New! View global litigation for patent families

US20020029066A1 - Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus - Google Patents

Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20020029066A1
US20020029066A1 US09949249 US94924901A US2002029066A1 US 20020029066 A1 US20020029066 A1 US 20020029066A1 US 09949249 US09949249 US 09949249 US 94924901 A US94924901 A US 94924901A US 2002029066 A1 US2002029066 A1 US 2002029066A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
suture
portion
compressed
fig
end
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US09949249
Inventor
Seth Foerster
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Opus Medical Inc
Original Assignee
Opus Medical Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0482Needle or suture guides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0469Suturing instruments for use in minimally invasive surgery, e.g. endoscopic surgery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0485Devices or means, e.g. loops, for capturing the suture thread and threading it through an opening of a suturing instrument or needle eyelet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0487Suture clamps, clips or locks, e.g. for replacing suture knots; Instruments for applying or removing suture clamps, clips or locks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06166Sutures
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • A61B2017/0446Means for attaching and blocking the suture in the suture anchor
    • A61B2017/0454Means for attaching and blocking the suture in the suture anchor the anchor being crimped or clamped on the suture
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B2017/0496Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials for tensioning sutures
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06004Means for attaching suture to needle
    • A61B2017/06028Means for attaching suture to needle by means of a cylindrical longitudinal blind bore machined at the suture-receiving end of the needle, e.g. opposite to needle tip
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06166Sutures
    • A61B2017/06185Sutures hollow or tubular

