US20020188171A1 - Lung reduction apparatus and method - Google Patents

Lung reduction apparatus and method Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020188171A1
US20020188171A1 US10/199,776 US19977602A US2002188171A1 US 20020188171 A1 US20020188171 A1 US 20020188171A1 US 19977602 A US19977602 A US 19977602A US 2002188171 A1 US2002188171 A1 US 2002188171A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
jacket
lung
portion
apparatus
method
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/199,776
Inventor
Clifton Alferness
Richard Lin
Wilfred Jaeger
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Spiration Inc
Original Assignee
Spiration Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US09/379,973 priority Critical patent/US6416554B1/en
Application filed by Spiration Inc filed Critical Spiration Inc
Priority to US10/199,776 priority patent/US20020188171A1/en
Assigned to SPIRATION, INC. reassignment SPIRATION, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JAEGER, WILFRED E., LIN, RICHARD Y., ALFERNESS, CLIFTON A.
Publication of US20020188171A1 publication Critical patent/US20020188171A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/00234Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for minimally invasive surgery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/0063Implantable repair or support meshes, e.g. hernia meshes

Abstract

An apparatus and method reduces the size of a lung. The apparatus includes a jacket of flexible fabric configured to cover at least a portion of the lung. A lace, carried by the jacket, collapses the jacket about the lung portion. The jacket may further include a drawstring circumscribing the jacket at the base for closing the open base of the jacket about the lung portion. The collapsing of the jacket may be employed for both reducing the size of the lung and maintaining the lung in a reduced size condition or the lung portion may be deflated prior to the placement of the jacket over the lung portion, in which case, the jacket serves to prevent re-expansion of the lung portion.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is generally directed to an apparatus and method for treating Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The present invention is more particularly directed to such an apparatus and method which may be implanted in the human body to provide lung size reduction by constricting at least a portion of a lung. [0001]
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States over the last three decades. COPD is characterized by the presence of airflow obstruction due to chronic bronchitis or emphysema. The airflow obstruction in COPD is due largely to structural abnormalities in the smaller airways. Important causes are inflammation, fibrosis, goblet cell metaplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy in terminal bronchioles. [0002]
  • The incidence, prevalence, and health-related costs of COPD are on the rise. Mortality due to COPD is also on the rise. In 1991 COPD was the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and had increased 33% since 1979. [0003]
  • COPD affects the patient's whole life. It has three main symptoms: cough; breathlessness; and wheeze. At first, breathlessness may be noticed when running for a bus, digging in the garden, or walking up hill. Later, it may be noticed when simply walking in the kitchen. Overtime, it may occur with less and less effort until it is present all of the time. [0004]
  • COPD is a progressive disease and currently has no cure. Current treatments for COPD include the prevention of further respiratory damage, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Each is discussed below. [0005]
  • The prevention of further respiratory damage entails the adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Smoking cessation is believed to be the single most important therapeutic intervention. However, regular exercise and weight control are also important. Patients whose symptoms restrict their daily activities or who otherwise have an impaired quality of life may require a pulmonary rehabilitation program including ventilatory muscle training and breathing retraining. Long-term oxygen therapy may also become necessary. [0006]
  • Pharmacotherapy may include bronchodilator therapy to open up the airways as much as possible or inhaled ∃-agonists. For those patients who respond poorly to the foregoing or who have persistent symptoms, Ipratropium bromide may be indicated. Further, courses of steroids, such as corticosterocds, may be required. Lastly, antibiotics may be required to prevent infections and influenza and pheumococcal vaccines may be routinely administered. Unfortunately, there is no evidence that early, regular use of pharmacotherapy will alter the progression of COPD. [0007]
  • About 40 years ago, it was first postulated that the tethering force that tends to keep the intrathoracic airways open was lost in emphysema and that by surgically removing the most affected parts of the lungs, the force could be partially restored. Although the surgery was deemed promising, the procedure was abandoned. [0008]
  • The lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) was later revived. In the early 1990's, hundreds of patients underwent the procedure. However, the procedure has fallen out of favor due to the fact that Medicare stopped remitting for LVRS. Unfortunately, data is relatively scarce and many factors conspire to make what data exists difficult to interpret. The procedure is currently under review in a controlled clinical trial. However, what data does exist tends to indicate that patients benefited from the procedure in terms of an increase in forced expiratory volume, a decrease in total lung capacity, and a significant improvement in lung function, dyspnea, and quality of life. [0009]
  • Improvements in pulmonary function after LVRS have been attributed to at least four possible mechanisms. These include enhanced elastic recoil, correction of ventilation/perfusion mismatch, improved efficiency of respiratory musculature, and improved right ventricular filling. [0010]
