US20020111667A1 - Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture - Google Patents

Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020111667A1
US20020111667A1 US10002521 US252101A US2002111667A1 US 20020111667 A1 US20020111667 A1 US 20020111667A1 US 10002521 US10002521 US 10002521 US 252101 A US252101 A US 252101A US 2002111667 A1 US2002111667 A1 US 2002111667A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
stent
ptfe
polytetrafluoroethylene
siloxane
porous
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10002521
Inventor
Timothy Girton
David Sogard
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Boston Scientific Scimed Inc
Original Assignee
Boston Scientific Scimed Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/90Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/91Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/90Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/91Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes
    • A61F2/915Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes with bands having a meander structure, adjacent bands being connected to each other
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/04Macromolecular materials
    • A61L31/048Macromolecular materials obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/14Materials characterised by their function or physical properties, e.g. injectable or lubricating compositions, shape-memory materials, surface modified materials
    • A61L31/146Porous materials, e.g. foams or sponges
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C67/00Shaping techniques not covered by groups B29C39/00 - B29C65/00, B29C70/00 or B29C73/00
    • B29C67/20Shaping techniques not covered by groups B29C39/00 - B29C65/00, B29C70/00 or B29C73/00 for porous or cellular articles, e.g. of foam plastics, coarse-pored
    • B29C67/202Shaping techniques not covered by groups B29C39/00 - B29C65/00, B29C70/00 or B29C73/00 for porous or cellular articles, e.g. of foam plastics, coarse-pored comprising elimination of a solid or a liquid ingredient
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/90Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/91Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes
    • A61F2/915Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes with bands having a meander structure, adjacent bands being connected to each other
    • A61F2002/91533Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure made from perforated sheet material or tubes, e.g. perforated by laser cuts or etched holes with bands having a meander structure, adjacent bands being connected to each other characterised by the phase between adjacent bands
    • A61F2002/91541Adjacent bands are arranged out of phase
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/005Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using adhesives
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0058Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements soldered or brazed or welded
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0066Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements stapled
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0075Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements sutured, ligatured or stitched, retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable

Abstract

Non-expanded porous PTFE materials and products are disclosed. More particularly, grafts and stent-grafts incorporating the non-porous PTFE materials are described.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture. The present invention further relates to medical devices such as grafts, endoprosthesis or intraluminal devices, which include as a component a non-expanded porous PTFE material. The non-expanded porous PTFE material is formed from an extruded mixture of PTFE resin and an extractable polymer material, the polymer material being extracted to leave voids or pores in the extrudate. Implantable tubular grafts, stent coverings, medical patches and fabrics can be made in this manner. Thin stent coverings can be applied on the exterior surface of the stent, on the interior surface of the stent, or both. [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Porous PTFE is conventionally formed from a mixture of PTFE particles and lubricant which is pre-processed to form a compacted billet, extruded into a particular shape, such as a tube, and stretched or expanded to provide a node and fibril structure. Such a node and fibril structure not only imparts certain physical properties to products made therefrom, but also provides porosity to the products. Once stretched it is referred to as expanded PTFE (ePTFE). Sintering of the ePTFE is then generally carried out to “lock in” the porous structure. In applications involving medical implants, such as grafts, stent-grafts, patches and other such products, expanded PTFE has provided appropriate porosity to allow assimilation of the implant by the body and tissue ingrowth into the porous wall, both of which are necessary for long term patency. [0002]
  • The formation of ePTFE requires a great deal of expertise and costly equipment. Parameters such as the ratio of lubricant to PTFE particles in the feed material, the pressure and temperature of extrusion, the temperature, rate and degree of stretching are some of the parameters which must be carefully controlled in order to achieve the desired characteristics in the final product. Even still, porosity will vary in accordance with the fibril length, which for a given expanded structure may have a wide range. [0003]
  • Other techniques of creating pores in polymeric materials have existed. For example, one known technique has been to include salt particles in polymer compositions, which salt particles are removed or leached out using water once the polymer is cured. Such techniques have also been applied to PTFE products. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,576,608 discloses implantable products made from a compacted, sintered blend of PTFE particles, PTFE fibers, a binder and a soluble salt, such as sodium chloride, which is leached out using water, leaving voids in the compacted resin. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No.4,849,285 discloses a matrix of unfibrillated PTFE resin and curable silicone in combination with particulate inorganic materials which remain in the PTFE structure to provide a self-supporting feature, thereby obviating the need for expansion. The addition of sodium chloride is disclosed as being useful for creating pores by dissolving the salt particles in water subsequent to sintering. No removal of the other components is suggested by this reference. [0004]
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,141,522 discloses a composite material for use with mammalian tissue which consists essentially of an unsintered microfibrillar, non-absorbable biocompatible component prepared from PTFE, a particulate bioabsorbable filler such as a lactide, carbonate, oxylate or lactone and a non-absorbable, biocompatible thermoplastic component. The bioabsorbable filler is incorporated into the expanded, porous structure of PTFE and is intended to be absorbed by the body over time. The non-absorbable thermoplastic component is intended to provide structural integrity to the material. [0005]
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,716,660 discloses an expanded PTFE tubular prosthesis having within its internodal spaces an insoluble, biocompatible material. The insoluble biocompatible material is introduced into the pores of the ePTFE using a dispersion or solution at acidic pH of biodegradable materials, which upon deposition into the porous structure of the ePTFE are rendered insoluble by increasing the pH. The biodegradable material within the pores is intended to encourage ingrowth and be absorbed by the body over time. [0006]
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,840,775 discloses a process for making porous PTFE by contacting PTFE with a fluid which penetrates and swells, but does not dissolve the PTFE. The fluid is introduced using temperature to permit extensive penetration of the PTFE. The liquid is then removed to leave a swelled, open structure of PTFE. As previously mentioned, expanded PTFE has been used extensively for grafts and stent-graft devices. Expanded PTFE covers and/or liners for stents have found to be particularly useful in endoprosthetic devices because while the porosity of the PTFE allows for assimilation of the device by the body, it also prohibits unwanted hyperplasia. [0007]
  • Endoprosthesis devices including stents, stent-grafts, grafts, vena cava filters, balloon catheters, and so forth, are placed or implanted within various body vessels for the treatment of various diseases. One particular type of an endoprosthesis device is the stent. A stent is implanted within a vessel for the treatment of stenoses, strictures, or aneurysms in the blood vessels. The devices are implanted within the vascular system to reinforce diseased, partially occluded, weakened or abnormally dilated sections of the blood vessel. Stents are often employed after angioplasty to prevent restenosis of a diseased blood vessel. While stents are most notably used in blood vessels, they have also been implanted in other bodily vessels including urinary tracts and bile ducts to reinforce and prevent neoplastic growth. [0008]
  • Stents are typically longitudinal tubular devices formed of biocompatible materials and come in a variety of construction types, and are often expandable in nature. Many if not all of the materials used for stents involve metal or carbon fiber materials which are highly electro-positive and are bio-active. Since stents tend to be used under conditions were they are counteracting disease processes, supporting healing processes, or guarding against stenosis of a passage, bio-activity, which may encourage undesirable or poorly regulated growth processes, or lead to clot formation, should be avoided. [0009]
  • Coating of the stent can keep the stent from directly contacting surrounding tissue or fluids, and thus can theoretically protect against unwanted electrochemically induced tissue reactions. [0010]
  • In the field of expandable stents, a further problem arises due to the fact that many stent constructions involve structures that have numerous apertures or spaces between various strands or structural elements of the stent such as those structures that are filamentous, wire-like, or of a tubular nature in which various openings have been cut or etched into the stent. With these constructions, tissue may grow through the openings of the stent. Furthermore, the stent itself may provoke a foreign body reaction and be both a stimulus for and a framework supporting, proliferative tissue growth, resulting, for example, in scar tissue or restenosis of the very region it is placed to control. [0011]
  • One approach to this drawback is to provide a coating, liner, cover or both, for the stent which prevents the healing or diseased layer of tissue from directly contacting the stent, or from passing through the stent in any way. Such liners may be formed, for example, of porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) which allows the passage of fluids and vital materials while serving as a barrier to tissue growth. However, when applying such a construction, a further difficulty which may arise is that the layer or sleeve of polymer must be attached to the stent for example, by staples or sutures at one end, or is prone to developing loose pockets or folds which might accumulate organic matter or lead to sepsis or unusual growth. Also, the necessarily thin liner material may detach or degrade. The risk of loose or unattached liner material is particularly great for constructions which utilize poorly adherent polymers, such as PTFE, or structures which seek to combine an expandable stent of stiff material, which changes both its dimension and its shape, with a dissimilar liner or shell. [0012]
  • One method for overcoming these problems is found in U.S. Pat. No. 6,010,529 in which tube of polymeric material, e.g. expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), is passed through the interior of a stent body and is turned back upon itself over the stent to form a cuff. The assembly is then heated and the outer layer contacts and coalesces with the inner layer, closely surrounding the stent body within a folded envelope having a continuous and seamless end. Porosity is imparted to the PTFE by previous stretching or expansion the material. [0013]
  • Another type of covered stent which permits radial expansion is shown in WO 96/00103. As shown and described therein, a metallic expandable stent includes an outer covering of ePTFE. The ePTFE cover exhibits suitable expansion capabilities so as to enable the cover to expand upon expansion of the underlying stent. A polytetrafluoroethylene/lubricant blend may be extruded into a tube and the tube heated to remove the lubricant. Then, in order to impart the expandable characteristics to the ePTFE cover during formation of the ePTFE cover material, the ePTFE must undergo successive processing steps of expanding the material, sintering the material, radially dilating the material and resintering the dilated material, a procedure that is quite process intensive. The device described therefore requires precise manufacturing techniques and is extremely processing sensitive. Careful processing of the material forming the cover is required in order for the cover to exhibit sufficient expansion capabilities. [0014]
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,824,046 describes a composite intraluminal device, in particular an elongate radially expandable tubular stent having an interior luminal surface and an opposed exterior surface extending along a longitudinal stent axis. A stent cover is formed of unsintered ePTFE which is expandable. [0015]
  • There remains a need in the art to produce porous PTFE material which can be used in a variety of products and applications, and particularly in medical device applications, without requiring expansion to produce porosity. There is also a need for producing such porous PTFE materials without the extensive costs and technical difficulties associated with conventional porous PTFE having a node and fibril structure produced using expansion techniques. Moreover, there is a need for a stent-graft composite device incorporating such a porous material. [0016]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In one aspect of the present invention there is provided an endoprosthetic device which includes a tubular extrudate having a PTFE matrix and distributed therein discrete domains of an extractable polymeric material, wherein upon exposure to sufficient dissolving medium or degradation temperature said discrete domains are extracted from said matrix to create pores in said tubular extrudate. [0017]
  • In another aspect of the present invention there is provided a vascular graft comprising the aforementioned porous tubular extrudate. [0018]
  • In another aspect of the invention there is provided a method of forming a porous PTFE product which includes the steps of: providing a mixture of PTFE resin and an extractable polymer material; xtruding said mixture to form an extrudate which includes a PTFE matrix with discrete domains of said extractable polymer material; ubjecting said extrudate to a solvent for said extractable polymer material, a temperature sufficient to grade said extractable polymer material or a combination thereof, whereby at least a portion of said extractable polymer material is extracted, thereby forming pores in said extrudate. [0019]
  • In another aspect of the invention there is provided a stent-graft composite product, whereby the stent is radially distensible and has a cover, a liner or both at least partially covering the stent structure and being made from the porous PTFE material of the present invention. The stent can be affixed to the porous PTFE cover by any suitable means, including using adhesives, laminating inner and outer coverings through the stent openings, sutures, pockets or cuffs, or other such means. [0020]
  • Although the formation of pores in the products of the present invention are formed without expansion techniques, such porous PTFE materials may be subsequently subjected to conventional expansion and sintering processes. [0021]
  • In another embodiment of the endoprosthesis device of the present invention there is included an elongate radially expandable tubular stent having an interior surface and in exterior surface extending along a longitudinal stent axis. The expandable tubular stent has a stent cover on said interior surface, exterior surface or both, the cover being formed of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene. The porous polytetrafluoroethylene cover is a non-stretched (non-expanded) porous structure, the non-stretched structure lacking node and fibril structure. [0022]
  • In particular, the present invention relates to a radially expandable stent for use in treating stenoses wherein the stent is at least partially covered with an expandable polymer covering which includes the porous PTFE of the present invention and which physically isolates the stent from surrounding blood and tissue. [0023]
  • In one desirable embodiment of the present invention there is included a porous PTFE which is prepared by extracting siloxane from an interpenetrating network (IPN) of PTFE and siloxane, leaving behind a porous PTFE structure without having to expand and stretch the PTFE.[0024]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one type of intraluminal stent device that may be used in the present invention. [0025]
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a different intraluminal stent device which may be used in the present invention. [0026]
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a stent-graft device which employs the intraluminal stent device of FIG. 1 in combination with a porous polytetrafluoroethylene cover of the present invention on both the inner and outer surface of the device. [0027]
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the same stent-graft device shown in FIG. 3. [0028]
  • FIG. 5 is the same stent-graft device as in FIG. 3 illustrating only the outer surface cover. [0029]
  • FIG. 6 is the same stent-graft device as in FIG. 3 with the exception that only a liner or inner surface cover is shown. [0030]
  • FIG. 7 is a cross-section of non-expanded PTFE extrudate having a PTFE resin matrix and extractable polymeric domains. [0031]
  • FIG. 7[0032] a is a cross-section of the non-expanded porous PTFE material of the present invention subsequent to removal of the polymeric domains..
  • FIG. 8 is a schematic representation of ePTFE node and fibril structure of the prior art.[0033]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTIONS OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The non-expanded porous PTFE materials of the present invention are formed from a combination of a PTFE resin and an extractable polymeric component, which are admixed together and extruded to form an extrudate which includes a PTFE matrix having discrete domains of the extractable polymeric component distributed therein. The extractable polymeric component is desirably a particulate material of a particle size which facilitates admixing with PTFE resin powder. Desirably the extractable polymeric component is finely divided to a particle size of about 5 microns to about 100 microns. Distribution of the extractable polymeric component particles is largely determined by the degree of mixing prior to the extrusion process. Although not necessary, it is desirable that the PTFE resin particles and the extractable polymeric component are admixed prior to incorporation of the lubricant component generally associated with PTFE extrusion in order to facilitate uniformity of the mixture. Solvents and/or heat may be used to facilitate the mixing process. [0034]
  • Although the extractable polymeric component is desirably added to the PTFE resin in solid form, e.g. particulates, it is also possible to use liquid or gel forms of the polymer. For example, a gel, liquid or flowable form of an extractable polymeric component may be admixed with the PTFE resin. Such blending still results in separation of the extractable polymeric component from the PTFE matrix such that removal of the extractable polymeric component leaves a pore or void. An extractable polymer may also be incorporated into the PTFE resin in a solubilized or dispersion form, and admixed to form a composition which can be extruded into a product. [0035]
  • Once the aforementioned admixture is obtained, it may be subjected to conventional compaction into a billet for extrusion into tubular shapes, or subjected to other extrusion pre-conditioning depending on the final product application. [0036]
  • Extruded tubes made from the present compositions exhibit polymeric domains represented by the extractable polymers. The extrudate is then subjected to chemical fluids, (e.g. liquids or gases) thermal or electromagnetic radiation to remove the extractable polymer, leaving behind voids or pores, which generally have the shape of the extractable polymer which has been removed. [0037]