Abstract

A suture loop is formed in a hollow braided suture by feeding one end of a length of suture through a part in the braid of the suture and into the inner lumen formed by the hollow braid. The braided configuration of the suture allows it to be expanded in diameter by pushing and reduced in diameter by pulling. Said end of suture is passed continuously through said inner lumen forming a loop of suture with a single tail. The loop may be tightened by pulling on said first end of the suture while pushing on said outer hollow braid. The loop may be locked by extending or pulling on said outer hollow braid to reduce its diameter and lock it down around said first end of the suture.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    This invention relates generally to the creation of a sliding and locking loop of cord, and more particularly to a surgical technique of suturing and the formation of a suture loop that may be tightened and locked.
  • [0002]
    Suturing is a necessary aspect of virtually any surgical procedure. Numerous techniques of tying sutures have been developed by surgeons over the years to address various applications of sutures. For example, a surgeon's knot, in which an overhand knot is modified to include two wraps of the suture ends around each other, was developed to minimize the amount of slippage in the suture as the second or locking throw of a ligation or approximation of tissue was accomplished. Another knot called a Roeder knot was developed to allow surgeons to place a loop of suture around a vessel for ligation in an endoscopic environment. The Roeder knot is basically a pre-tied slip knot that may be cinched and locked around a vessel or other structure. Many other knots, such as the Weston knot described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,405,352 address various other aspects of the surgical requirements of knots for flexibility, development of hoop stress (tightening of the suture loop), stability and reversibility.
  • [0003]
    In some cases, the development of a knot in a surgical procedure may require dexterity beyond the capability of the surgeon. This is certainly the case in surgeries such as arthroscopic, laparascopic, or thoroscopic surgery. These procedures are accomplished with the aid of an endoscope, a viewing instrument that can be used in conjunction with specialized surgical instrumentation to detect, diagnose, and repair areas of the body that were previously only able to be repaired using traditional “open” surgery. Access to the operative site using endosurgical or minimally invasive techniques is accomplished by inserting small tubes called trocars into a body cavity. These tubes have a diameter of, for example, between 3 mm and 30 mm and a length of about 150 mm (6 inches). A commonality in these procedures is that the spaces in which the surgeon works are limited, and the tools used for suturing make tying knots difficult at best. Surgeons are accustomed to handling the suture, as knots in open procedures are typically tied and pushed down to the wound using the fingers. In endoscopic procedures, either the knots need to be tied externally to the body and inserted into the body and to the operative site using some kind of knot pushing device, or they need to be tied inside the body using long, clumsy instruments.
  • [0004]
    Currently, in one known technique, the placement of sutures while using endoscopic techniques involves placing a semi-circular needle, attached to and carrying a suture, into a pair of endoscopic needle holders. These needle holders, which resemble a pair of pliers with an elongated shaft between the handles and the jaws, must be placed down through one of the surgical trocars into the body cavity containing the structure to be sutured. Because of their size, the needles used in these procedures are generally not able to be held in the jaws of the needle driver while being introduced through the operative trocar. The surgeon must hold the suture string in the needle holder jaws, and push the needle holder trailing the needle and suture into the body cavity. The suture and needle combination is dropped in the body cavity, and the needle is then located and picked up and properly positioned in the needle holder jaws. This is a difficult and time-consuming aspect of this current endoscopic technique for suturing. The needle carrying the suture may then be driven by pronation of the wrist, causing rotation of the elongate shaft, and subsequent arcuate rotation of the semi-circular needle.
  • [0005]
    The current instrumentation requires the surgeon to prepare the needle for penetration of the tissue while the needle is inside the body. This process is a time consuming, and sometimes frustrating exercise in hand to eye coordination, which is complicated by the fact that the surgeon is viewing the three dimensional space inside the body cavity through a two dimensional video monitor.
  • [0006]
    There have been other attempts to improve the methods of tissue repair. These include the development of staplers and anchoring devices. In response to some of the aforementioned problems in placing sutures in tissues endoscopically, manufacturers have developed tissue staplers. These devices utilize stainless steel or titanium staples that are constructed much like the staples used to hold papers together. The major disadvantage of these kinds of staplers is that they leave metal in the body. For some tissues this is not a problem, however in some procedures, metal staples left within the tissues can be a major hindrance to the healing process.
  • [0007]
    In orthopedic surgery, many different designs for bone anchors have been developed. These anchors allow soft tissues to be reattached to bone, and simplify the process by removing the need to create a transosseous tunnel. Transosseous tunnels are created in bones to allow suture material to be threaded through and tied across the bony bridge created by tunnels after the suture material has been placed through the soft tissues and tied with conventional knots. Anchors are commonly used in joint re-constructions, and because the metal is contained in the bone, it does not cause a problem with healing.
  • [0008]
    While endoscopy has certainly found favor with many physicians as an alternative operative modality, the advanced skill set and operative time necessary to become an efficient and practiced endoscopist have proven to be a challenge for a large portion of the surgical community. The cost pressures brought about by large scale patient management (the continued rise and success of health maintenance organizations or HMO's) have also caused the surgical community to cast a critical eye on the overall costs and long-term outcomes of some of the procedures that have been tried via a endoscopic approach. While the laparascopic cholecystectomy (gall bladder removal) has certainly proven its worth in the past 8-10 years, many other procedures have not shown similar cost effectiveness and positive long-term outcomes.
  • [0009]
    Hence, alternatives have been sought to bridge the gap between skill and equipment intensive endoscopic surgery and more familiar open surgery. As such, under the broad umbrella of “minimally invasive surgery” which would include endoscopic surgery, a relatively new approach called “mini-incision surgery” has begun to emerge. This approach uses the principles of traditional open surgery, along with some of the equipment advances of endoscopy to provide the patient with the best of both worlds.
  • [0010]
    Perhaps the most visible of these new approaches is the emergence of minimally invasive heart surgery, both for coronary bypass and for valve replacement. Techniques and tools for cardiovascular surgery have begun to be used that allow the heart surgeon to perform procedures through small incisions between the ribs that previously required a massive incision and splitting the sternum to gain access to the heart.
  • [0011]
    In a similar way, orthopedic surgeons have begun to explore alternatives to the traditional open approach for the many indications requiring reconstruction of some aspect of the shoulder. As was the case when minimally invasive approaches were adopted for knee repair and re-construction, the use of either an endoscope or a “mini-open” approach is gaining in popularity with surgeons, patients and third party payers.
  • [0012]
    It is an increasingly common problem for tendons and other soft, connective tissues to tear or to detach from associated bone. One such type of tear or detachment is a “rotator cuff” tear, wherein the supraspinatus tendon separates from the humerus, causing pain and loss of ability to elevate and externally rotate the arm. Complete separation can occur if the shoulder is subjected to gross trauma, but typically, the tear begins as a small lesion, especially in older patients.
  • [0013]
    To repair a torn rotator cuff, the typical course today is to do so surgically, through a large incision. This approach is presently taken in almost 99% of rotator cuff repair cases. There are two types of open surgical approaches for repair of the rotator cuff, one known as the “classic open” and the other as the “mini-open”. The “classic open” approach requires a large incision and complete detachment of the deltoid muscle from the acromion to facilitate exposure. Following the suturing of the rotator cuff to the humeral head, the detached deltoid is surgically reattached. Because of this maneuver, the deltoid requires postoperative protection, thus retarding rehabilitation and possibly resulting in residual weakness. Complete rehabilitation takes approximately 9 to 12 months.
  • [0014]
    The “mini-open” technique, which represents the current growing trend and the majority of all surgical repair procedures, differs from the classic approach by gaining access through a smaller incision and splitting rather than detaching the deltoid. Additionally, this procedure is typically used in conjunction with arthroscopic acromial decompression. Once the deltoid is split, it is retracted to expose the rotator cuff tear. The cuff is debrided to ensure suture attachment to viable tissue and to create a reasonable edge approximation. In addition, the humeral head is abraded or notched at the proposed “soft tissue to bone” reattachment point, as healing is enhanced on a raw bone surface. A series of small diameter holes, referred to as transosseous tunnels, are “punched” through the bone laterally from the abraded or notched surface to a point on the outside surface of the greater tuberosity, commonly a distance of 2 to 3 cm. Finally, the cuff is sutured and secured to the bone by pulling the suture ends through the transosseous tunnels and tying them together using the bone between two successive tunnels as a bridge, after which the deltoid muscle must be surgically reattached to the acromion.
  • [0015]
    Although the above described surgical technique is the current standard of care for rotator cuff repair, it is associated with a great deal of patient discomfort and a lengthy recovery time, ranging from at least four months to one year or more. It is the above described manipulation of the deltoid muscle together with the large skin incision that causes the majority of patient discomfort and an increased recovery time.
  • [0016]
    Less invasive arthroscopic techniques are beginning to be developed in an effort to address the shortcomings of open surgical repair. Working through small trocar portals that minimize disruption of the deltoid muscle, a few surgeons have been able to reattach the rotator cuff using various bone anchor and suture configurations. The rotator cuff is sutured intracorporeally and an anchor is driven into bone at a location appropriate for repair. Rather than thread the suture through transosseous tunnels which are difficult or impossible to create arthroscopically using current techniques, the repair is completed by tying the cuff down against bone using the anchor and suture. Early results of less invasive techniques are encouraging, with a substantial reduction in both patient recovery time and discomfort.
  • [0017]
    However, as will now be described, there are cases where the knots themselves are a hindrance to the healing of the wound. In cases where joint re-constructions are undertaken by orthopedic surgeons, oftentimes the space available within joint is quite limited. This is especially true, for example, in a rotator cuff repair. The knots in the tendon can be bulky and create a painful impingement of the tendon on the bone. Because non-absorbable suture materials are used for these types of repairs, the suture and associated knots are not absorbed into the body, and hence provide a constant, painful reminder of their presence. It would therefore be desirable to develop a system that did not require the traditional knots to secure the suture to the tendon.
  • [0018]
    So it may be seen that none of the currently extant approaches to the placement and securing of sutures in, for example, rotator cuff surgery have fulfilled all of the surgeon's requirements.
  • [0019]
    What is needed, therefore, is a new approach for repairing the rotator cuff, wherein suture tension can be measured and adjusted, the suture resides completely below the cortical bone surface, there is no requirement for the surgeon to tie a knot to attach the suture to the bone anchor, and the skill level for correct placement is suitable for practitioners having average ability.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    Accordingly, the inventors have developed a novel system and method for creating a suture loop and securing the suture material to tissue. This is done by taking advantage of some of the unique aspects of the construction of braided sutures. These sutures, commonly constructed out of silk, cotton, or polyester fibers, are woven into an 8 to 10 ply hollow diamond braid. Oftentimes, one or two core fibers are run down the middle of the diamond braid. In the present invention, these core fibers are eliminated. They may be replaced by pull loops, which will be more fully explained below.
  • [0021]
    The hollow nature of the diamond braid allows for the formation of a unique “single-tailed” suture. This suture is formed by taking one end of the suture (the free end) and passing it through an opening formed in the diamond braid and into the hollow interior lumen of the other half of the suture (the standing part). Much like the familiar children's toy which is commonly identified as a “Chinese finger torture”, the diamond braid, by the very nature of its configuration, is able to expand and contract in diameter based on the forces exerted on the fibers. When the suture or hollow core cord is placed in compression, the fibers allow for the expansion of the diameter, both exteriorly and in the hollow inner lumen. When tension is placed on the suture, the fibers are allowed to contract, and, in the case of the single tailed suture, the free end that has been passed into the interior lumen of the standing end is compressed and held by the contraction of the diameter of the standing part.
  • [0022]
    There are many different methods and tools that can be used to create the single tail loop. In the present invention, various configurations of fids, pull strings, and other tools may be used to thread the free end of the suture through the interior lumen of the standing end of the suture. A fid is a tool that allows the free end to be threaded through the standing end by parting the fibers of the hollow cord wall. A fid is typically a hollow, tapered cylinder with a smoothly closed end and an open end that is disposed to receive the free end of the hollow cord. It has an outside diameter minimally greater than the outside diameter of the cord.
  • [0023]
    More particularly, there is provided a suture having a structure which comprises a plurality of flexible filaments loosely woven together in a tubular geometry. The desired tubular geometry includes an outer wall which defines an internal lumen. The construction is such that when a first portion of the suture is placed under compression, the outer wall of the first portion is radially expanded, such that a diameter of the first portion internal lumen increases in size sufficiently so that a second portion of the suture structure, which is not under compression, may be accommodated within the first portion lumen. However, when the suture first portion is subsequently placed under tension, while the suture second portion is disposed within the first portion lumen, the diameter of the first portion lumen decreases sufficiently to capture the suture second portion therein to create a binding interface between the first and second suture portions, thereby locking the second suture portion in axial position within the lumen of the first suture portion.
  • [0024]
    In another aspect of the invention, a single-tailed suture is disclosed for securing a plurality of body components together. The inventive single-tailed suture comprises a length of braided suturing material having a distal portion and a proximal portion, and a braided outer wall which defines an internal lumen, wherein the braided suturing material extends through one of the body components, such as a tendon. A distal end of the braided suturing material extends through the outer wall of the proximal portion so that a predetermined length of the distal suture portion is disposed within the lumen of a predetermined length of the proximal suture portion. The predetermined length of the proximal suture portion is in tension to create a binding interface between the predetermined length of the distal suture portion and the predetermined length of the proximal suture portion to create a suture loop.
  • [0025]
    In yet another aspect of the invention, a method of suturing a plurality of body components together is described, wherein the inventive method uses a length of braided suturing material which comprises a plurality of flexible filaments loosely woven together in a tubular geometry comprising an outer wall which defines an internal lumen. A first step in the inventive method is to insert a distal end of the suturing material through a portion of a first one of the body components, wherein the body components may comprise soft connective tissues such as tendons or ligaments, and/or bone. Then, a predetermined length of a portion of the braided suturing material which is proximal to the first body component is compressed, so that an internal diameter of the lumen of the compressed suture portion increases substantially in size. At this juncture, a distal end of the length of braided suturing material is inserted through the outer wall of the compressed suture portion and into the internal lumen thereof, so that a desired length of the braided suturing material which is distal to the first body component is disposed within the internal lumen of the compressed suture portion.
  • [0026]
