US20020107580A1 - Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices - Google Patents

Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020107580A1
US20020107580A1 US09846781 US84678101A US2002107580A1 US 20020107580 A1 US20020107580 A1 US 20020107580A1 US 09846781 US09846781 US 09846781 US 84678101 A US84678101 A US 84678101A US 2002107580 A1 US2002107580 A1 US 2002107580A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
backing
primary
tufted
covering
surface
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US09846781
Other languages
el (el)
Other versions
US7546298B2 (en )
US20030060896A9 (en )
Inventor
Steven Hulai
Tim Neil
Original Assignee
Hulai Steven J.
Tim Neil
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F9/00Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units
    • G06F9/06Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units using stored programs, i.e. using an internal store of processing equipment to receive or retain programs
    • G06F9/44Arrangements for executing specific programs
    • G06F9/451Execution arrangements for user interfaces
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S707/00Data processing: database and file management or data structures
    • Y10S707/99941Database schema or data structure
    • Y10S707/99944Object-oriented database structure

Abstract

A floor covering includes a primary backing having yarns tufted through the primary backing forming wear surface portions comprised of the back stitches of the tufted yarns in conjunction with non-tufted areas of the primary backing, also forming exposed wear surfaces. Both exposed wear surfaces portions form an aesthetic design pattern whereby a low, dense broadloom or modular carpet is provided at reduced materials and costs. Preferably, the primary backing is comprised of a woven polypropylene and a secondary backing is provided with the cut or loop yarns on the back side of the primary backing being fixed in place by a resin. A secondary backing formed of a composition of EVA, calcium carbonate and resin, overlaid by a woven scrim, is provided. The secondary backing may be formed of a needle-bonded synthetic fiber. Additionally, the primary backing may be formed of a non-woven material such as nylon and polyester.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to coverings and particularly to tufted broadloom carpet and/or modular carpet, i.e., carpet tiles or roll tile wherein the wear surface of the covering includes exposed patterned portions of the primary backing and backstitches of the tufts having complementary aesthetic design characteristics.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    One form of conventional covering is tufted broadloom roll carpet or modular carpet, i.e., carpet tiles or roll tile, hereafter generically referred to as carpet or covering. The terms carpet or covering are meant to embrace carpet applied to a floor, wall or ceiling. A principal and inherent deficiency in a carpet, particularly in commercial facilities, resides in the declining appearance retention of the aesthetic features of the carpet over long periods of use. For example, in commercial facilities, as well as in homes, carpet pile located adjacent doorways or high traffic areas quickly mats down with very noticeable adverse changes in appearance. Another example is conventional carpet used in locations where wheels and/or casters for chairs, carts and other items are frequently used. The appearance of the carpet in such areas degrades rapidly. It will be appreciated that carpet construction made to conventional levels typically sacrifices other desirable attributes such as comfort under foot or sound absorption and oftentimes a lack of aesthetic characteristics. Also, carpet which is over-engineered and over-designed to accommodate those high-use and high-traffic areas is concomitantly over-designed in areas of less traffic and use. For example, by designing a very high density carpet to accommodate high traffic areas by using additional pile, not only is the cost of the carpet substantially increased by the increased cost of the most expensive part of the carpet, i.e., the pile, but also waste disposal becomes a serious problem. Accordingly, there is a need for a carpet which overcomes the foregoing deficiencies and yet provides an aesthetically pleasing appearance at low cost.
  • DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the burden of the wear surface of a tufted carpet constructed in accordance with the present invention is in part transferred to the primary backing surface which carpet pile normally obscures. The primary backing for a tufted pile carpet typically serves as a support for the pile rather than to impart any aesthetics to the carpet. In most carpets, the primary backing is totally obscured by the pile and plays no role in the aesthetic design of the carpet. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, however, a tufted carpet is provided in which the backstitches of the tufts and exposed portions of the primary backing are presented as the wear surface. That is, both the backstitches of the tufts and primary backing portions in selected discrete areas of the carpet, respectively, are exposed as discrete parts of the wear surface. The exposed portions of the primary backing thus also form an aesthetic part of the carpet wear surface in conjunction with other portions of the wear surface of the carpet formed by the backstitches of the tufts exposed on one side of the primary backing. Because significant portions of the carpet wear surface comprise the exposed primary backing, the primary backing is not only provided with aesthetic considerations but is also formed with an ultraviolet stabilizer to alleviate the destructive effect of the sun's ultraviolet rays.
  • [0004]
    The preferred primary backing according to the invention is made of woven polypropylene tape yarns or multi-filament yarns, although other materials of construction, such as nylon or polyester or other polyolefins such as polyethylene may be used. Other yarn forms may also be used and other fabric forms, including warp knitted, weft insertion and non-woven or stitch-bonded may also be used.
  • [0005]
    The carpet hereof is thus characterized in part by the tight, dense and exposed backstitches of the tufts along portions of the wear surface of the primary backing in conjunction with portions of the primary backing which are likewise exposed as wear surfaces and which do not have any tufted yarns therethrough. It will be appreciated that the use of tufted yarns in only portions of the carpet and exposing the remaining portions of the primary backing, i.e., untufted areas, as part of the wear surface has the concomitant benefit of requiring less surface pile material, reduced costs and reduced disposal concerns at the end of the carpet's useful life. Moreover, the resulting carpet has a dense low-profile surface, which retains its textile aesthetics and enables rolling traffic such as beds, chairs, cleaning equipment and the like to move over the carpet without substantial degradation in the appearance of the carpet. The carpet is also much lighter than conventional tufted carpet.
  • [0006]
    To form the carpet hereof, a primary backing is tufted in a conventional manner and at selected areas along the primary backing. Rather than forming cut or continuous loops along the wear surface of the carpet, the tufted primary backing is inverted such that the backstitches of the tufts form portions of the wear surface. A resin is applied to the back side of the primary backing, which now contains either the cut or loop yarns to retain the cut or loop yarns in place on the back side of the primary backing. Thus, all of the cut or loop yarns on the back side of the primary backing are encapsulated by the resin. A hot melt composition is then applied over the resin. Preferably, the hot melt composition comprises a mixture of EVA, calcium carbonate and a resin, a mixture known in the trade as Unibond® backing. Additionally, while the hot melt is still in a liquid or plastic condition, a secondary backing, preferably a woven polypropylene scrim, is applied to the melt composition. The carpet construction is then moved across a chill table to solidify the Unibond® layer. Consequently, the woven polypropylene scrim forms the back side of the carpet which is then applied to the floor surface, for example, by an adhesive.
  • [0007]
    Instead of the secondary backing of woven polypropylene scrim, a needle-bonded synthetic fiber backing may be applied to the resin and Unibond® layer overlying the cut or loop yarn. The needle-bonded synthetic fiber is preferably a mixture of nylon and minor amounts of polypropylene, both of which are preferably recycled fibers from other manufacturing streams. Thus, the needle-bonded nylon and polypropylene fibers are homogenized and applied to the back side of the primary which is saturated with the resin fixing the cut or loop yarns in place. Of course, the needle-bonded nylon and polypropylene can be formed of original nylon and polypropylene without any waste content or mixtures of new and waste nylon and polypropylene fibers may be used. This type of secondary backing affords a dense coherent cushion fabric providing comfort underfoot, acoustic control and thermal insulation.
  • [0008]