  • The extractable polymers are sufficiently incompatible with PTFE such that they naturally form domains upon extrusion. This is desirable since the formation of pores distributed in the PTFE matrix is intended. The choice of polymers may be selected from a wide range of materials, including those which are water-soluble and those which are water-insoluble. Combinations of polymers, with varying degrees of solubility may be employed. [0038]
  • The choice of solvent is dictated by the extractable polymer selected. Most solvents do not affect PTFE in any appreciable manner and its inertness is one of the important properties for use in medical devices. However, solvents which are known to deleteriously affect PTFE are not desirable. In some instances, the solubility of the extractable polymeric component in a given solvent may vary with temperature. Thus, the dissolving or extracting medium may be delivered with sufficient heat if necessary to maximize the ability to remove the polymeric domain. In some instances, such as when water or other medium which does not wet well the surface of PTFE, is used as the dissolvable medium, it may be necessary to include force, e.g. pressure or a combination of heat and force to penetrate to the polymeric domains. [0039]
  • Table I below provides a non-exclusive list of useful extractable polymeric components and selected solvents for their removal. [0040]
    TABLE I
    Selected
    Extractable Polymers Selected Useful Solvents
    polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) water, methanol, ethyl alcohol
    cellulose triacetate acetone
    poly(oxyethylene water, toluene
    glycols)
    ethyl cellulose ethanol, isopropanol, methylacetate
    methylcellulose cold water
    cellulose propionate acetone, dioxane
    carboxymethylcellulose water
    dextran (glucose water
    polymer)
    agar (poly hot water
    (D-galactopyranose)
    poly(vinylformal) chlorinated solvents, aliphatic hydrocarbons
    poly(sodium acrylic acid) water
    poly(sodium methacrylic water
    acid)
    sugar (polysaccharides) water
    polyvinylacetate methanol, ketones, esters, chlorinated
    hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons
    polystyrene toluene
    gelatin water
    wheat (prolamines) 75% alcohol
    (simple proteins)
    poly water, organic solvents
    (vinylpyrrolidone)
    poly trifluoroacetic acid, o-chlorophenol,
    (ethyleneterephthalate) hexafluoroisoprophanol, various phenolics,
    phenol (cresol)
    polyacrylonitrile (PAN) dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethylsulfoxide
    (DMS), dimethylacetamide (DMAC), ethylene
    carbonate, propylene carbonate, adiponitrate,
    γ-butyrolactone
    poly(methacrylate) acetonitrate, isovinyl acetate, n-butylcholoride,
    (PMA) and poly heptanone-4, heptanone-3, n-propanol
    (methylmethacrylate)
    (PMMA)
    poly(oxymethylene) phenol (109° C.)
    aniline (130° C.)
    ethylene carbonate (145° C.)
    poly(acrylic acid) alcohols, formamide, dimethylformamide
    poly(acrylamide) morpholine, water
    nylon 6 m-cresol, acetic acid, trichloroacetic acid
    nylon 6,6 formic acid, trifluoroethanol, chloral hydrate,
    dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), formamide, acetic
    acid, chloroacetic acid
    nylon 6,10 chlorobenzene
    nylon 11 dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide
    nylon 18 dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide,
    pyridine
  • In addition to water, organic solvents and other dissolving medium being employed to extract the polymer, the application of heat can be applied to cause the polymer to flow out of the PTFE matrix or to degrade the polymer such that it can be removed, for example, by subsequent dissolving medium. Additionally, electromagnetic radiation may be employed as a means of removing the polymer. Electron beam radiation is possible, but other forms may also be employed depending on the polymer. [0041]
  • In cases where the polymer is a crosslinked polymer, e.g. a thermoset polymer, solvent dissolution may be difficult and degradation of the polymer may be a first step in its removal. In the case of thermoplastic polymers, extraction via solvents or heat is generally preferred. The molecular weight of the chosen polymer may vary extensively and its lower and upper ranges are only limited by practical concerns such as availability, difficulties in forming a blend with PTFE resin or difficulty in extraction. [0042]
  • It is generally known that PTFE resin has a density of 2.2 g/cc. As a result of undergoing the process of the present invention, porous, non-expanded PTFE products are formed having a bulk density desirably in the range of about 0.2 to about 0.5. Thus, a substantial amount of air space or porosity has been introduced into the PTFE material. The lower limit of porosity is governed by the need to establish sufficient ingrowth or acceptability in the body. The upper limit is governed by the need to maintain structural integrity of the porous PTFE product. Thus, a wide range of porosity is possible within these guidelines. [0043]
  • Porous, non-expanded PTFE products, and in particular non-expanded porous PTFE grafts are made in accordance with the present invention. These grafts may be used alone as surgical implants or combined with a supporting structure, such as a radially distensible stent, to form a stent-graft. Such stent-grafts are generally used as intraluminal devices, particularly in vascular applications. [0044]
  • The present invention provides a covered stent which may be implanted intraluminally within a body vessel and disposed adjacent an occluded, weakened or otherwise damaged portion of the vessel so as to hold the vessel open. The covered stent is typically delivered intraluminally via a balloon catheter. The device is delivered in a compressed condition and once properly positioned may be deployed by radial expansion. The most common form of deploying the intraluminal device is by balloon expansion, however, the present invention may also be deployed by use of a self-expanding stent. [0045]
  • The stent may be made from a variety of materials including stainless steel, titanium, platinum, gold and other bio-compatible metals. Thermoplastic materials which are inert in the body may also be employed. Shaped memory alloys having superelastic properties generally made from specific ratios of nickel and titanium, commonly known as nitinol, are among the preferred stent materials. [0046]
  • Various stent types and stent constructions may be employed in the invention. Among the various stents useful include, without limitation, self-expanding stents and balloon expandable extents. The stents may be capable of radially contracting, as well and in this sense can best be described as radially distensible or deformable. Self-expanding stents include those that have a spring-like action which causes the stent to radially expand, or stents which expand due to the memory properties of the stent material for a particular configuration at a certain temperature. Nitinol is one material which has the ability to perform well while both in spring-like mode, as well as in a memory mode based on temperature. Other materials are of course contemplated, such as stainless steel, platinum, gold, titanium and other biocompatible metals, as well as polymeric stents. [0047]
  • The configuration of the stent may also be chosen from a host of geometries. For example, wire stents can be fastened into a continuous helical pattern, with or without a wave-like or zig-zag in the wire, to form a radially deformable stent. Individual rings or circular members can be linked together such as by struts, sutures, welding or interlacing or locking of the rings to form a tubular stent. Tubular stents useful in the present invention also include those formed by etching or cutting a pattern from a tube. Such stents are often referred to as slotted stents. Furthermore, stents may be formed by etching a pattern into a material or mold and depositing stent material in the pattern, such as by chemical vapor deposition or the like. [0048]
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an intraluminal device in the form of a stent [0049] 12. FIG. 2 illustrates an intraluminal device in the form of a stent 5 having a different construction than that shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates generally at [0050] 10 an intraluminal device in the form of a stent 12 as shown in FIG. 1 having a cover 14 on the outer surface 12 and liner 16 on the inner surface, both of which may be of the porous structure shown below in FIG. 7. The stent may optionally have only a cover 14 as shown in FIG. 5, or only a liner 16 as shown in FIG. 6, or both as shown in FIG. 3. In a preferred embodiment, the stent has both a cover 14 and a liner 16. The liner, cover, or both, will be referred to hereinafter collectively as a cover or covering. The cover provides an effective barrier about the stent 12 preventing excessive cell or tissue ingrowth or thrombus formation through the expanded wall of the stent 12.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the same device as shown in FIG. 3 with a cover [0051] 14 and a liner 16 around stent 12.
  • FIG. 1 is a more detailed illustration of stent [0052] 10 and shows generally an elongate tube. The body of stent 12 defines an opposed interior surface 11 and an exterior surface 13 and is formed of a generally open configuration having a plurality of openings or passages provided for longitudinal flexibility of the stent as well as permitting the stent to be radially expanded once deployed in the body lumen. Both the interior surface 11 and the exterior surface 13 may have the porous PTFE covering of the present invention. On the interior surface the covering is referred to as the liner 12 as shown in FIG. 1 and on the exterior surface it is referred to as a cover 14 as shown in FIG. 1.
  • While the figures illustrate a particular construction of stent [0053] 10, one of skill in the art would recognize that the porous PTFE covering material as described by the present invention would find utility in any stent configuration, and in particular the open stent configurations.
  • Stent [0054] 12 may be employed in combination with a cover 14 or liner 16 but is preferably employed with both. The cover 14 may be applied over the tubular stent 12 so as to fully circumferentially surround the stent 12, while the liner 16 is applied inside and through the stent 12 so that the stent 12 fully circumferentially surrounds the liner 16.
  • In one particular desirable embodiment of the present invention, the porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) material useful herein is first obtained in the form of an interpenetrating network of PTFE and a siloxane. In particular, polydimethylsiloxanes have been found to be useful. The silicone is then extracted from the IPN using either thermal or chemical means. The removal of the silicone leaves behind a porous PTFE structure. A particular material for use herein is Silon®, an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) supplied by Bio Med Sciences, Inc. located in Bethlehem, Pa. Such IPN polymer networks are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,022,902 incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. In this patent, Silon® is described as a breathable, hydrophobic polysiloxane membrane reinforced with poly(tetrafluoroethylene). [0055]
  • FIG. 7 shows a three-dimensional representation of an extrudate [0056] 40 which includes a PTFE resin matrix 42 having distributed therein discrete extractable polymeric domains 44. Such an extrudate may be extruded into a variety of shapes. Desirably, it is rolled or extruded into either a flat sheet, which is then formed into a tubular structrue for use as a graft or in a stent-graft device, or alternatively it is directly extruded into tubular form 14 as shown in FIG. 5.
  • The removal of the extractable polymeric component from the IPN leaves behind a porous PTFE structure without having to go through the added steps of stretching or expanding the PTFE in order to obtain the porous structure. Quite obviously, this simplifies the manufacturing process by decreasing the number of steps required, and also increases efficiency. As previously described, porous PTFE often requires the expanding and stretching steps in order to achieve the desired porous structure. FIG. 7[0057] a illustrates generally at 20 a porous PTFE structure after removal of the extractable polymeric component. The removal of the polymeric domain leaves behind the porous structure wherein voids or pores 25, are found distributed within matrix PTFE 30.
  • The novel porous PTFE structure produced by the present inventive process is quite different from the porous structure produced by PTFE which has been stretched, or expanded. Typically, PTFE which has been stretched (ePTFE) has a node and fibril structure as seen in FIG. 8. After stretching, the ePTFE possesses nodes [0058] 32 connected to fibrils 34. The spaced in between the nodes and fibrils represent pores 36.
  • When the extractable polymeric component is a siloxane, removing the siloxane from the IPN PTFE matrix of siloxane/PTFE through the use of heat involves heating the IPN structure to temperatures of between about 300° C. and about 390° C. Alternatively, chemical removal of the siloxane may be accomplished using a compound selected from the group consisting of toluene, heptane, chloroform. [0059]
  • Sintering is typically accomplished at or above the crystalline melting point of PTFE. It refers to the bonding of particles in a mass by molecular (or atomic) attraction in the solid state through the application of heat below the melting point of the polymer. Sintering causes the strengthening of the powder mass and normally results in densification and often recrystallization. [0060]
  • A PTFE tube may be extruded as a tube from an extrusion device, or extruded as a film and subsequently wrapped into a tube. Extrusion techniques of PTFE are well known in the art. [0061]
  • As discussed above, the stent may be covered on the interior surface [0062] 11 of the stent 10, the exterior surface 13 of the stent 10, or both. Preferably, the stent 10 is covered on both the interior 11 and the exterior 13 surfaces of the stent 10. Having the entire surface of the stent 10 covered with the porous PTFE of the present invention provides an effective barrier about the stent 10 preventing excessive cell or tissue growth, or thrombus formation through the expanded wall of a tubular stent 10.
  • In order for the covering of porous PTFE to function effectively in combination with an expandable stent, the material must exhibit sufficient expansion characteristics so as to enable the stent cover to open or expand along with the radial expansion of the stent [0063] 10. If the covering is applied to the stent in its fully deployed state, and then folded during insertion, it may only require unfolding as the stent radially expands. The porous, non-expanded PTFE covering may additionally be subjected to expansion prior to attachment to the stent, or alternatively be affixed to the stent in the radially compressed state and expanded during the expansion of the stent. If the covering material does not effectively open or expand with the stent, several problems can arise. The covering material may tear, and may even detach from the surface of the stent if improper or dissimilar expansion of the covering material occurs with the expansion of the stent.
  • In order to improve the adhesion, and further prevent detachment of the PTFE covering from the stent, the PTFE may be fused or welded around or to the metal stent. This may be accomplished either through a heating process and/or bonding process. If heating is utilized, typically the PTFE will be heated above its sintering temperature. [0064]
  • If an adhesive is utilized, preferably a biocompatible adhesive is used. Such adhesives are known to one of skill in the art and include, for example, polyurethanes, epoxies, cyanoacrylates, polyamides, polyimides, silicones, and so forth. Dispersions of PTFE or FEP (fluoroethylpropylene) may also be utilized. This list is not exclusive and is intended for illustrative purposes only, and is in no way intended as a limitation on the scope of the present invention. There is a vast number of adhesives that can be used for such applications, limited by their biocompatibility, and by their ability to bond to polymeric materials (e.g. PTFE) and metals, particularly in aqueous environments. [0065]
  • The covering material may also be assembled to the intraluminal device in more than one piece. Such a combination would require overlapping of sorts of the PTFE material, and subsequent fusion or adhesive bonding of the porous PTFE material to itself. [0066]
  • It is preferable, however, to utilize the porous PTFE covering in a continuous form such as a membrane or thin film. The porous PTFE (after removal of the extractable polymeric component), in the form of a membrane or a thin film, thus, preferably completely wraps the metal stent, thereby providing a barrier that physically isolates the stent from surrounding blood and tissue. This barrier further helps prevent healing or diseased layers of tissue from directly contacting the stent, or from passing through the stent in any way. The porous PTFE allows the passage of fluids and vital materials, however, while still serving as a barrier to tissue growth. [0067]
  • While the invention has been described in terms of the above-mentioned embodiments, numerous alternatives, modifications and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art. The invention is intended to encompass all such alternatives, modifications and variatons which fall within the scope and spirit of the invention. [0068]