  • Lastly, lung tranplantation is also an option. Today, COPD is the most common diagnosis for which lung transplantation is considered. Unfortunately, this consideration is given for only those with advanced COPD. Given the limited availability of donor organs, lung transplant is far from being available to all patients. [0011]
  • In view of the foregoing, there in a need in the art for a new and improved therapy for COPD. More specifically, there is a need for such a therapy which provides more permanent results than pharmacotherapy while being less traumatic than LVRS. The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method which provide such an improved therapy for COPD. [0012]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides an implantable apparatus for reducing the size of a lung. The apparatus includes a jacket of flexible fabric configured to cover at least a portion of a lung and collapsing means carried by the jacket for collapsing the jacket about the lung portion. [0013]
  • The invention still further provides a method of reducing the size of a lung. The method includes the steps of disposing a jacket of flexible fabric over at least a portion of a lung. The collapsing of the jacket may serve to both reduce the size of the lung and maintain it in its reduced size condition. Alternatively, the lung portion may first be deflated whereupon the collapsed jacket serves to maintain the lung portion in a deflated, reduced size condition.[0014]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by making reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in the several figures of which like referenced numerals identify identical elements, and wherein: [0015]
  • FIG. 1 is a simplified sectional view of a thorax illustrating a healthy respiratory system; [0016]
  • FIG. 2 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 1 but illustrating a respiratory system suffering from COPD; [0017]
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view illustrating a lung constriction apparatus embodying the present invention; [0018]
  • FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the respiratory system of FIG. 2 with a lung constriction apparatus embodying the present invention being disposed over a lung portion to be reduced in size; [0019]
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an initial step in collapsing the lung constricting apparatus about the lung portion; [0020]
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a further step in collapsing the lung constriction apparatus; [0021]
  • FIG. 7 illustrates the lung constricting apparatus being fully collapsed about the lung portion; and [0022]
  • FIG. 8 illustrates the respiratory system after both left and right side lung portions have been reduced in size in accordance with the present invention.[0023]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, it is a sectional view of a healthy respiratory system. The respiratory system [0024] 20 resides within the thorax 22 which occupies a space defined by the chest wall 24 and the diaphragm 26.
  • The respiratory system [0025] 20 includes the trachea 28, the left mainstem bronchus 30, the right mainstem bronchus 32, and the bronchial branches 34, 36, 38, 40, and 42. The respiratory system 20 further includes left lung lobes 52 and 54 and right lung lobes 56, 58, and 60. Each bronchial branch communicates with a respective different portion of a lung lobe, either the entire lung lobe or a portion thereof.
  • Characteristic of a healthy respiratory system is the arched or inwardly arcuate diaphragm [0026] 26. As the individual inhales, the diaphragm 26 straightens to increase the volume of the thorax 22. This causes a negative pressure within the thorax. The negative pressure within the thorax in turn causes the lung lobes to fill with air. When the individual exhales, the diaphragm returns to its original arched condition to decrease the volume of the thorax. The decreased volume of the thorax causes a positive pressure within the thorax which in turn causes exhalation of the lung lobes.
  • In contrast to the healthy respiratory system of FIG. 1, FIG. 2 illustrates a respiratory system suffering from COPD. Here it may be seen that the lung lobes [0027] 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60 are enlarged and that the diaphragm 26 is not arched but substantially straight. Hence, this individual is incapable of breathing normally by moving the diaphragm 28. Instead, in order to create the negative pressure in the thorax 22 required for breathing, this individual must move the chest wall outwardly to increase the volume of the thorax. This results in inefficient breathing causing these individuals to breathe rapidly with shallow breaths.
  • It has been found that the apex portion [0028] 62 and 66 of the upper lung lobes 52 and 56, respectively, are most affected by COPD. Hence, the preferred embodiment will be described for treating the apex 66 of the right, upper lung lobe 56. However, as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, the present invention may be applied to any lung portion without departing from the present invention.
  • The apparatus and method of the present invention treats COPD by deriving the benefits of lung volume reduction surgery without the need of performing lung volume reduction surgery. As will be seen hereinafter, the present invention contemplates permanent collapse of a lung portion or lung portions most affected. This leaves extra volume within the thorax for the diaphragm to assume its arched state for acting upon the remaining healthier lung tissue. As previously mentioned, this should result in improved pulmonary function due to enhanced elastic recoil, correction of ventilation/perfusion mismatch, improved efficiency of respiratory musculature, and improved right ventricle filling. [0029]