    Once the foregoing steps have been performed, and the compressed suture portion is moved to a desired point, so that the resultant suture loop will be of a preferred size, tension is applied to the compressed suture portion to decrease the internal diameter of its lumen, to thereby create a binding interface between the compressed suture portion and the suturing material disposed in its lumen, so that the aforementioned suture loop of a desired length is formed.
  • [0027]
    The invention, together with additional features and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying illustrative drawing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 1a is a schematic view illustrating a basic construction of hollow cords or sutures of the type utilized in the present invention, in tension;
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 1b is a schematic view similar to FIG. 1a, illustrating the hollow suture of FIG. 1a in compression, rather than tension;
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 1c is a schematic view similar to FIGS. 1a and 1 b, illustrating the creation of a binding interface between two portions of a hollow suture which is of a construction like that shown in FIGS. 1a and 1 b, wherein one of the suture portions is disposed within the internal lumen of the other of the suture portions;
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 1d is an end view of the hollow suture illustrated in FIG. 1a;
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 1e is an end view of the hollow suture illustrated in FIG. 1b;
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 1f is an end view of the hollow suture binding interface illustrated in FIG. 1c;
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIGS. 2 through 7 are schematic perspective views illustrating in sequence an apparatus and method for forming a single tail suture in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIGS. 8 through 12 are schematic perspective views similar to FIGS. 2 through 7, illustrating in sequence an alternate apparatus and method for forming a single tail suture in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0036]
    [0036]FIGS. 13 through 16 are schematic perspective views illustrating in sequence still another alternate apparatus and method for forming a single tail suture in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0037]
    [0037]FIGS. 17a through 17 c are detail plan views of a fid, a suture needle, and an adaptation of a suture needle to a fid, respectively;
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 18 is a detail perspective view illustrating the fid combination of FIG. 17c as it is being inserted through the outer wall 118 of a suture 113 a;
  • [0039]
    [0039]FIG. 19 is a detail perspective view of another embodiment of a fid;
  • [0040]
    [0040]FIGS. 20a through 20 c are detail perspective views of an additional fid embodiment;
  • [0041]
    [0041]FIGS. 21 through 27 are schematic perspective views illustrating in sequence yet another alternate apparatus and method for forming a single tail suture in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0042]
    [0042]FIGS. 28 through 35 are schematic perspective views illustrating in sequence still another alternate apparatus and method for forming a single tail suture in accordance with the present invention;
  • [0043]
    [0043]FIG. 36 is a perspective view of an inventive tool which may be used for tensioning a single tail suture;
  • [0044]
    [0044]FIG. 37 is a perspective view of an alternative tensioning tool for use in tensioning a single tail suture;
  • [0045]
    [0045]FIGS. 38 through 40 are plan views, in sequence, illustrating yet another alternative embodiment and method for creating and tensioning a single tail suture; and
  • [0046]
    [0046]FIGS. 41 through 43 are plan views similar to those of FIGS. 38 through 40, illustrating, in sequence, a method by which the expanded braid of FIGS. 38-40 may be tensioned over the suture.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0047]
    Referring now more particularly to the drawings, FIG. 1a shows a tensioned suture 11 of a braided construction, in tension. The tension on the suture preferably sets characteristics of the suture so that it is of diameter D and pitch P. FIG. 1b shows the tensioned suture 11 loaded with axial compression to form a compressed suture 13, the suture braid being designed so that its pitch and diameter are affected by the axial compression on the suture by a factor “n” as shown. The factor “n” is of such a value that it makes possible the passage of the tensioned suture 11, having the diameter D, through the center of the compressed suture 13. The factor “n” is also of such a value that the interior of compressed suture 13 further provides for the passage of any instrument that is required for the manipulation of the suture.
  • [0048]
    In a preferred configuration, the factor “n” ranges in value from a minimum of about 1.5 to a maximum of about 15.0 in order to achieve acceptable performance, with a range of about 2 to 4 being preferred.
  • [0049]
    When the tensioned suture 11 is passed through the compressed suture 13 and the compressed suture 13 is further manipulated to be tensioned about the tensioned suture 11, there is created a binding interface 15 of a length L between the tensioned suture 11 and the compressed suture 13 as shown in FIG. 1c. As will be shown, the nature of the binding interface 15 is related directly to the tension in compressed suture 13, the length L (which is approximately equal to the length of the formerly compressed suture 13), and to an interface frictional factor. The nature of the binding interface 15 is further directly related to the value of an angle “Q”, which is defined as the angle of orientation of fibers 17 which form the braided outer cylindrical wall 18 of the suture 11, 13, relative to a longitudinal axis 19 of the compressed suture 13, as shown in FIG. 1b. More particularly, the nature of the binding interface is related to the sine of angle Q. An important aspect of the present invention is the inventors' discovery of the ability to define and control the degree of binding interface between the sutures 11 and 13, thereby providing a controllable means of binding and securing sutures in tissue. In FIG. 1c, the binding interface 15 extends along a bound portion 24 of the suture, which is approximately co-extensive with the length along which the tensioned suture 11 extends within the interior of the (formerly) compressed suture portion 13.
  • [0050]
    It is to be understood that hollow braided cord such as the suture 11 described supra is constructed using a number of separate fiber bundles (“picks”) which are woven together to form a braid. There is always an even number of bundles, as an equal number of bundles are woven in each direction. A typical number of bundles is 12, with 6 woven clockwise, and 6 woven counterclockwise. For the purposes of understanding the relationship between the tension in the suture and the binding force, we will consider a single bundle, with the assumption that each bundle is subjected to the same forces and acts in a similar way within the structure of the hollow braided cord.
  • [0051]
    Considering a single fiber bundle 17 (FIG. 1b), it is seen that the geometry described by that bundle within the braided cord is roughly helical, with deviations from a perfect helix to accommodate the over and under construction of braiding. For purposes of modeling the forces on the single fiber bundle 17, we will consider a single revolution of the bundle and smooth the bundle to a consistent helix, recognizing that the forces on the bundle are consistent throughout the strand and along the length of the suture.
  • [0052]
    For ease of reference, the variables used in the following derivation are listed below:
  • [0053]
    T—Tension in the hollow cord or suture
  • [0054]
    Q—Angle formed by a single fiber bundle to the centerline of the hollow cord
  • [0055]
    r—Radius of the thin-walled cylinder approximating the hollow cord
  • [0056]
    t—Wall thickness of the thin-walled cylinder
  • [0057]
    L—Length of the hollow cord
  • [0058]
    S—Stress
  • [0059]
    b—Total number of fiber bundles in the hollow cord
  • [0060]
    w—width of a single fiber bundle
  • [0061]
    N—Normal force developed by a single fiber bundle
  • [0062]
    p—Pressure generated by tension in the hollow cord
  • [0063]
    Ff—Force generated by a single fiber bundle
  • [0064]
    Ft—Total force generated by all of the fiber bundles b
  • [0065]
    Now, the binding interface is a frictional force developed as a result of the normal force N exerted by the outer suture on the inner suture. The normal force N is equal to the pressure or hoop stress developed, multiplied by the area. The tension T in the suture creates a pressure which is a function of the angle Q formed by the single bundle 17 to the centerline 19 of the hollow cord. It may be understood that, as the angle Q approaches zero, the induced pressure approaches zero. For purposes of calculation, the hollow cord may be mathematically approximated as a thin-walled cylinder of radius r, wall thickness t, and length L. Stress, represented by S, for thin-walled cylinders is represented by the equation: t = pr S ( 1 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00001
  • [0066]
    (from page 325, Mechanics of Materials, Beer and Johnston, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1981), which, solving for stress S yields: S = pr t ( 2 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00002
  • [0067]
    The component of the force developed by the tension T in the cord which is normal to the centerline of the cord is expressed as:
  • T sin Q   (3)
  • [0068]
    We can equate the stress S in the cord to the force per unit area developed by the tension T in the cord, where the area A is defined by the thickness t multiplied by the width w of a single fiber bundle. Now the total tension T is distributed throughout all of the fiber bundles b, and so the tension in a single fiber bundle is: T b ( 4 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00003
  • [0069]
    Therefore, we see: S = pr t = T sin Q btw ( 5 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00004
  • [0070]
    and, solving for p, we get: p = T sin Q bwr ( 6 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00005
  • [0071]
    Now, the normal force generated by this pressure is the pressure times the unit area, with the area being equal to the circumference of the cylinder times the width, or: N = p A = w2 π rT sin Q bwr ( 7 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00006
  • [0072]
    and simplifying, we get: N = 2 π T b sin Q ( 8 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00007
  • [0073]
    As will be understood by those skilled in the art, frictional force is equal to the normal force multiplied by a friction coefficient, normally represented by μ. The equation then becomes:
  • F ƒ =μN=2μπT sin Q   (9)
  • [0074]
    The total force developed over all of the fiber bundles b of the hollow cord with a length L and a number of fiber bundles or picks per inch of k then becomes: F t = 2 kL μπ T sin Q b 2 ( 10 )
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00008
  • [0075]
    It may be seen from this equation that in order for the single-tail suture of the present invention to lock, F must be larger than T, and therefore the constant 2 kL μπ sin Q b 2
    Figure US20020029066A1-20020307-M00009
  • [0076]
    must be larger than one.
  • [0077]
    Now, the frictional coefficient μ is simply a material property, and k (picks per inch), L (length), Q (angle between the centerline and the pick), and b (total number of picks) are design parameters. It may be seen, therefore, that by judicious selection of the constants k, L, Q, and b, a self-locking system may be developed that optimizes the bound interface.
  • [0078]
    Now with particular reference to FIGS. 2-7, wherein like or functionally equivalent elements to those illustrated in prior embodiments are designated by like reference numerals, preceded by the numeral 1, there is illustrated one preferred embodiment of this bound interface which will serve to attach a suture loop 21 (FIGS. 3-7) to one piece of tissue 23. Suturing material 111, forming the suture loop 21, is of a braided construction which will allow a needle or fid 27 to pass through the center of the compressed portion 113 of the braided suture 111 when it is in compression. The fid 27 may be passed through the tissue 23 by common instruments of the art. Referring to FIG. 3, the compressed portion 113 is created by manipulation of the braided sheath (typically the practitioner's fingers are used to “bunch” the fibers 117 forming the braided sheath together in compression along a portion of the length of the suture 111) and access to an interior lumen 29 is identified. The fid 27 is then inserted into the interior lumen 29, as shown in FIG. 4. Once inserted, the fid 27 is drawn out of the end of the compressed portion 113 and optionally clipped off, as shown in FIG. 5. The compressed portion 113 is then pushed, sliding it along the tensioned suture 111 to create the desired suture loop 21 geometry, as shown in FIG. 6. Of course, as will be appreciated, the compressed portion 113 is literally merely a portion of the tensioned suture 111 which has been manipulated into a compressed (or “bunched”) state. Thus, it is not literally “pushed”. Rather, by sliding one's fingers or another suitable instrument along the length of the tensioned suture 111, behind the compressed portion 113, one can “move” the compressed portion 113 along the length of the suture 111 (literally changing the portion of the length of the suture 111 which is in compression, in the manner similar to that of a standing wave).
  • [0079]
    Once the desired suture loop 21 geometry has been achieved, it can be “locked” into place by applying tension on the compressed portion 113, as shown in FIG. 7, until the interior lumen 29 thereof decreases in diameter sufficiently to engage the portion of tensioned suturing material 111 which is disposed therein. This creates a binding interface 115 between portions 113 and 111 of the suture, the binding interface 115 being designed in length and pitch of braid to provide a bound end 124 to the suture loop 21 when suture 21 is in tension.
  • [0080]
    Now with particular reference to FIGS. 8-12, there is illustrated a second preferred embodiment of this bound interface, wherein like or functionally equivalent elements to those in previous embodiments are designated by like reference numerals, preceded by the numeral 2. In this embodiment, a suture loop 221 is to be attached to a piece of tissue 223. Suture loop 221 is comprised of a suturing material 211 which is of a braided construction. This braided construction allows a fid in the form of a hook 227, which includes a distal hook portion 30, to pass through the center of a compressed portion 213 of the braided suture 211. The hook 227 is passed through the tissue 223 by common instruments of the art. A flexible loop 31 resides in the interior of the compressed portion 213 and functions to aid in the management of the hook 227 as it travels through the compressed portion 213. The hook 227, and, in particular, the distal hook portion 30 thereof, is placed in the distal portion of the flexible loop 31, as shown in FIG. 9. The hook 227 is then drawn into the interior of the compressed portion 213 of the suture and through a port 35 into the interior lumen 229 within the compressed portion 213 by pulling the proximal end of the flexible loop 31, as shown in FIG. 10. The hook 227 is then drawn out of the compressed portion 213 of the suture and optionally clipped off (FIG. 11). The compressed portion 213 of the suture is then pushed, sliding it along the suture 211 to create the desired loop geometry 221, as illustrated in FIG. 12. Tension is then applied on the compressed portion 213 of the suture to generate a bound portion 224 (FIG. 12) of the suture having a binding interface 215, the binding interface 215 being designed in length and pitch of braid to provide a bound end 224 to the suture loop 221 when suture 211 is in tension.
  • [0081]
    The flexible nature of the looped component 31 of FIGS. 8-12 is desirable in circumstances that require both ends of the suture to flex in order to manage the suture attachment to the tissue.
  • [0082]
    FIGS. 13-16 depict another embodiment in which one tail of the suture can be rigid throughout the procedure. In this embodiment, wherein like or functionally equivalent elements to those in previous embodiments are designated by like reference numerals preceded by the numeral 3, a suture 311 is of a braided construction which will allow a fid in the form of a barb 327 to pass through the center of a compressed portion 313 of the braided suture 31. The barb 327 is passed through tissue 323 by common instruments of the art. A rigid component 331 resides in the interior of the compressed portion 313 and functions to aid in the management of the barb 327 as it travels through the compressed portion 313. The barb 327, and, in particular, a distal barb portion 330 thereof, is placed in the distal portion of the rigid component 331, as shown in FIG. 14. The barb 327 is then drawn into an interior lumen 329 of the compressed portion 313 of the suture 311 through a port 335 by pulling the proximal end of the rigid component 331, illustrated in FIG. 15. The barb 327 is then drawn out of the compressed suture 313 and optionally clipped off, as illustrated in FIG. 16. The compressed suture 313 is then pushed to create the desired loop geometry. Tension is applied on the compressed portion 313 of the suture 311 to generate a bound portion 324 thereof, a binding interface 315 being designed in length and pitch of braid to provide a bound end to a suture loop 321 when the bound portion 324 is in tension.
  • [0083]
    Presented thus far are 3 different manifestations of the self binding suture loop. The first, shown in FIGS. 2-7, addresses an embodiment which lends itself to suturing in an environment where generous flexible access to both suture ends is available. The second embodiment, illustrated in FIGS. 8-12, lends itself to an environment where restricted flexible access to both suture ends is available. The third embodiment, shown in FIGS. 13-16, lends itself to an environment where restricted access is available to both ends of the suture, but one end of the suture can remain rigid throughout the procedure. In all of these disclosed embodiments there resides the common requirement of one suture end 27, 227, 327, for negotiating a path through the compressed suture 13, 113, 213, 313. In two of the embodiments, receptacles 31, 331 are utilized to receive the suture end 27, 327, respectively.
  • [0084]