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A medical device comprising:
    a tubular extrudate comprising a PTFE matrix having distributed therein discrete domains of an extractable polymeric material, wherein upon exposure to sufficient dissolving medium or degradation temperature, said discrete domains are extracted from said matrix to create pores in said tubular structure.
  2. 2. The medical device of claim 1 further including a radially distensible stent positioned axially about said tubular extrudate.
  3. 3. A vascular graft comprising:
    a tubular extrudate comprising a PTFE matrix having distributed therein discrete domains of an extractable polymeric material, wherein upon exposure to sufficient dissolving medium or degradation temperature said discrete domains are extracted upon said matrix to create pores in said tubular extrudate.
  4. 4. A method of forming a porous PTFE product comprising:
    providing a mixture of PTFE and an extractable polymer material;
    extruding said mixture to form an extrudate comprising a PTFE matrix with discrete domains of said extractable polymer material;
    subjecting said extrudate to a solvent for said polymer material, a temperature sufficient to degrade said polymer material or a combination thereof, whereby at least a portion of said polymer material is extracted, thereby forming pores in said extrudate.
  5. 5. An endoprosthesis device comprising:
    an elongate radially expandable tubular stent having an interior surface and an exterior surface extending along a longitudinal stent axis; and
    a stent cover on said interior surface, exterior surface or both, said stent cover being formed of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene;
    wherein said porous polytetrafluoroethylene is formed by the steps of:
    providing an interpenetrating network of siloxane/polytetrafluoroethylene;
    removing said siloxane from said interpenetrating network leaving a porous polytetrafluoroethylene structure.
  6. 6. The endoprosthesis device of claim 5 wherein said stent cover is on said exterior surface and said interior surface of said stent.
  7. 7. The endoprosthesis device of claim 5 wherein said stent cover is expandable upon expansion of said stent.
  8. 8. The endoprosthesis device of claim 5 wherein said siloxane is chemically extracted from said siloxane/polytetrafluoroethylene interpenetrating network.
  9. 9 The endoprosthesis device of claim 8 wherein said siloxane is chemically extracted by a compound selected from the group consisting of toluene, heptane and chloroform.
  10. 10. The endoprosthesis device of claim 5 wherein said siloxane is removed from said siloxane/polytetrafluoroethylene interpenetrating network by heating said network to a temperature of at least about 300° C.
  11. 11. A method of making an endoprosthesis device comprising the steps of:
    providing an elongate radially expandable tubular stent;
    providing a porous polytetrafluoroethylene by extracting siloxane from an interpenetrating network of siloxane and polytetrafluoroethylene;
    forming a stent cover from said porous polytetrafluoroethylene; and
    applying said stent cover to said interior surface, said exterior surface, or both of said stent wherein said stent cover extends along the longitudinal stent axis.
  12. 12. The method of claim 7 wherein said stent cover is applied to said interior surface and to said exterior surface of said stent.
  13. 13. The method of claim 7 wherein said stent cover is fixed to said stent using an adhesive.
  14. 14. The method of claim 9 wherein said adhesive is selected from the group consisting of polyurethanes, epoxies, cyanoacrylates, polyamdies, polyimides, and silicones.
  15. 15. The method of claim 7 wherein said stent cover is fixed to said stent by a welding process, said welding process comprising heating the polytetrafluoroethylene stent cover to a temperature that is greater than the sintering temperature of the polytetrafluoroethylene.
  16. 16. A method for producing a porous polytetrafluoroethylene tube useful in medical devices comprising the steps of:
    providing an interpenetrating network of siloxane and polytetrafluoroethylene; and
    removing said siloxane from said interpenetrating network leaving a porous polytetrafluoroethylene structure.
  17. 17. An endoprosthesis device comprising:
    an elongate radially expandable tubular stent having an interior surface and an exterior surface extending along a longitudinal stent axis; and
    a stent cover on said interior surface, exterior surface or both, which is formed of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene;
    wherein said porous polytetrafluoroethylene comprises a non-stretched porous structure.
  18. 18. An endoprosthesis device according to claim 17 wherein said polytetrafluoroethylene lacks node and fibril structure.
  19. 19. The endoprosthesis device of claim 17 wherein said stent cover is on said exterior surface and said interior surface of said stent.
  20. 20. The endoprosthesis device of claim 17 wherein said stent cover is expandable upon expansion of said stent.
US10002521 2000-11-02 2001-11-01 Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture Abandoned US20020111667A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09704494 US6770086B1 (en) 2000-11-02 2000-11-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US10002521 US20020111667A1 (en) 2000-11-02 2001-11-01 Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10002521 US20020111667A1 (en) 2000-11-02 2001-11-01 Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09704494 Continuation-In-Part US6770086B1 (en) 2000-11-02 2000-11-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020111667A1 true true US20020111667A1 (en) 2002-08-15

Family

ID=24829763

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09704494 Active 2021-02-27 US6770086B1 (en) 2000-11-02 2000-11-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US10002521 Abandoned US20020111667A1 (en) 2000-11-02 2001-11-01 Non-expanded porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) products and methods of manufacture
US10858589 Abandoned US20040220659A1 (en) 2000-11-02 2004-06-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09704494 Active 2021-02-27 US6770086B1 (en) 2000-11-02 2000-11-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10858589 Abandoned US20040220659A1 (en) 2000-11-02 2004-06-02 Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (3) US6770086B1 (en)
EP (2) EP1385691B1 (en)
JP (1) JP3853734B2 (en)
DE (1) DE60143364D1 (en)
WO (1) WO2002036332A3 (en)

Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6776604B1 (en) 2001-12-20 2004-08-17 Trivascular, Inc. Method and apparatus for shape forming endovascular graft material
US20040185081A1 (en) * 2002-11-07 2004-09-23 Donald Verlee Prosthesis with multiple drugs applied separately by fluid jet application in discrete unmixed droplets
US20040220659A1 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-11-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US20050027347A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2005-02-03 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US20060142862A1 (en) * 2004-03-02 2006-06-29 Robert Diaz Ball and dual socket joint
US20060149361A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Jamie Henderson Sintered ring supported vascular graft
US20060147665A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Julio Duran Method for making ePTFE and structure containing such ePTFE. such as a vascular graft
US20060149366A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Jamie Henderson Sintered structures for vascular graft
US20060155371A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-13 Jamie Henderson Differentially expanded vascular graft
US20060233991A1 (en) * 2005-04-13 2006-10-19 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US20070123968A1 (en) * 2005-11-14 2007-05-31 Artegraft, Inc. Self-sealing vascular graft
US20070149951A1 (en) * 2005-12-27 2007-06-28 Mina Wu Variable stiffness guidewire
US20070203564A1 (en) * 2006-02-28 2007-08-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Biodegradable implants having accelerated biodegradation properties in vivo
US20070208421A1 (en) * 2006-03-01 2007-09-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Stent-graft having flexible geometries and methods of producing the same
US20070260268A1 (en) * 2005-02-14 2007-11-08 Bartee Chad M PTFE composite multi-layer material
US20070288049A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Richard Champion Davis Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US20070293928A1 (en) * 2006-06-14 2007-12-20 Damian Tomlin Retrieval device with sidewall grippers
US20080004653A1 (en) * 2004-09-17 2008-01-03 Sherman Darren R Thin Film Devices for Occlusion of a Vessel
US20080132994A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2008-06-05 Robert Burgermeister Geometry and non-metallic material for high strength, high flexibility, controlled recoil stent
US20080140172A1 (en) * 2004-12-13 2008-06-12 Robert Hunt Carpenter Multi-Wall Expandable Device Capable Of Drug Delivery Related Applications
US7678217B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2010-03-16 Trivascular2, Inc. Method for manufacturing an endovascular graft section
US7766935B2 (en) 2006-06-12 2010-08-03 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US7785317B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2010-08-31 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. Joined metal tubing and method of manufacture
US20100233463A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2010-09-16 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for Forming Porous PTFE Layer, and Porous PTFE Layer and Molded Product That are Obtained by the Forming Method
US20110030885A1 (en) * 2009-08-07 2011-02-10 Zeus, Inc. Prosthetic device including electrostatically spun fibrous layer and method for making the same
US20110208289A1 (en) * 2010-02-25 2011-08-25 Endospan Ltd. Flexible Stent-Grafts
US8389041B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2013-03-05 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for rotating and coating an implantable device
US8535702B2 (en) 2005-02-01 2013-09-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices having porous polymeric regions for controlled drug delivery and regulated biocompatibility
US8808848B2 (en) 2010-09-10 2014-08-19 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Porous article
US8840824B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2014-09-23 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US8979892B2 (en) 2009-07-09 2015-03-17 Endospan Ltd. Apparatus for closure of a lumen and methods of using the same
US9254209B2 (en) 2011-07-07 2016-02-09 Endospan Ltd. Stent fixation with reduced plastic deformation
US20160081826A1 (en) * 2014-09-23 2016-03-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Implantable medical device with shape memory polymer filter layer
US9427339B2 (en) 2011-10-30 2016-08-30 Endospan Ltd. Triple-collar stent-graft
US9468517B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2016-10-18 Endospan Ltd. Thermal energy application for prevention and management of endoleaks in stent-grafts
US9526638B2 (en) * 2011-02-03 2016-12-27 Endospan Ltd. Implantable medical devices constructed of shape memory material
US9597204B2 (en) 2011-12-04 2017-03-21 Endospan Ltd. Branched stent-graft system
US9770350B2 (en) 2012-05-15 2017-09-26 Endospan Ltd. Stent-graft with fixation elements that are radially confined for delivery
US9839510B2 (en) 2011-08-28 2017-12-12 Endospan Ltd. Stent-grafts with post-deployment variable radial displacement
US9918825B2 (en) 2009-06-23 2018-03-20 Endospan Ltd. Vascular prosthesis for treating aneurysms
US10010395B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2018-07-03 Zeus Industrial Products, Inc. Composite prosthetic devices

Families Citing this family (52)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6579314B1 (en) * 1995-03-10 2003-06-17 C.R. Bard, Inc. Covered stent with encapsulated ends
US6451047B2 (en) 1995-03-10 2002-09-17 Impra, Inc. Encapsulated intraluminal stent-graft and methods of making same
US6264684B1 (en) 1995-03-10 2001-07-24 Impra, Inc., A Subsidiary Of C.R. Bard, Inc. Helically supported graft
US6395019B2 (en) 1998-02-09 2002-05-28 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft
US7500988B1 (en) * 2000-11-16 2009-03-10 Cordis Corporation Stent for use in a stent graft
US6398803B1 (en) 1999-02-02 2002-06-04 Impra, Inc., A Subsidiary Of C.R. Bard, Inc. Partial encapsulation of stents
WO2003002243A3 (en) 2001-06-27 2004-03-04 Remon Medical Technologies Ltd Method and device for electrochemical formation of therapeutic species in vivo
US20040093056A1 (en) 2002-10-26 2004-05-13 Johnson Lianw M. Medical appliance delivery apparatus and method of use
US7637942B2 (en) 2002-11-05 2009-12-29 Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Coated stent with geometry determinated functionality and method of making the same
US7959671B2 (en) 2002-11-05 2011-06-14 Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Differential covering and coating methods
US7875068B2 (en) 2002-11-05 2011-01-25 Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Removable biliary stent
DE60322581D1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2008-09-11 Setagon Inc layers medical devices with porous and manufacturing processes for
US20060121080A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2006-06-08 Lye Whye K Medical devices having nanoporous layers and methods for making the same
US7637934B2 (en) 2003-03-31 2009-12-29 Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Medical appliance optical delivery and deployment apparatus and method
US20050113904A1 (en) * 2003-11-25 2005-05-26 Shank Peter J. Composite stent with inner and outer stent elements and method of using the same
US8435285B2 (en) * 2003-11-25 2013-05-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Composite stent with inner and outer stent elements and method of using the same
US7922946B2 (en) * 2004-11-24 2011-04-12 Donaldson Company, Inc. PTFE membrane
US8840660B2 (en) 2006-01-05 2014-09-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioerodible endoprostheses and methods of making the same
US8089029B2 (en) 2006-02-01 2012-01-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioabsorbable metal medical device and method of manufacture
US8048150B2 (en) 2006-04-12 2011-11-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprosthesis having a fiber meshwork disposed thereon
US7666496B2 (en) 2006-05-24 2010-02-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Micro-sintered node ePTFE structure
CA2659761A1 (en) 2006-08-02 2008-02-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprosthesis with three-dimensional disintegration control
ES2368125T3 (en) 2006-09-15 2011-11-14 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. bioerodible endoprostheses biostable inorganic layers.
EP2959925A1 (en) * 2006-09-15 2015-12-30 Boston Scientific Limited Medical devices and methods of making the same
US7955382B2 (en) 2006-09-15 2011-06-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprosthesis with adjustable surface features
CA2663271A1 (en) 2006-09-15 2008-03-20 Boston Scientific Limited Bioerodible endoprostheses and methods of making the same
US8808726B2 (en) 2006-09-15 2014-08-19 Boston Scientific Scimed. Inc. Bioerodible endoprostheses and methods of making the same
CA2663762A1 (en) 2006-09-18 2008-03-27 Boston Scientific Limited Endoprostheses
US20080077218A1 (en) * 2006-09-25 2008-03-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Injection of therapeutic into porous regions of a medical device
DE602007010669D1 (en) 2006-12-28 2010-12-30 Boston Scient Ltd hear it
US8052745B2 (en) 2007-09-13 2011-11-08 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprosthesis
US8663309B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2014-03-04 Trivascular, Inc. Asymmetric stent apparatus and method
US8226701B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2012-07-24 Trivascular, Inc. Stent and delivery system for deployment thereof
US8066755B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2011-11-29 Trivascular, Inc. System and method of pivoted stent deployment
US8142490B2 (en) * 2007-10-24 2012-03-27 Cordis Corporation Stent segments axially connected by thin film
US8328861B2 (en) 2007-11-16 2012-12-11 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for bifurcated graft
US8083789B2 (en) 2007-11-16 2011-12-27 Trivascular, Inc. Securement assembly and method for expandable endovascular device
US8196279B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2012-06-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Stent-graft covering process
US8252048B2 (en) * 2008-03-19 2012-08-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Drug eluting stent and method of making the same
US7998192B2 (en) 2008-05-09 2011-08-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprostheses
US8236046B2 (en) 2008-06-10 2012-08-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioerodible endoprosthesis
US7985252B2 (en) 2008-07-30 2011-07-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioerodible endoprosthesis
US8382824B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2013-02-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical implant having NANO-crystal grains with barrier layers of metal nitrides or fluorides
US8267992B2 (en) 2009-03-02 2012-09-18 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Self-buffering medical implants
US8668732B2 (en) 2010-03-23 2014-03-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Surface treated bioerodible metal endoprostheses
JP5661334B2 (en) * 2010-05-26 2015-01-28 テルモ株式会社 Stent
WO2012027331A1 (en) 2010-08-27 2012-03-01 Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Compositions and methods for treating or preventing metabolic syndrome and related diseases and disorders
US8992595B2 (en) 2012-04-04 2015-03-31 Trivascular, Inc. Durable stent graft with tapered struts and stable delivery methods and devices
US9498363B2 (en) 2012-04-06 2016-11-22 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery catheter for endovascular device
US9603728B2 (en) 2013-02-15 2017-03-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioerodible magnesium alloy microstructures for endoprostheses
WO2015066181A1 (en) 2013-10-29 2015-05-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioerodible magnesium alloy microstructures for endoprostheses
CN105802192A (en) * 2016-04-29 2016-07-27 苏州林华医疗器械股份有限公司 Novel material applied to indwelling needle catheter and preparation method thereof

Citations (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4289600A (en) * 1978-03-31 1981-09-15 Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corp. Microporous membrane materials
US4533369A (en) * 1982-05-28 1985-08-06 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Gas-permselective composite membranes and process for the production thereof
US4605406A (en) * 1984-08-03 1986-08-12 Medtronic, Inc. Method for fabricating prosthesis material
US4828772A (en) * 1984-10-09 1989-05-09 Millipore Corporation Microporous membranes of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene
US4863604A (en) * 1987-02-05 1989-09-05 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Microporous asymmetric polyfluorocarbon membranes
US4874568A (en) * 1988-09-26 1989-10-17 The Dow Chemical Company Process of making a porous membrane
US4906377A (en) * 1988-05-04 1990-03-06 Millipore Corporation Fluorocarbon membranes and process for making fluorocarbon membranes
US4951381A (en) * 1988-10-03 1990-08-28 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing a magnetic head slider
US4963304A (en) * 1988-09-26 1990-10-16 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparing microporous membranes
US4997603A (en) * 1988-08-05 1991-03-05 Hoechst Celanese Corp. Process for formation of halogenated polymeric microporous membranes having improved strength properties
US5098625A (en) * 1989-03-14 1992-03-24 Yeu Ming Tai Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd. Process for forming an expanded porous tetrafluoroethylene polymer
US5198162A (en) * 1984-12-19 1993-03-30 Scimat Limited Microporous films
US5248428A (en) * 1991-06-28 1993-09-28 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Article for separations and purifications and method of controlling porosity therein
US5607464A (en) * 1991-02-28 1997-03-04 Medtronic, Inc. Prosthetic vascular graft with a pleated structure
US5723526A (en) * 1993-09-08 1998-03-03 Teijin Chemicals Ltd Resin composition and molded article
US5744515A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-04-28 Bsi Corporation Method and implantable article for promoting endothelialization
US5776185A (en) * 1994-09-27 1998-07-07 Alessandro Verona Cardiovascular graft
US6015609A (en) * 1996-04-04 2000-01-18 Navartis Ag Process for manufacture of a porous polymer from a mixture
US6053943A (en) * 1995-12-08 2000-04-25 Impra, Inc. Endoluminal graft with integral structural support and method for making same
US6060530A (en) * 1996-04-04 2000-05-09 Novartis Ag Process for manufacture of a porous polymer by use of a porogen
US6143675A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-11-07 W. L. Gore & Associates (Uk) Ltd. Porous composite
US6156064A (en) * 1998-08-14 2000-12-05 Schneider (Usa) Inc Stent-graft-membrane and method of making the same
US6190590B1 (en) * 1996-02-28 2001-02-20 Impra, Inc. Apparatus and method for making flanged graft for end-to-side anastomosis
US6235377B1 (en) * 1995-09-05 2001-05-22 Bio Med Sciences, Inc. Microporous membrane with a stratified pore structure created in situ and process
US6245099B1 (en) * 1998-09-30 2001-06-12 Impra, Inc. Selective adherence of stent-graft coverings, mandrel and method of making stent-graft device
USH1978H1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2001-08-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Monolithic films having zoned breathability
US6293969B1 (en) * 1997-01-29 2001-09-25 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Bell-bottom modular stent-graft
US6361559B1 (en) * 1998-06-10 2002-03-26 Converge Medical, Inc. Thermal securing anastomosis systems
US6702965B2 (en) * 1997-02-06 2004-03-09 Bollore Method of forming a porous composite product, in particular with a high specific surface
US6770086B1 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-08-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US6770202B1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2004-08-03 Pall Corporation Porous membrane
US7083640B2 (en) * 1995-03-10 2006-08-01 C. R. Bard, Inc. Covered stent with encapsulated ends

Family Cites Families (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3407096A (en) * 1966-01-25 1968-10-22 American Cyanamid Co Fuel cell and method for preparing the electrodes
US4196070A (en) * 1977-12-12 1980-04-01 Nuclepore Corporation Method for forming microporous fluorocarbon polymer sheet and product
JPS6037733B2 (en) * 1978-10-12 1985-08-28 Sumitomo Electric Industries
JPS6037735B2 (en) * 1978-10-18 1985-08-28 Sumitomo Electric Industries
US4576608A (en) 1980-11-06 1986-03-18 Homsy Charles A Porous body-implantable polytetrafluoroethylene
EP0128501B1 (en) * 1983-06-06 1989-03-29 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Artificial vessel and process for preparing the same
US4657544A (en) 1984-04-18 1987-04-14 Cordis Corporation Cardiovascular graft and method of forming same
EP0216149B1 (en) * 1985-08-23 1991-12-04 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Artificial vessel having excellent patency
CA1283492C (en) 1985-11-13 1991-04-23 Tyrone D. Mitchell Interpenetrating polymeric networks comprising polytetrafluoroethylene and polysiloxane
US4764560A (en) * 1985-11-13 1988-08-16 General Electric Company Interpenetrating polymeric network comprising polytetrafluoroethylene and polysiloxane
CA1292597C (en) * 1985-12-24 1991-12-03 Koichi Okita Tubular prothesis having a composite structure
US4945125A (en) 1987-01-05 1990-07-31 Tetratec Corporation Process of producing a fibrillated semi-interpenetrating polymer network of polytetrafluoroethylene and silicone elastomer and shaped products thereof
US5157058A (en) 1987-01-05 1992-10-20 Tetratec Corporation Microporous waterproof and moisture vapor permeable structures, processes of manufacture and useful articles thereof
US5066683A (en) 1987-01-05 1991-11-19 Tetratec Corporation Microporous waterproof and moisture vapor permeable structures, processes of manufacture and useful articles thereof
US4849285A (en) 1987-06-01 1989-07-18 Bio Med Sciences, Inc. Composite macrostructure of ceramic and organic biomaterials
US4986832A (en) * 1987-09-04 1991-01-22 Ube Industries, Ltd. Artificial blood vessel and process for preparing it
US6022902A (en) 1989-10-31 2000-02-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Porous article with surface functionality and method for preparing same
US5141522A (en) 1990-02-06 1992-08-25 American Cyanamid Company Composite material having absorbable and non-absorbable components for use with mammalian tissue
US5123917A (en) * 1990-04-27 1992-06-23 Lee Peter Y Expandable intraluminal vascular graft
EP0630432B1 (en) * 1992-03-13 1999-07-14 Atrium Medical Corporation Controlled porosity expanded fluoropolymer (e.g. polytetrafluoroethylene) products and fabrication
US5721283A (en) 1992-06-25 1998-02-24 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Porous polytetrafluoroethylene and preparation
JP3077859B2 (en) * 1992-10-02 2000-08-21 長一 古屋 Method of removing the surfactant from the material sheet for the gas diffusion electrode
US5466509A (en) 1993-01-15 1995-11-14 Impra, Inc. Textured, porous, expanded PTFE
US5474128A (en) * 1993-07-02 1995-12-12 Best Tool Co., Inc. Telescoping conduits for increasing the fluid resistance of well production tubing inadvertently dropped in an oil or gas well
US5735892A (en) 1993-08-18 1998-04-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Intraluminal stent graft
DE69433617D1 (en) 1993-09-30 2004-04-22 Endogad Res Pty Ltd An intraluminal graft
US5639278A (en) * 1993-10-21 1997-06-17 Corvita Corporation Expandable supportive bifurcated endoluminal grafts
US5656279A (en) 1994-02-23 1997-08-12 Bio Med Sciences, Inc. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network scar treatment sheeting, process of manufacture and useful articles thereof
DE69527141T2 (en) 1994-04-29 2002-11-07 Scimed Life Systems Inc Stent with collagen
ES2239322T3 (en) 1994-06-27 2005-09-16 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Polytetrafluoroethylene radially expandable and expandable endovascular stents formed subject.
US5665114A (en) 1994-08-12 1997-09-09 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Tubular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene implantable prostheses
US6124523A (en) 1995-03-10 2000-09-26 Impra, Inc. Encapsulated stent
DE69518337D1 (en) 1995-03-10 2000-09-14 Impra Inc Endoluminal stent encapsulated and manufacturing
US5641373A (en) 1995-04-17 1997-06-24 Baxter International Inc. Method of manufacturing a radially-enlargeable PTFE tape-reinforced vascular graft
DK171865B1 (en) 1995-09-11 1997-07-21 Cook William Europ An expandable endovascular stent
US5788626A (en) 1995-11-21 1998-08-04 Schneider (Usa) Inc Method of making a stent-graft covered with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene
US5747128A (en) 1996-01-29 1998-05-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Radially supported polytetrafluoroethylene vascular graft
US5843161A (en) 1996-06-26 1998-12-01 Cordis Corporation Endoprosthesis assembly for percutaneous deployment and method of deploying same
US5769884A (en) * 1996-06-27 1998-06-23 Cordis Corporation Controlled porosity endovascular implant
US5928279A (en) 1996-07-03 1999-07-27 Baxter International Inc. Stented, radially expandable, tubular PTFE grafts
US5741326A (en) 1996-07-15 1998-04-21 Cordis Corporation Low profile thermally set wrapped cover for a percutaneously deployed stent
US5824046A (en) 1996-09-27 1998-10-20 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Covered stent
US5925074A (en) 1996-12-03 1999-07-20 Atrium Medical Corporation Vascular endoprosthesis and method
US6010529A (en) 1996-12-03 2000-01-04 Atrium Medical Corporation Expandable shielded vessel support
CA2273887A1 (en) * 1996-12-03 1998-06-25 Atrium Medical Corporation Multi-stage prosthesis
DE69828798T2 (en) 1997-03-05 2006-01-05 Boston Scientific Ltd., St. Michael Konformanliegende multilayer stent device
US6203536B1 (en) * 1997-06-17 2001-03-20 Medtronic, Inc. Medical device for delivering a therapeutic substance and method therefor
US5837752A (en) * 1997-07-17 1998-11-17 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks
US6540780B1 (en) 1998-11-23 2003-04-01 Medtronic, Inc. Porous synthetic vascular grafts with oriented ingrowth channels

Patent Citations (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4289600A (en) * 1978-03-31 1981-09-15 Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corp. Microporous membrane materials
US4533369A (en) * 1982-05-28 1985-08-06 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Gas-permselective composite membranes and process for the production thereof
US4605406A (en) * 1984-08-03 1986-08-12 Medtronic, Inc. Method for fabricating prosthesis material
US4828772A (en) * 1984-10-09 1989-05-09 Millipore Corporation Microporous membranes of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene
US5198162A (en) * 1984-12-19 1993-03-30 Scimat Limited Microporous films
US4863604A (en) * 1987-02-05 1989-09-05 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Microporous asymmetric polyfluorocarbon membranes
US4906377A (en) * 1988-05-04 1990-03-06 Millipore Corporation Fluorocarbon membranes and process for making fluorocarbon membranes
US4997603A (en) * 1988-08-05 1991-03-05 Hoechst Celanese Corp. Process for formation of halogenated polymeric microporous membranes having improved strength properties
US4874568A (en) * 1988-09-26 1989-10-17 The Dow Chemical Company Process of making a porous membrane
US4963304A (en) * 1988-09-26 1990-10-16 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparing microporous membranes
US4951381A (en) * 1988-10-03 1990-08-28 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing a magnetic head slider
US5098625A (en) * 1989-03-14 1992-03-24 Yeu Ming Tai Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd. Process for forming an expanded porous tetrafluoroethylene polymer
US5607464A (en) * 1991-02-28 1997-03-04 Medtronic, Inc. Prosthetic vascular graft with a pleated structure
US5248428A (en) * 1991-06-28 1993-09-28 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Article for separations and purifications and method of controlling porosity therein
US5723526A (en) * 1993-09-08 1998-03-03 Teijin Chemicals Ltd Resin composition and molded article
US5776185A (en) * 1994-09-27 1998-07-07 Alessandro Verona Cardiovascular graft
US7083640B2 (en) * 1995-03-10 2006-08-01 C. R. Bard, Inc. Covered stent with encapsulated ends
US5744515A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-04-28 Bsi Corporation Method and implantable article for promoting endothelialization
US6143675A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-11-07 W. L. Gore & Associates (Uk) Ltd. Porous composite
US6235377B1 (en) * 1995-09-05 2001-05-22 Bio Med Sciences, Inc. Microporous membrane with a stratified pore structure created in situ and process
US6053943A (en) * 1995-12-08 2000-04-25 Impra, Inc. Endoluminal graft with integral structural support and method for making same
US6190590B1 (en) * 1996-02-28 2001-02-20 Impra, Inc. Apparatus and method for making flanged graft for end-to-side anastomosis
US6015609A (en) * 1996-04-04 2000-01-18 Navartis Ag Process for manufacture of a porous polymer from a mixture
US6060530A (en) * 1996-04-04 2000-05-09 Novartis Ag Process for manufacture of a porous polymer by use of a porogen
US6293969B1 (en) * 1997-01-29 2001-09-25 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Bell-bottom modular stent-graft
US6702965B2 (en) * 1997-02-06 2004-03-09 Bollore Method of forming a porous composite product, in particular with a high specific surface
US6361559B1 (en) * 1998-06-10 2002-03-26 Converge Medical, Inc. Thermal securing anastomosis systems
US6156064A (en) * 1998-08-14 2000-12-05 Schneider (Usa) Inc Stent-graft-membrane and method of making the same
US6245099B1 (en) * 1998-09-30 2001-06-12 Impra, Inc. Selective adherence of stent-graft coverings, mandrel and method of making stent-graft device
US6770202B1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2004-08-03 Pall Corporation Porous membrane
USH1978H1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2001-08-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Monolithic films having zoned breathability
US6770086B1 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-08-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US20040220659A1 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-11-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene

Cited By (71)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040220659A1 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-11-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent covering formed of porous polytetraflouroethylene
US9351858B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2016-05-31 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US7678217B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2010-03-16 Trivascular2, Inc. Method for manufacturing an endovascular graft section
US20040224047A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2004-11-11 Trivascular, Inc. Method and apparatus for shape forming endovascular graft material
US20050027347A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2005-02-03 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US8348989B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2013-01-08 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US9050754B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2015-06-09 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US6776604B1 (en) 2001-12-20 2004-08-17 Trivascular, Inc. Method and apparatus for shape forming endovascular graft material
US7147455B2 (en) 2001-12-20 2006-12-12 Boston Scientific Santa Rosa Corp. Method and apparatus for shape forming endovascular graft material
US20060206193A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2006-09-14 Boston Scientific Santa Rosa Corporation Endovascular graft joint and method for manufacture
US20040185081A1 (en) * 2002-11-07 2004-09-23 Donald Verlee Prosthesis with multiple drugs applied separately by fluid jet application in discrete unmixed droplets
US20060142862A1 (en) * 2004-03-02 2006-06-29 Robert Diaz Ball and dual socket joint
US20080004653A1 (en) * 2004-09-17 2008-01-03 Sherman Darren R Thin Film Devices for Occlusion of a Vessel
US20080132994A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2008-06-05 Robert Burgermeister Geometry and non-metallic material for high strength, high flexibility, controlled recoil stent
US20080140172A1 (en) * 2004-12-13 2008-06-12 Robert Hunt Carpenter Multi-Wall Expandable Device Capable Of Drug Delivery Related Applications
US20060155371A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-13 Jamie Henderson Differentially expanded vascular graft
US7857843B2 (en) 2004-12-31 2010-12-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Differentially expanded vascular graft
US7524445B2 (en) 2004-12-31 2009-04-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Method for making ePTFE and structure containing such ePTFE, such as a vascular graft
US20060149361A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Jamie Henderson Sintered ring supported vascular graft
US20060147665A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Julio Duran Method for making ePTFE and structure containing such ePTFE. such as a vascular graft
US20060149366A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-07-06 Jamie Henderson Sintered structures for vascular graft
US7806922B2 (en) * 2004-12-31 2010-10-05 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Sintered ring supported vascular graft
US8535702B2 (en) 2005-02-01 2013-09-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices having porous polymeric regions for controlled drug delivery and regulated biocompatibility
US7789888B2 (en) * 2005-02-14 2010-09-07 Bartee Chad M PTFE composite multi-layer material
US20070260268A1 (en) * 2005-02-14 2007-11-08 Bartee Chad M PTFE composite multi-layer material
US8721735B2 (en) 2005-02-14 2014-05-13 Chad M. Bartee PTFE composite multi-layer material
US20110060420A1 (en) * 2005-02-14 2011-03-10 Bartee Chad M Ptfe composite multi-layer material
US20060233991A1 (en) * 2005-04-13 2006-10-19 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US9549829B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2017-01-24 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US9446553B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2016-09-20 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US8728372B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2014-05-20 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US8840824B2 (en) 2005-04-13 2014-09-23 Trivascular, Inc. PTFE layers and methods of manufacturing
US8163002B2 (en) 2005-11-14 2012-04-24 Vascular Devices Llc Self-sealing vascular graft
US20070123968A1 (en) * 2005-11-14 2007-05-31 Artegraft, Inc. Self-sealing vascular graft
US7867176B2 (en) 2005-12-27 2011-01-11 Cordis Corporation Variable stiffness guidewire
US20070149951A1 (en) * 2005-12-27 2007-06-28 Mina Wu Variable stiffness guidewire
US20070203564A1 (en) * 2006-02-28 2007-08-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Biodegradable implants having accelerated biodegradation properties in vivo
US20070208421A1 (en) * 2006-03-01 2007-09-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Stent-graft having flexible geometries and methods of producing the same
US8025693B2 (en) 2006-03-01 2011-09-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Stent-graft having flexible geometries and methods of producing the same
US7785317B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2010-08-31 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. Joined metal tubing and method of manufacture
US7766935B2 (en) 2006-06-12 2010-08-03 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US7670353B2 (en) 2006-06-12 2010-03-02 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US20070288049A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Richard Champion Davis Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US8920457B2 (en) 2006-06-12 2014-12-30 Depuy Synthes Products Llc Modified headpiece for hydraulic coil deployment system
US20070293928A1 (en) * 2006-06-14 2007-12-20 Damian Tomlin Retrieval device with sidewall grippers
US8585732B2 (en) 2006-06-14 2013-11-19 DePuy Synthes Products, LLC Retrieval device with sidewall grippers
US8092629B2 (en) * 2006-10-31 2012-01-10 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for forming porous PTFE layer
US20100233463A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2010-09-16 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for Forming Porous PTFE Layer, and Porous PTFE Layer and Molded Product That are Obtained by the Forming Method
US8202387B2 (en) * 2006-10-31 2012-06-19 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for forming porous PTFE layer
US20110139343A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2011-06-16 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for Forming Porous PTFE Layer
US8202386B2 (en) * 2006-10-31 2012-06-19 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for forming porous PTFE layer, and porous PTFE layer and molded product that are obtained by the forming method
US20110139350A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2011-06-16 Nippon Valqua Industries, Ltd. Method for Forming Porous PTFE Layer
US9918825B2 (en) 2009-06-23 2018-03-20 Endospan Ltd. Vascular prosthesis for treating aneurysms
US8979892B2 (en) 2009-07-09 2015-03-17 Endospan Ltd. Apparatus for closure of a lumen and methods of using the same
US8257640B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2012-09-04 Zeus Industrial Products, Inc. Multilayered composite structure with electrospun layer
US9034031B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2015-05-19 Zeus Industrial Products, Inc. Prosthetic device including electrostatically spun fibrous layer and method for making the same
US20110030885A1 (en) * 2009-08-07 2011-02-10 Zeus, Inc. Prosthetic device including electrostatically spun fibrous layer and method for making the same
US8262979B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2012-09-11 Zeus Industrial Products, Inc. Process of making a prosthetic device from electrospun fibers
US9468517B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2016-10-18 Endospan Ltd. Thermal energy application for prevention and management of endoleaks in stent-grafts
US20110208289A1 (en) * 2010-02-25 2011-08-25 Endospan Ltd. Flexible Stent-Grafts
US8632841B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2014-01-21 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for rotating and coating an implantable device
US8389041B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2013-03-05 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for rotating and coating an implantable device
US8808848B2 (en) 2010-09-10 2014-08-19 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Porous article
US9526638B2 (en) * 2011-02-03 2016-12-27 Endospan Ltd. Implantable medical devices constructed of shape memory material
US9254209B2 (en) 2011-07-07 2016-02-09 Endospan Ltd. Stent fixation with reduced plastic deformation
US9839510B2 (en) 2011-08-28 2017-12-12 Endospan Ltd. Stent-grafts with post-deployment variable radial displacement
US9427339B2 (en) 2011-10-30 2016-08-30 Endospan Ltd. Triple-collar stent-graft
US9597204B2 (en) 2011-12-04 2017-03-21 Endospan Ltd. Branched stent-graft system
US9770350B2 (en) 2012-05-15 2017-09-26 Endospan Ltd. Stent-graft with fixation elements that are radially confined for delivery
US20160081826A1 (en) * 2014-09-23 2016-03-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Implantable medical device with shape memory polymer filter layer
US10010395B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2018-07-03 Zeus Industrial Products, Inc. Composite prosthetic devices

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US6770086B1 (en) 2004-08-03 grant
WO2002036332A2 (en) 2002-05-10 application
EP1385691A2 (en) 2004-02-04 application
WO2002036332A3 (en) 2002-09-12 application
EP1385691B1 (en) 2010-10-27 grant
US20040220659A1 (en) 2004-11-04 application
JP3853734B2 (en) 2006-12-06 grant
DE60143364D1 (en) 2010-12-09 grant
JP2004512876A (en) 2004-04-30 application
EP2275248A1 (en) 2011-01-19 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6214039B1 (en) Covered endoluminal stent and method of assembly
USRE31618E (en) Tubular organic prosthesis
US6613078B1 (en) Multi-component endoluminal graft assembly, use thereof and method of implanting
US5925075A (en) Intraluminal stent graft
US5578075A (en) Minimally invasive bioactivated endoprosthesis for vessel repair
US6053943A (en) Endoluminal graft with integral structural support and method for making same
US6524334B1 (en) Expandable stent-graft covered with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene
US4655771A (en) Prosthesis comprising an expansible or contractile tubular body
US6402779B1 (en) Balloon-assisted intraluminal stent graft
US20040167606A1 (en) Stent-graft-membrane and method of making the same
US6790226B2 (en) Endoluminal prosthesis with support wire
US6733524B2 (en) Polymer coated stent
US20020156523A1 (en) Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US20030055484A1 (en) Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US5755772A (en) Radially expansible vascular prosthesis having reversible and other locking structures
US20090048663A1 (en) Branched stent graft system
US20090043377A1 (en) Branched Vessel Endoluminal Device
US6315791B1 (en) Self-expanding prothesis
US5549663A (en) Endoprosthesis having graft member and exposed welded end junctions, method and procedure
US5755774A (en) Bistable luminal graft endoprosthesis
US20010032009A1 (en) Partial encapsulation of stents
US5639278A (en) Expandable supportive bifurcated endoluminal grafts
US5855598A (en) Expandable supportive branched endoluminal grafts
US5693085A (en) Stent with collagen
US5632772A (en) Expandable supportive branched endoluminal grafts

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SCIMED LIFE SYSTEMS, INC., MINNESOTA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GIRTON, TIMOTHY SAMUEL;SOGARD, DAVID JOHN;REEL/FRAME:012604/0567;SIGNING DATES FROM 20011102 TO 20011213

AS Assignment

Owner name: BOSTON SCIENTIFIC SCIMED, INC., MINNESOTA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SCIMED LIFE SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:018505/0868

Effective date: 20050101

Owner name: BOSTON SCIENTIFIC SCIMED, INC.,MINNESOTA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SCIMED LIFE SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:018505/0868

Effective date: 20050101