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, it illustrates a lung constriction apparatus [0030] 70 embodying the present invention. The apparatus 70 takes the form of a jacket 72 formed of a flexible fabric such as an open mesh of polyester. The jacket includes an open base 74 and a curved surface 76 extending from the open base 74 and terminating in a closed, domed-shape end or apex 78. The open base 74 is dimensioned to be applied over and to cover the lung portion to be reduced in size.
  • The constriction apparatus [0031] 70 further includes at least one lace 80 extending from the apex 78 to the base 74. The cord 82 forming the lace 80 has a pair of free ends 84 and 86 which are threaded through a guide tube 88 from the distal end 90 of the guide tube 88 to the proximal end 92 of the guide tube 88.
  • The guide tube [0032] 88 serves to maintain the free ends 84 and 86 of the cord 82 together. When the free ends 84 and 86 of the cord 82 are drawn while holding the guide tube distal end 90 adjacent the base 74, the jacket 72 is collapsed to reduce the inner volume of the jacket. This constriction of the jacket serves to collapse the jacket about the lung portion to be reduced in size.
  • As will be seen hereinafter, a plurality of laces may be carried by the jacket. As each lace is drawn, the jacket will be collapsed to a greater and controlled extent. [0033]
  • The jacket [0034] 72 further includes a piping 94 at the base 74. A draw string 96 is threaded through the piping to circumscribe the jacket 72 and the base 74. The draw string has a pair of free ends 98 and 100. As will be seen hereinafter, after the laces are drawn to collapse the jacket 72 about the lung portion, the free ends 98 and 100 of the draw string 96 may be pulled and drawn to close the open base 74 of the jacket 72 about the lung portion. This will provide additional constriction to assure that the lung portion does not reinflate. It also serves to cut off all blood circulation to the lung portion. This promotes infarction and fibrosis.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4, it illustrates the constriction device [0035] 70 after it has been placed over the apex of the upper right lung lobe 56 to cover the lung portion 66 of the right upper lobe 56 referred to previously with respect to FIG. 2. The jacket 72 covers the lung portion 66. At this point, the free ends 84 and 86 of the cord forming the lace 80 have not been drawn.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5, here it may be seen that the lace [0036] 80 has been drawn by the pulling of the free ends 84 and 86 of the lace cord while holding the guide tube 88 such that its distal end 90 is closely adjacent the base 74 of the jacket 72. As will be observed in FIG. 5, because the jacket 72 has been collapsed about the lung portion 66 of the upper lobe 56, the lung portion 66 has been reduced in size due to the constriction of the jacket 72.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates the jacket [0037] 72 with additional laces 110 and 112 which have also been drawn. When the laces are drawn tightly, the free ends of the cords forming the laces may be tied off and then cut as illustrated. The lung portion 66 of the upper right lobe 56 is now more fully reduced in size by the constriction of the jacket 72.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates the further constriction provided by the drawstring after being pulled. The free ends of the drawstring after being pulled may be then tied together and cut as illustrated. As can be seen in FIG. 7, the lung portion [0038] 66 of the upper right lobe 56 has been drastically reduced in size. Further, the drawstring constriction will cut off circulation to the lung portion 66 to promote infarction and fibrosis.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates the respiratory system after both the lung portion [0039] 66 of the upper right lobe 56 and the lung portion 62 of the upper left lobe 52 have been treated as described above. Here it can be seen that the volumes of the right upper lung lobe 56 and left upper lung lobe 52 have been reduced in size by the jacket 72. This causes the lung lobes to occupy less volume within the thorax 22 to permit the diaphragm 26 to assume its arched state for acting upon the remaining healthier lung tissue. As previously mentioned, this should result in improved pulmonary function due to enhanced elastic recoil, correction of ventilation/perfusion mismatch, improved efficiency of respiratory musculature, and improved right ventricle filling.
  • As can thus be seen from the foregoing, the present invention provides an apparatus and method for treating COPD by lung volume reduction. The lung volume reduction is achieved through the permanent collapsing of one or more lung portions, or lobes, or portions of lobes. The foregoing is achieved without the need for removing lung tissue. Following the treatment, the lung tissue within the thorax will occupy a lesser volume than previously occupied providing room for the diaphragm to assume its arcuate state to assist in normal breathing and to achieve the benefits of lung volume reduction. [0040]
  • While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, modifications may be made. For example, while the jacket may be employed for reducing the size of a lung by constriction, the invention is not intended to be so limited. Rather, the lung portion may become deflated during surgery on its own or by other means known in the art. The jacket may then be placed on the lung portion while it is in a deflated condition. The jacket may then be collapsed about the lung portion to cinch down over the lung to maintain it in its deflated, reduced volume condition. The jacket would thus prevent re-expansion of the captured lung portion. The remaining portions of the lung may then be expanded, if necessary, by means known in the art. Hence, it is intended in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. [0041]

