US20020094432A1 - Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material and a process for the production of composite materials for vehicle interior trim - Google Patents

Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material and a process for the production of composite materials for vehicle interior trim Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020094432A1
US20020094432A1 US09/513,089 US51308900A US2002094432A1 US 20020094432 A1 US20020094432 A1 US 20020094432A1 US 51308900 A US51308900 A US 51308900A US 2002094432 A1 US2002094432 A1 US 2002094432A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
weight
foamed material
molecular weight
polyester
polyurethane
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US09/513,089
Inventor
Klaus-Peter Herzog
Gunther Baatz
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Bayer AG
Original Assignee
Bayer AG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to DE19909978.2 priority Critical
Priority to DE1999109978 priority patent/DE19909978A1/en
Application filed by Bayer AG filed Critical Bayer AG
Assigned to BAYER AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT reassignment BAYER AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BAATZ, GUNTHER, HERZOG, KLAUS-PETER
Publication of US20020094432A1 publication Critical patent/US20020094432A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08GMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED OTHERWISE THAN BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING UNSATURATED CARBON-TO-CARBON BONDS
    • C08G18/00Polymeric products of isocyanates or isothiocyanates
    • C08G18/06Polymeric products of isocyanates or isothiocyanates with compounds having active hydrogen
    • C08G18/28Polymeric products of isocyanates or isothiocyanates with compounds having active hydrogen characterised by the compounds used containing active hydrogen
    • C08G18/40High-molecular-weight compounds
    • C08G18/4009Two or more macromolecular compounds not provided for in one single group of groups C08G18/42 - C08G18/64
    • C08G18/4018Mixtures of compounds of group C08G18/42 with compounds of group C08G18/48
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/12Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin next to a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08GMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED OTHERWISE THAN BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING UNSATURATED CARBON-TO-CARBON BONDS
    • C08G2101/00Foams
    • C08G2101/0008Foams flexible
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08GMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED OTHERWISE THAN BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING UNSATURATED CARBON-TO-CARBON BONDS
    • C08G2101/00Foams
    • C08G2101/0083Foams prepared using water as the sole blowing agent
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08GMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED OTHERWISE THAN BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING UNSATURATED CARBON-TO-CARBON BONDS
    • C08G2290/00Compositions for creating anti-fogging
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/249921Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component
    • Y10T428/249953Composite having voids in a component [e.g., porous, cellular, etc.]
    • Y10T428/249987With nonvoid component of specified composition
    • Y10T428/24999Inorganic
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/647Including a foamed layer or component
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/659Including an additional nonwoven fabric

