US20020155309A1 - Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles - Google Patents

Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020155309A1
US20020155309A1 US09790093 US79009301A US2002155309A1 US 20020155309 A1 US20020155309 A1 US 20020155309A1 US 09790093 US09790093 US 09790093 US 79009301 A US79009301 A US 79009301A US 2002155309 A1 US2002155309 A1 US 2002155309A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
former
mold
polymer
water
latex
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US09790093
Inventor
Zhixin Li
Joseph Gardner
Chaodong Xiao
John Thomaides
Yasuo Tokimori
Stanislaw Petrash
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
STARCH AND CHEMICAL INVESTMENT HOLDING Corp
National Starch and Chemical Investment Holding Corp
Original Assignee
STARCH AND CHEMICAL INVESTMENT HOLDING Corp
National Starch and Chemical Investment Holding Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08JWORKING-UP; GENERAL PROCESSES OF COMPOUNDING; AFTER-TREATMENT NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G
    • C08J5/00Manufacture of articles or shaped materials containing macromolecular substances
    • C08J5/02Direct processing of dispersions, e.g. latex, to articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C33/00Moulds or cores; Details thereof or accessories therefor
    • B29C33/56Coatings, e.g. enameled or galvanised; Releasing, lubricating or separating agents
    • B29C33/60Releasing, lubricating or separating agents
    • B29C33/62Releasing, lubricating or separating agents based on polymers or oligomers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C41/00Shaping by coating a mould, core or other substrate, i.e. by depositing material and stripping-off the shaped article; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C41/02Shaping by coating a mould, core or other substrate, i.e. by depositing material and stripping-off the shaped article; Apparatus therefor for making articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles
    • B29C41/14Dipping a core
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C41/00Shaping by coating a mould, core or other substrate, i.e. by depositing material and stripping-off the shaped article; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C41/34Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C41/38Moulds, cores or other substrates
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/0055Plastic or rubber gloves
    • A41D19/0058Three-dimensional gloves
    • A41D19/0062Three-dimensional gloves made of one layer of material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31826Of natural rubber
    • Y10T428/31833Next to aldehyde or ketone condensation product or addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31913Monoolefin polymer
    • Y10T428/31917Next to polyene polymer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31924Including polyene monomers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31928Ester, halide or nitrile of addition polymer

Abstract

The present invention is directed to a release composition for molds and formers used in the production of natural and synthetic latex articles. The release coating contains a water-borne, high Tg polymer formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer and at least one hydrophilic monomer, where the Tg of the polymer is at least −10° C. One advantage of the release composition is that it is compatible with a coagulant solution used in the formation of latex gloves. Articles formed using the release coating have good anti-blocking properties