    As a further alternative, and in lieu of the woven polypropylene primary backing, a non-woven primary backing, particularly useful for modular carpeting, may be provided. This primary backing may be formed of a mixture of nylon and polyester fibers, cut or chopped, mixed together and passed between a pair of heated rolls to form a flat sheet of the composite structure. The composite sheet may be tufted and provides a more dimensionally stable primary backing than woven polypropylene. This ensures carpet stability, particularly when used for modular carpets. While the non-woven primary backing may be used with either the Unibond® material and woven polypropylene scrim as a secondary backing or the needle-bonded synthetic fiber secondary backing, the non-woven backing is not essential or necessary for use in the manufacture of broadloom carpet. For modular carpeting, however, where high stability is required, the non-woven primary backing formed of the tufted sheet of nylon and polyester fibers may have a secondary backing, including a PVC precoat, to encapsulate the tufted fibers and maintain the tufted fibers in place. A main coat having a heavier PVC content and also a fiberglass stabilizer layer may be added for further stability.
  • [0009]
    In a preferred embodiment according to the present invention, there is provided a covering for a floor, wall or ceiling surface comprising a primary backing in part exposed on one side of the covering for forming discrete wear surface portions of a wear surface of the covering, a plurality of yarns tufted into the primary backing along remaining parts of the primary backing forming cut or loop yarns on a back side of the primary backing remote from the wear surface, leaving a plurality of backstitches of the tufted yarns along and forming remaining portions of the wear surface and a resin fixing the cut or loop pile tufted yarn along the back side of the primary backing, the backstitches and the primary backing portions exposed along the wear surface having aesthetic characteristics distinguished from one another.
  • [0010]
    In a further preferred embodiment according to the present invention, there is provided a covering for a floor, wall or ceiling surface comprising a woven primary backing having tufted and non-tufted portions on one side thereof exposed for forming discrete wear surface portions of a wear surface of the covering, the tufted portions including a plurality of yarns tufted into the primary backing and formed of cut or loop yarns on a back side of the primary backing remote from the wear surface, leaving a plurality of backstitches of the tufted yarns along and forming part of the wear surface and a resin fixing the cut or loop tufted yarns along the back side of the primary backing, the non-tufted portions comprising warp and weft yarns of the primary backing, the tufted and non-tufted portions of the primary backing exposed along the wear surface having aesthetic characteristics distinguished from one another. If desired, a protective coating may be applied to the wear surface side of the primary backing to enhance wear life.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    [0011]FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional view of a covering constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0012]
    [0012]FIGS. 2 and 3 are views similar to FIG. 1 illustrating further embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 4 is a perspective view illustrating the wear surface of a section of a covering constructed in accordance with the present invention; and
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 5 is a plan view of another style of the covering hereof.
  • BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION
  • [0015]
    Referring now to the drawings, particularly to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a covering, generally designated 10, constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. The covering 10 includes a woven polypropylene primary backing 12 which is tufted in a conventional manner by passing textured or untextured continuous filament or spun yarns 14 through the woven backing, forming looped yarns 16 along the underside of the primary backing 12. The tufting process is conventional and any type of fiber may be utilized for the yarn being tufted, for example, a polyester, polyolefin, polylactic acid or nylon, as desired. Moreover, while tufted continuous loop yarns 16 are illustrated on the back side of the primary backing 12, it will be appreciated that the loops or loop yarns 16 may comprise cut pile yarns along the back side of the primary backing 12. For reasons which will become clear, the woven primary backing also has an ultraviolet (UV) stabilizer to protect against the degrading effect of ultraviolet rays. That is, the primary backing is formed preferably of a woven polypropylene with a UV stabilizer added during extrusion of the polypropylene yarn forming the primary backing.
  • [0016]
    A resin 18 is applied along the back side of the primary backing and coats, encapsulates and saturates the loops 16 to lock the loop yarns in place. A Unibond® backing or coating is then applied over the resin-coated, continuous loop yarns 16. The Unibond® coating 20 comprises a mixture of ethylvinyl acetate (EVA), calcium carbonate and a resin. The Unibond® coating is applied as a hot melt composition over the resin 18. While the hot melt is still in a liquid or plastic condition, a secondary backing, preferably a woven polypropylene scrim 22, is applied to the Unibond® coating 20. The carpet construction is then passed over a chill table to set and solidify the Unibond® coating and secure the secondary backing 22 in the carpet construction. The secondary backing 22 provides integrity and dimensional stability to the covering.
  • [0017]
    From a review of FIG. 1, it will be appreciated that the backstitches 28 of the tufted yarns 14 are exposed through the primary backing 12 and form part of the wear surface. Moreover, each backstitch 28 is tufted tightly such that it is in substantial continuous contact with the woven polypropylene primary backing 12 for the entirety of its length exposed through the primary backing 12 on the wear surface.
  • [0018]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, there are illustrated two different styles of covering construction and which are considered representative of a multitude of different styles of covering according to the present invention. A principal aspect of the present invention resides in the use of the primary backing as part of the wear surface of the covering. In FIG. 4, the covering style illustrated comprises a diagonally extending pattern of hexagons formed by the tufted yarns 14. Portions 24 of the primary backing 12 lie exposed on and form part of the wear side of the covering. Backstitches 28 of the tufted yarns 14 form other or remaining parts of the wear surface of the covering. Thus, the non-tufted portions 24 of the primary backing 12 and the tufted portions of the yarns 14, e.g., the backstitches 28, form a complementary pattern along the wear surface of the covering. In this exemplary embodiment, the yarns 14 bound hexagonal areas of the primary backing 12 exposed as part of the wear surface. The tufted yarns 14 in this embodiment may comprise cut or continuous loop yarns. Because the primary backing portions 24 are exposed as part of the wear surface for the covering, the primary backing is exposed to ultraviolet rays. Accordingly, the fibers, film yarns or multi-filaments forming the yarns of the primary backing, preferably polypropylene, are extruded with a UV stabilizer. This precludes degradation of the exposed portions of the primary backing due to sunlight.
  • [0019]
    It will be appreciated that the pattern of the covering illustrated in FIG. 4, i.e., a checkerboard pattern of non-tufted primary backing exposed as part of the wear surface and tufted primary backing with the backstitches exposed as part of the wear surface is illustrative only and that the present invention may be carried forward in a multitude of different styles and pattern constructions with a variety of aesthetic characteristics. For example, as illustrated in FIG. 5, the primary backing 12 b contains a tufted pattern of rows of tufts 14 b separated one from the other by rows of non-tufted primary backing, both exposed as the wear surface of the carpet. While many different patterns can be obtained by tufting portions of the primary backing and omitting tufting on other portions of the primary backing, it will be appreciated that the final result is a covering with portions of the primary backing exposed as part of the wear surface and portions of the primary backing containing yarns tufted into the primary backing with the backstitches of the tufted yarns forming the remaining part of the wear surface. The non-tufted primary backing portion thus forms part of the aesthetics of the covering in conjunction with the exposed backstitches of the tufted portions of the primary backing. Accordingly, the primary backing is preferably colored during its formation or thereafter by dyeing, to afford, in conjunction with preferably differently colored tufting yarns, a pleasing aesthetic appearance. It will also be appreciated that the textures of the wear surface of the covering are considerably different, considering that the non-tufted portions and the backstitches of the tufted portions of the primary backing both form discrete parts of the wear surface.
  • [0020]
    The appearance of the present covering is retained over a long period of usage. Instead of having exposed upstanding pile continuously worn down in high-traffic areas as in conventional tufted carpet, the wear surface of the present covering is provided by the backstitches, which are drawn tightly against the primary backing. Consequently, a very dense pile, with little capability for movement, is afforded. Moreover, with this construction, the textile characteristics of the covering, such as multiple colors and different textures, are retained.
  • [0021]