Abstract

Composites comprising a polyurethane core and an outer facing layer are described in the present invention. Suitable polyurethane cores are hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed materials which comprise the reaction product of:
(a) at least one polyisocyanate, with
(b) at least one polyester polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups and having an average molecular weight within the range from more than 700 to 10,000, and
(c) at least one ethoxylated polyether polyol, containing at least two hydroxyl groups, having a molecular weight of at more than 700, a functionality of from 2 to 6, and having a degree of ethoxylation greater than 30% by weight, and
(d) optionally, at least one compound containing at least two active hydrogen atoms and having an average molecular weight within the range from 32 to 700, and
(e) catalysts, water and/or foaming agents, and
(f) optionally, adjuvant substances and additives. The present invention also relates to process for the production of these composite materials, and to the use of these composite materials for vehicle interior trim.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention describes composites comprising a polyurethane foam core and an outer layer of a textile material. Suitable polyurethane foam cores for the composite materials of the present invention comprise hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foam materials. These composite materials can be used for the production of vehicle interior trim parts. [0001]
  • One important application of polyester-polyurethane foamed materials is the splitting of long blocks of block foamed material to form strip material, followed by further processing to produce composite materials suitable for use as interior trim parts in vehicles after lamination with textiles or sheeting materials. [0002]
  • Composite materials for vehicle trim are understood to mean textile-laminated PUR foamed materials such as, for example, seat or seat back upholstered supports. [0003]
  • It is predominantly textile-laminated strip material which forms the uppermost layer of upholstery in these areas. The textile-laminated strip material, after being cut and sewn to the seat or seat back support, is converted to the finished fitted part by upholstering it (mostly by hand hitherto) to the rest of the seat or seat back construction. [0004]
  • In addition to upholstering by hand, there is also a technique for the foam-backing of prefabricated seat and seat back supports or of other upholstery parts, such as, for example, head rests or arm rests, in a foam mold using a costly processing technique. [0005]
  • However, apart from manufacturing advantages, this results in specific disadvantages for parts “enveloped” by the climatic environment of the seat, such as, for example, seat and seat back supports. This is due to the lamination of vacuum-tight sheeting, which thus mostly exerts a diffusion-inhibiting effect, on to the back of textile-laminated strip material; but which is necessary due to the production technique employed. Alternatively, this technique results at least in the use of strip material which is particularly impermeable to air for the lamination operation. [0006]
  • If the strip material which is used according to the invention is of sufficient thickness, this disadvantage can also be compensated for, at least in part, by the moisture absorption behavior of the layer of foamed material which remains in the sandwich lamination (i.e., from the top side of the textile to the underside of the sheeting). [0007]
  • In sandwich laminations for customary upholstering by hand, however, the back of the strip is simply laminated to a wide-meshed knitted fabric which facilitates diffusion. [0008]
  • Apart from adhesive lamination, flame-lamination is a technique which has proved to be a particularly inexpensive. Flame lamination is, however, an efficient technique for joining strip materials made of flexible foamed materials to textiles and sheeting. [0009]
  • In a flame-lamination technique, foamed material strips are joined to textile strip material, in a continuous process at, for example, operating speeds within the range from 15 to 40 m/minute. This process comprises melting the surface of the foamed material by flaming (i.e., burning) it with a gas flame burner bar immediately before the textile strip is supplied. In addition to melting processes on the PUR matrix, decomposition reactions also occur on the surface. Immediately after being brought together, the textile and foamed material strips are pressed together by, for example, being passed between pairs of rotating rollers of the flame-laminating installation. After pressing, the melt which is formed on the surface of the foamed material has to form a relatively continuous bond. [0010]
  • Previously, these requirements have been fulfilled significantly better by ester-PUR foamed materials than by ether-PUR foamed materials, since during the laminating process the ether-PUR foamed materials form a melt which is considerably less viscous. Additionally, in comparison to ester-PUR foamed materials, the said melt shows a delayed viscosity build-up on cooling, which causes distinctly lower bond strength in the lamination process. [0011]
  • However, ether-PUR foamed materials possess properties which, in practice, make them highly suitable for use as upholstery materials. These include, for example, a significantly higher permeability to air at a comparable bulk density, and a considerably higher level of elasticity. [0012]
  • Ester-PUR foamed materials have a comparatively pronounced thermoplastic character, thus improving their capacity for flame-laminating. In addition, ester-PUR foamed materials with sufficiently open cell structure exhibit appreciable moisture absorption properties, and enable an improved seat climate, and thus, are expected to result in an increased level of seat comfort in one or the other upholstery situation. [0013]
  • Like polyester-PUR flexible foamed materials, polyether-PUR flexible foamed materials are preferably produced in a single-stage (“one shot”) process. Details of the chemistry and process technology are given, for example, in the Kunststoff-Handbuch, Volume VII, Carl Hanser-Verlag Munich/Vienna, 3rd Edition (1993), on pages 193-220. This process results in block foamed materials (for further processing) which exhibit unsatisfactory hydrophilic properties, even when they are mainly of an open-cell character. Therefore, there have been numerous attempts aimed at improving this behavior by post-treating the foamed material matrix or by foaming it in conjunction with various different types of additives (see, for example, DE-A 2,207,356 and DE-A 2,207,361). These attempts have only achieved moderate success at considerable cost. [0014]