Claims (18)

What is claimed is:
1. An implantable apparatus for reducing the size of a lung comprising:
a jacket of flexible fabric configured to cover at least a portion of a lung; and
collapsing means for collapsing the jacket about the lung portion.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the flexible fabric is an open mesh material.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the jacket includes an opening for applying the jacket to the lung portion, and a closed end.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein the jacket includes a base defining the opening.
5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the collapsing means is carried by the jacket and comprises at least one lace extending from the closed end towards the base, the at least one lace including a cord having a pair of free ends which, when drawn, collapse the jacket about the lung portion.
6. The apparatus of claim 5 further including a guide tube having a distal end and a proximal end and wherein the free ends of the cord are threaded from the distal end of the guide tube to and through the proximal end of the guide tube.
7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the distal end of the guide tube is closely adjacent the base of the jacket.
8. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the collapsing means includes a draw string circumscribing the jacket at the base, the draw string having a pair of free ends which, when drawn, close the open base of the jacket about the lung portion.
9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the flexible fabric is formed of polyester.
10. A method of reducing the size of a lung, the method including the steps of:
disposing a jacket of flexible fabric over at least a portion of a lung; and
collapsing the jacket about the lung portion.
11. The method of claim 10 wherein the open flexible fabric is an open mesh material.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein the open mesh material is a polyester mesh.
13. The method of claim 10 including the step of providing the jacket with a closed end and an opening to permit disposing the jacket over the lung portion.
14. The method of claim 13 wherein the collapsing step includes lacing a cord on the jacket from the closed end towards the opening, the cord when laced having a pair of free ends, and pulling on the free ends of the cord to cause the jacket to collapse about the lung portion.
15. The method of claim 14 wherein the collapsing step further includes tying the free ends of the cord together after the jacket is collapsed about the lung portion.
16. The method of claim 13 wherein the collapsing step includes circumscribing the opening with a cord, the cord having a pair of free ends, and pulling on the free ends of the cord to collapse the opening of the jacket about the lung portion.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein the collapsing step further includes typing the free ends of the cord together after the opening of the jacket is collapsed about the lung portion.
18. The method of claim 10 including the further step of deflating the lung portion prior to disposing the jacket over the lung portion.
US10/199,776 1999-08-24 2002-07-18 Lung reduction apparatus and method Abandoned US20020188171A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09/379,973 US6416554B1 (en) 1999-08-24 1999-08-24 Lung reduction apparatus and method
US10/199,776 US20020188171A1 (en) 1999-08-24 2002-07-18 Lung reduction apparatus and method

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/199,776 US20020188171A1 (en) 1999-08-24 2002-07-18 Lung reduction apparatus and method

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/379,973 Continuation US6416554B1 (en) 1999-08-24 1999-08-24 Lung reduction apparatus and method

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020188171A1 true US20020188171A1 (en) 2002-12-12

Family

ID=23499438

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/379,973 Active US6416554B1 (en) 1999-08-24 1999-08-24 Lung reduction apparatus and method
US10/199,776 Abandoned US20020188171A1 (en) 1999-08-24 2002-07-18 Lung reduction apparatus and method

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/379,973 Active US6416554B1 (en) 1999-08-24 1999-08-24 Lung reduction apparatus and method

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (2) US6416554B1 (en)
AU (1) AU772041B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2316707C (en)