    To summarize the advantageous characteristics of the covering hereof, the backstitches of the tufted primary backing are presented as a part of the carpet wear surface, together with a carefully designed portion of the primary backing with each having a color, texture and pattern forming aesthetic design elements of the covering. The tight, dense backstitch is presented as a wear surface and is both attractive and functional. Secondly, the effect of the backstitches is to form a low pile. This has the concomitant benefit of requiring less material in the covering with reduced cost and disposal concerns at the end of the product's useful lifetime. Thirdly, the very dense and low-profile surface, while retaining its textile aesthetics, facilitates rolling traffic, with vastly less work expended in moving the traffic and greatly increases lifespan of the rolling traffic, as well as the covering. Additionally, substantial economies are effected in raw material costs in light of the reduced materials utilized in the covering hereof. Moreover, the covering is susceptible of a multitude of different patterns, affording many different colors and textures.
  • [0022]
    To provide an enhanced cushioning effect, and referring to FIG. 2, there is illustrated a woven primary backing 12 tufted with continuous loop yarns 14, which are coated on the underside by a resin 18, similarly as in FIG. 1. In this form, however, a needle-bonded synthetic fibrous and maincoat mat 30 underlies the resin coating 18. The needle-bonded synthetic fibers forming mat 30 may comprise nylon and polypropylene in a cut mixture thereof and mixed with a resin. Preferably, all, none or a proportion of the cut fibers may be formed from waste material from other carpet manufacturing streams.
  • [0023]
    Referring now to FIG. 3, and in lieu of a woven polypropylene primary backing 12, there is provided a non-woven primary backing 40, particularly useful for modular carpeting, i.e., carpet tiles. The non-woven primary backing is preferably formed of a mixture of nylon and polyester fibers. Those fibers are reduced and mixed together and passed between heated rolls to flatten the fibers and form a composite flat sheet structure. The polyester fibers essentially bond the nylon fibers to one another. This sheet may then be tufted, with either the cut or continuous loop yarns 14, to form a highly dimensionally stable primary backing.
  • [0024]
    While it is possible to provide the non-woven primary backing with either the Unibond® material and the woven scrim as a secondary backing or the needle-bonded synthetic fiber backing, the non-woven backing is not necessary for broadloom carpeting. Preferably, and for use in modular carpeting, a PVC backing is provided to the non-woven primary backing. Particularly, a PVC precoat 42 is applied to the tufted yarn loops 14 to trap and lock the loops in place along the underside of the non-woven primary backing 40. A main coat 44 of heavier PVC is then applied, together with a fiberglass stabilizer layer for additional stability.
  • [0025]
    It will be appreciated that in all of the foregoing constructions, the wear surface of the covering comprises non-tufted exposed primary backing and exposed backstitches of tufted yarns formed in an aesthetically pleasing pattern of low, dense fibers where the exposed, non-tufted primary backing forms part of the aesthetic design element for the wear surface. It will also be appreciated that a fabric constructed as described above, but modified, can be used as wall or ceiling covering. The modification would be effected by substituting a compound containing a flame retardant as a backing material in place of the Unibond® backing described above. These types of backing compounds are commonly available. No secondary backing is mandated in this case.
  • [0026]
    While the invention has been described in connection with what is presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the disclosed embodiment, but on the contrary, is intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A covering for a floor, wall or ceiling surface comprising:
    a primary backing in part exposed on one side of the covering for forming discrete wear surface portions of a wear surface of the covering;
    a plurality of yarns tufted into said primary backing along remaining parts of said primary backing forming cut or loop yarns on a back side of said primary backing remote from said wear surface, leaving a plurality of backstitches of the tufted yarns along and forming remaining portions of said wear surface; and
    a resin fixing said cut or loop pile tufted yarn along the back side of said primary backing;
    said backstitches and said primary backing portions exposed along said wear surface having aesthetic characteristics distinguished from one another.
  2. 2. A covering according to claim 1 wherein said primary backing is formed of a woven material having an ultraviolet stabilizer.
  3. 3. A covering according to claim 1 wherein each said backstitch extends between a pair of needled openings along the wear surface extending along and in engagement with the primary backing throughout substantially the entirety of the extent of the backstitch between said openings.
  4. 4. A covering according to claim 1 wherein said backstitches and primary backing portions have different colorings to afford different aesthetic effects.
  5. 5. A covering according to claim 1 including an EVA and calcium carbonate layer underlying the resin.
  6. 6. A covering according to claim 5 including a secondary backing comprising a scrim embedded in the EVA and calcium carbonate layer.
  7. 7. A covering according to claim 6 wherein said scrim comprises a woven polypropylene.
  8. 8. A covering according to claim 1 wherein the tufted yarns are of a continuous loop pile construction.
  9. 9. A covering according to claim 1 wherein the tufted yarns are of a cut loop pile construction.
  10. 10. A covering according to claim 1 wherein said primary backing is formed of a woven material having an ultraviolet stabilizer, said backstitches and primary backing portions having different colorings to afford different aesthetic effects, an EVA and calcium carbonate layer underlying the resin and a secondary backing comprising a scrim embedded in the EVA and calcium carbonate layer.
  11. 11. A covering according to claim 10 wherein said scrim comprises a woven polypropylene, and wherein the tufted yarns are of a continuous loop construction.
  12. 12. A covering according to claim 10 wherein said scrim comprises a woven polypropylene, and wherein the tufted yarns are of a cut loop construction.
  13. 13. A covering according to claim 1 including a secondary backing underlying said resin and secured to said primary backing by said resin, said secondary backing including a needle-bonded synthetic fiber backing.
  14. 14. A covering according to claim 13 wherein said secondary backing includes fibers formed of nylon and polypropylene.
  15. 15. A covering according to claim 1 wherein said primary backing comprises a non-woven material formed of synthetic fibers.
  16. 16. A covering according to claim 15 wherein said non-woven fiber materials comprise nylon and polyester bonded to one another.
  17. 17. A covering according to claim 15 wherein said resin comprises a precoat of polyvinylchloride to fix the cut or loop yarns and a main polyvinylchloride coating having a fiberglass stabilizer underlying the precoat.
  18. 18. A covering according to claim 1 wherein the covering comprises broadloom carpeting.
  19. 19. A covering according to claim 1 wherein the covering comprises modular carpeting.
  20. 20. A covering for a floor, wall or ceiling surface comprising:
    a woven primary backing having tufted and non-tufted portions on one side thereof exposed for forming discrete wear surface portions of a wear surface of the covering;
    said tufted portions including a plurality of yarns tufted into said primary backing and formed of cut or loop yarns on a back side of said primary backing remote from said wear surface, leaving a plurality of backstitches of the tufted yarns along and forming part of said wear surface; and
    a resin fixing said cut or loop tufted yarns along the back side of said primary backing;
    said non-tufted portions comprising warp and weft yarns of said primary backing;
    said tufted and non-tufted portions of said primary backing exposed along said wear surface having aesthetic characteristics distinguished from one another.
US09846781 2001-01-09 2001-05-02 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices Active 2024-09-12 US7546298B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US26022301 true 2001-01-09 2001-01-09
US09846781 US7546298B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2001-05-02 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09846781 US7546298B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2001-05-02 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US11061464 US20060047665A1 (en) 2001-01-09 2005-02-22 System and method for simulating an application for subsequent deployment to a device in communication with a transaction server
US11061890 US20060036941A1 (en) 2001-01-09 2005-02-22 System and method for developing an application for extending access to local software of a wireless device
US12347193 US7941450B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2008-12-31 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US12425642 US20090300578A1 (en) 2001-01-09 2009-04-17 System and Method For Developing An Application For Extending Access to Local Software Of A Wireless Device
US12480266 US7865528B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2009-06-08 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US12973232 US8204911B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2010-12-20 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12038051 Continuation-In-Part US7904468B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2008-02-27 Method and software for facilitating interaction with a personal information manager application at a wireless communication device