  • The object of the present invention was thus to provide polyurethane foamed materials which exhibit good hydrophilic properties and which are suitable for the production of composite materials which are particularly suitable for vehicle interior trim. [0015]
  • It has surprisingly been found that polyester-PUR foamed materials, which have been produced by replacing part of the polyester polyols in the formulations by polyether polyols which have a degree of ethoxylation greater than 30% by weight, achieve this object particularly well. [0016]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a composite comprising a polyurethane core and at least one outer layer wherein the polyurethane core comprises hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed materials. Suitable polyester-polyurethane foams materials comprise the reaction product of: [0017]
  • (a) at least one polyisocyanate, with [0018]
  • (b) at least one polyester polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups and having an average molecular weight of more than 700 to 10,000, [0019]
  • (c) at least one ethoxylated polyether polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups, having a molecular weight of more than 700 and a functionality of from 2 to 6, and having a degree of ethoxylation greater than 30% by weight, based on 100% by weight of alkoxylation, and [0020]
  • (d) optionally, at least one compound containing at least two active hydrogen atoms and having an average molecular weight within the range of from 32 to 700, and [0021]
  • (e) catalysts, water and/or foaming agents, and optionally, adjuvant substances and additives. [0022]
  • These composite materials are particularly suitable to be used as vehicle interior trim. [0023]
  • The present invention also relates to a process for the production of these composite materials, and particularly to a continuous process for the production of a flame-laminated composite of textile and foamed material. [0024]
  • The degree of ethoxylation of the polyether polyols which are used is usually greater than 30% by weight, and is preferably between 50 and 95% by weight. Trimethylolpropane derived polyether polyols, and/or polyether polyols which are derived from glycerol, preferably highly ethoxylated polyether polyols which are derived from glycerol, are usually employed (e.g. VP PU41WB01, a trifunctional polyether polyol commercially available from Bayer AG). [0025]
  • The content of highly ethoxylated polyether polyols present in the polyol mixture is usually between 2 and 50% by weight, based on the combined weight of components b), c) and d). [0026]
  • Suitable polyester polyols can be produced by the condensation reaction of organic dicarboxylic acids, which contain 2 to 12 carbon atoms, and polyhydric alcohols. [0027]
  • Succinic acid, glutaric acid or adipic acid, or corresponding mixtures of dicarboxylic acids, are preferably used as the organic dicarboxylic acids. [0028]
  • Araliphatic dicarboxylic acids such as, for example, ortho- or terephthalic acid, or unsaturated carboxylic acids such as, for example, maleic and fumaric acid, can also be used. [0029]
  • When polyhydric alcohols are used as condensation reactants in the preparation of polyester polyols, they generally also contain from 2 to 12 carbon atoms. [0030]
  • Dihydric (glycol) reactants from the series ranging from ethylene glycol to 1,6-hexanediol are particularly preferred as polyhydric alcohols in the present invention. Diethylene glycol or dipropylene glycol are more preferred. [0031]
  • Small amounts of glycerol, trimethylol propane or homologues of higher functionality are often used in conjunction as polyhydric alcohol components of higher functionality which have a branching effect. [0032]
  • Polyester polyols prepared from adipic acid and diethylene glycol and 2 to 3 wt % of trimethylol propane as a branching agents (e.g. VP PU60WB01 or VP PU 60WB02, commercially available from Bayer AG), or other low-fogging formulations are preferably used. [0033]
  • Highly ethoxylated polyether polyols of higher functionality can also be used instead of highly ethoxylated polyether diols (difunctional) or highly ethoxylated triols, e.g. polyether polyols based on glycerine (such as VP PU41 WB01 of Bayer AG), and analogous products. [0034]
  • The stabilizers which are typically used are modern silicone stabilizers which result in a fine-celled foamed material structure which is as open-celled as possible. Examples of such stabilizers include compounds based on polydimethylsiloxane (e.g. VP Al 3613 or VP Al 3614 of Bayer AG, or B 8300 and B 8301 of Goldschmidt AG). [0035]
  • The proportion of highly ethoxylated polyether polyols in the polyol mixture for the composites of the present invention typically ranges between about 2 and 50%, based on the combined weight of component b), c) and d). [0036]
  • The functionality of the ethoxylated polyether polyols, as determined by the starter molecule, is usually between 2 and 6. Trifunctional components are particularly preferred. [0037]
  • Due to the possibility of mixing different types of polyester polyols for the foaming operation, the important and desired properties of the resultant foamed materials can be adjusted to suit the intended application. [0038]
  • Thus, the requirements of DIN 75201 (low fogging norm for interior trim parts) can be fulfilled without problems by the use of polyester polyols of a low-fogging formulation such as polyester polyols characterized by an OH number of 60 or 52, respectively, which are the reaction product of adipic acid and diethylene glycol and trimethylol propane as the branching component and have been processed by short-path distillation to remove volatile constituents such as cyclic diethylene glycol esters (e.g. VP PU 60WB01 or VP PU 60WB02 of Bayer AG). [0039]
  • When comparing a polyol comprising 3 wt % of trimethylolpropane (VP PU 60WB01) with a polyol comprising 2 wt % of trimethylol propane (VP PU 60WB02), the latter additionally provides the higher level of properties of “textile ester foamed materials”. This difference means that the properties of the resultant foams correspond approximately to the property spectrum of foamed materials which are based on commercially available polyester polyols of a comparable structure but which give rise to fogging in the resultant foams (e.g. DE 2300 and DE 2200 of Bayer AG). [0040]
  • In order to further reduce the contribution to fogging, the substances which are used to catalyze the foaming reaction, apart from the customary amine components (see the Kunststoff-Handbuch, Volume VII, Carl Hanser-Verlag, Munich/Vienna, 3rd Edition (1993), pages 104-107 and page 219) can predominantly comprise those which contribute little to the odor or fogging of the resultant foamed materials. These include, for example, various compounds as described below. [0041]