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040078054A1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2004-04-22 Broncus Technologies, Inc. Method for lung volume reduction
US7670282B2 (en) 2004-06-14 2010-03-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung access device
US7682332B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2010-03-23 Portaero, Inc. Methods to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US7686013B2 (en) 2006-01-17 2010-03-30 Portaero, Inc. Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve
US7753052B2 (en) 2003-06-05 2010-07-13 Portaero, Inc. Intra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system
US7766938B2 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-08-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Pleural effusion treatment device, method and material
US7766891B2 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-08-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung device with sealing features
US7789083B2 (en) 2003-05-20 2010-09-07 Portaero, Inc. Intra/extra thoracic system for ameliorating a symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7811274B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2010-10-12 Portaero, Inc. Method for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7824366B2 (en) 2004-12-10 2010-11-02 Portaero, Inc. Collateral ventilation device with chest tube/evacuation features and method
US7896008B2 (en) 2003-06-03 2011-03-01 Portaero, Inc. Lung reduction system
US7909803B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2011-03-22 Portaero, Inc. Enhanced pneumostoma management device and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7931641B2 (en) 2007-05-11 2011-04-26 Portaero, Inc. Visceral pleura ring connector
US8062315B2 (en) * 2007-05-17 2011-11-22 Portaero, Inc. Variable parietal/visceral pleural coupling
US8104474B2 (en) 2005-08-23 2012-01-31 Portaero, Inc. Collateral ventilation bypass system with retention features
US8142455B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2012-03-27 Pneumrx, Inc. Delivery of minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices
US8163034B2 (en) 2007-05-11 2012-04-24 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices to create a chemically and/or mechanically localized pleurodesis
US8220460B2 (en) 2004-11-19 2012-07-17 Portaero, Inc. Evacuation device and method for creating a localized pleurodesis
US8336540B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2012-12-25 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management device and method for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8347881B2 (en) 2009-01-08 2013-01-08 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management device with integrated patency sensor and method
US8475389B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-07-02 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices for assessment of pneumostoma function
US8518053B2 (en) 2009-02-11 2013-08-27 Portaero, Inc. Surgical instruments for creating a pneumostoma and treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8632605B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2014-01-21 Pneumrx, Inc. Elongated lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8721734B2 (en) 2009-05-18 2014-05-13 Pneumrx, Inc. Cross-sectional modification during deployment of an elongate lung volume reduction device
US8740921B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2014-06-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US9125639B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2015-09-08 Pneumrx, Inc. Steerable device for accessing a target site and methods
US9402633B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2016-08-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Torque alleviating intra-airway lung volume reduction compressive implant structures