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12480266 Continuation-In-Part US7865528B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2009-06-08 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020107580A1 true true US20020107580A1 (en) 2002-08-08
US20030060896A9 true US20030060896A9 (en) 2003-03-27
US7546298B2 US7546298B2 (en) 2009-06-09

Family

ID=26947812

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09846781 Active 2024-09-12 US7546298B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2001-05-02 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US12347193 Active 2022-03-11 US7941450B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2008-12-31 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12347193 Active 2022-03-11 US7941450B2 (en) 2001-01-09 2008-12-31 Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US7546298B2 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1883014A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-01-30 Nextair Corporation Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20080026776A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-01-31 Tim Neil Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20090210824A1 (en) * 2007-02-06 2009-08-20 Panasonic Corporation Content list display apparatus and content list display method
US20100131922A1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2010-05-27 Research In Motion Limited System and method for applying development patterns for component based applications

Families Citing this family (107)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060036941A1 (en) * 2001-01-09 2006-02-16 Tim Neil System and method for developing an application for extending access to local software of a wireless device
US7546298B2 (en) * 2001-01-09 2009-06-09 Nextair Corporation Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US20030041125A1 (en) * 2001-08-16 2003-02-27 Salomon Kirk C. Internet-deployed wireless system
US8307045B1 (en) * 2001-08-22 2012-11-06 Open Text S.A. System and method for creating target-specific data conversion templates using a master style template
US7197744B2 (en) * 2002-04-04 2007-03-27 Honeywell International, Inc. Universal script editor
US6965674B2 (en) * 2002-05-21 2005-11-15 Wavelink Corporation System and method for providing WLAN security through synchronized update and rotation of WEP keys
CA2387328C (en) * 2002-05-24 2012-01-03 Diversinet Corp. Mobile terminal system
US7965842B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2011-06-21 Wavelink Corporation System and method for detecting unauthorized wireless access points
US7316014B2 (en) * 2002-07-12 2008-01-01 Bsquare Corporation Application modification system and method
US7606242B2 (en) * 2002-08-02 2009-10-20 Wavelink Corporation Managed roaming for WLANS
US7522906B2 (en) * 2002-08-09 2009-04-21 Wavelink Corporation Mobile unit configuration management for WLANs
US20080313282A1 (en) 2002-09-10 2008-12-18 Warila Bruce W User interface, operating system and architecture
US8832178B2 (en) 2002-11-06 2014-09-09 Noel William Lovisa Service implementation
US8589861B2 (en) * 2002-11-06 2013-11-19 Code Valley Corp Pty Ltd Code generation
US9521209B2 (en) 2002-11-06 2016-12-13 Code Valley Corp Pty Ltd Code generation
KR100483497B1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2005-04-15 한국전자통신연구원 Parsing system and method of Multi-document based on elements
US7665094B2 (en) * 2002-12-13 2010-02-16 Bea Systems, Inc. Systems and methods for mobile communication
US20040158585A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-08-12 Bea Systems, Inc. System and method for manipulating enterprise application deployment descriptors
JP5068000B2 (en) * 2003-07-31 2012-11-07 富士通株式会社 Information processing method and program in Xml Driven Architecture
WO2005026952A3 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-10-20 Research In Motion Ltd System and method for management of mutating applications
EP1723516A4 (en) * 2004-02-27 2008-03-19 Research In Motion Ltd System and method for building mixed mode execution environment for component applications
EP1571547A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-07 Research In Motion Limited System and method for building wireless applications with intelligent mapping between user interface and data components
US8078731B1 (en) * 2004-05-17 2011-12-13 Webalo, Inc. User proxy server
US7650432B2 (en) * 2004-05-20 2010-01-19 Bea Systems, Inc. Occasionally-connected application server
US20050288044A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for using soap to invoke web services on handheld devices
US8572494B2 (en) * 2004-07-14 2013-10-29 International Business Machines Corporation Framework for development and customization of web services deployment descriptors
EP1851903A4 (en) * 2005-02-22 2008-05-14 Nextair Corp Wireless communication device use of application server applications
EP1851904B1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2011-05-18 Nextair Corporation Facilitating mobile device awareness of the availability of new or updated server-side applications
WO2006089387A1 (en) 2005-02-22 2006-08-31 Nextair Corporation Extending access to local software of a wireless device
CA2598317C (en) * 2005-02-22 2012-01-31 Nextair Corporation Mobile device having extensible software for presenting server-side applications, software and methods
US8224951B2 (en) * 2005-02-22 2012-07-17 Nextair Corporation Determining operational status of a mobile device capable of executing server-side applications
US8855620B2 (en) * 2005-03-01 2014-10-07 Mfoundry, Inc. Systems and methods for application program and application program update deployment to a mobile device
US20060222755A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Conor Medsystems, Inc. System and method for loading a beneficial agent into holes in a medical device
US20060236254A1 (en) * 2005-04-18 2006-10-19 Daniel Mateescu System and method for automated building of component based applications for visualizing complex data structures
US8060554B2 (en) * 2005-04-18 2011-11-15 Research In Motion Limited System and method for enabling asynchronous push-based applications on a wireless device
US7769897B2 (en) * 2005-04-18 2010-08-03 Research In Motion Limited System and method for generating a wireless application from a web service definition
US7751533B2 (en) * 2005-05-02 2010-07-06 Nokia Corporation Dynamic message templates and messaging macros
US8589140B1 (en) 2005-06-10 2013-11-19 Wapp Tech Corp. System and method for emulating and profiling a frame-based application playing on a mobile device
US7813910B1 (en) 2005-06-10 2010-10-12 Thinkvillage-Kiwi, Llc System and method for developing an application playing on a mobile device emulated on a personal computer
EP1816573A9 (en) 2006-02-02 2008-12-24 Nextair Corporation Apparatus, method and machine-readable medium for facilitating generation of a markup language document containing identical sets of markup language elements
US20070258314A1 (en) * 2006-02-09 2007-11-08 Ziep Software Inc. Driving method based on a binary architecture
US7913234B2 (en) * 2006-02-13 2011-03-22 Research In Motion Limited Execution of textually-defined instructions at a wireless communication device
EP1818815A1 (en) 2006-02-13 2007-08-15 Nextair Corporation Execution of textually-defined instructions at a wireless communication device
US7890853B2 (en) 2006-02-13 2011-02-15 Nextair Corporation Apparatus and machine-readable medium for generating markup language representing a derived entity which extends or overrides attributes of a base entity
EP1865422A1 (en) 2006-06-09 2007-12-12 Nextair Corporation Software, methods and apparatus facilitating presentation of a wireless communication device user interface with multi-language support
EP1865680A1 (en) 2006-06-09 2007-12-12 Nextair Corporation Remote storage of a markup language document for access by sets of wireless computing devices
US20070288471A1 (en) * 2006-06-09 2007-12-13 Nextair Corporation Remote storage of a markup language document for access by sets of wireless computing devices
US20070300237A1 (en) * 2006-06-22 2007-12-27 Tim Neil Facilitating access to application data at an application server by a wireless communication device
US7779085B2 (en) * 2006-07-17 2010-08-17 Research In Motion Limited Automatic mobile device configuration
EP1881715B1 (en) * 2006-07-17 2012-08-22 Research In Motion Limited Automatic mobile device configuration