  • Dimethylpiperazine, bis-(dimethylaminoethyl) ether (available as either Niax A 30 supplied by OSI, or as Dabco BL 11 supplied by Air Products; each of which are in the form of preparations), or dimethyl-ethanolamine and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-hydroxyethyl-bisaminoethyl ether (available as Desmorapid KE 9645 supplied by Rhein-Chemie) are set forth as examples which can be incorporated into the foam formulation. Another example is 1,2-dimethylimidazole (available as Dabco 2039 supplied by Air Products), or different types of mixtures of amines or urea/amine combinations such as these. [0042]
  • Other adjuvant substances and additives are optionally added in order to influence other properties. Examples thereof include flame retardants, emulsifiers, dispersing agents, adjuvant substances to improve the ease of punching out the material, or antioxidants to prevent discoloration of the core. [0043]
  • The foamed materials can be produced with bulk densities within the range of from about 20 to 80 kg/m[0044] 3, which is customary for polyester-PUR foamed materials. By also using additional foaming agents, such as, for example, by means of liquid carbon dioxide (e.g. by employing the NovaFlex technique (Hennecke/Bayer AG) and/or related processes, or by employing a reduced pressure technique or analogous techniques), the range of uses and the possibilities of use can be widened correspondingly. The density of the foamed material preferably falls within the range of the specifications of the automobile industry, namely from about 25 to about 45 kg/m3. Since on the one hand the water absorption capacity increases with increasing bulk density, and on the other hand the wetting capacity (i.e., the accessible internal surface of the foamed material) depends on the extent of open-cell character of the foamed material which is achieved, and the latter normally decreases with increasing bulk density, the range of bulk density of from 30 to 40 kg/m3 is particularly preferred.
  • The foamed materials which are used in accordance with the present invention exhibit hydrophilic properties. They are capable of absorbing 10 times the amount of water, with respect to the weight of foamed material, within 20 to 25 seconds. When the dry foamed materials (i.e., foamed materials comprising a proportion of polyether polyol of from about 10% by weight in the polyol mixture) are placed on the surface of water, the foamed material sample sinks within seconds. [0045]
  • This occurs without swelling of the foamed material matrix, up to a content of about 30% by weight of these special polyether polyols (i.e., highly ethoxylated) as described above in the polyol mixture. This is definitely desirable for some applications. [0046]
  • A higher proportion of the highly ethoxylated polyether polyol results, in addition, in appreciable swelling of the foamed material matrix. [0047]
  • As strip material, the PUR foamed materials can be used for the production of foamed material-textile composite materials which are manufactured in the form of sandwich laminates, by adhesive or flame lamination. The polyester-PUR foamed materials are preferably used for the production of flame-laminated textile composite materials. [0048]
  • The addition of short-chain, generally linear glycols, or the addition of phosphorus-containing organic compounds, which impart a satisfactory level of initial and final strength to the material bond, has proved to be particularly advantageous when the materials according to the invention are used in a flame-laminating operation. Some examples of suitable additives of this type include, but are not limited to, aliphatic diols of the general formula HO—(R—CH)[0049] n—OH, wherein n can be an integer within the range from 2 to 15 and R can be an alkyl or alkoxy group, as well as oligomeric polyoxypropylene glycols, polyoxyethylene glycols, propoxylation and ethoxylation products of polyhydric alcohols, or aliphatic and aromatic polyester glycols with molecular weights ranging from about 32 to 700, or OH-functional esters of phosphoric or phosphorous acid (such as Levagard 4090 N of Bayer AG, or Weston 430, commercially available from General Electric Spec. Chemicals).
  • The following substances can be used as polyisocyanates for the production of the polyester-PUR foamed materials: [0050]
  • Aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, araliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic polyisocyanates such as those described by W. Siefken in Justus Liebig Annalen der Chemie, 562, pages 75 to 136, including, for example, those corresponding to the general formula: [0051]
  • Q(NCO)n,
  • wherein: [0052]
  • n represents an integer of from 2 to 4, preferably 2 to 3, and [0053]
  • Q represents an aliphatic hydrocarbon radical containing 2 to 18 carbon atoms, preferably 6 to 10 carbon atoms, a cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon radical containing 4 to 15 carbon atoms, preferably 5 to 10 carbon atoms, an aromatic hydrocarbon radical containing 6 to 15 carbon atoms, preferably 6 to 13 carbon atoms, or an araliphatic hydrocarbon radical containing 8 to 15 carbon atoms, preferably 8 to 13 carbon atoms. [0054]
  • Examples of such suitable polyisocyanates include those which are described in, for example, DE-OS 2,832,253, pages 10 to 11. [0055]
  • In general, the polyisocyanates which are particularly preferred are those which are readily accessible industrially, e.g., 2,4- and/or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and any mixtures of these isomers (“TDI”), polyphenylpoly-methylene polyisocyanates such as those which are produced by aniline-formaldehyde condensation and subsequent phosgenation (“MDI”), and polyisocyanates which comprise carbodiimide groups, urethane groups, allophanate groups, isocyanurate groups, urea groups or biuret groups (modified polyisocyanates), particularly those modified polyisocyanates which are derived from 2,4- and/or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate or from 4,4′-and/or 2,4′-diphenylmethane diisocyanate. [0056]
  • The mixtures of TDI isomers T 80 and T 65 which are usually employed, and mixtures thereof, are particularly preferred. [0057]
  • Due to the option of varying the admixture of highly ethoxylated polyether polyols within wide limits, and due to the possibility of using different types of polyester polyols for the foaming operation, the properties of the foamed materials can easily be adjusted to achieve the desired values. [0058]
  • Thus, even admixing 5% of a polyether polyol which comprises a high degree of ethoxylation is sufficient to achieve a significant increase in the water absorption capacity of the resultant foamed material. On the other hand, such a low level of polyether polyol means that polyester-PUR foamed materials are produced for which the initial level of properties is substantially retained. [0059]