Description

  • The present invention relates to the use of a polymeric release composition for molds and formers used in the production of natural and synthetic rubber articles. In particular the polymeric release composition is useful for the formation of latex gloves, and also for preventing blocking on the outer surface of such gloves. The release composition of the present invention has the advantage of being easily cleaned from molds and formers, and is compatible with coagulant currently used in many manufacturing processes, eliminating the need for an extra step to coat the mold or former with a release coating. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • As used herein, the terms latex glove or latex article refer to a glove or article made of natural or synthetic rubber. Articles made from natural or synthetic rubber are elastic materials having low glass transition temperatures. The surfaces of these materials are tacky and tend to adhere to each other. For example, latex gloves are difficult to strip from glove formers at the end of the manufacturing process, and they tend to stick together, or block, when packaged for distribution and sale. [0002]
  • There are currently several approaches to solving the problem. One method involves the use of a particulate or powder material, such as starch, talc, or calcium carbonate. The particulate can be blended into a coagulant solution to form a barrier between the latex rubber and the surface of the former. The powder facilitates the stripping of gloves from the formers, and also prevents blocking. Unfortunately, the powder coating is a known nuisance, as loose powder can become airborne. Starch powder tends to adsorb proteins found in natural rubber latex and the powder is easily dislodged during use, contaminating the surrounding environment and causing allergies and other negative effects. Further, the protein/powder complex serves as a food source for bacteria, allowing them to proliferate. Recently, there has been a growing demand for powder-free natural and synthetic rubber gloves, which do not use loose powder. [0003]
  • Another approach is the use of a chlorination process to provide the necessary anti-blocking properties, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,851,266. In this case, calcium carbonate is used as a mold release agent and washed away prior to chlorination. Although this reduces the tack and friction of the rubber, this process makes the rubber less pliant and reduces the shelf life of the rubber article. Also, chlorination leaves the article quite slippery, which makes it difficult to handle objects with chlorinated gloves. To address this problem, chlorinated gloves are often textured. [0004]
  • Yet another approach is the use of silicone materials. These materials facilitate removal of gloves from the formers, and also reduce blocking. Unfortunately, the residue of this material is rather hard to clean from the former in preparation for the next dipping cycle. [0005]
  • Talc-free mold release agents using surfactants are described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,310,928. [0006]
  • Polymeric mold release agents have also been disclosed in the art. Formulated polychloroprenes are described in EP 0 640623, Urethane dispersions in U.S. Pat. No. 5,534,350, and Styrene/acrylates containing silicone in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,993,923; 5,691,069; 5,700,585; and 5,712,346. Copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/400,488, and copending U.S. patent application, submitted Sep. 15, 2000 describe the use of star polymers as inner coatings for latex gloves. [0007]
  • Surprisingly it has been found that a release composition containing a water-borne high Tg polymer formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer and at least one hydrophilic monomer provides a powder-free mold release agent, provides anti-blocking in the finished article, and also aids in providing a smooth latex deposition on the formers. Additionally, the release composition is dispersible in high electrolyte coagulant, making it compatible with current manufacturing processes. [0008]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a mold or former for natural or synthetic rubber articles having on its surface a release composition comprising a water-borne polymer formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer and at least one hydrophilic monomer, where the polymer has a Tg of at least −10° C. [0009]
  • Other embodiments of the invention are methods of making a latex glove in which a release composition, containing a water-borne polymer, having a Tg of at least −10° C., and formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer and at least one hydrophilic monomer, is applied to a former as a release coating. [0010]
  • Still another embodiment of the invention is a natural or synthetic rubber article having on its surface a coating comprising a polymer having a Tg of at least −10° C., and formed from a hydrophobic monomer and a hydrophilic monomer. [0011]
  • Still another embodiment of the invention is a latex coagulant, comprising a release composition, comprising a polymer having a Tg of at least −10° C., and formed from a hydrophobic monomer and a hydrophilic monomer, which is used in manufacturing powder-free rubber articles. [0012]
  • While not wishing to be bound to any particular theory, it is believed that the key performance characteristics desirable for a release coating are: a high Tg polymer, which provides anti-blocking; ease of cleaning from a former; wettability of the film, for smooth latex deposition; an affinity to the latex surface; the ability to impart an anti-blocking character to the article formed from a mold or former.[0013]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a mold or former for the production of natural and synthetic rubber articles, having on its surface a release composition comprising a water-borne high Tg polymer formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer and at least one hydrophilic monomer. [0014]
  • Natural and synthetic rubber articles, as used herein, refer to articles made from low-Tg, tacky polymeric materials. Examples of such materials include, but are not limited to, butyl rubber, natural latex rubber, polyvinyl chloride, neoprene, nitrile, viton, styrene butadiene copolymers, polyurethanes, or interpenetrating polymer network emulsion polymers, or combinations of these. [0015]
  • The water-borne polymer of the present invention is one which is water-borne, and formed by means known in the art, such as emulsion polymerization and suspension polymerization. [0016]
  • By high Tg polymer is meant a polymer having a Tg of at least −10° C., preferably from 25 to 200° C., and most preferably from 40 to 150° C. Monomers useful in forming the polymer of the present invention are ethylenically unsaturated monomers or mixtures thereof. Particularly useful hydrophobic monomers include (meth)acrylates, vinyl acetate, ethylene, and styrene. A preferred hydrophobic monomer is styrene. [0017]
  • The polymer of the present invention is also formed from a hydrophilic monomer. The hydrophilic monomer is present in the polymer at from 10-90 percent, based on the weight of the polymer. Suitable hydrophilic monomers include those monomers that are ionic, e.g. anionic, cationic, or zwitterionic, or have sufficient nonionic polar functionality, e.g. hydroxyl or amido groups to render them hydrophilic. Examples of such monomer include, but are not limited to hydroxyethyl acrylate, acrylonitrile, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl (meth)acrylate, [3-(methacryloylamino)propyl]trimethylammonium chloride, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid sodium salt (a.k.a. AMPS), [2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride. Preferred hydrophilic monomers are acrylic acid and methacrylic acid. [0018]
  • The polymer may optionally contain a cross-linker. The cross-linker is present at from 0 to 10 percent, and preferably from 0.5 to 5 percent by weight, based on the weight of the polymer. The cross-linker is preferably a di-functional cross-linker, such as divinylbenzene, diallyl maleate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, vinyl crotonate and diallyl phthalate. Multi-functional cross-linkers, such as allyl and vinyl sucrose ethers, pentaerythritol tetra(meth)acrylate, trimethylolpropane tri(meth)acrylate, and the like, can also be used. [0019]
  • The release composition may optionally contain other ingredients, such as dispersants, surfactants, microspheres, and rheology modifiers. [0020]
  • Surfactants useful in the present invention include, but are not limited to: anionic, cationic, nonionic, and amphoteric surfactants; and polymeric surfactants including but not limited to linear and star copolymers. The surfactant improves the uniformity of the latex deposition, improves the ease of stripping and improves the wettability of the coated former by the latex. [0021]
  • Preferably the release coating contains no silicones, however the addition of a silicone to the composition can also be advantageous. A problem with having silicon compounds in the release composition is that they can remain on a mold or former, making the mold or former more difficult to clean. [0022]
  • The release composition may also contain microspheres. Microspheres are useful in reducing the surface contact area, and thus the adhesion between the coated rubber article and the mold, former, or other object. This improves both the release and anti-blocking characteristics. The microspheres have diameters below 60 microns, preferably from 5 to 40 microns, and most preferably from 10 to 30 microns. The microsphere may be made of any material that is harder than the article being coated. Examples of microspheres useful in the present invention are those made of polyamides such as nylons, polymethylmethacrylate, polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyesters, polyethers, polysulfones, polycarbonates, polyether ether ketones, and other polymers and copolymers, silica, and microcrystalline cellulose. Preferably the microspheres are present in the release composition at from 0.05 to 5 percent by weight, and most preferably at from 0.1 to 1 percent by weight. [0023]
  • A dispersant may optionally be added to aid in dispersion of the microspheres into the aqueous release composition. Dispersants useful in the present invention include, but are not limited to, surfactants and polymeric dispersants including amphiphilic linear and star copolymers. [0024]
  • A rheology modifier is optionally present in the release composition. The rheology modifier is used to control the viscosity of the composition for ease of use in different manufacturing processes and equipment, and to control the uniformity and thickness of the coating. Rheology modifiers useful in the present invention include, but are not limited to cellulosics such as hydroxyethylcellulose, cationic hydroxyethylcellulose, such as polyquaternium-4 and polyquaternium-10, hydrophobically modified hydroxyethylcellulose, carboxymethylcellulose, methylcellulose, and hydroxypropylcellulose; dispersed or soluble starches or modified starches; and polysaccharide gums such as xanthan gum, guar gum, cationic guar gum such as guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, and locust bean gum. Other suitable rheology modifiers include but are not limited to acid soluble copolymers, surfactants, etc. The rheology modifier is typically added at from 0.01 to 10 percent by weight, and preferably from 0.02 to 3 percent by weight, based on the release composition. [0025]
  • The release composition may also contain other additives known in the art, such as adhesion promoters, crosslinking agents, biocides, low surface energy compounds, fillers, and anti-foaming agents. [0026]
  • The release composition of the present invention is made by combining each of the ingredients to form an aqueous dispersion, by means known in the art. [0027]
  • The polymeric release coating may be used to coat a variety of materials used as molds and formers of natural and synthetic rubber articles. The molds and formers may be of any material known in the art, including but not limited to ceramics, glass, and stainless steel. Items produced in the molds or formers include gloves, prophylactics, catheters, tires, swimming caps, balloons, tubing, and sheeting. A particularly suitable end use application is as a release composition in the production of latex gloves, including surgeons' gloves, physicians' examining gloves, and workers' gloves, more particularly powder-free latex gloves. [0028]
  • When used to coat the molds or formers in the preparation of gloves, the polymeric coating composition may be applied using several different methods. For example, in one method for coating the glove mold or former, a former or mold in the shape of a hand is dipped into a solution or dispersion containing the release composition, then dipped into a coagulant mixture containing a latex coagulant. Useful coagulants include, but are not limited to, calcium nitrate and calcium chloride. In another method, a clean former or mold in the shape of a hand is dipped into a coagulant containing a release composition. After drying, the mold coated with the release coating and coagulant can be used to prepare a glove by methods known in the art. For example, the coated mold is immersed in a natural or synthetic rubber latex for a time sufficient for the rubber to coagulate and form a rubber coating of the desired thickness. Optionally, the glove then may be water leached to remove impurities from the rubber. The formed glove is then oven cured, cooled, and dipped into a coating composition, which will become the inner glove coating. Alternatively, the formed glove can be dipped into a coating composition prior to the oven cure and cooling. The inner surface treatments include, but are not limited to those known in the art, including polymers such as that described in U.S. patent application Ser. 09/663,468 incorporated herein by reference, other polymer coatings, chlorination, and starch or clay powders. After cooling, the glove is simultaneously stripped from the mold and inverted. Some, or all of the release coating on the glove mold or former is transferred to the what has become the outer surface of the glove. [0029]
  • The release composition and the coagulant can be combined into the same solution or dispersion. The release composition of the present invention is compatible with coagulants currently used in the production of rubber articles. The combination of the coagulant and release composition into the same processing step, allows manufacturers to use the release composition in current processes without the need for costly modifications or the need for additional processing steps. [0030]
  • In addition to being useful as an outside coating on a glove, the polymer composition of the present invention is useful as a release agent in other industries, including but not limited to: injection molding, C-V joints, and in the manufacture of tires, synthetic gloves, and other rubber articles. [0031]
  • Articles formed using the release composition of the present invention possess good anti-blocking properties. This property prevents adhesion between articles, such as latex gloves, which are packed together, but must be easily separated from each other for use. [0032]
  • The following examples are presented to further illustrate and explain the present invention and should not be taken as limiting in any regard. [0033]
  • Method A—Making a Latex Glove with a Pre-treated Former [0034]
  • A latex glove can be made by: [0035]
  • (a) Immersing a glove former in a solution or dispersion comprising a release composition comprising a water-borne polymer with Tg higher than −10° C. formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer, and at least one hydrophilic monomer, producing a coated former; [0036]
  • (b) after drying, immersing the coated former into a conventional coagulant solution; [0037]
  • (c) immersing said coated mold into a natural rubber latex to coat the former with said latex; [0038]
  • (d) optionally, leaching the latex coated former in water to remove impurities from the rubber; [0039]
  • (e) immersing the latex coated former into a inner surface coating composition; [0040]
  • (f) curing the latex in an oven; and [0041]
  • (g) removing the finished glove from the former. [0042]
  • Method B—Making a Latex Glove with a Formulated Coagulant [0043]
  • A latex glove can be made by: [0044]
  • (a) immersing a glove former in a coagulant solution containing a release composition comprising a water-borne polymer with Tg higher than −10° C. formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer, and at least one hydrophilic monomer, producing a coated former; [0045]
  • (b) immersing said coated mold into a natural rubber latex to coat the former with said latex; [0046]
  • (c) optionally, leaching the latex coated former in water to remove impurities from the rubber; [0047]
  • (d) immersing the latex coated former into a inner surface coating composition; [0048]
  • (e) curing the latex in an oven; and [0049]
  • (f) removing the finished glove from the former. [0050]
  • EXAMPLE 1 [0051]
  • Preparation of an Emulsion Polymer [0052]
  • A resin kettle equipped with a mechanical stirrer, nitrogen inlet, thermometer, and two slow addition feeds was charged with LUBRHOPHOS LB-400 (8.6 g), TOMADOL 1-3 (13.8 g) and water (391 g). This stirred mixture was warmed to 65° C. while flushing with nitrogen. To this mixture was added 5% of a well mixed pre-emulsion prepared from the slow addition of premixed styrene (83.5 g), methacrylic acid (MAA) (177.5 g), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (2.4 g) to a stirred premixed solution of LUBRHOPHOS LB-400 (8.6 g), TOMADOL 1-3 (13.8 g), and water (216 g). After this addition was complete, the reaction vessel was charged with an initial catalyst of sodium persulfate (0.2 g in 16.8 g water) and the reaction mixture was allowed to warm to 80° C. over the next 30 minutes. Once the reaction temperature of 80° C. was obtained, the reaction mixture was simultaneously charged with the pre-emulsion over 180 minutes and a sodium persulfate solution (0.27 g in 60 g water) over 210 minutes. Immediately after the addition of the catalyst was complete, the remaining monomer was scavenged by the addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (1.2 g in 2 g water), followed by the addition of ferrous ammonium sulfate (0.3 g of a 2% solution dissolved in 5 g water) 30 minutes later, then the slow addition of erythorbic acid (1.2 g in 10 g water) over the next 30 minutes. The reaction mixture was then cooled, filtered through an 80 mesh filter, and used for the formulation without additional purification. The emulsion product contains 30% solids with 68 parts MAA, 32 parts styrene and 1 part cross-linker. The Tg of the polymer was estimated to be 115° C. using MSI simulation software. [0053]
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • Preparation of Polymer Containing Coagulant [0054]
  • 500 g of polymer solution from example 1 was added to a 2-gallon container. 4500 g of coagulant solution (containing 10% calcium nitrate or 5% calcium chloride) were then slowly introduced while stirring. The polymer was stable in the coagulant dispersion, but mild flocculation was observed. Slight sedimentation was found over time but this can be easily redispersed. The polymer containing coagulant can last several weeks without changing the properties. [0055]
  • EXAMPLE 3
  • Making a Powder Free Glove using Method B [0056]
  • A clean ceramic mold was rinsed and dried at 70° C. It was then immediately immersed for 10-20 seconds into the polymer containing coagulant from Example 2. The coated mold was then partially dried and immersed into natural rubber latex at room temperature for 20-30 seconds. After a brief cure (120° C. for 2 minutes), the latex deposit was leached in water at 60° C. to remove impurities from the natural rubber. The leached latex deposit was then dried and dipped into a polymeric inner surface treatment solution to coat the inner surface. The polymer treated glove was then vulcanized at 90-130° C. for 15-30 minutes. [0057]
  • The latex glove was easily stripped from the mold. The 2-side polymer treated latex glove was powder free, with the inside surface exhibiting good donnability and the outside surface exhibiting anti-blocking and non-slippery grip. [0058]
  • The mold was then immersed into a 1 molar KOH alkaline solution and rinsed with water to remove residual polymer. The cleaned mold was used for new latex depositions. [0059]
  • EXAMPLE 4
  • Making a Powder Free Glove Using Method A [0060]
  • A clean ceramic mold was rinsed and dried at 70° C. It was then immediately immersed for 10-20 seconds into a 3% solids dispersion of the polymer from example 1 in water. The mold was then dried at 70° C. for 1-4 minutes and immersed for 10-20 seconds into a regular coagulant (10% calcium nitrate aqueous solution or 5% calcium chloride). The coated mold was then partially dried and immersed into natural rubber latex at room temperature for 20-30 seconds. After a brief cure (120° C. for 2 minutes), the latex deposit was leached in water at 60° C. to remove impurities from the natural rubber. The leached latex deposit was then dried and dipped into a polymeric inner surface treatment solution to coat the inner surface. The polymer treated glove was then vulcanized at 90-130° C. for 15-30 minutes. [0061]
  • The latex glove was easily stripped from the mold. The 2-sided polymer treated latex glove is powder free, with the inside surface exhibiting good donnability and the outside surface exhibiting anti-blocking and non-slippery grip. [0062]
  • The mold was cleaned by immersing into a 1 molar KOH alkaline solution and rinsing with water to remove remaining polymer. The clean mold was used for new latex depositions, with no degradation in glove quality. [0063]
  • EXAMPLE 5
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Emulsion Polymers with Different Tg's [0064]
  • Emulsion polymers were made as in example 1 with different Tg's by varying the monomer compositions. All polymers contained 1 part per hundred monomer (pphm) of a difunctional cross-linker. [0065]
    TABLE 1
    MAA Styrene Butyl Acrylate Estimated* Tg
    Sample 5A 68% 32% 115° C. 
    Sample 5B 35% 40% 25% 74° C.
    Sample 5C 35% 25% 40% 53° C.
  • These polymers were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B at 3% polymer concentration. For all polymers, the latex deposits were uniform and the stripped molds were easy to clean. The anti-blocking of polymer 5A was very good, polymer 5B was good, and polymer 5C was fair. [0066]
  • EXAMPLE 6
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Emulsion Polymers of Different Cross-linking Density [0067]
  • Emulsion polymers were made as in example 1 with different cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) amounts. The cross-linker, parts per hundred monomer (pphm), varied from 0 pphm, 0.5 pphm, 1 pphm, 2 pphm, 3 pphm, 4 pphm to 5 pphm. Gelling was noted at 5 pphm cross-linker. These polymers, with the exception of the one containing 5 pphm cross-linker, were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B at 3% polymer concentration. All polymers produced uniform latex deposition and the stripped molds were easy to clean. Zero pphm cross-linker showed reduced mold release and anti-blocking. All other polymers showed very good anti-blocking and mold release. Four pphm cross-linker showed exceptional ease of stripping. [0068]
  • EXAMPLE 7
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Emulsion Polymers of Different Acid Level [0069]
  • Emulsion polymers were made as in example 1 with different acid levels. All polymers contained 1 pphm ethylene glycol dimethacrylate cross-linker. [0070]
    TABLE 2
    MAA, % Styrene, %
    Sample 7A 0 100
    Sample 7B 5 95
    Sample 7C 20 80
    Sample 7D 25 75
    Sample 7E 35 65
    Sample 7F 38 62
    Sample 7G 48 52
    Sample 7H 50 50
    Sample 7I 68 32
    Sample 7J 74 26
    Sample 7K 80 20
  • The 80% MM reaction gelled. These polymers, with the exception of the one containing 80% MM, were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B at 3% polymer concentration. Zero and 5% MM showed good anti-blocking and mold release. All others showed very good anti-blocking and mold release. Polymer 7D exhibited long time stability in the coagulant mixture. [0071]
  • EXAMPLE 8
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Emulsion Polymers Containing Methyl Methacrylate (MMA) [0072]
  • Polymer emulsions were prepared according to example 1 using methyl methacrylate (MMA) in place of styrene. All polymers contained 1 pphm ethylene glycol dimethacrylate cross-linker. [0073]
    TABLE 3
    MMA MAA
    Sample 8A 32% 68%
    Sample 8B 50% 50%
    Sample 8C 75% 25%
  • These polymers were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B at 3% polymer concentration. The results showed that the higher the percent of methyl methacrylate, the better the mold release and anti-blocking. All gave acceptable mold release and anti-blocking properties. [0074]
  • EXAMPLE 9
  • Polymer emulsions were prepared according to example 1 using other hydrophobic monomers in place of styrene (table 4). [0075]
    TABLE 4
    Hydrophobic Monomer MAA
    Sample 9A CHM 32% 68%
    Sample 9B IBXM 75% 25%
    Sample 9C DPA 75% 25%
  • Monomers for polymers 9A-C include cyclohexyl methacrylate (CHM), isobornyl methacrylate (IBXM), and dicyclopentanyl acrylate (DPA). All polymers contained 1 pphm of a difunctional cross-linker. These polymers were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B at 3% polymer concentration. All samples gave acceptable anti-blocking and mold release. [0076]
  • EXAMPLE 10
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Surfactants [0077]
  • A series of non-ionic surfactants, including BRIJ and TWEEN from ICI, and SURFYNOL from Air Products, were used as release agents in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. The concentration of the surfactants was 2% in the release coatings. The latex deposit was uniform and the stripped formers were very easy to clean. The latex glove was easily stripped off the mold, but exhibited poor anti-blocking. [0078]
  • EXAMPLE 11
  • Making a Powder Free Latex Glove with Beads [0079]
  • Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) beads with particle size around 20 μm were dispersed in a regular coagulant solution (containing 10% calcium nitrate or 5% calcium chloride). The weight percentage of beads was 3% in the total solution. This dispersion was used as a release agent in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. The latex glove was hard to strip off the former. [0080]
  • EXAMPLE 12
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with a Thickener [0081]
  • Xanthan gum was dissolved in a regular coagulant solution, containing 10% calcium nitrate or 5% calcium chloride. The concentration of xanthan gum in the formulated coagulant was 0.04%. This dispersion was used as a release agent in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. The latex gloves were hard to strip off the formers and showed poor anti-blocking. [0082]
  • EXAMPLE 13
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with a Polymer and a Thickener [0083]
  • A formulated coagulant containing 0.04% xanthan gum and 3% polymer from example 1 was prepared. This dispersion was used as a release agent in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. The outside polymer coating was more uniform than in example 3. [0084]
  • EXAMPLE 14
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with Beads, a Surfactant, and a Thickener [0085]
  • A formulated coagulant containing 0.3% Beads, 0.1% SURFYNOL-465 and 4% CaCl[0086] 2 was prepared. This dispersion was used as a release agent in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. The outside coating was uniform, but the latex gloves were hard to strip off the formers and showed poor anti-blocking.
  • EXAMPLE 15
  • Making Powder Free Latex Gloves with a Polymer Formulation [0087]
  • A formulated coagulant containing, 4% calcium chloride, 2% polymer from example 1, 0.25% PMMA beads, and 0.1% SURFYNOL-465 surfactant was prepared. This dispersion was used as a release agent in the preparation of powder free latex gloves, using Method B. Compared to examples 3 & 4, the glove is more uniform, and easier to strip off the former. The glove also exhibited excellent anti-blocking. [0088]

Claims (22)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A mold or former for producing a natural or synthetic rubber article having on its surface a release composition comprising a water-borne high Tg polymer formed from:
    (1) at least one hydrophobic monomer; and
    (2) at least one hydrophilic monomer,
    wherein said water-borne polymer has a Tg of at least −10° C.
  2. 2. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said water-borne polymer comprises an emulsion polymer.
  3. 3. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said hydrophobic monomer comprises styrene.
  4. 4. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said hydrophilic monomer is an acid monomer.
  5. 5. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said mold release composition further comprises a surfactant.
  6. 6. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said release composition further comprises microspheres.
  7. 7. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said release composition further comprises a dispersant.
  8. 8. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said water-borne polymer further comprises a cross-linker.
  9. 9. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said release composition further comprises a rheology modifier.
  10. 10. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said release composition further comprising a coagulant.
  11. 11. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said high Tg polymer comprises:
    a) from 20 to 35 percent by weight of methyacrylic acid;
    b) from 65 to 80 percent by weight of styrene; and
    c) from 0.5 to 1.5 percent by weight of a crosslinker.
  12. 12. The mold or former of claim 1 wherein said release composition is free of silicon compounds.
  13. 13. An article comprising a formed natural or synthetic rubber article having thereon a coating composition comprising a water-borne high Tg polymer formed from:
    (1) at least one hydrophobic monomer; and
    (2) at least one hydrophilic monomer,
    wherein said water-borne polymer has a Tg of at least −10° C.
  14. 14. The article of claim 12 wherein said article is powder-free.
  15. 15. A process for making a glove comprising:
    (a) immersing a glove former in a coagulant solution containing a release composition comprising a water-borne polymer with Tg of at least −10° C. formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer, and at least one hydrophilic monomer, producing a coated former;
    (b) immersing said coated mold into a natural rubber latex to coat the former with said latex;
    (c) immersing the latex coated former into a inner surface coating composition;
    (d) curing the latex in an oven; and
    (e) removing the finished glove from the former.
  16. 16. The process of claim 14 wherein step (a) comprises two separate steps comprising:
    a.1) immersing said ceramic former into said water-borne polymer release composition; and
    a.2) immersing said release coated ceramic former into a coagulant solution.
  17. 17. The process of claim 14 wherein said the latex coated former of step (b) is leached in water prior to step (c).
  18. 18. A release composition comprising:
    a) a water-borne high Tg polymer formed from at least one hydrophobic monomer; and at least one hydrophilic monomer, wherein said water-borne polymer has a Tg of at least −10° C.;
    b) a coagulant.
  19. 19. The composition of claim 17 wherein said coagulant is a calcium salt.
  20. 20. The composition of claim 17 further comprising microspheres.
  21. 21. The composition of claim 17 further comprising a rheology modifier.
  22. 22. The composition of claim 17 further comprising a surfactant.
US09790093 2001-02-21 2001-02-21 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles Abandoned US20020155309A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09790093 US20020155309A1 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-02-21 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09790093 US20020155309A1 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-02-21 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles
US09882222 US6784397B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-06-15 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural of synthetic rubber articles
CN 02808283 CN1289577C (en) 2001-02-21 2002-01-24 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles
PCT/US2002/002219 WO2002068168A3 (en) 2001-02-21 2002-01-24 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles
EP20020703237 EP1373374A2 (en) 2001-02-21 2002-01-24 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles
JP2002567512T JP2004523389T5 (en) 2002-01-24
AU2002236870A AU2002236870A1 (en) 2001-02-21 2002-01-24 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09882222 Continuation-In-Part US6784397B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-06-15 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural of synthetic rubber articles

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020155309A1 true true US20020155309A1 (en) 2002-10-24

Family

ID=25149625

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09790093 Abandoned US20020155309A1 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-02-21 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural or synthetic rubber articles
US09882222 Expired - Fee Related US6784397B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-06-15 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural of synthetic rubber articles

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09882222 Expired - Fee Related US6784397B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2001-06-15 Mold release and anti-blocking coating for powder-free natural of synthetic rubber articles

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20020155309A1 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8173750B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2012-05-08 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US8569421B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2013-10-29 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US8815971B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2014-08-26 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US8822610B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2014-09-02 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US9587064B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2017-03-07 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Salt-tolerant star macromolecules
US9783628B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2017-10-10 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Dual-mechanism thickening agents for hydraulic fracturing fluids

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040262546A1 (en) * 2003-06-25 2004-12-30 Axel Thiess Radiation protection material, especially for use as radiation protection gloves
US7906148B2 (en) 2003-07-31 2011-03-15 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Latex medical articles for release of antimicrobial agents
US20050137619A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-23 Scott Schewe Molds and related methods and articles
KR101057423B1 (en) 2011-01-12 2011-08-19 인하대학교 산학협력단 Concrete form releaser composition of composite copolymer and the method thereof
US20150374051A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2015-12-31 James B Rauckman Process for making custom configured electrical lineman's gloves
US20160002377A1 (en) * 2014-07-01 2016-01-07 Taiwan Fluoro Technology Co., Ltd. Mold releasing agent

Family Cites Families (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS6344709B2 (en) * 1983-01-14 1988-09-06 Kuraray Co
DE3486145D1 (en) * 1983-07-11 1993-06-17 Commw Scient Ind Res Org A process for the polymerization and polymers prepared by this process.
US4534928A (en) * 1983-12-19 1985-08-13 Dow Corning Corporation Molding process using room temperature curing silicone coatings to provide multiple release of articles
US5300256A (en) * 1989-08-11 1994-04-05 Eastman Chemical Company Solid-form additive systems dispersible in aqueous media
US5069965A (en) * 1989-10-18 1991-12-03 Bioresearch, Inc. Articles having improved slip coatings
US5204126A (en) * 1990-02-06 1993-04-20 Nanofilm Corporation Mold surfaces with ultra thin release films
US5135297A (en) * 1990-11-27 1992-08-04 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Surface coating of polymer objects
US5458929A (en) * 1994-02-15 1995-10-17 The Dow Chemical Company Cure controlled catalyzed mixtures of epoxy resins and curing agents containing mesogenic moieties, B-staged and cured products therefrom
US5691069A (en) * 1995-02-14 1997-11-25 Avery Dennison Corporation Acrylic emulsion coatings for rubber articles
US5712346A (en) * 1995-02-14 1998-01-27 Avery Dennison Corporation Acrylic emulsion coatings
US6730380B2 (en) * 1996-02-20 2004-05-04 Safeskin Corp. Readily-donned elastomeric articles
GB9613050D0 (en) * 1996-06-21 1996-08-28 Bowman David A A rinsing system
US5900452A (en) * 1996-08-12 1999-05-04 Tactyl Technologies, Inc. S-EB-S block copolymer/oil aqueous dispersion and its use in forming articles
DE19636996A1 (en) * 1996-09-12 1998-03-19 Basf Ag A process for the preparation of polymers in the presence of Triazolylradikalen
US6593404B1 (en) * 1997-10-23 2003-07-15 Cheil Industries, Inc. Thermoplastic resin composition
US6203911B1 (en) * 1998-06-17 2001-03-20 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Thermoset volatile monomer molding compositions
US6355343B1 (en) * 1998-07-08 2002-03-12 S. D. Warren Services Company Release sheet for use with multicomponent reactive urethane systems and method of manufacture
DE60010612T2 (en) 1999-09-21 2005-05-19 National Starch And Chemical Investment Holding Corp., Wilmington Use of a polymer coating for rubber articles
US6692840B1 (en) 2000-09-15 2004-02-17 National Starch And Chemical Investment Holding Corporation Polymer coating for rubber articles

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9856331B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2018-01-02 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over reverse addition fragmentation transfer polymerization processes
US9546225B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2017-01-17 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US9518136B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2016-12-13 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over reverse addition fragmentation transfer polymerization processes
US8815971B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2014-08-26 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US8822610B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2014-09-02 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US9012528B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2015-04-21 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Control over controlled radical polymerization processes
US9382370B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2016-07-05 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US9399694B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2016-07-26 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US8604132B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2013-12-10 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Rheology modifying star macrmolecules for fracking fluids and home care
US8569421B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2013-10-29 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US9783628B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2017-10-10 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Dual-mechanism thickening agents for hydraulic fracturing fluids
US8173750B2 (en) 2009-04-23 2012-05-08 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Star macromolecules for personal and home care
US9587064B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2017-03-07 ATRP Solutions, Inc. Salt-tolerant star macromolecules

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20020155310A1 (en) 2002-10-24 application
US6784397B2 (en) 2004-08-31 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5601870A (en) Flexible rubber article and method of making
US5284607A (en) Process for forming powder-free medical gloves
US6391409B1 (en) Powder-free nitrile-coated gloves with an intermediate rubber-nitrile layer between the glove and the coating and method of making same
US5742943A (en) Slip-coated elastomeric flexible articles and their method of manufacture
US6288159B1 (en) S-EB-S block copolymer/oil aqueous dispersion and its use in forming articles
US5756211A (en) Method of manufacturing high filler content plastics having a glitter appearance
US6051320A (en) Thin-walled natural rubber latex material substantially free of sulfur and nitrosamines
US5069965A (en) Articles having improved slip coatings
US6075081A (en) Manufacture of rubber articles
US4499154A (en) Dipped rubber article
US5691069A (en) Acrylic emulsion coatings for rubber articles
US3919442A (en) Rubber articles having improved slip coating
US20030221239A1 (en) Method of making a glove having improved donning characteristics
US6284856B1 (en) Acrylate, silicone, styrene, urethane copolymer coatings for natural and synthetic rubber articles
US6465591B1 (en) Acrylic emulsion coating for films, paper and rubber
US20010011387A1 (en) Method for producing rubber glove
US5792531A (en) Readily donned, powder free elastomeric article
WO1997048765A1 (en) Soft nitrile rubber formulation
US5851683A (en) Sequential copolymer based gloves
US7032251B2 (en) Crosslinking agent for coated elastomeric articles
US20060115653A1 (en) Breathable elastomeric article
WO1996023643A1 (en) A process for making a glove having a polyurethane coating
US6383552B1 (en) Thin-walled natural rubber latex material substantially free of sulfur and nitrosamines, and method of making same
US6730380B2 (en) Readily-donned elastomeric articles
EP0486183A1 (en) Latex gloves with improved donnability

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: STARCH AND CHEMICAL INVESTMENT HOLDING CORPORATION

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LI, ZHIXIN;GARDNER, JOSEPH B.;ZIAO, CHAODONG;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:011832/0684;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010305 TO 20010426

AS Assignment

Owner name: NATIONAL STARCH AND CHEMICAL INVESTMENT HOLDING CO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LI, ZHIZIN;GARDNER, JOSEPH B.;XIAO, CHAODONG;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015346/0555;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010402 TO 20010426