EP1881403A1 (en) * 2006-07-21 2008-01-23 Nextair Corporation Automatic application definition distribution
US7920852B2 (en) * 2006-07-21 2011-04-05 Research In Motion Limited Compression of data transmitted between server and mobile device
EP1881402A1 (en) * 2006-07-21 2008-01-23 Nextair Corporation Compression of data transmitted between server and mobile device
US7805133B2 (en) * 2006-07-21 2010-09-28 Research In Motion Limited Automatic application definition distribution
US7899474B2 (en) * 2006-08-18 2011-03-01 Research In Motion Limited Associating a label with a queued message at a mobile device
KR100772923B1 (en) * 2006-08-23 2007-11-05 한국전자통신연구원 The system and method for executing application of server in mobile device
US20090210631A1 (en) 2006-09-22 2009-08-20 Bea Systems, Inc. Mobile application cache system
US20080313646A1 (en) * 2007-06-15 2008-12-18 Acevedo Jesus R Storage-device discovery protocol
US20090025011A1 (en) * 2007-07-17 2009-01-22 Tim Neil Inter-process communication at a mobile device
US9264483B2 (en) * 2007-07-18 2016-02-16 Hammond Development International, Inc. Method and system for enabling a communication device to remotely execute an application
US8478245B2 (en) 2007-08-01 2013-07-02 Phunware, Inc. Method and system for rendering content on a wireless device
US8103865B2 (en) 2007-08-01 2012-01-24 Phunware, Inc. Server method and system for rendering content on a wireless device
US20090083294A1 (en) * 2007-09-25 2009-03-26 Shudi Gao Efficient xml schema validation mechanism for similar xml documents
US8108426B2 (en) * 2007-09-28 2012-01-31 Xcerion Aktiebolag Application and file system hosting framework
US7979350B1 (en) 2007-10-23 2011-07-12 Gotv Networks, Inc. Method and system for accessing wireless account information
US8060594B1 (en) 2007-10-23 2011-11-15 Phunware, Inc. Client-side wireless communications link support for mobile handheld devices
US9015692B1 (en) 2007-10-23 2015-04-21 Phunware, Inc. Method and system for customizing content on a server for rendering on a wireless device
US8009619B1 (en) 2007-10-23 2011-08-30 Phunware, Inc. Server-side wireless communications link support for mobile handheld devices
US8811968B2 (en) * 2007-11-21 2014-08-19 Mfoundry, Inc. Systems and methods for executing an application on a mobile device
KR101474561B1 (en) * 2007-11-27 2014-12-19 삼성전자주식회사 Mobile application execution method and apparatus in a communication terminal,
EP2096559A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-09-02 Nextair Corporation Method and software for facilitating interaction with a personal information manager application at a wireless communication device
US8271579B2 (en) 2008-04-07 2012-09-18 Phunware, Inc. Server method and system for executing applications on a wireless device
US9110873B2 (en) 2008-06-27 2015-08-18 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Platform-independent data application description language
US8341318B2 (en) 2009-03-16 2012-12-25 Apple Inc. Techniques for facilitating communication between an accessory and a mobile computing device using application specific protocols
WO2011010642A1 (en) * 2009-07-23 2011-01-27 日本電気株式会社 Software output destination processing terminal, system, method, and program for the same
US20110093510A1 (en) * 2009-10-20 2011-04-21 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Methods and systems for serially transmitting records in xml format
US9341843B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2016-05-17 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses with a small scale image source
US9223134B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-12-29 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Optical imperfections in a light transmissive illumination system for see-through near-eye display glasses
US9182596B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-11-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses with the optical assembly including absorptive polarizers or anti-reflective coatings to reduce stray light
US9128281B2 (en) 2010-09-14 2015-09-08 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Eyepiece with uniformly illuminated reflective display
US9134534B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-09-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses including a modular image source
US9097891B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-08-04 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses including an auto-brightness control for the display brightness based on the brightness in the environment
US9229227B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2016-01-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses with a light transmissive wedge shaped illumination system
US9366862B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2016-06-14 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc System and method for delivering content to a group of see-through near eye display eyepieces
US9759917B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2017-09-12 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc AR glasses with event and sensor triggered AR eyepiece interface to external devices
US9097890B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-08-04 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Grating in a light transmissive illumination system for see-through near-eye display glasses
US9091851B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-07-28 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Light control in head mounted displays
US9285589B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2016-03-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc AR glasses with event and sensor triggered control of AR eyepiece applications
US9129295B2 (en) 2010-02-28 2015-09-08 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc See-through near-eye display glasses with a fast response photochromic film system for quick transition from dark to clear
US20120194549A1 (en) * 2010-02-28 2012-08-02 Osterhout Group, Inc. Ar glasses specific user interface based on a connected external device type
CN102906623A (en) 2010-02-28 2013-01-30 奥斯特豪特集团有限公司 Local advertising content on an interactive head-mounted eyepiece
US8990427B2 (en) * 2010-04-13 2015-03-24 Synactive, Inc. Method and apparatus for accessing an enterprise resource planning system via a mobile device
US8732697B2 (en) * 2010-08-04 2014-05-20 Premkumar Jonnala System, method and apparatus for managing applications on a device
US9311158B2 (en) * 2010-09-03 2016-04-12 Adobe Systems Incorporated Determining a work distribution model between a client device and a cloud for an application deployed on the cloud
US9424509B2 (en) * 2011-03-09 2016-08-23 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. System for application personalization for a mobile device
US9104441B2 (en) * 2011-09-30 2015-08-11 Avaya Inc. Context and application aware selectors
US9313100B1 (en) 2011-11-14 2016-04-12 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Remote browsing session management
US9336321B1 (en) 2012-01-26 2016-05-10 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Remote browsing and searching
US8839087B1 (en) 2012-01-26 2014-09-16 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Remote browsing and searching
US9137210B1 (en) * 2012-02-21 2015-09-15 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Remote browsing session management
US8910115B2 (en) 2012-04-02 2014-12-09 Kony Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for application development
US9336252B2 (en) * 2012-11-15 2016-05-10 International Business Machines Corporation Mobile application cache based on extreme scale technology
US9043810B2 (en) 2012-11-27 2015-05-26 Bank Of America Corporation Interfacing between native and web applications utilizing a mobile module
US20140245020A1 (en) * 2013-02-22 2014-08-28 Guardtime Ip Holdings Limited Verification System and Method with Extra Security for Lower-Entropy Input Records
US20140298243A1 (en) * 2013-03-29 2014-10-02 Alcatel-Lucent Usa Inc. Adjustable gui for displaying information from a database
US9578137B1 (en) 2013-06-13 2017-02-21 Amazon Technologies, Inc. System for enhancing script execution performance
US9449346B1 (en) 2014-05-21 2016-09-20 Plaid Technologies, Inc. System and method for programmatically accessing financial data

Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US26447A (en) * 1859-12-13 Attaching spokes of carbiager wheels
US116698A (en) * 1871-07-04 William feeeib
US117439A (en) * 1871-07-25 Improvement in hair-curlers
US198931A (en) * 1878-01-08 Improvement in door-checks
US6067582A (en) * 1996-08-13 2000-05-23 Angel Secure Networks, Inc. System for installing information related to a software application to a remote computer over a network
US6167253A (en) * 1995-01-12 2000-12-26 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Mobile data/message/electronic mail download system utilizing network-centric protocol such as Java
US6292186B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2001-09-18 International Business Machines Corporation Universal information appliance with parser
US20020006124A1 (en) * 2000-01-07 2002-01-17 Ray Jimenez Methods and apparatus for an audio web retrieval telephone system
US6347398B1 (en) * 1996-12-12 2002-02-12 Microsoft Corporation Automatic software downloading from a computer network
US20020026447A1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2002-02-28 Takahide Matsutsuka System for designing and performing web application
US6356905B1 (en) * 1999-03-05 2002-03-12 Accenture Llp System, method and article of manufacture for mobile communication utilizing an interface support framework
US20020112078A1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2002-08-15 David Yach Virtual machine web browser
US6438575B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-08-20 Clickmarks, Inc. System, method, and article of manufacture for wireless enablement of the world wide web using a wireless gateway
US20020116698A1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2002-08-22 Marc Lurie Method for distributing, integrating, and hosting a software platform
US20020160745A1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2002-10-31 Ray Wang Method and system for location-aware wireless mobile devices including mobile user network message interfaces and protocol
US6496979B1 (en) * 1997-10-24 2002-12-17 Microsoft Corporation System and method for managing application installation for a mobile device
US6559773B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2003-05-06 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Reconfigurable display architecture with spontaneous reconfiguration
US6590589B1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2003-07-08 International Business Machines Corporation Automatic generation of fastpath applications
US6609150B2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-08-19 Siebel Systems, Inc. Web client-server system and method for incompatible page markup and presentation languages
US6629284B1 (en) * 1999-10-28 2003-09-30 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. System and method for supervised downloading of broadcast data
US6701521B1 (en) * 2000-05-25 2004-03-02 Palm Source, Inc. Modular configuration and distribution of applications customized for a requestor device
US20040117439A1 (en) * 2001-02-12 2004-06-17 Levett David Lawrence Client software enabling a client to run a network based application
US20050014494A1 (en) * 2001-11-23 2005-01-20 Research In Motion Limited System and method for processing extensible markup language (XML) documents
US20050059426A1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2005-03-17 Ari Aarnio Systems and methods for presenting and/or converting messages
US7010573B1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2006-03-07 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Message gates using a shared transport in a distributed computing environment
US7051080B1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2006-05-23 Oracle International Corporation Techniques for navigating in mobile applications
US7062535B1 (en) * 2000-04-03 2006-06-13 Centerpost Communications, Inc. Individual XML message processing platform
US7191211B2 (en) * 2000-10-03 2007-03-13 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet access device priority protocol

Family Cites Families (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE69634177D1 (en) * 1995-08-30 2005-02-17 Microsoft Corp System and host device for transmitting electronic mail
US6151643A (en) * 1996-06-07 2000-11-21 Networks Associates, Inc. Automatic updating of diverse software products on multiple client computer systems by downloading scanning application to client computer and generating software list on client computer
US6434403B1 (en) 1999-02-19 2002-08-13 Bodycom, Inc. Personal digital assistant with wireless telephone
US6928468B2 (en) 1999-10-29 2005-08-09 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. System for broadcasting software applications and portable data communications device for use in such a system
CA2297711A1 (en) 1999-12-23 2001-06-23 Mobileq.Com Inc. Method and system for building internet-based applications
JP2001306308A (en) 2000-04-11 2001-11-02 Sap Ag Method for defining class of data center application
US6717593B1 (en) * 2000-09-12 2004-04-06 Avaya Technology Corp. Mark-up language implementation of graphical or non-graphical user interfaces
US6925631B2 (en) 2000-12-08 2005-08-02 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method, computer system and computer program product for processing extensible markup language streams
US20060047665A1 (en) * 2001-01-09 2006-03-02 Tim Neil System and method for simulating an application for subsequent deployment to a device in communication with a transaction server
US7546298B2 (en) * 2001-01-09 2009-06-09 Nextair Corporation Software, devices and methods facilitating execution of server-side applications at mobile devices
US20020198931A1 (en) 2001-04-30 2002-12-26 Murren Brian T. Architecture and process for presenting application content to clients
US20030187952A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2003-10-02 Gary Young System and method for formatting information requested by a mobile device
US20030096605A1 (en) * 2001-11-16 2003-05-22 Schlieben Karl J. System for handling proprietary files
US7312473B2 (en) * 2001-12-28 2007-12-25 Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd. Display device and electronic device using the same
US7565647B2 (en) 2002-03-22 2009-07-21 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Markup compiler that outputs MIDlets
US20020181060A1 (en) 2002-05-28 2002-12-05 Chiang-Lung Huang Beamcast (continuous infrared data beaming system)
WO2004092982A3 (en) * 2003-04-07 2005-01-20 Dexterra Inc System and method for context sensitive mobile data and software update
US6946979B1 (en) * 2004-07-01 2005-09-20 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Encoder having electrode pattern with pairs of non-conductive portions and multiple sliders that contact the electrode pattern
US7200390B1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2007-04-03 Cellco Partnership Device software update transport and download
EP1851904B1 (en) 2005-02-22 2011-05-18 Nextair Corporation Facilitating mobile device awareness of the availability of new or updated server-side applications
US8667179B2 (en) * 2005-04-29 2014-03-04 Microsoft Corporation Dynamic utilization of condensing metadata
US7813963B2 (en) * 2005-12-27 2010-10-12 The Pen Interactive electronic desktop action method and system for executing a transaction

Patent Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US26447A (en) * 1859-12-13 Attaching spokes of carbiager wheels
US116698A (en) * 1871-07-04 William feeeib
US117439A (en) * 1871-07-25 Improvement in hair-curlers
US198931A (en) * 1878-01-08 Improvement in door-checks
US6167253A (en) * 1995-01-12 2000-12-26 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Mobile data/message/electronic mail download system utilizing network-centric protocol such as Java
US6067582A (en) * 1996-08-13 2000-05-23 Angel Secure Networks, Inc. System for installing information related to a software application to a remote computer over a network
US6347398B1 (en) * 1996-12-12 2002-02-12 Microsoft Corporation Automatic software downloading from a computer network
US6496979B1 (en) * 1997-10-24 2002-12-17 Microsoft Corporation System and method for managing application installation for a mobile device
US6292186B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2001-09-18 International Business Machines Corporation Universal information appliance with parser
US6590589B1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2003-07-08 International Business Machines Corporation Automatic generation of fastpath applications
US6356905B1 (en) * 1999-03-05 2002-03-12 Accenture Llp System, method and article of manufacture for mobile communication utilizing an interface support framework
US6629284B1 (en) * 1999-10-28 2003-09-30 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. System and method for supervised downloading of broadcast data
US20020112078A1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2002-08-15 David Yach Virtual machine web browser
US6559773B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2003-05-06 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Reconfigurable display architecture with spontaneous reconfiguration
US20020006124A1 (en) * 2000-01-07 2002-01-17 Ray Jimenez Methods and apparatus for an audio web retrieval telephone system
US6609150B2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-08-19 Siebel Systems, Inc. Web client-server system and method for incompatible page markup and presentation languages
US7062535B1 (en) * 2000-04-03 2006-06-13 Centerpost Communications, Inc. Individual XML message processing platform
US20020116698A1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2002-08-22 Marc Lurie Method for distributing, integrating, and hosting a software platform
US7010573B1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2006-03-07 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Message gates using a shared transport in a distributed computing environment
US6701521B1 (en) * 2000-05-25 2004-03-02 Palm Source, Inc. Modular configuration and distribution of applications customized for a requestor device
US20050059426A1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2005-03-17 Ari Aarnio Systems and methods for presenting and/or converting messages
US6438575B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-08-20 Clickmarks, Inc. System, method, and article of manufacture for wireless enablement of the world wide web using a wireless gateway
US20020160745A1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2002-10-31 Ray Wang Method and system for location-aware wireless mobile devices including mobile user network message interfaces and protocol
US7051080B1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2006-05-23 Oracle International Corporation Techniques for navigating in mobile applications
US20020026447A1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2002-02-28 Takahide Matsutsuka System for designing and performing web application
US7191211B2 (en) * 2000-10-03 2007-03-13 Raja Tuli Portable high speed internet access device priority protocol
US20040117439A1 (en) * 2001-02-12 2004-06-17 Levett David Lawrence Client software enabling a client to run a network based application
US20050014494A1 (en) * 2001-11-23 2005-01-20 Research In Motion Limited System and method for processing extensible markup language (XML) documents

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8132149B2 (en) * 2005-03-14 2012-03-06 Research In Motion Limited System and method for applying development patterns for component based applications
US20100131922A1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2010-05-27 Research In Motion Limited System and method for applying development patterns for component based applications
EP1883014A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-01-30 Nextair Corporation Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20080026776A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-01-31 Tim Neil Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US7623877B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2009-11-24 Research In Motion Limited Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20100069104A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2010-03-18 Tim Neil Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US7764970B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2010-07-27 Research In Motion Limited Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20110021218A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2011-01-27 Tim Neil Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US8185141B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2012-05-22 Research In Motion Limited Limited lifespan for outgoing data at a mobile device
US20090210824A1 (en) * 2007-02-06 2009-08-20 Panasonic Corporation Content list display apparatus and content list display method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US7546298B2 (en) 2009-06-09 grant
US20090177663A1 (en) 2009-07-09 application
US7941450B2 (en) 2011-05-10 grant
US20030060896A9 (en) 2003-03-27 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3325323A (en) Tufting through a porous backing which is subsequently fused
US3528874A (en) Heat-insulating fabric and method of preparing it
US4342802A (en) Floor covering of needled woven fabric and nonwoven batt
US20080075915A1 (en) Composite Pad of Fiber and Foam and Related Process
US4647484A (en) Carpet underlay
US4426415A (en) Tufted carpeting, especially artificial turf, with tufts stitched through multiple layers of pre-woven backing material of differing gauge
US5683780A (en) Modular carpet tile mat construction and process of making same
US20030041808A1 (en) Odor absorbing animal bed and method
US5436064A (en) Stiff fabric composite
US6854146B2 (en) Method for producing digitally designed carpet
US3654051A (en) Carpet tile
US4307145A (en) Decorative fabric and method of making the same
US20050281963A1 (en) Transition synthetic sports turf
US3142611A (en) Non-woven pile fabrics and methods of their manufacture
US5962101A (en) Dimensionally stable tufted carpet
US5494723A (en) Tufting carpet
US5887416A (en) Rental mat
US5171619A (en) Floor mat and process of forming the same
US20040170799A1 (en) Heat-insulating material and method of making the same
US5536551A (en) Method for binding tufts
US6866912B2 (en) Textile constructions with stabilized primary backings and related methods
US3583890A (en) Underlay for rugs or mats to be placed on a carpet with a deep pile
US20070275207A1 (en) Carpet tile and related methods
US5567497A (en) Skid-resistant floor covering and method of making same
US20020046433A1 (en) Patterned bonded carpet and method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: NEXTAIR CORPORATION, CANADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HULAJ, STEVEN;NEIL, TIM;REEL/FRAME:012279/0875

Effective date: 20010501

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED, ONTARIO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEXTAIR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:029873/0155

Effective date: 20130222

SULP Surcharge for late payment
AS Assignment

Owner name: BLACKBERRY LIMITED, ONTARIO

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:034179/0923

Effective date: 20130709

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8