    The fid 27 in FIGS. 2-7 represents a preferred embodiment of a fid, in the form of a needle, which will pass easily through the internal lumen of the braided suture 113. A specific procedure may require the fid 27 to be sharp or pointed for the purposes of easily navigating through tissue, as shown in a fid 27 a in FIGS. 17b and 17 c. Should this be the case, it is preferred that a cap 37 be employed (FIGS. 17a and 17 c), which fits snugly and securely onto the tip of the fid 27 a, for the purposes of easily navigating through an interior lumen 29 (FIG. 3).
  • [0085]
    If it becomes difficult to access the interior lumen 29 a of the compressed braid portion 113 a with any of the devices shown in the previous embodiment, FIG. 18 illustrates a modified embodiment of the invention which includes a grommet 50, either flexible or rigid, that functions to supplement access of the fid 27 a of FIG. 17c, for example, into the lumen 29 a of the compressed suture portion 113 a. The example shown is illustrative only, in that such a grommet could be incorporated into any of the prior embodiments heretofore illustrated.
  • [0086]
    [0086]FIG. 19 illustrates an alternative embodiment to that illustrated in FIG. 8, for example, wherein hook 227 is utilized to engage the flexible loop 31. Such hooks 227 are not preferred in all sizes of sutures or in all procedures. In smaller environments, where visualization of the hook can be difficult, it is preferred to utilize a hook 227 a, as shown in FIG. 19, which has a tab portion 41 that is predisposed to accept a suture loop. As shown, the hook 227 a also includes a piercing tip 42. The tab portion 41 protrudes outwardly in a manner that makes it easy to capture a suture loop, such as suture loop 31 shown in FIG. 8. After the suture loop is captured, the tab portion 41 is sufficiently flexible so as to permit the suture loop to slide distally into an eyelet 43. Once connected to the eyelet 43, the suture loop draws the tab portion 41 into the interior of the braided suture.
  • [0087]
    [0087]FIGS. 20a-c, wherein like or functionally equivalent elements to those in previous embodiments are designated by like reference numerals preceded by the numeral 4, show an additional alternative embodiment for a hook-type fid device which is preferred in larger suture sizes in normal visualization environments. Referring now to FIG. 20a there may be seen a suture 411 to which is attached a hook 427, which includes a tab portion 441. The tab portion 441 is made accessible by bending the hook 427 as shown in FIG. 20b. FIG. 20c illustrates a loop portion 431 that has been looped around the tab portion 441. This mechanical attachment will allow for the suture 411 to be pulled into an interior lumen 429 within a compressed portion 413 of the suture 411.
  • [0088]
    FIGS. 21-27 illustrate a method by which a self binding suture is used to attach two pieces of tissue together. In this embodiment, like or functionally equivalent elements to those in previous embodiments are designated by like reference numerals preceded by the numeral 6. Two pieces of tissue 623 a,b are beneath the skin and accessed via a cannula 45. A fid in the form of a needle 627 attached to the end of a suture 611 is passed through both pieces of tissue 623 a and 623 b using conventional methods, as shown in FIG. 21. The fid 627 is then passed through a loop 47 at the distal end of a snare 49, as shown in FIG. 22. The snare is pulled tight by pulling on a tab 51 at a proximal end of the snare 49, as illustrated in FIG. 23. The snare 49 is then pulled up into the interior lumen 629 of the compressed braided suture 613, dragging the fid 627 along with it (FIGS. 24 and 25). The snare 49 is then removed from the suture and the fid 627 is optionally cut off, as shown in FIG. 26. At this juncture, the outer portion of the compressed portion 613 may be pushed down into the cannula 45 while the cut tail of the suture 611 is pulled, creating the forces necessary to draw the tissue portions 623 a and 623 b together, as shown in FIG. 27. Once drawn together, tension on the binding interface 615 of the suture 611 creates a binding force that locks the proximal ends of the suture together, creating a bound portion 624 of the suture.
  • [0089]
    FIGS. 28-35 show another alternative embodiment and method in which the self binding suture concept of the present invention is used in a suturing device to attach two pieces of tissue together. In this embodiment, like or functionally equivalent elements to those in previous embodiments are designated by like reference numerals preceded by the numeral 7. The suturing device in this embodiment comprises a rigid catch 731 that also acts as a piercing element. With reference to FIG. 28, Catch 731 is mechanically linked to a curved needle 727 through an articulating mechanism 53 which is capable of guiding the needle 727 into the distal features of the catch 731. Two pieces of tissue 723 a, 723 b are beneath a patient's skin 55 and accessed via a cannula 745. The catch 731 is pushed into the tissue 723 a, 723 b so that its distal end pierces the tissue, as shown in FIG. 29. The articulating mechanism 53 is then actuated so that a piercing driver 57 drives needle 727 through the opposing tissue 723 a, 723 b and into the catch 731, as illustrated in FIG. 30. Catch 731 is then pulled up to catch needle tip 727, as shown in FIG. 31.
  • [0090]
    At this point, the articulating mechanism 53 is reversed to back out piercing driver 57 from the needle tip 727 (FIG., 32). The needle tip 727 is rigid, in order to provide for a secure engagement with catch 731. The proximal end 59 of the needle 727, however, is formed of a flexible material so as to enable the needle tip 727 and its supporting portions to follow the catch 731 upwardly into the compressed portion 713 of the suture, as shown in FIGS. 33 and 34. When the catch 731 is withdrawn from the compressed portion 713, as illustrated in FIG. 35, thereby pulling the needle 727 along, a binding interface 715 is formed along a bound portion 724 of the suture.
  • [0091]
    In the preceding described self-binding suture embodiments, the elements common to each are as follows:
  • [0092]
    1) a braided tensioned suture represented by reference numerals ending with “11” (hereinafter designated as “11”);
  • [0093]
    2) a portion of the suture 11 that is radially expanded as a result of it being under compression, represented by reference numbers ending with “13”, hereinafter designated as “13”, through which one tail of the suture 11 is threaded, optionally with the aid of a fid or similar tapered rigid portion, represented by reference numbers ending with “27”, herein designated by “27”;
  • [0094]
    3) a catch or loop, represented by references numbers ending with “31”, herein designated as “31”.
  • [0095]
    Once the tail 27 is threaded back through the expanded portion 13 of the suture, tension on the expanded portion 13 draws the suture down on the suture tail 27 to create a binding interface represented by numbers ending in “15”, herein designated by “15”. The tension that is put on the expanded portion 13 must be applied in a specific manner to be most effective. The tension must preferably be applied continuously in a constant motion starting at the distal end of compressed suture portion 13 and moving toward the proximal end thereof. This is most easily accomplished by grasping the distal end of suture portion 13 between the thumb and fore finger and sweeping the length of thereof to its proximal end while holding the threaded tail 27 in the other hand. Many applications of the invention provide for such manual access to the distal and proximal ends of compressed suture portion 13 and need no other devices for the creation of the binding interface 15. However, there are other potential applications of the inventive concept for which access to the proximal and distal ends of the compressed suture portion 13 are limited.
  • [0096]
    In such applications, FIG. 36 illustrates a device or, more particularly, a tensioner 63 which provides a means for applying the proper amount of tension to the compressed suture portion 13, from its distal end to the proximal end thereof, in order to create the bound suture portion 24, comprising a binding interface 15 between the expanded suture length and the tensioned suturing material extending through its internal lumen. The tensioner 63 includes a shaft 65 that is long enough to allow sufficient access to the distal end of the compressed portion 13. At the end of this shaft is disposed a head 67 having a slot 69, wherein the head is formed of material which will frictionally interact with the suture so as to apply the desired frictional tension thereto when portions of the compressed suture 13 extend through the slot. In operation, the tensioner shaft 65 is manipulated so that the head 67 is disposed at the distal end of the compressed suture portion 13, whereupon the suturing material is engaged within the slot 69. Then, the tensioner 63 is withdrawn proximally toward the practitioner, thereby functioning to “smooth down” or tension the compressed suture portion 13 as it travels therealong.
  • [0097]
    Another provision for a tensioner is one which may be integrated into the suture, in either a rigid or flexible manner, is shown, for example, in FIG. 37. In this embodiment, a modified tensioner device 71 is illustrated, which comprises a tubular structure 73. The tubular structure 73 may be fabricated of either flexible or rigid materials, and includes a flared portion 75 at its distal end. The outer dimensions of the flared portion 75 are sufficiently large so that it binds with the interior surface of the lumen 29 within the compressed suture portion 13. This binding interface between the tensioner 71 and the compressed suture portion 13 supplies the tension required to create a binding interface between the compressed suture portion 13 and the suture 11 extending through the lumen 29 thereof when the tensioner 71 is pulled proximally out of the lumen 29. The interior of the tubular structure 73 provides for the passage of all necessary fids, such as hooks, snares, and needles, for assisting passage of the suture 11 through the lumen 29. The flared portion 75 may also have an interior that facilitates the management of fid devices into the interior of the braid.
  • [0098]
    In all the heretofore disclosed embodiments, the radially expanded section 13 of the suture is held open by compressing that section of the suture. In order to draw a fid into the center of the braid, one hand is required to push on the suture and the other to draw or push the fid 27 into the center of the braid. However, the inventors have discovered a method for holding the braid open throughout the process of managing the fid device that also serves to tension the suture portion 13 in the final stages of creating the binding interface 15. Accordingly, FIGS. 38-43 illustrate such a method. More particularly, FIG. 38 illustrates shows an expanded braid 79 encapsulated in a tubular member 81, wherein the tubular member 81 has an interior lumen 83 large enough to accept a fid 85 that is in the process of completing a suture loop. A preferred approach would be to over-extrude the tubular member 81 onto the braided portion 79 to achieve this configuration. In FIG. 39 there is shown the fid 85 passing through the interior of the expanded braid 79 and exiting proximally. FIG. 40 shows the suture tail 87 completely in the expanded portion of the expanded braid 79.
  • [0099]
    Once the suture 87 is fully in place within the expanded braid 79, the expanded braid can be tensioned over the suture. This tensioning procedure is illustrated in FIGS. 41-43. Tensioning is accomplished by pulling the proximal portion of the tube 81 with such force, in the direction shown by arrows A, as is necessary to delaminate the braid 79 from the tube's interior surface 88. This force is in a direction and of sufficient strength to tension the binding interface distally to the proximal end as is required, resulting in a bound portion 89 (FIG. 43).
  • [0100]
    The apparatus and method of the present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential characteristics. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A suture having a structure comprising:
    a plurality of flexible filaments loosely woven together in a tubular geometry comprising an outer wall which defines an internal lumen;
    wherein when a first portion of said suture is placed under compression, the outer wall of said first portion is radially expanded, such that a diameter of said first portion internal lumen increases in size sufficiently so that a second portion of said suture structure, which is not under compression, may be accommodated within said first portion lumen;
    such that when said suture first portion is subsequently placed under tension, while said suture second portion is disposed within the first portion lumen, the diameter of the first portion lumen decreases sufficiently to capture said suture second portion therein to create a binding interface between the first and second suture portions, thereby locking said second suture portion in axial position within the lumen of said first suture portion.
  2. 2. The suture as recited in claim 1, wherein said first portion may comprise any portion of a length of said suture.
  3. 3. The suture as recited in claim 2, wherein the weave of said outer wall is sufficiently loose that said second suture portion may be inserted into said lumen therethrough, between filaments forming said wall.
  4. 4. The suture as recited in claim 1, where an end of a length of said suture comprises a tool adapted to facilitate insertion of said suture end into said suture first portion.
  5. 5. The suture as recited in claim 4, wherein said tool comprises a needle.
  6. 6. The suture as recited in claim 4, wherein said tool comprises a hook.
  7. 7. The suture as recited in claim 1, wherein an interior portion thereof includes a component for aiding insertion and navigation of an end of said suture through the outer wall and the internal lumen of said suture first portion.
  8. 8. The suture as recited in claim 7, wherein said component is adapted to receive said suture end to thereby facilitate insertion of said suture end through said outer wall weave.
  9. 9. The suture as recited in claim 8, wherein said suture end comprises a tool for aiding insertion of said end through said outer wall weave, said tool being adapted for engagement with said component.
  10. 10. The suture as recited in claim 9, wherein said component comprises an appendage which extends through said outer wall weave for engaging said tool.
  11. 11. The suture as recited in claim 10, wherein said appendage comprises a hook for grasping a portion of said tool.
  12. 12. A single-tailed suture for securing a plurality of body components together, comprising:
    a length of braided suturing material having a distal portion and a proximal portion, and comprising a braided outer wall which defines an internal lumen, wherein said braided suturing material extends through one of said body components;
    a distal end of said braided suturing material extending through the outer wall of said proximal portion so that a predetermined length of said distal suture portion being disposed within the lumen of a predetermined length of said proximal suture portion, said predetermined length of said proximal suture portion being in tension to create a binding interface between the predetermined length of said distal suture portion and the predetermined length of said proximal suture portion to create a suture loop.
  13. 13. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 12, wherein said distal suture end comprises a fid for assisting entry of said distal suture end into the lumen of said proximal suture portion.
  14. 14. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 12, and further comprising structure extendable from said proximal suture portion for aiding insertion and navigation of said suture distal end through the outer wall of said proximal suture portion.
  15. 15. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 14, wherein said structure comprises an appendage which is adapted to engage a fid disposed on said suture distal end.
  16. 16. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 12, wherein a size of said suture loop is adjustable by adjusting a location of said predetermined length of said proximal suture portion, prior to applying tension thereto.
  17. 17. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 12, wherein said braided suturing material has a diameter D when placed in tension, without suturing material disposed in said internal lumen, and a diameter D×n when said suturing material is placed in compression, wherein n has a value of between approximately 1.5 and 15.
  18. 18. The single-tailed suture as recited in claim 17, wherein n has a value of between 2 and 4.
  19. 19. A method of suturing a plurality of body components together, using a length of braided suturing material which comprises a plurality of flexible filaments loosely woven together in a tubular geometry comprising an outer wall which defines an internal lumen, the method comprising the steps of:
    a) inserting a distal end of said suturing material through a portion of a first one of said body components;
    b) compressing a predetermined length of a portion of said braided suturing material which is proximal to said first body component, such that an internal diameter of the lumen of said compressed suture portion increases substantially in size;
    c) inserting a distal end of said length of braided suturing material through the outer wall of said compressed suture portion and into the internal lumen thereof, so that a desired length of said braided suturing material which is distal to said first body component is disposed within the internal lumen of said compressed suture portion; and
    d) applying tension to said compressed suture portion to decrease the internal diameter of its lumen, to thereby create a binding interface between the compressed suture portion and the suturing material disposed in its lumen, so that a suture loop of a desired length is formed.
  20. 20. The suturing method as recited in claim 19, said method further comprising a step of moving the compressed suture portion along said length of suturing material, proximal to said first body component, until a desired suture loop is obtained, after which said tensioning step is performed.
US09949249 2000-02-29 2001-09-07 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus Abandoned US20020029066A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09515360 US6296659B1 (en) 2000-02-29 2000-02-29 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus
US09949249 US20020029066A1 (en) 2000-02-29 2001-09-07 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09949249 US20020029066A1 (en) 2000-02-29 2001-09-07 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus
US10750287 US7285124B2 (en) 2000-02-29 2003-12-31 Single-tailed suturing method

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09515360 Continuation US6296659B1 (en) 2000-02-29 2000-02-29 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10750287 Continuation US7285124B2 (en) 2000-02-29 2003-12-31 Single-tailed suturing method

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20020029066A1 true true US20020029066A1 (en) 2002-03-07

Family

ID=24051028

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09515360 Active US6296659B1 (en) 2000-02-29 2000-02-29 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus
US09949249 Abandoned US20020029066A1 (en) 2000-02-29 2001-09-07 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus
US10750287 Active 2020-05-21 US7285124B2 (en) 2000-02-29 2003-12-31 Single-tailed suturing method

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09515360 Active US6296659B1 (en) 2000-02-29 2000-02-29 Single-tailed suturing method and apparatus

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10750287 Active 2020-05-21 US7285124B2 (en) 2000-02-29 2003-12-31 Single-tailed suturing method

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US6296659B1 (en)

Cited By (104)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050125034A1 (en) * 2003-12-04 2005-06-09 Cichocki Frank R.Jr. Active suture for the delivery of therapeutic fluids
EP1543781A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-22 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US20050192631A1 (en) * 2001-09-13 2005-09-01 Grafton R. D. High strength suture tape
US20060030883A1 (en) * 2003-12-04 2006-02-09 Cichocki Frank R Jr Device for creating and maintaining infusion passages in tissue
US20070167950A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-07-19 Tauro Joseph C System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US20070239209A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2007-10-11 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US20070288023A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Greg Pellegrino Soft tissue repair using tissue augments and bone anchors
US20080132932A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-06-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Inc. Chondral Defect Repair
US20080281355A1 (en) * 2005-05-04 2008-11-13 Etech Ag Joining Element
US20090142132A1 (en) * 2007-11-30 2009-06-04 Klein Arnold G Flyline connecting device
US20090318966A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2009-12-24 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US20100087855A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2010-04-08 Quill Medical, Inc. Barbed suture in combination with surgical needle
US20100087857A1 (en) * 2004-11-05 2010-04-08 Stone Kevin T Soft Tissue Repair Device and Method
US20100145384A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2010-06-10 Biomet Sport Medicine, Llc Method for Implanting Soft Tissue
US20110015653A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Michael Bogart Apparatus and Method for Joining Similar or Dissimilar Suture Products
US20110087284A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-04-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft Tissue Repair and Conduit Device
US20110185560A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2011-08-04 Qioptiq Photonics Gmbh & Co. Kg Method for producing an objective
US7996967B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-08-16 Quill Medical, Inc. System for variable-angle cutting of a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US20110208240A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-08-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and Apparatus for Soft Tissue Fixation
US20110208239A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2011-08-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and Apparatus for Forming a Self-Locking Adjustable Loop
US20110224799A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-09-15 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for Trochanteric Reattachment
US8032996B2 (en) 2003-05-13 2011-10-11 Quill Medical, Inc. Apparatus for forming barbs on a suture
US8062334B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2011-11-22 Kfx Medical Corporation Suture anchor
US20110288584A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-11-24 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair device
US8083770B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2011-12-27 Quill Medical, Inc. Suture anchor and method
US8118834B1 (en) 2007-12-20 2012-02-21 Angiotech Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Composite self-retaining sutures and method
US8216273B1 (en) 2008-02-25 2012-07-10 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retainers with supporting structures on a suture
US20120209325A1 (en) * 2010-11-24 2012-08-16 Arthrocare Corporation Novel suture
US8246652B2 (en) 1993-05-03 2012-08-21 Ethicon, Inc. Suture with a pointed end and an anchor end and with equally spaced yieldable tissue grasping barbs located at successive axial locations
US8292921B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-10-23 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US8298262B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-10-30 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for tissue fixation
US8317825B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2012-11-27 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue conduit device and method
US8337525B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-12-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US8343227B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2013-01-01 Biomet Manufacturing Corp. Knee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US8361113B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-01-29 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8409253B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-04-02 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair assembly and associated method
US8500818B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2013-08-06 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Knee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US8506597B2 (en) 2011-10-25 2013-08-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for interosseous membrane reconstruction
US8551140B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2013-10-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US8562647B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2013-10-22 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for securing soft tissue to bone
US8597327B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-12-03 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Method and apparatus for sternal closure
US8608777B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-12-17 Biomet Sports Medicine Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8615856B1 (en) 2008-01-30 2013-12-31 Ethicon, Inc. Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US8641732B1 (en) 2008-02-26 2014-02-04 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining suture with variable dimension filament and method
US8652172B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-02-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Flexible anchors for tissue fixation
US8672969B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-03-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US8721664B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2014-05-13 Ethicon, Inc. Suture methods and devices
US8734485B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-05-27 Ethicon, Inc. Sutures with barbs that overlap and cover projections
US8747437B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-06-10 Ethicon, Inc. Continuous stitch wound closure utilizing one-way suture
US8771313B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2014-07-08 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with heat-contact mediated retainers
US8771352B2 (en) 2011-05-17 2014-07-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for tibial fixation of an ACL graft
US8777987B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2014-07-15 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures including tissue retainers having improved strength
US8790370B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-07-29 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament assemblies
US8795334B2 (en) 2011-01-28 2014-08-05 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair
US8793863B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2014-08-05 Ethicon, Inc. Method and apparatus for forming retainers on a suture
US8801783B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-08-12 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Prosthetic ligament system for knee joint
US8814905B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2014-08-26 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament snare assemblies
US20140243893A1 (en) * 2013-02-26 2014-08-28 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Flexible deformable suture anchor
US8821543B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-09-02 Depuy Mitek, Llc Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US8821545B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2014-09-02 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament snare assemblies
US8840645B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2014-09-23 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8876865B2 (en) 2008-04-15 2014-11-04 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with bi-directional retainers or uni-directional retainers
US8875607B2 (en) 2008-01-30 2014-11-04 Ethicon, Inc. Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US8881635B2 (en) 2011-02-02 2014-11-11 Syntorr Inc. Variable denier yarn and suture
US8894684B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2014-11-25 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using a suture having one or more protrusions
US8916077B1 (en) 2007-12-19 2014-12-23 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with retainers formed from molten material
US8926662B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2015-01-06 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue graft anchoring
US8932331B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-01-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US8932328B2 (en) 2008-11-03 2015-01-13 Ethicon, Inc. Length of self-retaining suture and method and device for using the same
US8936621B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-01-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8961560B2 (en) 2008-05-16 2015-02-24 Ethicon, Inc. Bidirectional self-retaining sutures with laser-marked and/or non-laser marked indicia and methods
US8968364B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-03-03 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for fixation of an ACL graft
USRE45426E1 (en) 1997-05-21 2015-03-17 Ethicon, Inc. Surgical methods using one-way suture
US8986327B2 (en) 2012-10-18 2015-03-24 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Flexible anchor delivery system
US8998949B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2015-04-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue conduit device
US9017381B2 (en) 2007-04-10 2015-04-28 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Adjustable knotless loops
US9060764B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-06-23 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue
US9060763B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-06-23 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue
US9078644B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2015-07-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US9084597B2 (en) 2012-03-09 2015-07-21 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suture-based knotless repair
US9095331B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2015-08-04 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US9125647B2 (en) 2008-02-21 2015-09-08 Ethicon, Inc. Method and apparatus for elevating retainers on self-retaining sutures
US9149267B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-10-06 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9192373B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2015-11-24 Medos International Sàrl Surgical constructs and methods for securing tissue
US9248580B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2016-02-02 Ethicon, Inc. Barb configurations for barbed sutures
US9271713B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-03-01 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for tensioning a suture
US9314241B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-04-19 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
WO2016076977A1 (en) * 2014-11-10 2016-05-19 Martin Daniel L Variable denier yarn and suture
US9345567B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2016-05-24 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using snare assemblies and soft anchors
US9357991B2 (en) 2011-11-03 2016-06-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for stitching tendons
US9370350B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-06-21 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9381013B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-07-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9538998B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-01-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for fracture fixation
US9615822B2 (en) 2014-05-30 2017-04-11 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Insertion tools and method for soft anchor
US9675341B2 (en) 2010-11-09 2017-06-13 Ethicon Inc. Emergency self-retaining sutures and packaging
US9700291B2 (en) 2014-06-03 2017-07-11 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Capsule retractor
US9737293B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Medos International Sàrl Surgical constructs with collapsing suture loop and methods for securing tissue
US9757119B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2017-09-12 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Visual aid for identifying suture limbs arthroscopically
US9757113B2 (en) 2013-07-31 2017-09-12 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable graft fixation device
US9763655B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-09-19 Medos International Sarl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using hard anchors
US9833231B2 (en) 1999-12-02 2017-12-05 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Apparatus for tissue repair
US9918827B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-03-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Scaffold for spring ligament repair
US9918826B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2018-03-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Scaffold for spring ligament repair
US9936940B2 (en) 2013-09-06 2018-04-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone

Families Citing this family (111)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8721663B2 (en) 1999-05-20 2014-05-13 Sentreheart, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transpericardial left atrial appendage closure
US6488689B1 (en) 1999-05-20 2002-12-03 Aaron V. Kaplan Methods and apparatus for transpericardial left atrial appendage closure
US7951201B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2011-05-31 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for the treatment of the intervertebral disc annulus
US6592625B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2003-07-15 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Spinal disc annulus reconstruction method and spinal disc annulus stent
US7004970B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2006-02-28 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for spinal disc annulus reconstruction and repair
US7052516B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2006-05-30 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Spinal disc annulus reconstruction method and deformable spinal disc annulus stent
US7935147B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2011-05-03 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for enhanced delivery of treatment device to the intervertebral disc annulus
US8128698B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2012-03-06 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for the treatment of the intervertebral disc annulus
US8163022B2 (en) 2008-10-14 2012-04-24 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for the treatment of the intervertebral disc annulus
US7615076B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2009-11-10 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for the treatment of the intervertebral disc annulus
US8632590B2 (en) 1999-10-20 2014-01-21 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Apparatus and methods for the treatment of the intervertebral disc
EP1906840A2 (en) 2005-06-01 2008-04-09 Arthrocare Corporation Knotless suture anchoring device having deforming section to accommodate sutures of various diameters
US6770076B2 (en) 2001-02-12 2004-08-03 Opus Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for attaching connective tissues to bone using a knotless suture anchoring device
US7195642B2 (en) 2001-03-13 2007-03-27 Mckernan Daniel J Method and apparatus for fixing a graft in a bone tunnel
US7280865B2 (en) * 2001-12-20 2007-10-09 Accuray Incorporated Anchored fiducial apparatus and method
US20060155328A1 (en) * 2003-03-18 2006-07-13 Opus Medical, Inc. Optimized suture braid
US7862584B2 (en) * 2003-05-07 2011-01-04 Anpa Medical, Inc. Suture lock
US8109968B2 (en) * 2003-05-07 2012-02-07 Anpa Medical, Inc. Suture lock
JP5074765B2 (en) 2003-10-09 2012-11-14 センターハート・インコーポレイテッドSentreHEART, Inc. Apparatus and method for ligating tissue
US7608092B1 (en) 2004-02-20 2009-10-27 Biomet Sports Medicince, LLC Method and apparatus for performing meniscus repair
US8109965B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2012-02-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, LLP Method and apparatus for soft tissue fixation
US7695503B1 (en) 2004-06-09 2010-04-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for soft tissue attachment
US7819898B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2010-10-26 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for soft tissue fixation
US7500983B1 (en) 2004-06-09 2009-03-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Apparatus for soft tissue attachment
US8088146B2 (en) 2004-06-14 2012-01-03 Teleflex Medical Incorporated High-strength suture
US20050288775A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Metallic fibers reinforced textile prosthesis
US8371307B2 (en) 2005-02-08 2013-02-12 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Methods and devices for the treatment of airway obstruction, sleep apnea and snoring
US8096303B2 (en) 2005-02-08 2012-01-17 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V Airway implants and methods and devices for insertion and retrieval
US20060184201A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2006-08-17 James Jervis E Suture retainer with suture guide and method of using a suture retainer with a suture guide
US7905903B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2011-03-15 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for tissue fixation
US7959650B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2011-06-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Adjustable knotless loops
US7828820B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2010-11-09 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatuses for securing suture
FI120963B (en) * 2006-09-20 2010-05-31 Bioretec Oy A bioabsorbable elongated member
WO2008069816A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-06-12 Ryan Timothy J Apparatus and methods for delivering sutures
EP2929842A1 (en) 2007-03-30 2015-10-14 Sentreheart, Inc. Devices and systems for closing the left atrial appendage
US20090259251A1 (en) * 2008-04-11 2009-10-15 Cohen Matthew D Loop suture
US20100204729A1 (en) * 2008-09-11 2010-08-12 Ahmad Robert Hadba Tapered Looped Suture
US8056599B2 (en) * 2008-09-24 2011-11-15 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp System and method of making tapered looped suture
US8403017B2 (en) * 2008-10-27 2013-03-26 Covidien Lp System, method and apparatus for making tapered looped suture
GB0819912D0 (en) * 2008-10-30 2008-12-10 Xiros Plc Tubular implantable cord
US8460379B2 (en) * 2009-03-31 2013-06-11 Arthrex, Inc. Adjustable suture button construct and methods of tissue reconstruction
US8439976B2 (en) * 2009-03-31 2013-05-14 Arthrex, Inc. Integrated adjustable button-suture-graft construct with two fixation devices
EP2413815A4 (en) * 2009-04-01 2017-03-15 Sentreheart Inc Tissue ligation devices and controls therefor
US20100274195A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2010-10-28 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable Device Suture Bars
US9038688B2 (en) 2009-04-29 2015-05-26 Covidien Lp System and method for making tapered looped suture
US8590588B2 (en) * 2009-04-29 2013-11-26 Covidien Lp System and method for making tapered looped suture
CA2800386A1 (en) * 2009-05-26 2010-12-02 Oc2, Llc Filamentous tissue implant
WO2010138228A1 (en) * 2009-05-26 2010-12-02 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Helically formed coil for a neural cuff electrode
US8828053B2 (en) * 2009-07-24 2014-09-09 Depuy Mitek, Llc Methods and devices for repairing and anchoring damaged tissue
US8814903B2 (en) 2009-07-24 2014-08-26 Depuy Mitek, Llc Methods and devices for repairing meniscal tissue
US8652153B2 (en) * 2010-01-11 2014-02-18 Anulex Technologies, Inc. Intervertebral disc annulus repair system and bone anchor delivery tool
US8968362B2 (en) 2010-04-08 2015-03-03 Covidien Lp Coated looped suture
EP2558014A4 (en) 2010-04-13 2017-11-29 Sentreheart Inc Methods and devices for treating atrial fibrillation
JP5763173B2 (en) 2010-04-27 2015-08-12 ジンテス ゲゼルシャフト ミット ベシュレンクテル ハフツング Anchor assembly having an expandable anchor
US9743919B2 (en) 2010-04-27 2017-08-29 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Stitch lock for attaching two or more structures
US9724080B2 (en) 2010-04-27 2017-08-08 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Insertion instrument for anchor assembly
US9451938B2 (en) 2010-04-27 2016-09-27 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Insertion instrument for anchor assembly
KR101028248B1 (en) * 2010-06-09 2011-04-11 주식회사 메타바이오메드 The method of manufacturing a suture
US20120053627A1 (en) * 2010-08-30 2012-03-01 DePuy Mikek, Inc. Suture anchor and threader
US8452406B2 (en) 2010-09-15 2013-05-28 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Automatic selection of lead configuration for a neural stimulation lead
US8398679B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2013-03-19 Covidien Lp Modular suture
EP2455040B1 (en) 2010-11-17 2015-03-04 Arthrex, Inc. Adjustable suture-button construct for knotless stabilization of cranial cruciate deficient ligament stifle
EP2455001A3 (en) 2010-11-17 2017-11-08 Arthrex, Inc. Adjustable suture-button constructs for ligament reconstruction
EP2455002A1 (en) 2010-11-17 2012-05-23 Arthrex, Inc. Adjustable suture-button construct for ankle syndesmosis repair
US20150066081A1 (en) * 2011-02-02 2015-03-05 Daniel L. Martin Variable denier yarn and suture
EP2717791A4 (en) 2011-06-08 2015-07-08 Sentreheart Inc Tissue ligation devices and tensioning devices therefor
US9198648B2 (en) * 2011-06-20 2015-12-01 Ethicon, Inc. Method and device for approximating tissue
WO2013003278A1 (en) 2011-06-28 2013-01-03 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Strain relief feature for an implantable medical device lead
US20130178898A1 (en) * 2011-07-06 2013-07-11 Imds Corporation Tissue approximation
US9357997B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2016-06-07 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suture passer and method
US8951263B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2015-02-10 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Orthopedic suture passer and method
US9662105B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2017-05-30 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suture passer and method
US8882834B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2014-11-11 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Soft tissue repair
US8801727B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2014-08-12 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Orthopedic suture passer and method
US8888849B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2014-11-18 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Soft tissue repair
US9301745B2 (en) 2011-07-21 2016-04-05 Arthrex, Inc. Knotless suture constructs
US9332979B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2016-05-10 Arthrex, Inc. Tensionable knotless acromioclavicular repairs and constructs
US9192368B2 (en) 2011-08-04 2015-11-24 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suspension device to anchor tissue graft
US9107653B2 (en) 2011-09-22 2015-08-18 Arthrex, Inc. Tensionable knotless anchors with splice and methods of tissue repair
US9421008B2 (en) 2011-09-23 2016-08-23 Arthrex, Inc. Soft suture-based anchors
US9526496B2 (en) 2011-09-26 2016-12-27 Atex Technologies, Inc. Loop
WO2013055886A1 (en) 2011-10-11 2013-04-18 Mcclellan William T Tissue device
US9615821B2 (en) 2011-12-09 2017-04-11 Arthrex, Inc. Tensionable knotless anchor systems and methods of tissue repair
US9259217B2 (en) 2012-01-03 2016-02-16 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Suture Button
US9204959B2 (en) * 2012-02-02 2015-12-08 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Implantable biologic holder
JP6026567B2 (en) 2012-03-21 2016-11-16 カーディアック ペースメイカーズ, インコーポレイテッド System and method for stimulating the vagus nerve
FR2990843B1 (en) * 2012-05-22 2014-06-13 Cousin Biotech An implantable fastener, implant for treating prolapses of the pelvic floor including such a device and kit comprising said device.
US9421010B2 (en) 2012-06-20 2016-08-23 Arthrex, Inc. Whipping suture anchor
US9737292B2 (en) 2012-06-22 2017-08-22 Arthrex, Inc. Knotless suture anchors and methods of tissue repair
US9463011B2 (en) 2012-08-17 2016-10-11 Arthrex, Inc. Soft anchors with soft eyelets
US9517060B2 (en) 2012-09-27 2016-12-13 Ethicon, Inc. Method and device for approximating tissue
JP6096300B2 (en) 2012-10-02 2017-03-15 カーディアック ペースメイカーズ, インコーポレイテッド Cuff electrode assembly and lead assembly
JP6162245B2 (en) 2012-10-02 2017-07-12 カーディアック ペースメイカーズ, インコーポレイテッド Lead assembly including a cuff electrode assembly
US20140121700A1 (en) * 2012-10-26 2014-05-01 Arthrex, Inc. Systems and methods for locking a cinch loop and methods of tissue repair
WO2014106023A1 (en) 2012-12-28 2014-07-03 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Stimulation cuff and implantation tool
US9737294B2 (en) 2013-01-28 2017-08-22 Cartiva, Inc. Method and system for orthopedic repair
WO2014126857A1 (en) 2013-02-13 2014-08-21 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Cuff electrode with integrated tendril
US20140249576A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Kent Island Holdings LLC Locking suture
WO2014138570A3 (en) * 2013-03-08 2014-11-06 Zone 2 Surgical, Inc. Collapsible locking suture
WO2014164028A1 (en) 2013-03-12 2014-10-09 Sentreheart, Inc. Tissue ligation devices and methods therefor
US9463013B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2016-10-11 Stryker Corporation Adjustable continuous filament structure and method of manufacture and use
US9198656B1 (en) * 2013-09-04 2015-12-01 River Point Medical, LLC Locking suture loop apparatus surgery
GB201316307D0 (en) * 2013-09-13 2013-10-30 Xiros Ltd Method of producing a swellable polymer fibre
US9486202B2 (en) 2013-11-15 2016-11-08 Riverpoint Medical, Llc Suture and soft anchor assembly and method of making the same
US20150141995A1 (en) * 2013-11-15 2015-05-21 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Adjustable Loop Constructs And Techniques
US9451953B2 (en) * 2013-12-11 2016-09-27 Depuy Mitek, Llc Knotless collapsible sutures and methods for suturing
WO2015095524A3 (en) 2013-12-20 2015-08-27 Arthrocare Corporation Knotless all suture tissue repair
US9486204B1 (en) 2014-05-23 2016-11-08 Riverpoint Medical, Llc Suture assembly for cranial cruciate ligament surgery
US9517062B2 (en) 2014-12-03 2016-12-13 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Closed loop suture for anchoring tissue grafts
GB201512682D0 (en) * 2015-07-20 2015-08-26 Xiros Ltd Joint stabilisation
US9888997B2 (en) 2015-07-20 2018-02-13 Arthrex, Inc. Soft anchor assembly with barbed flexible strand and techniques for use

Family Cites Families (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2600395A (en) 1951-06-01 1952-06-17 Domoj John Joseph Keyhole splice
US4186921A (en) * 1978-04-18 1980-02-05 Fox Daniel W Method of making a tethered ball apparatus
US4319428A (en) * 1979-12-28 1982-03-16 Fox Daniel W Adjustable tree tie down
US4987665A (en) * 1986-03-03 1991-01-29 American Cyanamid Company Prosthetic tubular article
US4792336A (en) * 1986-03-03 1988-12-20 American Cyanamid Company Flat braided ligament or tendon implant device having texturized yarns
US5263984A (en) * 1987-07-20 1993-11-23 Regen Biologics, Inc. Prosthetic ligaments
US5376118A (en) * 1989-05-10 1994-12-27 United States Surgical Corporation Support material for cell impregnation
US5217495A (en) * 1989-05-10 1993-06-08 United States Surgical Corporation Synthetic semiabsorbable composite yarn
US4962929A (en) * 1989-08-07 1990-10-16 Lacer, Inc. Wrist strap for attracting an item of sports equipment to the wrist
US4946377A (en) * 1989-11-06 1990-08-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Tissue repair device
US5062344A (en) 1990-04-12 1991-11-05 Sparton Corporation Bowline knot in a braided line
US5259846A (en) * 1991-01-07 1993-11-09 United States Surgical Corporation Loop threaded combined surgical needle-suture device
US5405352A (en) 1991-04-09 1995-04-11 Weston; Peter V. Suture knot, method for its formation and use, and knot forming apparatus
US5540703A (en) 1993-01-06 1996-07-30 Smith & Nephew Richards Inc. Knotted cable attachment apparatus formed of braided polymeric fibers
US5450860A (en) * 1993-08-31 1995-09-19 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Device for tissue repair and method for employing same
US5667528A (en) * 1995-11-22 1997-09-16 United States Surgical Corporation Braided suture surgical incision member attachment
DE19628909C2 (en) 1996-07-18 1999-11-18 Ruesch Willy Ag shutter
US5683417A (en) * 1996-08-14 1997-11-04 Cooper; William I. Suture and method for endoscopic surgery

Cited By (216)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8246652B2 (en) 1993-05-03 2012-08-21 Ethicon, Inc. Suture with a pointed end and an anchor end and with equally spaced yieldable tissue grasping barbs located at successive axial locations
USRE45426E1 (en) 1997-05-21 2015-03-17 Ethicon, Inc. Surgical methods using one-way suture
US9833231B2 (en) 1999-12-02 2017-12-05 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Apparatus for tissue repair
US8777989B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-07-15 Ethicon, Inc. Subcutaneous sinusoidal wound closure utilizing one-way suture
US8764776B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-07-01 Ethicon, Inc. Anastomosis method using self-retaining sutures
US8764796B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-07-01 Ethicon, Inc. Suture method
US8747437B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-06-10 Ethicon, Inc. Continuous stitch wound closure utilizing one-way suture
US8777988B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2014-07-15 Ethicon, Inc. Methods for using self-retaining sutures in endoscopic procedures
US8011072B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-09-06 Quill Medical, Inc. Method for variable-angle cutting of a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US8028387B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-10-04 Quill Medical, Inc. System for supporting and cutting suture thread to create tissue retainers thereon
US8020263B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-09-20 Quill Medical, Inc. Automated system for cutting tissue retainers on a suture
US7996967B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-08-16 Quill Medical, Inc. System for variable-angle cutting of a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US7996968B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-08-16 Quill Medical, Inc. Automated method for cutting tissue retainers on a suture
US8028388B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-10-04 Quill Medical, Inc. System for cutting a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US8926659B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2015-01-06 Ethicon, Inc. Barbed suture created having barbs defined by variable-angle cut
US8015678B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2011-09-13 Quill Medical, Inc. Method for cutting a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US7892256B2 (en) * 2001-09-13 2011-02-22 Arthrex, Inc. High strength suture tape
US20050192631A1 (en) * 2001-09-13 2005-09-01 Grafton R. D. High strength suture tape
US8679158B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2014-03-25 Ethicon, Inc. Multiple suture thread configuration with an intermediate connector
US8734486B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2014-05-27 Ethicon, Inc. Multiple suture thread configuration with an intermediate connector
US8083770B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2011-12-27 Quill Medical, Inc. Suture anchor and method
US8690914B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2014-04-08 Ethicon, Inc. Suture with an intermediate barbed body
US8652170B2 (en) 2002-08-09 2014-02-18 Ethicon, Inc. Double ended barbed suture with an intermediate body
US8852232B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-10-07 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures having effective holding strength and tensile strength
US9248580B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2016-02-02 Ethicon, Inc. Barb configurations for barbed sutures
US8734485B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-05-27 Ethicon, Inc. Sutures with barbs that overlap and cover projections
US8795332B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-08-05 Ethicon, Inc. Barbed sutures
US8821540B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-09-02 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures having effective holding strength and tensile strength
US20100087855A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2010-04-08 Quill Medical, Inc. Barbed suture in combination with surgical needle
US8721681B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2014-05-13 Ethicon, Inc. Barbed suture in combination with surgical needle
US8032996B2 (en) 2003-05-13 2011-10-11 Quill Medical, Inc. Apparatus for forming barbs on a suture
US8257393B2 (en) * 2003-12-04 2012-09-04 Ethicon, Inc. Active suture for the delivery of therapeutic fluids
US8128656B2 (en) 2003-12-04 2012-03-06 Ethicon, Inc. Device for creating and maintaining infusion passages in tissue
US7875055B2 (en) 2003-12-04 2011-01-25 Ethicon, Inc. Active suture for the delivery of therapeutic fluids
US20060030883A1 (en) * 2003-12-04 2006-02-09 Cichocki Frank R Jr Device for creating and maintaining infusion passages in tissue
US20050125034A1 (en) * 2003-12-04 2005-06-09 Cichocki Frank R.Jr. Active suture for the delivery of therapeutic fluids
JP2005177476A (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-07-07 Radi Medical Systems Ab Device to seal incision in blood vessel and surgical suture
US7717929B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2010-05-18 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US20050137624A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-23 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
JP4641790B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2011-03-02 ラディ・メディカル・システムズ・アクチェボラーグ Intravascular incision sealing device
EP1543781A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-22 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US8267959B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2012-09-18 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US20070239209A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2007-10-11 Radi Medical Systems Ab Technique for securing a suture
US8721664B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2014-05-13 Ethicon, Inc. Suture methods and devices
US8267964B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2012-09-18 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8951287B1 (en) 2004-06-02 2015-02-10 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US9044226B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2015-06-02 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US9655611B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2017-05-23 Kfx Medical, Llc System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US9414835B1 (en) 2004-06-02 2016-08-16 Kfx Medical, Llc System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US20090318966A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2009-12-24 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8109969B1 (en) 2004-06-02 2012-02-07 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8100942B1 (en) 2004-06-02 2012-01-24 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8926663B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2015-01-06 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8062334B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2011-11-22 Kfx Medical Corporation Suture anchor
US8512378B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2013-08-20 Kfx Medical Corporation Suture anchor
US8529601B2 (en) 2004-06-02 2013-09-10 Kfx Medical Corporation System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8551140B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2013-10-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US9572655B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2017-02-21 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8840645B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2014-09-23 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9801708B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2017-10-31 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US20100087857A1 (en) * 2004-11-05 2010-04-08 Stone Kevin T Soft Tissue Repair Device and Method
US8303604B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-11-06 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and method
US9504460B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2016-11-29 Biomet Sports Medicine, LLC. Soft tissue repair device and method
US8998949B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2015-04-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue conduit device
US8317825B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2012-11-27 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue conduit device and method
US20080281355A1 (en) * 2005-05-04 2008-11-13 Etech Ag Joining Element
US8870915B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2014-10-28 DePuy Synthes Products, LLC Joining element
US9757121B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2017-09-12 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Joining element
US9757120B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2017-09-12 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Joining element
US20110288584A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-11-24 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair device
US8623051B2 (en) * 2005-06-24 2014-01-07 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair device
US20070167950A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-07-19 Tauro Joseph C System and method for attaching soft tissue to bone
US8652171B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-02-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for soft tissue fixation
US9498204B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-11-22 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
US8936621B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-01-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8632569B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-01-21 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9492158B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-11-15 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8932331B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-01-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US8608777B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-12-17 Biomet Sports Medicine Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8597327B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-12-03 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Method and apparatus for sternal closure
US8574235B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-11-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for trochanteric reattachment
US8298262B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-10-30 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for tissue fixation
US9414833B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-08-16 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair assembly and associated method
US8273106B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-09-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair and conduit device
US8721684B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-05-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
US9622736B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-04-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9603591B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-03-28 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Flexible anchors for tissue fixation
US9510821B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-12-06 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
US8292921B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-10-23 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9510819B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-12-06 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9271713B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-03-01 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for tensioning a suture
US9149267B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-10-06 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8337525B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2012-12-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9642661B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-05-09 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and Apparatus for Sternal Closure
US20110224799A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-09-15 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for Trochanteric Reattachment
US9468433B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-10-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8968364B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-03-03 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for fixation of an ACL graft
US9561025B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-02-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US9005287B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-04-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for bone reattachment
US20110208240A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-08-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and Apparatus for Soft Tissue Fixation
US9801620B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-10-31 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US9532777B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-01-03 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9402621B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2016-08-02 Biomet Sports Medicine, LLC. Method for tissue fixation
US8361113B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-01-29 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9538998B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-01-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for fracture fixation
US9763656B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2017-09-19 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for soft tissue fixation
US8409253B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2013-04-02 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair assembly and associated method
US9173651B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2015-11-03 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US20110087284A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2011-04-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Soft Tissue Repair and Conduit Device
US8771316B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-07-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
US8652172B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2014-02-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Flexible anchors for tissue fixation
US20070288023A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Greg Pellegrino Soft tissue repair using tissue augments and bone anchors
US8251998B2 (en) 2006-08-16 2012-08-28 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Chondral defect repair
US20080132932A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-06-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Inc. Chondral Defect Repair
US8777956B2 (en) 2006-08-16 2014-07-15 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Chondral defect repair
US8801783B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-08-12 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Prosthetic ligament system for knee joint
US9724090B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2017-08-08 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Method and apparatus for attaching soft tissue to bone
US9833230B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2017-12-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US9918826B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2018-03-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Scaffold for spring ligament repair
US20110208239A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2011-08-25 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and Apparatus for Forming a Self-Locking Adjustable Loop
US9788876B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2017-10-17 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US8672969B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-03-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US9681940B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2017-06-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Ligament system for knee joint
US8672968B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-03-18 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for implanting soft tissue
US9539003B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2017-01-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, LLC. Method and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8562645B2 (en) * 2006-09-29 2013-10-22 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8562647B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2013-10-22 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for securing soft tissue to bone
US9486211B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2016-11-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for implanting soft tissue
US9414925B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2016-08-16 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Method of implanting a knee prosthesis assembly with a ligament link
US8500818B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2013-08-06 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Knee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US20100145384A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2010-06-10 Biomet Sport Medicine, Llc Method for Implanting Soft Tissue
US9078644B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2015-07-14 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Fracture fixation device
US9017381B2 (en) 2007-04-10 2015-04-28 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Adjustable knotless loops
US9861351B2 (en) 2007-04-10 2018-01-09 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Adjustable knotless loops
US8793863B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2014-08-05 Ethicon, Inc. Method and apparatus for forming retainers on a suture
US8915943B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2014-12-23 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining systems for surgical procedures
US8777987B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2014-07-15 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures including tissue retainers having improved strength
US9498893B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2016-11-22 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures including tissue retainers having improved strength
US20090142132A1 (en) * 2007-11-30 2009-06-04 Klein Arnold G Flyline connecting device
US8209899B2 (en) * 2007-11-30 2012-07-03 Arnold Gregory Klein Flyline connecting device
US8916077B1 (en) 2007-12-19 2014-12-23 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with retainers formed from molten material
US8771313B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2014-07-08 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with heat-contact mediated retainers
US9044225B1 (en) 2007-12-20 2015-06-02 Ethicon, Inc. Composite self-retaining sutures and method
US8118834B1 (en) 2007-12-20 2012-02-21 Angiotech Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Composite self-retaining sutures and method
US8615856B1 (en) 2008-01-30 2013-12-31 Ethicon, Inc. Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US8875607B2 (en) 2008-01-30 2014-11-04 Ethicon, Inc. Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US9125647B2 (en) 2008-02-21 2015-09-08 Ethicon, Inc. Method and apparatus for elevating retainers on self-retaining sutures
US8216273B1 (en) 2008-02-25 2012-07-10 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retainers with supporting structures on a suture
US8460338B2 (en) 2008-02-25 2013-06-11 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retainers with supporting structures on a suture
US8641732B1 (en) 2008-02-26 2014-02-04 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining suture with variable dimension filament and method
US8876865B2 (en) 2008-04-15 2014-11-04 Ethicon, Inc. Self-retaining sutures with bi-directional retainers or uni-directional retainers
US8961560B2 (en) 2008-05-16 2015-02-24 Ethicon, Inc. Bidirectional self-retaining sutures with laser-marked and/or non-laser marked indicia and methods
US20110185560A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2011-08-04 Qioptiq Photonics Gmbh & Co. Kg Method for producing an objective
US8932328B2 (en) 2008-11-03 2015-01-13 Ethicon, Inc. Length of self-retaining suture and method and device for using the same
US8343227B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2013-01-01 Biomet Manufacturing Corp. Knee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US8900314B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2014-12-02 Biomet Manufacturing, Llc Method of implanting a prosthetic knee joint assembly
US20110015653A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Michael Bogart Apparatus and Method for Joining Similar or Dissimilar Suture Products
US9095335B2 (en) 2009-07-16 2015-08-04 Covidien Lp Apparatus and method for joining similar or dissimilar suture products
US8517073B2 (en) 2009-07-16 2013-08-27 Covidien Lp Apparatus and method for joining similar or dissimilar suture products
US9675341B2 (en) 2010-11-09 2017-06-13 Ethicon Inc. Emergency self-retaining sutures and packaging
US9198653B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2015-12-01 Medos International Sàrl Surgical filament snare assemblies
US9532778B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2017-01-03 Medos International Sàrl Surgical filament snare assemblies
US9345468B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2016-05-24 Medos International Sárl Surgical filament snare assemblies
US8821545B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2014-09-02 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament snare assemblies
US9895145B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2018-02-20 Medos International Sàrl Surgical filament snare assemblies
US9179908B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2015-11-10 Medos International Sàrl Surgical filament snare assemblies
US8814905B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2014-08-26 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament snare assemblies
US8821544B2 (en) 2010-11-23 2014-09-02 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament snare assemblies
US8690915B2 (en) 2010-11-24 2014-04-08 Arthrocare Corporation Suture
US8808326B2 (en) 2010-11-24 2014-08-19 Arthrocare Corporation Suture
US20140163612A1 (en) * 2010-11-24 2014-06-12 Arthrocare Corporation Novel suture
US9277918B2 (en) * 2010-11-24 2016-03-08 Arthrocare Corporation Knotless suture system
US20120209325A1 (en) * 2010-11-24 2012-08-16 Arthrocare Corporation Novel suture
US9095331B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2015-08-04 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US9833229B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2017-12-05 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US8974495B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2015-03-10 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US8821543B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-09-02 Depuy Mitek, Llc Adjustable anchor systems and methods
US9078651B2 (en) 2011-01-28 2015-07-14 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair
US9370352B2 (en) 2011-01-28 2016-06-21 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair
US8795334B2 (en) 2011-01-28 2014-08-05 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue repair
US8881635B2 (en) 2011-02-02 2014-11-11 Syntorr Inc. Variable denier yarn and suture
US8771352B2 (en) 2011-05-17 2014-07-08 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for tibial fixation of an ACL graft
US9216078B2 (en) 2011-05-17 2015-12-22 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for tibial fixation of an ACL graft
US9445827B2 (en) 2011-10-25 2016-09-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for intraosseous membrane reconstruction
US8506597B2 (en) 2011-10-25 2013-08-13 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for interosseous membrane reconstruction
US9357991B2 (en) 2011-11-03 2016-06-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for stitching tendons
US9314241B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-04-19 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9381013B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-07-05 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9357992B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-06-07 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9370350B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-06-21 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US9561027B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2017-02-07 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue graft anchoring
US8926662B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2015-01-06 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Tissue graft anchoring
US9084597B2 (en) 2012-03-09 2015-07-21 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suture-based knotless repair
US9820731B2 (en) 2012-03-09 2017-11-21 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Suture-based knotless repair
US9872678B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2018-01-23 Medos International Sarl Surgical filament assemblies
US8790370B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-07-29 Depuy Mitek, Llc Surgical filament assemblies
US9060763B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-06-23 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue
US9757116B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2017-09-12 Medos International Sárl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue
US8894684B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2014-11-25 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using a suture having one or more protrusions
US9034013B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-05-19 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using a suture having one or more protrusions
US9060764B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-06-23 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue
US9795373B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2017-10-24 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using a suture having one or more protrusions
US9345567B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2016-05-24 Medos International Sàrl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using snare assemblies and soft anchors
US9763655B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-09-19 Medos International Sarl Systems, devices, and methods for securing tissue using hard anchors
US8986327B2 (en) 2012-10-18 2015-03-24 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Flexible anchor delivery system
US9271716B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2016-03-01 Medos International Sàrl Surgical constructs and methods for securing tissue
US9192373B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2015-11-24 Medos International Sàrl Surgical constructs and methods for securing tissue
US20140243893A1 (en) * 2013-02-26 2014-08-28 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Flexible deformable suture anchor
US9757119B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2017-09-12 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Visual aid for identifying suture limbs arthroscopically
US9918827B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-03-20 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Scaffold for spring ligament repair
US9737293B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Medos International Sàrl Surgical constructs with collapsing suture loop and methods for securing tissue
US9757113B2 (en) 2013-07-31 2017-09-12 Medos International Sàrl Adjustable graft fixation device
US9936940B2 (en) 2013-09-06 2018-04-10 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Method and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US9615822B2 (en) 2014-05-30 2017-04-11 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Insertion tools and method for soft anchor
US9700291B2 (en) 2014-06-03 2017-07-11 Biomet Sports Medicine, Llc Capsule retractor
WO2016076977A1 (en) * 2014-11-10 2016-05-19 Martin Daniel L Variable denier yarn and suture

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20040162579A1 (en) 2004-08-19 application
US7285124B2 (en) 2007-10-23 grant
US6296659B1 (en) 2001-10-02 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8231654B2 (en) Adjustable knotless loops
US6923819B2 (en) Apparatus and method for surgical suturing with thread management
US8292921B2 (en) Soft tissue repair device and associated methods
US6520980B1 (en) Method and apparatus for attaching connective tissues to bone using a self-locking knotless suture anchoring device
US6048351A (en) Transvaginal suturing system
US5370650A (en) Articulating mesh deployment apparatus
US7214180B2 (en) Method for cardiac restraint
US6569082B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for cardiac restraint
US8133258B2 (en) Method and apparatus for attaching connective tissues to bone using a knotless suture anchoring device
US5782864A (en) Knotless suture system and method
US5391176A (en) Surgical instrument for tying a knot in a length of suture at a remote location
US5037433A (en) Endoscopic suturing device and related method and suture
EP0669103B1 (en) Surgical crimping device
US5449367A (en) Pre-tied knot for surgical use and method of using same
US7033370B2 (en) Suturing instruments and methods of use
US5178629A (en) Method of forming a suture knot
US5478353A (en) Suture tie device system and method for suturing anatomical tissue proximate an opening
US9017381B2 (en) Adjustable knotless loops
US5520703A (en) Laparoscopic deschamp and associated suturing technique
US4781190A (en) Method of arthroscopic repair of a limb joint
US6547807B2 (en) Suture relay for surgery
US20040260345A1 (en) Method and apparatus for attaching connective tissues to bone using a knotless suture anchoring device
US5843099A (en) Single system ligature carrier and tissue clamp for sacrospinous colpopexy
US5549618A (en) Knot tying method and apparatus
US5776151A (en) Surgical repair kit and its method of use