Families Citing this family (57)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5954766A (en) * 1997-09-16 1999-09-21 Zadno-Azizi; Gholam-Reza Body fluid flow control device
US7798147B2 (en) 2001-03-02 2010-09-21 Pulmonx Corporation Bronchial flow control devices with membrane seal
US6679264B1 (en) 2000-03-04 2004-01-20 Emphasys Medical, Inc. Methods and devices for use in performing pulmonary procedures
US8474460B2 (en) 2000-03-04 2013-07-02 Pulmonx Corporation Implanted bronchial isolation devices and methods
US6904909B2 (en) * 2000-03-04 2005-06-14 Emphasys Medical, Inc. Methods and devices for use in performing pulmonary procedures
US20040074491A1 (en) * 2001-03-02 2004-04-22 Michael Hendricksen Delivery methods and devices for implantable bronchial isolation devices
US6328689B1 (en) 2000-03-23 2001-12-11 Spiration, Inc., Lung constriction apparatus and method
US6514290B1 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-02-04 Broncus Technologies, Inc. Lung elastic recoil restoring or tissue compressing device and method
US6491706B1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2002-12-10 Spiration, Inc. Constriction device including fixation structure
US20030050648A1 (en) 2001-09-11 2003-03-13 Spiration, Inc. Removable lung reduction devices, systems, and methods
US20040089306A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2004-05-13 Ronald Hundertmark Devices and methods for removing bronchial isolation devices implanted in the lung
JP4446739B2 (en) * 2001-10-11 2010-04-07 パルモンクス・コーポレイションPulmonx Corporation Using bronchial flow control device and the device
US6592594B2 (en) 2001-10-25 2003-07-15 Spiration, Inc. Bronchial obstruction device deployment system and method
US10098640B2 (en) 2001-12-04 2018-10-16 Atricure, Inc. Left atrial appendage devices and methods
US6929637B2 (en) 2002-02-21 2005-08-16 Spiration, Inc. Device and method for intra-bronchial provision of a therapeutic agent
AU2003220124A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-22 Emphasys Medical, Inc. Methods and devices for inducing collapse in lung regions fed by collateral pathways
US20030181922A1 (en) 2002-03-20 2003-09-25 Spiration, Inc. Removable anchored lung volume reduction devices and methods
US20030195385A1 (en) * 2002-04-16 2003-10-16 Spiration, Inc. Removable anchored lung volume reduction devices and methods
WO2003096881A2 (en) * 2002-05-14 2003-11-27 University Of Pittsburgh Device and method of use for functional isolation of animal or human tissues
US20030216769A1 (en) 2002-05-17 2003-11-20 Dillard David H. Removable anchored lung volume reduction devices and methods
AT407629T (en) 2002-07-26 2008-09-15 Emphasys Medical Inc Bronchial flow device with a membrane seal
US20040059263A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-03-25 Spiration, Inc. Device and method for measuring the diameter of an air passageway
US7814912B2 (en) 2002-11-27 2010-10-19 Pulmonx Corporation Delivery methods and devices for implantable bronchial isolation devices
AU2004207500B2 (en) * 2003-01-24 2009-12-24 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Internal tissue retractor
US7100616B2 (en) * 2003-04-08 2006-09-05 Spiration, Inc. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction method
US7497857B2 (en) 2003-04-29 2009-03-03 Medtronic, Inc. Endocardial dispersive electrode for use with a monopolar RF ablation pen
US7533667B2 (en) 2003-05-29 2009-05-19 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices to assist pulmonary decompression
US7200559B2 (en) * 2003-05-29 2007-04-03 Microsoft Corporation Semantic object synchronous understanding implemented with speech application language tags
US7533671B2 (en) * 2003-08-08 2009-05-19 Spiration, Inc. Bronchoscopic repair of air leaks in a lung
US8876791B2 (en) 2005-02-25 2014-11-04 Pulmonx Corporation Collateral pathway treatment using agent entrained by aspiration flow current
US8206684B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2012-06-26 Pulmonx Corporation Methods and devices for blocking flow through collateral pathways in the lung
US7645285B2 (en) 2004-05-26 2010-01-12 Idx Medical, Ltd Apparatus and methods for occluding a hollow anatomical structure
US20060004400A1 (en) 2004-06-16 2006-01-05 Mcgurk Erin Method of treating a lung
US8409219B2 (en) 2004-06-18 2013-04-02 Medtronic, Inc. Method and system for placement of electrical lead inside heart
US7771472B2 (en) 2004-11-19 2010-08-10 Pulmonx Corporation Bronchial flow control devices and methods of use
US7398782B2 (en) 2004-11-19 2008-07-15 Portaero, Inc. Method for pulmonary drug delivery
JP2009501570A (en) 2005-07-14 2009-01-22 アイディエックス・メディカル・エルティーディー Apparatus and method for occluding a hollow anatomical structure
US8157818B2 (en) 2005-08-01 2012-04-17 Ension, Inc. Integrated medical apparatus for non-traumatic grasping, manipulating and closure of tissue
US20070208217A1 (en) 2006-03-03 2007-09-06 Acorn Cardiovascular, Inc. Self-adjusting attachment structure for a cardiac support device
US7691151B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2010-04-06 Spiration, Inc. Articulable Anchor
US7829986B2 (en) * 2006-04-01 2010-11-09 Stats Chippac Ltd. Integrated circuit package system with net spacer
US20080243141A1 (en) 2007-04-02 2008-10-02 Salvatore Privitera Surgical instrument with separate tool head and method of use
US8728093B2 (en) * 2007-09-18 2014-05-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Compression, banding and percutaneous airway ligation of emphysematous lung tissue
CN101868199B (en) 2007-10-12 2016-04-06 斯波瑞申有限公司 Valve loader methods, systems, and devices
US8043301B2 (en) 2007-10-12 2011-10-25 Spiration, Inc. Valve loader method, system, and apparatus
US9393023B2 (en) 2009-01-13 2016-07-19 Atricure, Inc. Apparatus and methods for deploying a clip to occlude an anatomical structure
JP5913098B2 (en) 2009-07-21 2016-04-27 アプライド メディカル リソーシーズ コーポレイション Surgical access device including an internal retractor
US9017349B2 (en) 2010-10-27 2015-04-28 Atricure, Inc. Appendage clamp deployment assist device
US9066741B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2015-06-30 Atricure, Inc. Robotic toolkit
US8636754B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2014-01-28 Atricure, Inc. Clip applicator
US8795241B2 (en) 2011-05-13 2014-08-05 Spiration, Inc. Deployment catheter
JP6239509B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2017-11-29 アトリキュア インクAtricure Inc. The surgical device
WO2013044267A1 (en) 2011-09-23 2013-03-28 Pulmonx, Inc. Implant loading device and system
EP2785280A2 (en) 2011-12-02 2014-10-08 Rainer Zotz A device for performing diagnostics and/or therapy
EP2599461A1 (en) * 2011-12-02 2013-06-05 Rainer Zotz A device for performing diagnostics and/or therapy
US9282973B2 (en) 2012-01-20 2016-03-15 Atricure, Inc. Clip deployment tool and associated methods
JP6301345B2 (en) 2012-10-12 2018-03-28 マーディル, インコーポレイテッド Cardiac therapy system and method

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
IT1284108B1 (en) 1996-07-04 1998-05-08 Carlo Rebuffat Presidio surgery for the treatment of pulmonary emphysema
US5702343A (en) * 1996-10-02 1997-12-30 Acorn Medical, Inc. Cardiac reinforcement device
US6241654B1 (en) * 1999-07-07 2001-06-05 Acorn Cardiovasculr, Inc. Cardiac reinforcement devices and methods

Cited By (63)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6997189B2 (en) 1998-06-05 2006-02-14 Broncus Technologies, Inc. Method for lung volume reduction
US20040078054A1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2004-04-22 Broncus Technologies, Inc. Method for lung volume reduction
US8029492B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2011-10-04 Portaero, Inc. Method for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7811274B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2010-10-12 Portaero, Inc. Method for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7828789B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2010-11-09 Portaero, Inc. Device and method for creating a localized pleurodesis and treating a lung through the localized pleurodesis
US7789083B2 (en) 2003-05-20 2010-09-07 Portaero, Inc. Intra/extra thoracic system for ameliorating a symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7896008B2 (en) 2003-06-03 2011-03-01 Portaero, Inc. Lung reduction system
US7753052B2 (en) 2003-06-05 2010-07-13 Portaero, Inc. Intra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system
US8323230B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2012-12-04 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US7682332B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2010-03-23 Portaero, Inc. Methods to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US7775968B2 (en) 2004-06-14 2010-08-17 Pneumrx, Inc. Guided access to lung tissues
US7670282B2 (en) 2004-06-14 2010-03-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung access device
US7766891B2 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-08-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung device with sealing features
US7766938B2 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-08-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Pleural effusion treatment device, method and material
US8220460B2 (en) 2004-11-19 2012-07-17 Portaero, Inc. Evacuation device and method for creating a localized pleurodesis
US10034999B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2018-07-31 Pneumrx, Inc. Steerable device for accessing a target site and methods
US9125639B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2015-09-08 Pneumrx, Inc. Steerable device for accessing a target site and methods
US7824366B2 (en) 2004-12-10 2010-11-02 Portaero, Inc. Collateral ventilation device with chest tube/evacuation features and method
US8104474B2 (en) 2005-08-23 2012-01-31 Portaero, Inc. Collateral ventilation bypass system with retention features
US7726305B2 (en) 2006-01-17 2010-06-01 Portaero, Inc. Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve
US7686013B2 (en) 2006-01-17 2010-03-30 Portaero, Inc. Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve
US8668707B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2014-03-11 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8142455B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2012-03-27 Pneumrx, Inc. Delivery of minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices
US8157823B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2012-04-17 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8157837B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2012-04-17 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction device and method
US9402971B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2016-08-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US9402632B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2016-08-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US9402633B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2016-08-02 Pneumrx, Inc. Torque alleviating intra-airway lung volume reduction compressive implant structures
US9474533B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2016-10-25 Pneumrx, Inc. Cross-sectional modification during deployment of an elongate lung volume reduction device
US8282660B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2012-10-09 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US9782558B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2017-10-10 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US10188397B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2019-01-29 Pneumrx, Inc. Torque alleviating intra-airway lung volume reduction compressive implant structures
US8932310B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2015-01-13 Pneumrx, Inc. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8888800B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2014-11-18 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8740921B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2014-06-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US10226257B2 (en) 2006-03-13 2019-03-12 Pneumrx, Inc. Lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8163034B2 (en) 2007-05-11 2012-04-24 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices to create a chemically and/or mechanically localized pleurodesis
US7931641B2 (en) 2007-05-11 2011-04-26 Portaero, Inc. Visceral pleura ring connector
US8062315B2 (en) * 2007-05-17 2011-11-22 Portaero, Inc. Variable parietal/visceral pleural coupling
US7927324B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2011-04-19 Portaero, Inc. Aspirator and method for pneumostoma management
US8474449B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-07-02 Portaero, Inc. Variable length pneumostoma management system for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8475389B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-07-02 Portaero, Inc. Methods and devices for assessment of pneumostoma function