  • The invention is explained in greater detail by the following examples. The numerical data in the formulations should be understood as meaning parts by weight with respect to 100 parts by weight of polyol. The invention is further illustrated but is not intended to be limited by the following examples in which all parts and percentages are by weight unless otherwise specified. [0060]
  • EXAMPLES
  • Production of foamed materials: [0061]
  • The reaction components were reacted by known, customary methods, wherein motor-driven devices were usually employed. [0062]
  • Details of the processing conditions which are suitable according to the invention are described in, for example, the Kunststoff-Handbuch, Volume VII, Carl Hanser-Verlag, Munich/Vienna, 3rd Edition, 1993, on pages 193-220. [0063]
  • The following components were used in the examples of this invention: [0064]
    Polyol A: a low fogging polyester polyol prepared from adipic acid,
    diethylene glycol and 3 wt % of trimethylol propane,
    having an OH number of 60 (VP PU 60WB01 of Bayer
    AG);
    Polyol B: a trifunctional polyether polyol based on glycerine and
    having an OH number of 37 and a degree of ethoxylation
    of at least 70% by weight (VP PU 41WB01 of Bayer
    AG);
    Polyol C: an ethoxylated bisphenol A having an OH number of
    about 270 to about 285 (commercially available as
    Dianol 240/1 from Akzo-Chemie);
    Polyol D: a low fogging polyester polyol prepared from adipic acid,
    diethylene glycol and 2 wt % of trimethylol propane
    having an OH number of 52 (VP PU 60WB01 of Bayer
    AG);
    Polyol E: a difunctional polyether polyol based on propylene glycol
    and having an OH number of 57 and a degree of
    ethoxylation of at least about 49% by weight;
    Polyol F: a short-chain aromatic polyester polyol having an OH
    number of between about 300 and 330 (Stepanpol PS
    3152 of Stepan, Illinois/USA);
    Additive A: tris(dipropylene glycol) phosphite, a phosphorus-
    containing additive having an OH number of about 395
    (Weston 430 of General Electric Spec. Chem.);
    Stabilizer A: a silicone stabilizer based on polydimethylsiloxane (VP
    AI 3613 of Bayer AG);
    Stabilizer B: a silicone stabilizer based on polydimethylsiloxane
    (B8301 of Th. Goldschmidt AG)
    Catalyst A: an amine catalyst (Niax A 30 of OSI)
    Catalyst B: an amine catalyst (RC-A-117 of Rhein Chemie)
    Isocyanate A: an isomeric mixture of 2,4-toluene dilsocyanate and
    2,6-toluene dilsocyanate in a weight ratio of 80:20
    Isocyanate B: an isomeric mixture of 2,4-toluene diisocyanate and
    2,6-toluene diisocyanate in a weight ratio of 65:35
  • The components were intensively mixed with one another in accordance with the given formulations, and were reacted. [0065]
    EXAMPLE 1
    Polyol A: 90 parts by weight
    Polyol B: 10 parts by weight
    Water 3.0 parts by weight
    Stabilizer A: 1.5 parts by weight
    Catalyst A: 0.2 parts by weight
    Catalyst B: 0.2 parts by weight
    Isocyanate A: 19.0 parts by weight
    Isocyanate B: 19.0 parts by weight
  • Flame lamination on a lab scale flame laminator of a 7 mm strip of the foamed material produced from the above described formulation in Example 1 with polyester textile sheeting (of automobile quality) resulted in peeling strength values, according to DIN 53 357, of 9 to 11 N/5 cm after 24 hours. [0066]
    EXAMPLE 2
    Polyol A: 85 parts by weight
    Polyol B: 10 parts by weight
    Polyol C: 5 parts by weight
    Water: 3 parts by weight
    Catalyst A: 0.2 parts by weight
    Catalyst B: 0.2 parts by weight
    Stabilizer A: 1.5 parts by weight
    Isocyanate A: 19.7 parts by weight
    Isocyanate B: 19.7 parts by weight
  • Flame lamination on a lab scale flame laminator of a 7 mm strip of the foamed material produced from the formulation described above in Example 2 with polyester textile sheeting (of automobile quality) resulted in peeling strength values (in accordance with DIN 53 357) of 13 to 15 N/5 cm after 24 hours. [0067]
  • Examples 3 to 6 [0068]
  • In Examples 3-6, foams were prepared from the formulations set forth in Table 1 below. [0069]
    TABLE 1
    Formulation Example 3 Example 4 Example 5 Example 6
    Polyol D (pbw) 80 80 80 60
    Polyol B (pbw) 35
    Polyol E (pbw) 20 15 15
    Additive A (pbw) 5 5
    Polyol F (pbw) 5
    Water 3 3 3 3
    Stabilizer A (pbw) 1.5 1.5 1.5
    Stabilizer B (pbw) 1.5
    Catalyst A (pbw) 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
    Catalyst B (pbw) 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
    Isocyanate A (pbw) 18.5 19.4 19.8 12.9
    Isocyanate B (pbw) 18.5 19.4 19.8 25.8
  • Determination of hydrophilic character: [0070]
  • In order to determine their hydrophilic character, each of the foamed materials produced in Examples 1-6 as described above were tested against a standard ester foamed material of a low-fogging formulation, in a simulation test which was specific to the application. The formulation of this standard foamed material was as follows: [0071]
    Standard Foam:
    Polyol D: 100 parts by weight
    Water: 3.0 parts by weight
    Stabilizer A: 1.0 parts by weight
    Catalyst A: 0.2 parts by weight
    Catalyst B: 0.2 parts by weight
    Isocyanate A: 18.4 parts by weight
    Isocyanate B: 18.4 parts by weight
  • The tests were performed as follows: [0072]
  • 1. The dry foamed materials were placed on the surface of water. Each of the foamed materials produced in Examples 1 to 6 sank completely within 25 seconds, in accordance with their hydrophilic character. By comparison, when the dry standard foam material was placed on the surface of the water, it floated on the surface for more than 1 hour. However, when moist foamed materials from which the water had substantially been removed were placed on the surface of the water, the hydrophilic foamed materials of Examples 1-6 sank within 2 seconds. By comparison, the standard foamed material again floated on the surface of the water for more than 1 hour. [0073]
  • 2. Water was deposited on a dry foamed material surface by means of a wash-bottle. The foamed materials produced by the formulations in Examples 1-6 above (i.e., in accordance with the invention), which were of a hydrophilic formulation, absorbed the water directly by suction. By comparison, when water was deposited on the dry surface of the standard foamed material, the water drops remained on the surface as spheres, namely in the form in which they were deposited. [0074]
  • Although the invention has been described in detail in the foregoing for the purpose of illustration, it is to be understood that such detail is solely for that purpose and that variations can be made therein by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention except as it may be limited by the claims. [0075]

