,606,668; 6,249,801; 5,926,105. [0002]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention seeks to provide security routing apparatus and methodologies. [0003]
  • There is thus provided in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention a security routing methodology, which includes sensing information contained in an object, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and routing the object to at least one address selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0004]
  • There is provided in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention a security routing methodology, which includes sensing information contained in an object, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and routing the object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0005]
  • There is also provided in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention a security routing methodology, which includes sensing information contained in an object directed to an address, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and routing the object to a selected at least one of a multiplicity of destinations enroute to the address in accordance with the security classification. [0006]
  • There is further provided in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention a security routing methodology, which includes sensing, at a first node, information contained in an object, analyzing, at the first node, the information to determine a security classification thereof and routing the object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0007]
  • There is also provided in accordance with yet another preferred embodiment of the present invention a system for routing an object. The system includes an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object, an information analyzer, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and a router, routing the object to at least one address selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0008]
  • There is further provided in accordance with yet another preferred embodiment of the present invention a system for routing an object, which includes an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object directed to an address, an information analyzer, analyzing the information- to determine a security classification thereof and a router, routing the object to a selected at least one of a multiplicity of destinations enroute to the address in accordance with the security classification. [0009]
  • There is also provided in accordance with yet a further preferred embodiment of the present invention a system for routing an object, which includes an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object, an information analyzer, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and a router, routing the object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0010]
  • There is also provided in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention a system for routing an object, which includes an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object, an information analyzer, analyzing the information to determine a security classification thereof and a router, routing the object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with the security classification. [0011]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the object includes a message. [0012]
  • Additionally or alternatively, the object includes at least of the following: a file, an e-mail message, a web page and a communication packet. [0013]
  • Still further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of: an object content, an object header, an object source and an object destination. [0014]
  • Additionally in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the security classification includes a secrecy classification, a danger classification, a suspiciousness classification and/or a maliciousness classification. [0015]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the step of analyzing the information includes comparing the information against a security policy. Preferably, the security classification includes at least one of the following: secrecy classification, danger classification, maliciousness classification and suspiciousness classification. [0016]
  • Still further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the step of analyzing the information includes comparing the information to an information contained in at least one other message. [0017]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the object contains at least one at least one destination address. Typically, the object includes a message. [0018]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the destination address is not one of the at least one address. [0019]
  • Alternatively, the destination address is one of the at least one address. [0020]
  • Still further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the security routing methodology also includes routing the object from the at least one address to the at least one destination address. [0021]
  • Additionally in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the security routing methodology also includes routing the object from the at least one address directly to the at least one destination address. [0022]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the security routing methodology also includes modifying the priority of the object. [0023]
  • Additionally in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the step of analyzing the information includes comparing the information to an information contained in at least one other message. [0024]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the security routing methodology also includes routing the message from the at least one selected node to at least one node addressed in the message. [0025]
  • Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the object sensor includes a network sniffer. [0026]
  • Still further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention the system for routing an object also includes a first interface providing interaction with the at least one first communication network and a second interface providing interaction with the at least one second communication network.[0027]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will be understood and appreciated more fully from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the drawings in which: [0028]
  • FIG. 1 is a simplified illustration, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality in a communication network in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention; [0029]
  • FIG. 2 is a highly symbolic illustration depicting the example of FIG. 1; [0030]
  • FIGS. [0031] 3A-3C are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed to various addresses, which are destination addresses, in accordance with various security classifications thereof;
  • FIGS. [0032] 4A-4C are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 3A-3C respectively;
  • FIGS. [0033] 5A-5D are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed indirectly to various addresses, the routing being in accordance with various security classifications thereof;
  • FIGS. [0034] 6A-6D are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 5A-5D respectively;
  • FIGS. [0035] 7A-7D are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed along various routes in accordance with various security classifications thereof;
  • FIGS. [0036] 8A-8D are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 7A-7D respectively;
  • FIGS. [0037] 9A-9D are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed or not routed in accordance with various security classifications thereof; and
  • FIGS. [0038] 10A-10D are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 9A-9D respectively.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • FIG. 1 shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a secrecy classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed according to its security classification. [0039]
  • As seen in FIG. 1, four messages with different security classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0040] 100, 101, 102 and 104 are send via the Internet 106 to a user 107 within an organization 108 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 110. Message 100 contains a device driver program, symbolized by a toothed wheel inside a computer window and is considered to be highly dangerous. Message 100 is shown routed by router 110 via a route 112 that employs a magnetic medium such a diskette as a transfer mechanism and is appropriate to the security classification of the object. Route 112 is marked with a diskette image. Message 101 contains a computer program, symbolized by a computer form and considered to be highly suspicious. Message 101 is routed by router 110 indirectly to a user 107 via an intermediate address having a security classification appropriate thereto, such as computer virus detection system 114. Message 102 contains offensive content, is symbolized by a shouting person and is considered to be somewhat malicious. Message 102 is not routed by router 110 to any destination address in the organization as symbolized by a no entry sign 116 blocking the message route. Message 104 include top-secret information is shown routed by router 110 to a top security network 118 within the organization whether or not a destination address is located within the security zone.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the functionality of FIG. 1 in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 2, four railroad cars with different security classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0041] 200, 201, 202 and 204 are routed by a customs office symbolized by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 210. It is seen that a railroad car 200 carrying depleted uranium and marked with an atom figure, which is highly dangerous, is routed by customs agent 210 through the least populated route, symbolized by a country side landscape and designated by reference numeral 212, enroute to a destination address. Railroad car 201 carrying powered sugar from Colombia, which is highly suspicious, is routed by customs agent 210 via a DEA inspection center, symbolized by syringe and designated by reference numeral 214, enroute to a destination address. Railroad car 202 carrying illicit drugs and marked with a skull symbol, which is highly malicious, is not routed by custom agent 210 to any destination address as symbolized by a no entry sign 216 blocking the tracks. A railroad car 204 carrying government documents and marked with a top secret inscription, clearly having a high-level secrecy classification, is routed by customs agent 210 to the Pentagon 218 whether or not the Pentagon is a destination address of the railroad car.
  • Reference is now made to FIGS. [0042] 3A-3C which are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed to various addresses, which may be or may not be destination addresses, in accordance with various security classifications thereof and to FIGS. 4A-4C, which are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 3A-3C respectively.
  • FIG. 3A shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a secrecy classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address having a secrecy classification appropriate thereto, whether or not that address is a destination address of the object. [0043]
  • As seen in FIG. 3A, three messages with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0044] 300, 302 and 304 are received at the Pentagon, which is designated by reference numeral 306 and routed by a router, symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 307. A top-secret CIA Memo designated by reference numeral 300 is shown routed by router 307 to a top security zone 308 within the Pentagon whether or not a destination address is located within the security zone. A message containing next year's budget, symbolized by a report containing a graph and designated by reference numeral 302, which is secret but not top secret, is shown routed by router 307 to a restricted zone 310 whether or not a destination address is located within the restricted zone. A non-secret message received at the Pentagon, symbolized by a newspaper and designated by reference numeral 304, is routed by router 307 to any destination address within the Pentagon, such as computer 312.
  • FIG. 4A illustrates the functionality of FIG. 3A in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 4A, three railroad cars with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0045] 400, 402 and 404 arrive at a military base, which is designated by reference numeral 406 and are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 408. It is seen that a railroad car 404 carrying office supplied and marked with a paperclip symbol, which clearly has a non-secret secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 408 to a destination address 410 within the military base 406. A railroad car 400 arriving at the military base 406 carrying government documents and marked with a top secret inscription, clearly having a high-level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 408 to a highly secure intelligence facility 412 within the military base 406 whether or not the highly secure intelligence facility is a destination address of the railroad car. A railroad car 402 arriving at the military base 406 carrying electronic equipment and marked with a radar symbol, presumably having a medium level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 408 to a restricted zone 414 within the military base 406 whether or not a destination address of the railroad car is within the restricted zone 414.
  • FIG. 3B shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a danger classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address having a capability to handle objects of the given danger classification, whether or not the address is a destination address of the object. [0046]
  • As seen in FIG. 31B, three messages with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0047] 320, 322 and 324 are received via the Internet 326 at an organization 328 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 330. Message 320, which contains a device driver program, symbolized by a toothed wheel inside a computer window and considered to be highly dangerous, is shown routed by router 330 to a computer system administrator symbolized by a highly sophisticated computer and designated by reference numeral 332, whether or not the computer system administrator 322 is a destination address of the message 320. Message 322, which contains a computer program symbolized by a computer form and considered to be somewhat dangerous, is routed by router 330 to an experienced user working in the same department as a user 323 that is a destination address of the message 322. The experienced user is symbolized by a computer of medium sophistication and is designated by reference numeral 334. A non-dangerous message 324, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 330 to any destination address, such as computer 336.
  • FIG. 4B illustrates the functionality of FIG. 3B in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 4B, three railroad cars with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0048] 420, 422 and 424 are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 428. Railroad car 420 carrying depleted uranium and marked with an atom figure, which is highly dangerous, is routed by the signaling person 428 to a remote underground disposal site, designated by reference numeral 430. A railroad car 422 carrying hospital waste and marked with a figure of test tubes, which is somewhat dangerous, is routed by the signaling person 428 to an incinerator, designated by reference numeral 432. A railroad car 424, carrying waste plastic and glass and marked with a trash bin figure, is routed to by the signaling person 428 to a landfill designated by reference numeral 434.
  • FIG. 3C shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a suspiciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address having sufficient strength to handle objects of the given suspiciousness classification, whether or not the address is a destination address of the object. [0049]
  • As seen in FIG. 3C, three messages with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0050] 340, 342 and 344 are received via the Internet 346 at an organization 348 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 350. Message 340 contains a computer program is symbolized by a computer form and is considered to be highly suspiciousness. Message 340 is shown routed by router 350 to a computer system administrator symbolized by a highly sophisticated computer and designated by reference numeral 352, whether or not the computer system administrator is a destination address of the message. Message 342, which contains a Microsoft Word document and is symbolized by a Microsoft Word icon, is considered to be somewhat dangerous. Message 342 is routed by router 350 to an experienced user, working in the same department, as a user 353 that is a destination address of the message. The experienced user is symbolized by a computer of medium sophistication and is designated by reference numeral 354. A non-dangerous message 344, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame and considered to be somewhat dangerous, is routed by router 350 to any destination address, such as computer 356.
  • FIG. 4C illustrates the functionality of FIG. 3C in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. It is seen that a railroad car carrying powered sugar from Colombia, which is highly suspicious, is sent to a nation-wide soft-drinks manufacturer, which has strict quality control facilities, while granulated sugar from Florida, which is somewhat suspicious, is sent to a local bakery, which has some quality control procedures in place. A railroad car carrying granulated sugar from Minnesota is sent to an open market. [0051]
  • FIG. 4C illustrates the functionality of FIG. 3C in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 4C, three railroad cars with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0052] 440, 442 and 444 are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 448. Railroad car 440 carrying powered sugar from Colombia, which is highly suspicious, is routed by signaling person 448 to a nation-wide soft-drinks manufacturer designated by reference numeral 450, which has strict quality control facilities. A railroad car 442 carrying granulated sugar from Florida, which is somewhat suspicious, is routed by signaling person 448 to a local bakery, symbolized by a baker and designated by reference numeral 452, which has some quality control procedures in place. A railroad car 444, carrying granulated sugar from Minnesota, is routed to by signaling person 448 to any destination address such as open market 454.
  • Reference is now made to FIGS. [0053] 5A-5D which are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed indirectly to a destination addresses via specific nodes in accordance with various security classifications thereof and to FIGS. 6A-6D, which are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 5A-5B respectively.
  • FIG. 5A shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a secrecy classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed indirectly to an address via a route having a secrecy classification appropriate thereto. [0054]
  • As seen in FIG. 5A, three messages with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0055] 500, 502 and 504 are sent from the White House, which is designated by reference numeral 505, to an embassy in a foreign country, symbolized by an American flag on a map of Italy and designated by reference numeral 506, and routed by a router, symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 507. A top-secret message 500 sent from the White House is routed by router 507 via a CIA declassification expert, symbolized by strainer and designated by reference numeral 510. A message containing next year's budget, symbolized by a report containing a graph and designated by reference numeral 502, which is secret but not top secret, is shown routed by router 507 via a White House Security Office, symbolized by a security badge and designated by reference numeral 512. A non-secret message, such as press release is sent directly to the to embassy 506.
  • FIG. 6A illustrates the functionality of FIG. 5A in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 6A, three railroad cars with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0056] 600, 602 and 604 sent to sent from a first military base symbolized by a saluting soldier and designated by reference number 605 to a second military base also symbolized by a saluting soldier and designated by reference number 606. The railroad cars are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 608. It is seen that a railroad car 600 carrying office supplied and marked with a paper clip symbol, which clearly has a non-secret secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 608 directly to base 606. A railroad car 602 carrying documents and marked with a top secret inscription, clearly having a high level secrecy classification, routed by signaling person 608 via an encryption facility symbolized by binary digits overlaid with a key and designated by reference numeral 610. A railroad car 604 carrying radar equipment and marked with a radar symbol, presumably having a medium level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 608 via a disguise facility symbolized by person behind a curtain and designated by reference numeral 612.
  • FIG. 5B shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a danger classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed along a route having a capability to deal with objects of the given danger classification, such as a suitable danger reduction facility. [0057]
  • As seen in FIG. 5B, three messages with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0058] 520, 522 and 524 are sent via the Internet 526 to a user 527 within an organization 528 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 530. Message 520, which contains a device driver program, symbolized by a toothed wheel inside a computer window and considered to be highly dangerous, is shown routed by router 530 via a device driver emasculator, which removes file system operations therefrom and is designated by reference numeral 532. Message 522, which contains a computer program, symbolized by a computer form and considered to be somewhat dangerous, is routed by router 530 via an experienced user working in the same department as user 527. The experiences user is distinguished by a notebook computer and is designated by reference numeral 534. A non-dangerous message 524, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 530 directly to user 527.
  • FIG. 6B illustrates the functionality of FIG. 5B in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 6B, three railroad cars with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0059] 620, 622 and 624 are sent from a city designated by reference numeral 625 to a disposal site designated by reference numeral 626 and are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 628. Railroad car 620 carrying depleted uranium and marked with an atom figure which is highly dangerous, is routed by signaling person 628 via a lead encapsulation facility, symbolized by a person wrapping a package and designated by reference numeral 630. A railroad car 622 carrying hospital waste and marked with a figure of test tubes, which is somewhat dangerous, is routed by signaling person 628 via an incinerator, designated by reference numeral 632, to disposal site 626. A railroad car 624, carrying waste plastic and glass and marked with a trash bin figure, is routed to by signaling person 628 directly to disposal site 626.
  • FIG. 5C shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a suspiciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed along a route having a capability to deal with objects of the given suspiciousness classification, such as an appropriate inspection facility. [0060]
  • As seen in FIG. 5C, three messages with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0061] 540, 542 and 544 are sent via the Internet 546 to a user 547 within an organization 548 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 550. Message 540 contains a computer program, is symbolized by a computer form and is considered to be highly suspicious. Message 540 is routed by router 550 via a computer virus detection system 552. Message 542, which contains a Microsoft Word document is symbolized by a Microsoft Word icon and is considered to be somewhat suspicious. Message 542 is routed by router 550 via an experienced user 554 working in the same department as user 547. The experienced user is distinguished by a notebook computer and is designated by reference numeral 554. A non-suspicious message 544, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 550 directly to user 547.
  • FIG. 6C illustrates the functionality of FIG. 5C in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 6C, three railroad cars with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0062] 640, 642 and 644 are sent to a soft-drinks manufacturer designated by reference numeral 646 and are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 648. Railroad car 640 carrying powered sugar from Colombia, which is highly suspicious, is routed by FDA agent 648 via a DEA inspection center, symbolized by syringe and designated by reference numeral 650. A railroad car 642 carrying granulated sugar from Florida, which is somewhat suspicious, is routed by signaling person 648 via a FDA food inspection facility symbolized by test tubes and designated by reference numeral 652. A railroad car 644, carrying granulated sugar from Minnesota, is routed by signaling person 648 directly to manufacturer 646.
  • FIG. 5D shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a maliciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed along a route having a capability to deal with objects of the given maliciousness classification, such as a suitable danger reduction facility [0063]
  • As seen in FIG. 5D, three messages with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0064] 560, 562 and 564 are sent via the Internet 566 to a user 567 within an organization 568 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 570. Message 560 contains a VBS worm-virus, is symbolized by a worm symbol within a computer window and is considered to be highly malicious. Message 560 is routed by router 570 to a computer security officer, symbolized by a security badge and designated by reference numeral 572. Message 562 contains offensive content, is symbolized by a shouting person and is considered to be somewhat malicious. Message 562 is routed by router 570 via an offensive content warning facility, symbolized by a rubber stamp and designated by reference number 574, which attaches a suitable warning to the document enroute to user 567. A non-malicious message 564, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 570 directly to user 567.
  • FIG. 6D illustrates the functionality of FIG. 5B in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 6D, three railroad cars with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0065] 660, 662 and 664 are sent to a city designated by reference numeral 666 and are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 668. Railroad car 660 carrying illicit drugs and marked with a skull symbol, which is highly malicious, is routed by FDA agent 668 to a DEA enforcement center symbolized by a syringe and designated by reference numeral 670. A railroad car 662 carrying cigarettes and marked with a cigarette symbol, which is somewhat malicious, is routed by signaling person 668 via packaging facility, symbolized by a person wrapping a package and designated by reference numeral 672, for adding Surgeon General warnings to each package enroute to city 666. A railroad car 664, carrying fruits and marked with an apple symbol is routed by signaling person 668 directly to city 666.
  • Reference is now made to FIGS. [0066] 7A-7D which are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed along various routes, in accordance with various security classifications thereof and to FIGS. 8A-8D, which are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 7A-7D respectively.
  • FIG. 7A shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a secrecy classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed via a route appropriate to the secrecy classification of the object. [0067]
  • As seen in FIG. 7A, three messages with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0068] 700, 702 and 704 are sent from the White House, which is designated by reference numeral 705, to the Pentagon, which is designated by reference numeral 706, and routed by a router, symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 707. A non-secret message, such as press release 700 is shown routed by router 707 via the Internet, symbolized by a network cloud and designated by reference numeral 708. A message containing next year's budget, symbolized by a report containing a graph and designated by reference numeral 702 which is secret but not top secret, is shown routed by router 707 through a virtual private network (VPN) over the Internet. The VPN over the Internet is symbolized by an ellipse marked with binary digits overlaid with a key and designated by reference numeral 710. A top-secret message 704 is routed by router 707 via a secure intra-government computer network, symbolized by a network cloud overlaid with a lock and designated by reference numeral 712.
  • FIG. 8A illustrates the functionality of FIG. 7A in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 8A, three railroad cars with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0069] 800, 802 and 804 sent to sent from a military base in Texas, symbolized by a saluting soldier over the map of Texas and designated by reference number 805 to a military base in California, symbolized by a saluting soldier over the map of California and designated by reference number 806. The railroad cars are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 808. It is seen that a railroad car 800 carrying office supplied and marked with a paper clip symbol, which clearly has a non-secret secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 808 through a route which includes Mexico, symbolized by a map of Mexico and designated by reference numeral 810. A railroad car 802 carrying documents and marked with a top secret inscription, clearly having a high level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 808 via the fastest wholly domestic route, symbolized by a rabbit and designated by reference numeral 812. A railroad car 804 carrying radar equipment and marked with a radar symbol, presumably having a Himedium level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 808 via the most economical domestic route symbolized by piggy bank and designated by reference numeral 814.
  • FIG. 7B shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a danger classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed via a route appropriate to the danger classification of the object. [0070]
  • As seen in FIG. 7B, three messages with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0071] 720, 722 and 724 are send via the Internet 726 to a user 727 within an organization 728 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 730. Message 720, which contains a VBS worm-virus needed for research purposes, is symbolized by a worm symbol within a computer window and is considered to be highly dangerous. Message 720 is shown routed by router 730 via a route 732 that employs a magnetic medium such a diskette as a transfer mechanism. Route 732 is marked with a diskette image. Message 722, which contains a beta version of a computer program, symbolized by a computer form and considered to be somewhat dangerous, is routed by router 730 through an isolated development network 734. A non-dangerous message 724, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 730 through the organization's Intranet 736.
  • FIG. 8B illustrates the functionality of FIG. 7B in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 8B, three railroad cars with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0072] 820, 822 and 824 are sent from a city designated by reference numeral 825 to a disposal site designated by reference numeral 826 and are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 828. Railroad car 820 carrying depleted uranium and marked with an atom figure, which is highly dangerous, is routed by signaling person 828 through the least populated route, symbolized by a country side landscape and designated by reference numeral 830. A railroad car 822 carrying hospital waste and marked with a figure of test tubes, which is somewhat dangerous, is routed by signaling person 828 along the faster route, symbolized by a rabbit and designated by reference numeral 832. A railroad car 824 carrying waste plastic and glass and marked with a trash bin figure, is routed to by signaling person 828 via the most economical domestic route symbolized by piggy bank and designated by reference numeral 834.
  • FIG. 7C shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a suspiciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed via a route having a capability to deal with objects of the given suspiciousness classification, such as an appropriate inspection facility. [0073]
  • As seen in FIG. 7C, three messages with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0074] 740, 742 and 744 are send via the Internet 746 to a user 747 within an organization 748 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 750. Message 740 contains a VBS Script, is symbolized by a computer form and is considered to be highly suspicious. Message 740 is routed along route 752 that employs a magnetic medium such a diskette as a transfer mechanism. Route 752 is marked with a diskette image. Message 742, which contains a Microsoft Word document is symbolized by a Microsoft Word icon and is considered to be somewhat suspicious. Message 742 is routed by router 750 via an isolated development network 754. A non-suspicious message 744, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 750 through the organization's general purpose network 756.
  • FIG. 8C illustrates the functionality of FIG. 7C in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 8C, three railroad cars with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0075] 840, 842 and 844 are sent to an FDA inspection center symbolized by a figure of test tubes and designated by reference numeral 846. The railroad cars are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 848. Railroad car 840 carrying powered sugar from Afghanistan, which is highly suspicious, is routed by FDA agent 848 along through the least populated route, symbolized by a country side landscape and designated by reference numeral 850. A railroad car 842 carrying granulated sugar from Colombia, which is somewhat suspicious, is routed by FDA agent 848 along the faster route, symbolized by a rabbit and designated by reference numeral 852. A railroad car 844, carrying granulated sugar from Minnesota, is routed by signaling person 848 via the most economical domestic route symbolized by piggy bank and designated by reference numeral 854.
  • FIG. 7D shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a maliciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention each object is routed via a route appropriate to the maliciousness classification of the object. [0076]
  • As seen in FIG. 7D, three messages with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0077] 760, 762 and 764 are send via the Internet 766 to a user 767 within an organization 768 and are routed by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 770. Message 760 contains a VBS worm-virus, is symbolized by a worm symbol within a computer window and is considered to be highly malicious. Message 760 is routed by router 770 is routed through route 772, which is marked with a diskette image and employs a magnetic medium such a diskette as a transfer mechanism, to a computer security officer, which is symbolized by a security badge and designated by reference numeral 774, Message 762 contains offensive content, is symbolized by a shouting person and is considered to be somewhat malicious. Message 762 is routed by router 770 via an encrypted route over the organization's network. The encrypted route is marked with binary digits overlaid with a key and designated by reference numeral 776. A non-malicious message 764, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 760 through the organization's network 778.
  • FIG. 8D illustrates the functionality of FIG. 7D in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 8D, three railroad cars with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0078] 860, 862 and 864 are sent to an FDA inspection center symbolized by a figure of test tubes and designated by reference numeral 866. The railroad cars are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 868. Railroad car 860 carrying illicit drugs and marked with a skull symbol, which is highly malicious, is routed by FDA agent 868 along through the least populated route, symbolized by a country side landscape and designated by reference numeral 870. A railroad car 862 carrying cigarettes and marked with a cigarette symbol, which is somewhat malicious, is routed by signaling person 868 along the faster route, symbolized by a rabbit and designated by reference numeral 872. A railroad car 864, carrying fruits and marked with an apple symbol, is routed by signaling person 868 via the most economical domestic route symbolized by piggy bank and designated by reference numeral 874.
  • Reference is now made to FIGS. [0079] 9A-9D, which are simplified illustrations, partially symbolically depicting an example of security routing functionality wherein objects are routed or not routed in accordance with various security classifications thereof and to FIGS. 10A-10D, which are highly symbolic illustrations of the functionality of FIGS. 9A-9D respectively.
  • FIG. 9A shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a secrecy classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address that has a secrecy classification appropriate thereto or not routed. [0080]
  • As seen in FIG. 9A, three messages with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0081] 900, 902 and 904 are sent from the White House which is designated by reference numeral 905 and are routed by a router, symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 907. A top-secret message 900 sent from the White House is not routed by router 907 to any destination address outside of the White House, as symbolized by a no entry sign 908 blocking the message route. A message containing next year's budget, symbolized by a report containing a graph and designated by reference numeral 902, which is secret but not top secret, is routed by router 907 to any government destination address such as the Pentagon, which is designated by reference numeral 910. A non-secret message, such as press release 904 is sent to any destination address, such as a foreign address 912 symbolized by the leaning tower of Pisa.
  • FIG. 10A illustrates the functionality of FIG. 9A in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 10A, three railroad cars with different secrecy classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0082] 1000, 1002 and 1004 sent from a military base symbolized by a saluting soldier and designated by reference number 1005. The railroad cars are routed by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 1008. It is seen that a railroad car 1000 carrying office supplied and marked with a paper clip symbol, which clearly has a non-secret secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 1008 to any destination address, such as a city 1010. A railroad car 1002 carrying documents and marked with a top secret inscription, clearly having a high level secrecy classification, is not routed by router 1008 to any destination address outside of the military base, as symbolized by a no entry sign 1012 blocking the tracks. A railroad car 1004 carrying radar equipment and marked with a radar symbol, presumably having a medium level secrecy classification, is routed by signaling person 1008 to any government destination address such as the Pentagon, which is designated by reference numeral 1014.
  • FIG. 9B shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a danger classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address that has a danger classification appropriate thereto or not routed. [0083]
  • As seen in FIG. 9B, three messages with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0084] 920, 922 and 924 are received via the Internet 926 at an organization 928 and are routed within the organization by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 930. Message 920, which contains a VBS worm-virus needed for research purposes, is symbolized by a worm symbol within a computer window and is considered to be highly dangerous. Message 920 is not routed by router 930 to any destination address in the organization as symbolized by a no entry sign 932 blocking the message route. Message 922, which contains a beta version of a computer program, symbolized by a computer form and considered to be somewhat dangerous, is routed by router 930 only to experienced users, such as user 934 symbolized by a notebook computer. A non-dangerous message 924, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 930 to any address in the organization such as novice user 936 symbolized by a user accompanied by an instructor.
  • FIG. 10B illustrates the functionality of FIG. 9B in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 10B, three railroad cars with different danger classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0085] 1020, 1022 and 1024 are received at a disposal site designated by reference numeral 1026 and are routed within the disposal site by a signaling person designated by reference numeral 1028. Railroad car 1020 carrying depleted uranium and marked with an atom figure, which is highly dangerous, is not admitted by signaling person 1028 into the disposal site as symbolized by a no entry sign 1030 blocking the tracks. A railroad car 1022 carrying hospital waste and marked with a figure of test tubes, which is somewhat dangerous, is routed by signaling person 1028 to an the incinerator facility 1032 of the disposal site. A railroad car 1024, carrying waste plastic and glass and marked with a trash bin figure, is routed to by signaling person 1028 to the land fill facility 1034 of the disposal site.
  • FIG. 9C shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a suspiciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address that has a suspiciousness classification appropriate thereto or not routed. [0086]
  • As seen in FIG. 9C, three messages with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0087] 940, 942 and 944 are received via the Internet 946 at organization 948 and are routed within the organization by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 950. Message 940, which contains an executable program, is symbolized by a computer form and is considered to be highly dangerous. Message 940 is not routed by router 950 to any destination address in the organization as symbolized by a no entry sign 952 blocking the message route. Message 942, which contains a Microsoft Word document is symbolized by a Microsoft Word icon and is considered somewhat suspicious, is routed by router 950 only to experienced users, such as an user 954 symbolized by a notebook computer. A non-suspicious message 944, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 950 to any address in the organization such as ordinary user 956 symbolized by a user accompanied by an instructor.
  • FIG. 10C illustrates the functionality of FIG. 9C in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 10C, three railroad cars with different suspiciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0088] 1040, 1042 and 1044 are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 1048. Railroad car 1040 carrying powered sugar from Afghanistan, which is highly suspicious, is not sent to any destination, as symbolized by a no entry sign 1050 blocking the tracks. A railroad car 1042 carrying granulated sugar from Colombia, which is somewhat suspicious, is routed by FDA agent 1048 to a nation-wide soft-drinks manufacturer designated by reference numeral 1052, which has strict quality control facilities. A railroad car 1044, carrying granulated sugar from Minnesota, is routed by signaling person 1048 to any destination address such as an open market 1054.
  • FIG. 9D shows the security routing functionality of the present invention in an operative environment wherein the security classification of an object is a maliciousness classification. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, each object is routed to an address that is equipped to handle objects having a corresponding maliciousness classification or is not routed. [0089]
  • As seen in FIG. 9D, three messages with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0090] 960, 962 and 964 are received via the Internet 966 by an organization 968 and are routed within the organization by a router symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 970. Message 960 contains a VBS worm-virus, is symbolized by a worm symbol within a computer window and is considered to be highly malicious. Message 960 is not routed by router 970 to any destination address in the organization as symbolized by a no entry sign 972 blocking the message route. Message 962 contains offensive content, is symbolized by a shouting person and is considered to be somewhat malicious. Message 962, which is routed by router 970 only to adult users, such as an elderly user 974. A non-malicious message 964, which contains a drawing, symbolized by a picture frame, is routed by router 970 to any destination address such as user 976 symbolized by a baby.
  • FIG. 10D illustrates the functionality of FIG. 9D in the symbolic context of railroad car routing. As seen in FIG. 10D, three railroad cars with different maliciousness classifications, designated individually by reference numerals [0091] 1060, 1062 and 1064 are sent from an FDA inspection center symbolized by a figure of test tubes and designated by reference numeral 1066. The railroad cars are routed by an FDA agent symbolized by a signaling person and designated by reference numeral 1068. Railroad car 1060 carrying illicit drugs and marked with a skull symbol, which is highly malicious, is not routed by FDA agent 1068 to any destination address outside of the inspection center as symbolized by a no entry sign 1070 blocking the tracks. A railroad car 1062 carrying cigarettes and marked with a cigarette symbol, which is somewhat malicious, is sent by FDA agent 1068 only to an authorized bonded packaging facility 1072. A railroad car 1064, carrying fruits and marked with an apple symbol, is routed by FDA agent 1068 to any destination address such as an open market 1074.
  • It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that the present invention is not limited by what has been particularly shown and described herein above. Rather the scope of the present invention includes both combinations and subcombinations of the various features described hereinabove as well as variations and modifications which would occur to persons skilled in the art upon reading the specifications and which are not in the prior art. [0092]

Claims (382)

1. A security routing methodology comprising:
sensing information contained in an object;
analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
routing the object to at least one address selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
2. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said object comprises a message.
3. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
4. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
5. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
6. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
7. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
8. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
9. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
10. A security routing methodology according to claim 9 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
11. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
12. A security routing methodology according to claim 11 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
13. A security routing methodology according to claim 1 and wherein said object contains at least one at least one destination address.
14. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said object comprises a message.
15. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
16. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
17. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
18. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
19. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
20. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
21. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
22. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
23. A security routing methodology according to claim 22 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
24. A security routing methodology according to claim 22 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
25. A security routing methodology according to claim 22 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
26. A security routing methodology according to claim 22 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
27. A security routing methodology according to claim 22 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
28. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
29. A security routing methodology according to claim 28 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
30. A security routing methodology according to claim 28 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
31. A security routing methodology according to claim 28 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
32. A security routing methodology according to claim 28 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
33. A security routing methodology according to claim 28 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
34. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
35. A security routing methodology according to claim 34 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
36. A security routing methodology according to claim 34 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
37. A security routing methodology according to claim 34 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
38. A security routing methodology according to claim 34 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
39. A security routing methodology according to claim 34 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
40. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
41. A security routing methodology according to claim 40 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
42. A security routing methodology according to claim 40 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
43. A security routing methodology according to claim 40 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
44. A security routing methodology according to claim 40 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
45. A security routing methodology according to claim 40 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
46. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
47. A security routing methodology according to claim 46 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
48. A security routing methodology according to claim 47 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
49. A security routing methodology according to claim 46 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
50. A security routing methodology according to claim 49 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
51. A security routing methodology according to claim 46 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
52. A security routing methodology according to claim 51 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
53. A security routing methodology according to claim 46 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
54. A security routing methodology according to claim 53 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
55. A security routing methodology according to claim 46 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
56. A security routing methodology according to claim 55 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
57. A security routing methodology according to claim 13 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
58. A security routing methodology according to claim 57 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
59. A security routing methodology according to claim 58 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
60. A security routing methodology according to claim 57 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
61. A security routing methodology according to claim 60 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
62. A security routing methodology according to claim 57 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
63. A security routing methodology according to claim 62 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
64. A security routing methodology according to claim 57 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
65. A security routing methodology according to claim 64 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
66. A security routing methodology according to claim 57 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
67. A security routing methodology according to claim 66 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
68. A security routing methodology comprising:
sensing information contained in an object directed to an address;
analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
routing, the object to a selected at least one of a multiplicity of destinations enroute to said address in accordance with said security classification.
69. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said object comprises a message.
70. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
71. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
72. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
73. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
74. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
75. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
76. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
77. A security routing methodology according to claim 76 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
78. A security routing methodology according to claim 68 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
79. A security routing methodology according to claim 78 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
80. A security routing methodology comprising:
sensing information contained in an object;
analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
routing said object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
81. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said object comprises a message.
82. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
83. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
84. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
85. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
86. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
87. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
88. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
89. A security routing methodology according to claim 88 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
90. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
91. A security routing methodology according to claim 90 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
92. A security routing methodology according to claim 80 and also comprising routing said message from said at least one selected node to at least one node addressed in said message.
93. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said object comprises a message.
94. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
95. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
96. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
97. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
98. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
99. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
100. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
101. A security routing methodology according to claim 100 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
102. A security routing methodology according to claim 92 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
103. A security routing methodology according to claim 102 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
104. A security routing methodology comprising:
sensing, at a first node, information contained in an object;
analyzing, at said first node, said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
routing said object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
105. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said object comprises a message.
106. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
107. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
108. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
109. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
110. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
111. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
112. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
113. A security routing methodology according to claim 112 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
114. A security routing methodology according to claim 104 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
115. A security routing methodology according to claim 114 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
116. A system for routing an object comprising:
an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object;
an information analyzer, analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
a router, routing said object to at least one address selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
117. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said object comprises a message.
118. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
119. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
120. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
121. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
122. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
123. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
124. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
125. A system for routing an object according to claim 124 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
126. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
127. A system for routing an object according to claim 126 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
128. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said object contains at least one at least one destination address.
129. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said object comprises a message.
130. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
131. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
132. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
133. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
134. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
135. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
136. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
137. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
138. A system for routing an object according to claim 137 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
139. A system for routing an object according to claim 137 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
140. A system for routing an object according to claim 137 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
141. A system for routing an object according to claim 137 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
142. A system for routing an object according to claim 137 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
143. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
144. A system for routing an object according to claim 143 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
145. A system for routing an object according to claim 143 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
146. A system for routing an object according to claim 143 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
147. A system for routing an object according to claim 143 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
148. A system for routing an object according to claim 143 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
149. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
150. A system for routing an object according to claim 149 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
151. A system for routing an object according to claim 149 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
152. A system for routing an object according to claim 149 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
153. A system for routing an object according to claim 149 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
154. A system for routing an object according to claim 149 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
155. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
156. A system for routing an object according to claim 155 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
157. A system for routing an object according to claim 155 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
158. A system for routing an object according to claim 155 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
159. A system for routing an object according to claim 155 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
160. A system for routing an object according to claim 155 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
161. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
162. A system for routing an object according to claim 161 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
163. A system for routing an object according to claim 162 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
164. A system for routing an object according to claim 161 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
165. A system for routing an object according to claim 164 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
166. A system for routing an object according to claim 161 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
167. A system for routing an object according to claim 166 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
168. A system for routing an object according to claim 161 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
169. A system for routing an object according to claim 168 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
170. A system for routing an object according to claim 161 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
171. A system for routing an object according to claim 170 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
172. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
173. A system for routing an object according to claim 172 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
174. A system for routing an object according to claim 173 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
175. A system for routing an object according to claim 172 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
176. A system for routing an object according to claim 175 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
177. A system for routing an object according to claim 172 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
178. A system for routing an object according to claim 177 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
179. A system for routing an object according to claim 172 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
180. A system for routing an object according to claim 179 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
181. A system for routing an object according to claim 172 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
182. A system for routing an object according to claim 181 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
183. A system for routing an object comprising:
an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object directed to an address;
an information analyzer, analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
a router, routing said object to a selected at least one of a multiplicity of destinations enroute to said address in accordance with said security classification.
184. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said object comprises a message.
185. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said object comprises of at least-one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
186. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
187. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
188. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
189. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
190. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
191. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
192. A system for routing an object according to claim 191 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
193. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
194. A system for routing an object according to claim 193 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
195. A system for routing an object comprising:
an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object;
an information analyzer, analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
a router, routing said object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
196. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said object comprises a message.
197. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
198. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
199. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
200. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
201. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
202. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
203. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
204. A system for routing an object according to claim 203 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
205. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
206. A system for routing an object according to claim 205 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
207. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and also comprising routing said message from said at least one selected node to at least one node addressed in said message.
208. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said object comprises a message.
209. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
210. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
211. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
212. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
213. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
214. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
215. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
216. A system for routing an object according to claim 215 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
217. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
218. A system for routing an object according to claim 217 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
219. A system for routing an object comprising:
an object sensor, sensing information contained in an object;
an information analyzer, analyzing said information to determine a security classification thereof; and
a router, routing said object to at least one node selected from at least one destination node and at least one intermediate node which is selected at least partially in accordance with said security classification.
220. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said object comprises a message.
221. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
222. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
223. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
224. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
225. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
226. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
227. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
228. A system for routing an object according to claim 227 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
229. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
230. A system for routing an object according to claim 229 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
231. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 and wherein said object sensor includes a network sniffer.
232. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said object comprises a message.
233. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
234. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
235. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
236. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
237. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
238. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
239. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
240. A system for routing an object according to claim 239 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
241. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
242. A system for routing an object according to claim 241 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
243. A system for routing an object according to claim 231 and wherein said object contains at least one at least one destination address.
244. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein said object comprises a message.
245. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
246. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
247. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
248. A system for routing an object according to claim 247 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
249. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
250. A system for routing an object according to claim 249 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
251. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
252. A system for routing an object according to claim 251 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
253. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
254. A system for routing an object according to claim 253 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
255. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
256. A system for routing an object according to claim 255 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
257. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
258. A system for routing an object according to claim 243 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
259. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 and wherein said object sensor includes a network sniffer.
260. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said object comprises a message.
261. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
262. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
263. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
264. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
265. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
266. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
267. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
268. A system for routing an object according to claim 259 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
269. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 and wherein said object sensor includes a network sniffer.
270. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said object comprises a message.
271. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
272. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
273. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
274. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
275. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
276. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
277. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
278. A system for routing an object according to claim 269 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
279. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 and wherein said object sensor includes a network sniffer.
280. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said object comprises a message.
281. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
282. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
283. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
284. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
285. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
286. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
287. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
288. A system for routing an object according to claim 279 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
289. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 and wherein said object sensor includes a network sniffer.
290. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said object comprises a message.
291. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
292. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
293. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
294. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
295. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
296. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
297. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
298. A system for routing an object according to claim 289 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
299. A system for routing an object according to claim 116 also comprising:
a first interface providing interaction with said at least one first communication network; and
a second interface providing interaction with said at least one second communication network.
300. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said object comprises a message.
301. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
302. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
303. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
304. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
305. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
306. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
307. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
308. A system for routing an object according to claim 307 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
309. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
310. A system for routing an object according to claim 309 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
311. A system for routing an object according to claim 299 and wherein said object contains at least one at least one destination address.
312. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein said object comprises a message.
313. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
314. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
315. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
316. A system for routing an object according to claim 315 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
317. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
318. A system for routing an object according to claim 317 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
319. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
320. A system for routing an object according to claim 319 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
321. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
322. A system for routing an object according to claim 321 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
323. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
324. A system for routing an object according to claim 323 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
325. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
326. A system for routing an object according to claim 311 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
327. A system for routing an object according to claim 183 also comprising:
a first interface providing interaction with said at least one first communication network; and
a second interface providing interaction with said at least one second communication network.
328. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said object comprises a message.
329. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
330. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
331. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
332. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
333. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
334. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
335. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
336. A system for routing an object according to claim 327 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
337. A system for routing an object according to claim 195 also comprising:
a first interface providing interaction with said at least one first communication network; and
a second interface providing interaction with said at least one second communication network.
338. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said object comprises a message.
339. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
340. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
341. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
342. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
343. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
344. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
345. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
346. A system for routing an object according to claim 337 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
347. A system for routing an object according to claim 207 also comprising:
a first interface providing interaction with said at least one first communication network; and
a second interface providing interaction with said at least one second communication network.
348. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said object comprises a message.
349. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
350. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
351. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
352. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
353. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
354. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
355. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
356. A system for routing an object according to claim 347 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
357. A system for routing an object according to claim 219 also comprising:
a first interface providing interaction with said at least one first communication network; and
a second interface providing interaction with said at least one second communication network.
358. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said object comprises a message.
359. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file;
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
360. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
361. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said security classification comprises a secrecy classification.
362. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said security classification comprises a danger classification.
363. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said security classification comprises a suspiciousness classification.
364. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein said security classification comprises a maliciousness classification.
365. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
366. A system for routing an object according to claim 357 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
367. A system for routing an object according to claim 128 and wherein address of said system is at least one of said at least one destination address.
368. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein said object comprises a message.
369. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein said object comprises of at least one of:
a file:
an e-mail message;
a web page; and
a communication packet.
370. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein information contained in an object is selected from a set consisting of:
an object content;
an object header;
an object source; and
an object destination.
371. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein said at least one destination address is not one of said at least one address.
372. A system for routing an object according to claim 371 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
373. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein said at least one destination address is one of said at least one address.
374. A system for routing an object according to claim 373 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
375. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address to said at least one destination address.
376. A system for routing an object according to claim 375 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
377. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and also comprising routing the object from said at least one address directly to said at least one destination address.
378. A system for routing an object according to claim 377 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
379. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and also comprising modifying the priority of said object.
380. A system for routing an object according to claim 379 and wherein said security classification comprises at least one of:
secrecy classification;
danger classification;
maliciousness classification; and
suspiciousness classification.
381. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information against a security policy.
382. A system for routing an object according to claim 367 and wherein analyzing said information comprises comparing said information to an information contained in at least one other message.
US10/002,407 2001-11-15 2001-11-15 Security router Abandoned US20030093689A1 (en)

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US10/002,407 US20030093689A1 (en) 2001-11-15 2001-11-15 Security router
DE2002607515 DE60207515T4 (en) 2001-11-15 2002-11-14 A method for enhancing the throughput of data in a network gateway device, router, and
AT02025394T AT311064T (en) 2001-11-15 2002-11-14 A method for increasing throughput of data in a gateway device, router, and
ES02025394T ES2256391T3 (en) 2001-11-15 2002-11-14 Procedure to accelerate the transfer of data objects to bring the network gateway and router apparatus.
DE2002607515 DE60207515D1 (en) 2001-11-15 2002-11-14 A method for enhancing the throughput of data in a network gateway device, router, and
EP02025394A EP1318646B1 (en) 2001-11-15 2002-11-14 Method for speeding up the transfer of data objects through a network gateway, and router apparatus

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DE60207515D1 (en) 2005-12-29
DE60207515T2 (en) 2006-08-10
ES2256391T3 (en) 2006-07-16
AT311064T (en) 2005-12-15
DE60207515T4 (en) 2009-04-23
EP1318646B1 (en) 2005-11-23

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