US8491602B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-07-23 Portaero, Inc. Single-phase surgical procedure for creating a pneumostoma to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8506577B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-08-13 Portaero, Inc. Two-phase surgical procedure for creating a pneumostoma to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7909803B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2011-03-22 Portaero, Inc. Enhanced pneumostoma management device and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8464708B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-06-18 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management system having a cosmetic and/or protective cover
US8365722B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-02-05 Portaero, Inc. Multi-layer pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8453637B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-06-04 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management system for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8348906B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-01-08 Portaero, Inc. Aspirator for pneumostoma management
US8347880B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-01-08 Potaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management system with secretion management features for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8021320B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2011-09-20 Portaero, Inc. Self-sealing device and method for delivery of a therapeutic agent through a pneumostoma
US8252003B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2012-08-28 Portaero, Inc. Surgical instruments for creating a pneumostoma and treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8453638B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-06-04 Portaero, Inc. One-piece pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8231581B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2012-07-31 Portaero, Inc. Enhanced pneumostoma management device and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8430094B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2013-04-30 Portaero, Inc. Flexible pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8336540B2 (en) 2008-02-19 2012-12-25 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management device and method for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US9192403B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2015-11-24 Pneumrx, Inc. Elongated lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8632605B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2014-01-21 Pneumrx, Inc. Elongated lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US10058331B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2018-08-28 Pneumrx, Inc. Enhanced efficacy lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US9173669B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2015-11-03 Pneumrx, Inc. Enhanced efficacy lung volume reduction devices, methods, and systems
US8347881B2 (en) 2009-01-08 2013-01-08 Portaero, Inc. Pneumostoma management device with integrated patency sensor and method
US8518053B2 (en) 2009-02-11 2013-08-27 Portaero, Inc. Surgical instruments for creating a pneumostoma and treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8721734B2 (en) 2009-05-18 2014-05-13 Pneumrx, Inc. Cross-sectional modification during deployment of an elongate lung volume reduction device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU5361100A (en) 2001-03-01
CA2316707A1 (en) 2001-02-24
US6416554B1 (en) 2002-07-09
CA2316707C (en) 2008-01-08
AU772041B2 (en) 2004-04-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9622752B2 (en) Bronchoscopic repair of air leaks in a lung
US8079368B2 (en) Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction method
US7896008B2 (en) Lung reduction system
US6997189B2 (en) Method for lung volume reduction
JP4359660B2 (en) Predetermined length of the anchor-and-pull mitral valve therapy device and methods
EP1481650B1 (en) Intra/extra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system
US6689048B2 (en) Delivery of cardiac constraint jacket
US20110208167A1 (en) Ventilation bypass system for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
EP1434615B1 (en) Bronchial flow control device
US7052487B2 (en) Method and apparatus for reducing mitral regurgitation
US20070213814A1 (en) Method and apparatus for improving mitral valve function
US20030105481A1 (en) Minimally invasive direct cardiac massage device and method
US20040244803A1 (en) Intra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system
US6425393B1 (en) Automatic variable positive expiratory pressure valve and methods
US6929637B2 (en) Device and method for intra-bronchial provision of a therapeutic agent
US8551035B2 (en) Methods and devices to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US20040055606A1 (en) Bronchial flow control devices with membrane seal
US6174323B1 (en) Method and assembly for lung volume reduction
US20020010407A1 (en) Cardiac message apparatus
US20040060563A1 (en) Bronchial flow control devices and methods of use
US7112225B2 (en) Lung assist apparatus and methods for use
US7731651B2 (en) Device to deploy a resilient sleeve to constrict on body tissue
JP5518735B2 (en) Downsizing the apparatus and method of the heart valve
US20070208210A1 (en) Method and apparatus to unload a failing heart
US20060102186A1 (en) Intra-bronchial apparatus for aspiration and insufflation of lung regions distal to placement or cross communication and deployment and placement system therefor

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SPIRATION, INC., WASHINGTON

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ALFERNESS, CLIFTON A.;LIN, RICHARD Y.;JAEGER, WILFRED E.;REEL/FRAME:013319/0657;SIGNING DATES FROM 20020913 TO 20020915