Claims (7)

What is claimed is:
1. A composite comprising a polyurethane core and at least one outer layer in which
(1) the polyurethane core is hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed materials, comprising the reaction product of
(a) at least one polyisocyanate, with
(b) at least one polyester polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups and having an average molecular weight in the range of from more than 700 to 10,000,
(c) at least one ethoxylated polyether polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups, having a molecular weight of more than 700, a functionality of from 2 to 6, and a degree of ethoxylation greater than 30% by weight, and
(d) optionally, at least one compound containing at least two active hydrogen atoms and having an average molecular weight within the range from 32 to 700, and
(e) catalysts, water and/or foaming agents, and
(f) optionally, adjuvant substances and additives.
2. The composite of claim 1, wherein component (c) the ethoxylated polyether polyol has a degree of ethoxylation of between 50 and 95% by weight.
3. The composite of claim 1, wherein component (c) the ethoxylated polyether polyol is present in an amount of from 2 to 50% by weight, based on the combined weights of components (b), (c) and (d).
4. The composite of claim 1, wherein the hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material additionally comprises additives comprising at least one phosphorus-containing compound.
5. A continuous process for the production of a flame-laminated textile foamed material composite comprising
(1) melting the surface of a foamed material by flaming with a gas flame burner bar,
(2) applying a textile strip material onto the melted surface of the foamed material, and
(3) pressing the combined textile strip material and foamed material together to form a continuous bond between the melt formed on the surface of the foamed material and the textile strip material, wherein the foamed material comprises a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foam comprising the reaction product of:
(a) at least one polyisocyanate, with
(b) at least one polyester polyol containing at least two hydroxyl groups and having an average molecular weight in the range of from more than 700 to 10,000,
(c) at least one ethoxylated polyether polyol which contains at least two hydroxyl groups, has a molecular weight of more than 700, a functionality of from 2 to 6, and which has a degree of ethoxylation greater than 30% by weight, and
(d) optionally, at least one compound containing at least two active hydrogen atoms and having an average molecular weight within the range from 32 to 700, and
(e) catalysts, water and/or foaming agents, and
(f) optionally, adjuvant substances and additives.
6. The process of claim 5, wherein (3) the pressing is achieved via a pair of rotating rollers.
7. The flame-laminated textile/foamed material composite produced by the process of claim 5.
US09/513,089 1999-03-06 2000-02-25 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material and a process for the production of composite materials for vehicle interior trim Abandoned US20020094432A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE19909978.2 1999-03-06
DE1999109978 DE19909978A1 (en) 1999-03-06 1999-03-06 The use of hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foams, in the production of composite materials for automotive interior

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09/955,227 US6673849B2 (en) 1999-03-06 2001-09-14 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material for vehicle interior trim

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/955,227 Division US6673849B2 (en) 1999-03-06 2001-09-14 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material for vehicle interior trim

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020094432A1 true US20020094432A1 (en) 2002-07-18

Family

ID=7899995

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/513,089 Abandoned US20020094432A1 (en) 1999-03-06 2000-02-25 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material and a process for the production of composite materials for vehicle interior trim
US09/955,227 Expired - Fee Related US6673849B2 (en) 1999-03-06 2001-09-14 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material for vehicle interior trim

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/955,227 Expired - Fee Related US6673849B2 (en) 1999-03-06 2001-09-14 Composites comprising a hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foamed material for vehicle interior trim

Country Status (12)

Country Link
US (2) US20020094432A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1035146B1 (en)
JP (1) JP2000289174A (en)
KR (1) KR100582975B1 (en)
CN (1) CN1172990C (en)
AT (1) AT275593T (en)
BR (1) BR0001368A (en)
CA (1) CA2299905C (en)
DE (1) DE19909978A1 (en)
ES (1) ES2228316T3 (en)
HK (1) HK1030793A1 (en)
PT (1) PT1035146E (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050003178A1 (en) * 2003-04-21 2005-01-06 Detert James W. Apparatus and methods for the attachment of materials to polyurethane foam, and articles made using them
US20070191502A1 (en) * 2006-02-14 2007-08-16 Foamex L.P. Hydrophilic ester polyurethane foams
EP1834974A2 (en) * 2006-03-14 2007-09-19 Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Aromatic diacid ester diols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
US20080282611A1 (en) * 2005-08-20 2008-11-20 Neil Bonnett Graham Hydratable Polymer Materials

Families Citing this family (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE10063194A1 (en) * 2000-12-19 2002-06-20 Basf Ag Flexible polyurethane foams, used in upholstery, automobile construction and medical applications, are prepared by reaction of organic polyisocyanate, a polyesterol and a polyetherol
US6833335B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-12-21 Milliken & Company Barrier fabric
US20060008633A1 (en) * 2004-07-06 2006-01-12 Foamex L.P. Flame laminable hydrophilic ester polyurethane foams
DE102005006551A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2006-08-24 Basf Ag Aqueous polyurethane dispersions with low levels of cyclic compounds
JP2007161750A (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-28 Inoac Corp Water-absorbing and yellowing-resistant polyurethane foam
US20070299153A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2007-12-27 Hager Stanley L Viscoelastic foams with slower recovery and improved tear
HUE040691T2 (en) 2007-01-16 2019-03-28 Frank Prissok Hybrid systems consisting of foamed thermoplastic elastomers and polyurethanes
US20090026924A1 (en) * 2007-07-23 2009-01-29 Leung Roger Y Methods of making low-refractive index and/or low-k organosilicate coatings
JP5542696B2 (en) * 2008-02-26 2014-07-09 エバレデイ バツテリ カンパニー インコーポレーテツド Process for making an integrated layered urethane products
JP4994301B2 (en) * 2008-05-30 2012-08-08 株式会社イノアックコーポレーション Laminate
DE102008030940A1 (en) 2008-07-02 2010-01-14 Otto Bock Schaumstoffwerke Gmbh Soft polyurethane foam comprises a content of a hydroxyl group containing oil, grease or resin, which are chemically bounded in polyurethane
JP5352507B2 (en) * 2010-03-25 2013-11-27 倉敷紡績株式会社 Frame laminated polyurethane foam
US8557946B1 (en) * 2011-02-28 2013-10-15 Wm. T. Burnett Ip, Llc Oxidation discoloration resistant polyurethane foam
EP2818489A1 (en) * 2013-06-28 2014-12-31 Basf Se Hydrolysis resistant PUR molded parts

Family Cites Families (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3413245A (en) 1962-12-21 1968-11-26 Sambeth Joerg Process for rendering polyurethane foams hydrophilic by reacting same with a lactone
US3961629A (en) * 1968-06-11 1976-06-08 American Cyanamid Company Using hydrophilic polyurethane laparotomy sponges
DE2004518A1 (en) * 1970-02-02 1971-08-05 Bayer Ag
US3806474A (en) 1970-11-23 1974-04-23 Princeton Polymer Sponge Corp Hydrophilic polyester urethane foam
BE795476A (en) 1972-02-17 1973-08-16 Bayer Ag Process for the preparation of hydrophilic foams used as substraits for the growth of plants
BE795472A (en) 1972-02-17 1973-08-16 Bayer Ag polyurethanes foams containing ionic groups
JPS6191213A (en) * 1984-10-12 1986-05-09 Bridgestone Corp Production of bitumen foam or bitumen elastomer
US4826882A (en) * 1988-04-15 1989-05-02 Pmc, Inc. Open celled polyurethane foams
US4894832A (en) 1988-09-15 1990-01-16 North American Philips Corporation Wide band gap semiconductor light emitting devices
CA2071030A1 (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-12-18 Kenneth P. Klapper Thermoformable polyisocyanurate foam laminates for interior finishing applications
US5719201A (en) * 1995-03-30 1998-02-17 Woodbridge Foam Corporation Superabsorbent hydrophilic isocyanate-based foam and process for production thereof
JP3107997B2 (en) * 1995-09-06 2000-11-13 三洋化成工業株式会社 Process for the preparation of rigid polyisocyanurate foam
US5650450A (en) * 1996-01-25 1997-07-22 Foamex L.P. Hydrophilic urethane foam
DE69714759D1 (en) * 1996-11-08 2002-09-19 Huntsman Int Llc A process for the production of flexible foams and polyurethanhart-
DE19741646A1 (en) * 1997-09-22 1999-03-25 Bayer Ag Hydrophilic polyester-polyurethane foams, a process for their preparation and their use as moisture-absorbing materials

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050003178A1 (en) * 2003-04-21 2005-01-06 Detert James W. Apparatus and methods for the attachment of materials to polyurethane foam, and articles made using them
US20090008021A1 (en) * 2003-04-21 2009-01-08 Rynel, Inc. Apparatus and Methods for the Attachment of Materials to Polyurethane Foam, and Articles Made Using Them
US8211255B2 (en) 2003-04-21 2012-07-03 Rynel Inc. Apparatus and methods for the attachment of materials to polyurethane foam, and articles made using them
US20080282611A1 (en) * 2005-08-20 2008-11-20 Neil Bonnett Graham Hydratable Polymer Materials
US20070191502A1 (en) * 2006-02-14 2007-08-16 Foamex L.P. Hydrophilic ester polyurethane foams
EP1834974A2 (en) * 2006-03-14 2007-09-19 Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Aromatic diacid ester diols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
US20070219283A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2007-09-20 Burdeniuc Juan J Aromatic diacid ester diols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
EP1834974A3 (en) * 2006-03-14 2008-01-02 Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Aromatic diacid ester diols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
US7615580B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2009-11-10 Air Products And Chemicals, Inc. Ester alcohols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
US7666919B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2010-02-23 Air Products And Chemicals, Inc. Aromatic diacid ester diols and substituted carbamates thereof for minimizing deterioration of polyurethane foams
US20070235691A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2007-10-11 Air Products And Chemicals, Inc. Ester Alcohols and Substituted Carbamates Thereof for Minimizing Deterioration of Polyurethane Foams

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP1035146A2 (en) 2000-09-13
EP1035146A3 (en) 2001-10-24
HK1030793A1 (en) 2005-06-10
CN1172990C (en) 2004-10-27
CN1266073A (en) 2000-09-13
ES2228316T3 (en) 2005-04-16
BR0001368A (en) 2000-10-17
CA2299905A1 (en) 2000-09-06
AT275593T (en) 2004-09-15
PT1035146E (en) 2004-12-31
US6673849B2 (en) 2004-01-06
KR20000062744A (en) 2000-10-25
JP2000289174A (en) 2000-10-17
US20020036049A1 (en) 2002-03-28
EP1035146B1 (en) 2004-09-08
KR100582975B1 (en) 2006-05-24
CA2299905C (en) 2009-01-20
DE19909978A1 (en) 2000-09-07

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP1264850B1 (en) Polyurethane foams having improved heat sag and a process for their production
US9550854B2 (en) Amine catalysts for polyurethane foams
RU2237678C2 (en) Fine-pore, water-frothed, rigid polyurethane foam
US6346205B2 (en) Rigid polyurethane foams
RU2031098C1 (en) Method of preparing rigid polyurethane foam plastic with opened cells
US5672636A (en) Production of low-fogging polyurethane foams, and specific poly-oxyalkylene-polyols which can be used for this purpose
US6319962B1 (en) Hydrocarbon blown rigid polyurethane foams having improved flammability performance
JP2587290B2 (en) Method for producing cold-cure flexible polyurethane foam having excellent damping properties
EP0353786B1 (en) Manufacture of polyurethane foam
US4334032A (en) Foamed polymers containing low molecular weight urethane modifier compound
CN1040121C (en) Method for producing open cell rigid polyurethane plastic foam
AU743874B2 (en) Energy absorbing polyurethane foams
US6855741B2 (en) Composition for use in flexible polyurethane foams
US5059633A (en) Preparation of flexible polyurethane foams having low compressive strength and block polyoxypropylenepolyoxyethylenepolyol mixtures which can be used for this purpose
US20030153656A1 (en) Flame retardant polyurethanes and polyisocyanurates, and additives therefor
EP0421222B1 (en) Foam laminates which include ASTM E-84 Class 1 rated foams
EP0656382B1 (en) Process for producing modified polyisocyanurate foams
CA1326736C (en) Process for the production of flexible slabstock polyurethane foams
US4916168A (en) Manufacture of polyurethane foam
EP0726281A2 (en) High equivalent weight, polyester polyols for closed cell, rigid foams
US20070232712A1 (en) Method for Producing Rigid Polyurethane Foams
JP2009507095A (en) Rigid polyisocyanurate foams and a method of manufacturing the same
US6765035B2 (en) Process for making rigid and flexible polyurethane foams containing a fire-retardant
RU2212419C2 (en) Method of producing low-heat conductivity rigid polyurethane foams and rigid polyurethane foams obtained by this method
US4812368A (en) Process for the preparation of lightweight, planar molded articles

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BAYER AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT, GERMANY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HERZOG, KLAUS-PETER;BAATZ, GUNTHER;REEL/FRAME:010623/0094;SIGNING DATES FROM 20000126 TO 20000131

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION