US20010019408A1 - Method and apparatus for spectrum analysis and encoder - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for spectrum analysis and encoder Download PDF

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US20010019408A1
US20010019408A1 US09846583 US84658301A US2001019408A1 US 20010019408 A1 US20010019408 A1 US 20010019408A1 US 09846583 US09846583 US 09846583 US 84658301 A US84658301 A US 84658301A US 2001019408 A1 US2001019408 A1 US 2001019408A1
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modulator
analyzer
filters
radiation
dispersed
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Thomas Hagler
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MUDLOGGING SYSTEMS Inc
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Hagler Thomas W.
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/02Details
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/02Details
    • G01J3/0205Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows
    • G01J3/021Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows using plane or convex mirrors, parallel phase plates, or particular reflectors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/02Details
    • G01J3/0205Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows
    • G01J3/0213Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows using attenuators
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/02Details
    • G01J3/0205Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows
    • G01J3/0229Optical elements not provided otherwise, e.g. optical manifolds, diffusers, windows using masks, aperture plates, spatial light modulators or spatial filters, e.g. reflective filters
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/02Details
    • G01J3/0289Field-of-view determination; Aiming or pointing of a spectrometer; Adjusting alignment; Encoding angular position; Size of measurement area; Position tracking
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/12Generating the spectrum; Monochromators
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/12Generating the spectrum; Monochromators
    • G01J3/18Generating the spectrum; Monochromators using diffraction elements, e.g. grating
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/28Investigating the spectrum
    • G01J3/30Measuring the intensity of spectral lines directly on the spectrum itself
    • G01J3/32Investigating bands of a spectrum in sequence by a single detector
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/28Investigating the spectrum
    • G01J3/42Absorption spectrometry; Double beam spectrometry; Flicker spectrometry; Reflection spectrometry
    • G01J3/433Modulation spectrometry; Derivative spectrometry
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J1/00Photometry, e.g. photographic exposure meter
    • G01J1/42Photometry, e.g. photographic exposure meter using electric radiation detectors
    • G01J2001/4242Modulated light, e.g. for synchronizing source and detector circuit
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/28Investigating the spectrum
    • G01J2003/2866Markers; Calibrating of scan

Abstract

A disc serving as a spatial radiation modulator has dispersed radiation filters thereon. Each filter has a transmittance or reflectance modulation function of the form sin2(mθ+pπ/4), where m is a positive integer and p has one of the four values 0, 1, 2, 3. A radiation beam including selected wavelength components is diffracted into an elongated image dispersed according to wavelength. Different wavelength components are focused onto different filters on the modulator and are encoded by correspond filters. Since the modulation functions of the filters are orthogonal to one another, it is possible to extract the amplitude of each wavelength component after it has been encoded or modulated by corresponding filter from the total detected signal during one measurement.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates in general to spectrum analyzers and in particular, to a spectrum analyzer and encoder employing spatial modulation of radiation dispersed by wavelength. [0001]
  • Radiation spectral analysis is presently carried out in a number of ways. Dispersive and Fourier transform based analyzers are for high resolution and can be used for many different applications so that they are more versatile than existing application-specific instruments and procedures. While these analyzers offer superior spectral performance, they tend to be expensive, slow and are not portable. For most applications, these instruments offer a resolution which is largely unnecessary. Many applications require measurements only at several wavelengths so that most of the data taken over the entire complete spectrum using these instruments is discarded and not used at all for such applications. Such analyzers may also be too large and heavy for many practical applications. [0002]
  • In contrast, a non-dispersive approach to spectral analysis employs interference filters of fixed frequency passbands to perform given analytical functions. To perform the measurement, the light signal containing a number of wavelength components is propagated through one or more interference filters which are characterized by a center wavelength and bandwidth. The non-dispersive approach is Advantageous over the Fourier transform and dispersive spectrum analyzers in that the non-dispersive approach is cheaper and measures the minimum amount of spectral data required to perform a given analytical function. However, if the analytical function requires a significant number of filters, the system's signal-to-noise ratio is reduced as the total energy measured in a given filter over time is inversely related to the number of filters. Furthermore, if a spectrum analyzer using this approach is configured for a first application, the filters used in the device may have to be replaced, or the number of filters changed, in order to adapt the analyzer to a second application. Therefore, even though the non-dispersive approach may be cheaper and does not measure unnecessary data as compared to the dispersive and Fourier transform approaches, the present non-dispersive approach has its limitations. [0003]
  • Another type of optical spectrum analyzer, which is best described as a hybrid between dispersive and non-dispersive instruments, is the Hadamard spectrometer. The Hadamard spectrometer includes a spatial light modulator, comprised of a disc made of an opaque material with slots therein that reflect or transmit light, where the slots have uniform transmittance or reflectance, a technique which is generally referred to as a binary amplitude modulation or chopping. A light beam is dispersed according to wavelength onto the disc so that different wavelength components may be reflected by or transmitted through different slots. The disc is rotated about a rotation axis and the slots are selectively spaced at different radii from the axis to form a number of different channels for detecting corresponding wavelength components of the beam. The light reflected or transmitted by all of the channels are directed to the same detector. In order to differentiate the intensity of the wavelength component transmitted or reflected by a slot for one channel from that of another wavelength component for another channel, the disc is sequentially stepped through an application specific number of steps, each step defining a binary pattern, which defines one equation in a system of simultaneous equations for the amplitudes of the wavelength components. This set of simultaneous equations is then solved to yield the intensity for each channel prior to any specific analytical function, an approach which is cumbersome and time consuming. [0004]
  • None of the above approaches is entirely satisfactory. It is, therefore, desirable to provide an improved spectrum analyzer where the above-noted disadvantages are avoided or significantly diminished, in particular, where the encoding and demodulation are both generalized and significantly simplified such that the details of the spectrum analyzer can be rendered to a single application specific hardware component. [0005]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention is based on the recognition that system performance can be greatly improved by replacing the slots in the Hadamard disc by dispersed radiation filters that modulate the amplitudes of the wavelength components as digitized replicas of smooth functions which render the encoded wavelength components substantially orthogonal to one another. In this manner, the time consuming practice of solving a system of simultaneous equations is unnecessary to deconvolve the encoded signal. For this purpose, the modulation functions of the dispersed radiation filters are such that they cause the amplitudes of given modulated wavelength components to change between three or more distinct levels of contrast as the modulator is rotated about an axis, the preferred configuration having the largest number of distinct levels of contrast that is practical. [0006]
  • In many practical embodiments, digitized versions or replicas of the smooth functions may be used instead of analog ones while retaining most of the advantages of the invention. The small interference effects caused by digitization can either be ignored, or accounted for and corrected as required by the application. The modulation functions of two dispersed radiation filters for two different channels are considered to be substantially orthogonal to each other when it is possible to differentiate the contribution to the detector signal caused by the wavelength component in one of the two channels from that caused by the wavelength component in the other channel without having to solve a simultaneous system of equations. The definition also allows for a finite number of corrections to compensate for the effects of digitization. As explained below, for different applications, this definition may be applied differently. In this manner, the time required to decode the amplitude coefficients is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the modulators can be made with filters specifically adapted for certain analytical functions. If modulators with different characteristics are called for to perform a different analytical function, it is a simple matter to replace the modulator by one with the desired properties without altering the system apparatus. Another advantage of the invention lies in that the dispersed radiation filters of a modulator are at fixed spatial relationship to each other, so that wavelength calibration is reduced in determining the alignment of the dispersed image onto the radius of the disc. [0007]
  • One embodiment of the spectrum analyzer of this invention according to one aspect of the invention comprises a source providing radiation, where the radiation includes a plurality of selected wavelength components. Radiation from the source is collected and focused to form an image dispersed by wavelength onto a plane. A two-dimensional spatial modulator positioned in the plane modulates amplitudes of the wavelength components to encode each component, so that the amplitude of each encoded component is a function of time. Each of the functions has three or more distinct levels of contrast. The encoded beam is collected and directed towards a detector and signals generated by the detector are analyzed. Preferably, at least two of the modulation functions for encoding two corresponding wavelength components are substantially orthogonal, so that the amplitudes of the two encoded components present in the total detector signal may be distinguished from each other without solving a system of simultaneous equations. [0008]
  • Another aspect of the invention and useful for the above-described spectrum analyzer is a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator adapted to be rotated about an axis. The modulator has a plurality of dispersed radiation filters at different radii from the axis for modulating amplitudes of different wavelength components of an incident radiation beam to encode the beam, so that the amplitude of each encoded component is a function of a rotation angle of the modulator about the axis. Preferably, one or more of the filters has a modulation function that encodes the amplitude of the corresponding component so that the encoded component has three or more distinct levels of contrast over time when the modulator is rotated about the axis. More preferably, the modulation functions are smooth functions or digitized replicas thereof, obtained by rounding up or rounding down to a finite number of levels of contrast, such that the modulation functions of two filters for modulating two different wavelength components are substantially orthogonal. [0009]
  • Another two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator that will be useful for spectral analysis includes a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator adapted to be rotated about an axis. The modulator has at least one dispersed radiation filter being in the shape of a band surrounding the axis, where the radial position of the band is modulated between two different radii from the axis, such that the center wavelength of the reflected radiation is modulated between two different wavelengths when the modulator is rotated about the axis. Preferably the band is serpentine in shape. [0010]
  • Another two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator useful for spectral analysis is adapted to be rotated about an axis. The modulator has at least one dispersed radiation filter in the shape of a substantially continuous band around the axis, where the band has a width that varies as a function of a rotational angle of the modulator about the axis, to modulate the bandwidth of the reflected radiation. [0011]
  • In another embodiment of the invention, a spectrum analyzer for analyzing a sample comprises a source to provide excitation radiation comprised of a first plurality of wavelength components, and means for collecting and focusing a beam of radiation from the excitation source to form a first image dispersed by wavelength onto a first plane. A first two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator is positioned in the first plane to modulate the amplitude of the first plurality of wavelength components, where such amplitudes are periodically modulated using three or more distinct levels of contrast. The encoded excitation beam is collected and focused onto the sample, causing the sample to emit or scatter a beam of radiation. The emitted or scattered beam of radiation from the sample is collected and focused to form a second image dispersed by wavelength onto a second plane. A second two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator positioned in the second plane modulates the amplitudes of a second plurality of wavelength components in said emitted or scattered beam to encode such beam, where such amplitudes are periodically modulated using three or more distinct levels of contrast. The encoded emitted or scattered beam is collected and focused onto a detector and a time-based signal generated by the detector is analyzed for cross-modulation phenomena. [0012]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1A is a schematic side view of a spectrum analyzer to illustrate the preferred embodiment of this invention. [0013]
  • FIG. 1B is a schematic view illustrating a view along the line [0014] 1B-1B in FIG. 1A of a portion of the analyzer in FIG. 1A.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator suitable for use in the analyzer of FIG. 1A to illustrate an embodiment of the invention. [0015]
  • FIG. 3A is a graphical plot of a digitized replica of a smooth modulation function of one of the dispersed radiation filters in the modulator of FIG. 2 and an idealized modulation function from which the digitized modulation function of the filter of the modulator in FIG. 2 can be derived. Shown also in FIG. 3 is a digitized modulation function with only three levels of gray scale as a coarse digitized replica of the idealized modulation function of FIG. 3. [0016]
  • FIG. 3B is a plot showing the effects of finite digitization on the nominally orthogonal amplitude wavefunctions, sin[0017] 2(mθ+pπ/4). The data points were obtained for a twenty-five channel system, where p=0, and m=1-25.
  • FIG. 4 is a graphical illustration of the digitized replica of a smooth modulation function of two of the dispersed radiation filters of the two-dimensional modulator of FIGS. 2 and 3 and the elongated dispersed image superposed upon the replicas to illustrate the invention. [0018]
  • FIG. 5 is a top view of a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator to illustrate a modulator with four dispersed radiation filters for encoding different wavelength components using different modulation functions that are orthogonal to one another. [0019]
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator illustrating four spatial radiation filters for encoding four different wavelength components using the same modulation function. [0020]
  • FIG. 7 is a top view of a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator which provides spatial radiation filters in the shape of serpentine bands, each of which is located between two corresponding concentric circles of different radii from the rotation axis to illustrate another aspect of the invention. [0021]
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator provided with a spatial radiation filter in the shape of a band whose width varies with the rotational angle about the rotation axis to illustrate yet another aspect of the invention. [0022]
  • FIG. 9A is a schematic view of a cross-modulation fluorescence excitation/emission analyzer to illustrate one more aspect of the invention. [0023]
  • FIG. 9B is a view of the analyzer of FIG. 9A along the direction [0024] 9B-9B in FIG. 9A.
  • FIG. 10A is a schematic view of a spectrum analyzer that includes a folding mirror whose position is controllable to illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention. [0025]
  • FIG. 10B is a schematic view of the spectrum analyzer of FIG. 10A, illustrating in more detail the positioning of the folding mirror and other aspects of the analyzer. [0026]
  • FIG. 10C is a view of a portion of the spectrum analyzer of FIG. 10B along the line [0027] 10C-10C in FIG. 10B.
  • FIG. 11A is a schematic view of an apparatus for making the two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator of this invention. [0028]
  • FIG. 11B is a graphical illustration of the laser intensity that may be employed in the apparatus of FIG. 12A for making the two-dimensional modulator. [0029]
  • For simplicity in description, identical components are labelled by the same numerals in this application. [0030]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMNT
  • FIG. 1A is a schematic view of a spectrum analyzer to illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1A, spectrum analyzer [0031] 20 includes a two-dimensional spatial radiation modulator 22 for modulating radiation from a source 24, which may be a broadband or multiple wavelength source such as a blackbody radiator, an incandescent source, a low-pressure isotope lamp, an x-ray excited sample, a Raman excited sample, a luminescent sample, a dye laser, a semiconductor laser, a glass laser, a gas laser and specifically, a carbon dioxide laser. After the radiation from source 24 has been encoded by modulator 22, the encoded beam is directed towards a detector 26 which provides, in response to the encoded beam, a detector output to an analyzing means such as a computer 28. An input radiation beam from source 24 is preferably passed through an entrance aperture 32 to a folding mirror 34 which reflects the radiation towards a concave diffraction grating (focusing grating) 36 which focuses the radiation onto modulator 22. Grating 36 also diffracts the input beam so that an elongated image dispersed according to wavelength is formed on the modulator. Preferably, the elongated image is formed with its length along a radial direction of the modulator 22 when the modulator is rotated about an axis 40 by means of a motorized platter 42. The dispersed radiation filters in or on modulator 22 encode the different wavelength components in the input beam by selectively reflecting the encoded components towards grating 36. Grating 36 in turn collects, reflects and focuses these components into an encoded beam towards folding mirror 34 which reflects the beam towards an exit aperture 44 to detector 26. Detector 26 detects the total intensity of the different encoded wavelength components in the encoded beam to provide a detector output to computer 28. As will be described below, as taught by this invention, the filters in or on modulator 22 are such that computer 28 can distinguish the intensity contribution of each wavelength component that is encoded by modulator 22, without having to solve a simultaneous system of equations. Computer 28 includes a demodulation algorithm 400 a, analyzer 400 d and output 999. A sample cell (not shown) may be placed between the exit aperture 44 and the detector 26 for analysis of the sample in the cell.
  • FIG. 1B is a view of the entrance and exit apertures [0032] 32, 34 along the arrow 1B-1B in FIG. 1A. Also shown in FIG. 1A is an xyz axis, so that the view along the arrow 1B-1B is along the negative x axis.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of a spatial radiation modulator with four different spatial radiation filters thereon to illustrate an embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 2, modulator [0033] 22 a includes four spatial radiation filters 50 a, 50 b, 50 c and 50 d. These filters may be formed as a layer of radiation reflective material on top of a non reflective substrate; alternatively, these filters may be formed as radiation transmissive areas in an opaque substrate. For convenience in description, the spatial radiation filters are described to reflect radiation, it being understood that spatial radiation filters that transmit instead of reflect radiation may be used instead in each of the embodiments herein and such variations are within the scope of the invention.
  • In the preferred embodiment, filters [0034] 50 a-50 d have digitized modulation functions that are the digitized approximations or replicas of the function sin2(mθ+pπ/4), wherein m is a positive integer and p can take on any one of the values 0, 1, 2 and 3. Filter 50 a, for example, is a digitized approximation of the modulation function sin2θ, filter 50 b that of modulation function sin2(θ+π/4), filter 50 c that of sin2(θ+π/2) and filter 50 d that of sin2(θ+3π/4). Thus, the reflectance or transmittance of each of the dispersed radiation filters 50 a-50 d varies as a function of the rotational angle θ around the rotational axis 40.
  • One possible digitized approximation [0035] 50 to the sin2θ function is illustrated in FIG. 3A. Thus, the modulation function of each of the filters 50 a-50 d may be illustrated by the digitized modulation function 50 at 20 levels of gray scale. In general, the more levels of gray scale the closer is the digitized approximation to the idealized modulation function sin2θ which is shown in dotted line 50′. Obviously, other digitized approximations of the idealized function 50′ may be employed and are within the scope of the invention. The digitized approximations are adequate when it is possible to differentiate the contribution to the detector signal caused by the various wavelength components without having to solve a simultaneous system of equations, and may include a small but finite number of corrections to compensate for the effects of digitization.
  • FIG. 3B is a plot showing the effects of finite digitization on the nominally orthogonal amplitude wavefunctions, sin[0036] 2(mθ+pπ/4). The data points were obtained for a twenty-five channel system, where p=0, and m=1-25. A difference in the decoded amplitudes is defined by normalizing the twenty-five amplitudes to unity, decoding the amplitudes a first time, and then varying the amplitude of a single channel and decoding the amplitudes a second time. The average output error is given by the sum of the absolute difference in the first and second decoded amplitudes divided by the number of channels. In the figure, 61 a, 61 b and 61 c are the resulting errors for varying the amplitude of the fundamental, m=1, the first harmonic, m=2, and the second harmonic, m=3 by +/−100%. The error for the m=11 term is also shown by 61 d. The figure clearly illustrates the effects of finite digitization on the orthogonality of the modulation wavefunctions. Low end applications may only require 3-10 levels of contrast to meet a given accuracy specification, but high end systems, where significant accuracy is required may require 20 or more levels of contrast. For the most demanding applications, the first-order correction described below may be used to correct the decoded amplitudes for the interference.
  • As noted above, many of the advantages of the invention stem from the fact that it is possible to decode the detector signal to obtain the respective amplitudes of two or more wavelength components without having to solve a simultaneous system of equations. However, whether one has to solve a simultaneous system of equations depends on the accuracy that is required for the particular analytical function and application desired. Thus, for some applications requiring very high accuracy, it may be useful to define substantial orthogonality as follows. The modulation functions of two dispersed radiation filters may be considered to be substantially orthogonal to each other when the following conditions are satisfied: [0037]
  • 1) the error in the decoded amplitude of the first channel caused by changing the output of the second channel by 100% in either direction is less than one part in 10[0038] −3 after applying the first-order correction as described below.
  • 2) the error in the decoded amplitude of the second channel caused by changing the output of the first channel by 100% in either direction is less than one part in 10[0039] −3 after applying the first-order correction as described below.
  • FIG. 4 is a graphical illustration of the elongated wavelength dispersed image [0040] 52 focused by grating 36 of FIG. 1A superimposed onto the modulation function 50 of FIG. 3A to illustrate the invention. As shown in FIG. 4, the elongated dispersed image 52 is dispersed along the x axis so that its length 52 a is parallel to the x axis. The different components having different wavelengths dispersed along the length 52 a are shown by different crosshatching in FIG. 4. As the modulator 22 a is rotated about axis 40 as shown in FIGS. 1A and 2, the elongated image 52 is focused onto different portions of the filters 50 a and 50 b. For simplicity, only filters 50 a and 50 b are shown in FIG. 4. Thus, as the modulator 22 a is rotated, image 52 is focused onto different portions of filters 50 a, 50 b with modulation function 50 of FIG. 3A. Therefore, depending upon which portion of the filter 50 a, 50 b that image 52 is focused onto, the amount of reflectance of such wavelength components will differ and change over time. As also shown in FIG. 3A, the intensity distribution 52′ across the width and at a particular wavelength of the image 52 superposes a portion of the modulation function 50 of the filter 50 a or 50 b. In mathematical terms, the convolution of the modulation or encoding functions 50 of filters 50 a-50 d with dispersed wavelength components in image 52 would give rise to the total signal that is reflected by modulator 22 a over time towards the grating 36 which focuses such encoded beam towards the detector 26 as described above in reference to FIG. 1A.
  • In reference to FIG. 2, image [0041] 52 is dispersed by wavelength along a radial axis with respect to the rotation of modulator 22 a about axis 40, where the radial direction coincides with the x axis in FIGS. 1A and 4. In one embodiment, the reflectance of filters 50 a-50 d changes only along the azimuthal direction Θ in FIG. 2 and does not change in the radial direction x. Each of the filters 50 a-50 d occupies a two-dimensional annular area having a radius and a width. Theoretically, the modulation function of the filters can change in both the radial and azimuthal directions. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the modulation functions of the filters 50 a-50 d change only in the azimuthal direction and not in the radial direction. Therefore for simplicity, the width of the filters may be ignored and the modulation functions of the filters along the azimuthal direction regarded as the modulation functions of the two-dimensional filters.
  • FIG. 5 is a top view of another embodiment [0042] 22 b of the spatial radiation modulator of FIG. 1A. Modulator 22 b is provided with four dispersed radiation filters 50 a, 54 a, 56 a and 58 a, where the modulation functions of the four filters are all digitized approximations of the function of the general form sin2(mθ+pπ/4) described above in reference to modulator 22 a of FIG. 2. In filters 50 a-50 d of modulator 22 a of FIG. 2, m has the value 1 for all four filters, whereas p ranges from 0 to 3. In modulator 22 b of FIG. 5, however, the filters 50 a, 54 a, 56 a, 58 a have the respective m values of 1, 2, 3 and 4 whereas p is 0 for all four filters. In general, the spatial radiation filters of any form in the modulator can be defined by specifying the values for m and p in the expression sin2(mθ+pπ/4), where m is a positive integer and p can take on any one of the four values 0, 1, 2 and 3. Thus in general, the intensity of the encoded beam detected by detector 26 in FIG. 1A from a spatial radiation modulator such as modulators 22 a, 22 b or other modulators described in this application can be given in general by the following equation: S ( θ ) = m p a m , p sin 2 ( m θ + p π / 4 ) ( 1 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00001
  • where S(θ) is the intensity detected by the detector [0043] 26, and the summations include all of the m and p values corresponding to the filters present in a given modulator design. In equation 1 above, am,p is the amplitude of the wavelength component that has been encoded by the dispersed radiation filter having a modulation function which is a digitized approximation or replica of sin2(mθ+pπ/4). This invention permits such amplitudes to be determined without solving a simultaneous system of equations as will be demonstrated below. In the summation process in equation 1, the filters present in a particular spatial radiation modulator may not include filters corresponding to all combinations of m and p values. This is exemplified in the modulator 22 a of FIG. 2 where m takes on only the value 1, and in the modulator 22 b of FIG. 5 where p takes on the value 0 throughout all the filters. In such event, the amplitude am,p for filters that are not present in the modulator is simply 0. As a further benefit, this approach enables the use of generalized approaches to the modulation drive system and the demodulation algorithms, which can be efficiently adapted to a specific application. For example, the platter is rotated at a constant frequency (as opposed to being stepped), the demodulation algorithm is compatible with any function defined in equation 1, and the number of identity (m, p and wavelength/bandwidth) of the modulated components, and the specific analytic functions to be performed on the decoded data are defined in application specific software. It is still further preferred that the application specific software be located on one side of the application specific hardware, the patterned disc. The trigonometric function sin2(mθ+pπ/4) obey the following orthonormal relation. 0 2 π θ cos ( 2 m θ + p π / 2 ) sin 2 ( n θ + q π / 4 ) = - 1 2 πδ m , n ( δ p , q - δ p , q ± 2 ) ( 2 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00002
  • the amplitudes a[0044] m,p of the encoded wavelength components may be determined using the orthogonal properties of the trigonometric functions in accordance with equation 3 below: a m , p = - 2 π 0 2 π θ cos ( 2 m θ + p π / 2 ) S ( θ ) ( 3 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00003
  • One complication introduced by the use of digitized approximations or replicas of the trigonometric function in the modulators [0045] 22 a, 22 b leads to a ringing phenomena at higher harmonics of the fundamental rotational frequencies and gives rise to interference terms which are proportional to the various amplitudes of the wavelength components in the different channels. However, for sufficiently high numbers of levels of contrast, residual interference can be ignored for many applications. Nevertheless, the orthogonality described by equation 2 and used in equation 3 above is inexact. As a result, it is preferable for the interference terms to be accounted for and the individual amplitudes corrected for the interference resulting from the amplitudes in the other channels, which naturally leads to a series of successively higher-order correction terms: a m , p = a m , p ( O ) + a m , p ( 1 ) + ( 4 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00004
  • where the zero-order amplitude coefficients are determined from [0046] a m , p ( 0 ) = - 2 π 0 2 π θ cos ( 2 m θ + p π / 2 ) S ( θ ) ( 5 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00005
  • The first-order correction is given by [0047] a m , p ( 1 ) = n q A n , q m , p a n , q ( 0 ) ( 6 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00006
  • where the primes on the summations indicate that the term where m=n and p=q is excluded. [0048]
  • The matrix elements A[0049] n,q m,p are determined by sequentially decreasing or enhancing the amplitudes of the an,q and measuring the changes in am,p (0). For example, if we identify δam,p (0) as the change in am,p (0) resulting from the change Δan,q (0) the imposed change in an,q (0), the corresponding matrix element is given by A n , q m , p = δ a m , p ( 0 ) Δ a n , q ( 0 ) ( 7 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00007
  • In practice, the integral shown in Equation 5 is replaced with a discrete summation over the number of steps M per rotation. On start-up, a three dimensional trigonometric look-up table, T[0050] m,p j, is defined and initialized with the values of cos(2mθ+pπ/2) evaluated at the step interval for rotation. T m , p j - 2 π M cos ( j m 4 π / M + p π / 2 ) ( 8 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00008
  • The zeroth-order amplitude coefficients are given by a summation of the discrete signal measurements multiplied by the corresponding entry in the trigonometric look-up table [0051] a m , p ( 0 ) = j = 1 M T m , p j S ( j ) ( 9 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00009
  • where S(j) is the A/D reading from the detector at the jth rotational step. At the end of a complete rotation, the first-order corrections are evaluated if required for a given application: [0052] a m , p ( 1 ) = n l q l A n , q m , p a n , q ( 0 ) ( 10 )
    Figure US20010019408A1-20010906-M00010
  • Note that if the amplitudes have not changed significantly since the last time the corrections were evaluated, the corrections need not be re-evaluated. [0053]
  • From the description above, it is seen that where M measurements are taken by rotation from 0° through 360° of the modulator, the value of j for the jth rotation step would range from 1 through M. The different combinations of m and p that are present on the modulator corresponding to the actual dispersed radiation filters that are present would give rise to a number N equal to the total number of channels present on the modulator. Upon start-up of the system using a particular modulator, a three-dimensional trigonometric look-up table T[0054] m,p j, is then constructed using equation 8 above. In order to obtain the first-order correction, the amplitude an,q of the channel having a modulation function, which is an approximation of sin2(nθ+qπ/4), is increased or decreased by Δam,p (0) and the changes in the amplitude am,p (0) is detected. Thus, if the change introduced in amplitude an,q is Δan,q (0), the imposed change δm,p (0) caused by such introduction defines the corresponding matrix element An,q m,p, as given by equation 7 above. This process therefore defines a matrix An,q m,p defined by equation 7. The amplitude an,q may be altered by simply blocking the radiation that is reflected by the corresponding filter. At the end of a complete rotation, the first-order corrections may then be determined according to equation 10 above.
  • Thus, upon initialization of the system such as system [0055] 20 of FIG. 1A, a N row by M column matrix Tm,p j is calculated and its values stored in a N row by M column matrix look up table. Then when each of the M measurements at M values of θ are obtained when the modulator is rotated from 0 to 360°, M, M being a positive integer and so is N, the computer derives the amplitude of each of the wavelength components (the coefficients am,p equation 1) in the N channels by summing the products of each of the M measurements with each of the M entries in the corresponding row in the look-up table for such channel.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a spatial radiation modulator [0056] 22 c with four dispersed radiation filters therein with the same modulation functions sin2(2θ), but located at different radii from the rotational axis 40 for encoding different wavelength components. This may be useful for the grouping of wavelengths into sub-groups, where the components of such wavelengths are collectively modulated to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. As shown in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, the dispersed radiation filters preferably comprise areas in the shape of annular segments at different radii from the rotational axis 40.
  • FIG. 7 is a top view of another spatial radiation modulator [0057] 70 to illustrate another aspect of the invention. As shown in FIG. 7, modulator 70 is provided with three continuous bands 72, 74, 76 which are serpentine in shape. Each of the bands 72, 74, 76 is located between two concentric circles of two different radii from the rotational axis 40. Band 74, for example, is located between two concentric circles 78, 79 at radii r1 and r2 from the rotation axis 40, where the two radii correspond to two different wavelengths λ1 and λ2. Thus, serpentine band 74 is of such a shape that its path oscillates between the two concentric circles at a modulation frequency given by the equation below:
  • r(θ)=r1+(r2−r1)*sin2(m*θ)  (11)
  • where m is an integer, and θ the rotational angle around the rotation axis [0058] 40.
  • The same is true for bands [0059] 72, 76. As will be evident from FIG. 7, band 74 is modulated at a frequency intermediate between the modulation frequencies of bands 72 and 76. Therefore, in the same manner as that described above for demodulation of the different wavelength components for the modulators 22 a and 22 b in FIGS. 2 and 5 above, the amplitude of the signal at the wavelength (λ12)/2 modulated at a frequency for band 74 between the two wavelengths can be obtained in a similar manner from a single measurement when the modulator is rotated by 360 degrees. By choosing an appropriate modulation frequency, it is possible to obtain the first derivative between λ1 and λ2, which may be useful for many applications.
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of yet another spatial radiation modulator [0060] 80 to illustrate another aspect of the invention. Modulator 80 is provided with a band 82 having a width that varies as a function of the rotational angle θ around the rotation axis 40 at a selected frequency given by the equation:
  • Δr(θ)=Δr1+(Δr2−Δr1)+sin2(mθ)  (12)
  • where m is an integer, and θ the rotational angle around the rotation axis [0061] 40. The narrowest point is 82 b and the widest point of the band is 82 a. The detected amplitude of the wavelength component encoded by band 82 may be used to adjust the measurement results obtained using modulators 22 a, 22 b, 22 c for correcting errors introduced by imperfections of the different components of the spectrum analyzer.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the dispersed radiation filters comprises two-dimensional patterns of alternating high and low transmittance or reflectance areas. Such pattern is a practical implementation of the digitized approximation or replica of a smooth periodic function such as the sine squared function. This is analogous to the half-toning process used in printing where black and white printed patterns are used to approximate intermediate gray scale levels. Thus as shown in FIGS. 2, 5 and [0062] 6, areas in the dispersed radiation filter with higher reflectance are shown with a higher concentration of black dots whereas areas of the filters with a lower reflectance are shown with fewer dots. As noted above, the black dots in these figures may indicate areas of high transmittance or reflectance, whereas the white background of the disc in such filter areas is substantially non-reflective, non-transmissive or opaque. The size of the dots in these filters defines the size of reflective or transmissive pixels. Instead of using a substrate with low reflectivity or transmission and a patterned layer of high reflectively material on the substrate as described above, (or forming patterned transmissive areas in an opaque substrate), the dispersed radiation filters may be constructed in a different manner. Thus a substrate with moderate reflectivity or transmission may be employed instead. Then in areas of the filters requiring high reflectivity or transmission, an area having such characteristics is formed (by deposit of a reflective layer or formation of transmissive area), and a layer of low reflectivity or translucidity material may be deposited in areas of the filter calling for such characteristics. This is used in a different manner to the rest of the invention. The disc becomes the diffraction grating. The modulators include preferably at least one grating whose diffraction characteristics are functions of radius of the grating and the rotation or position of the grating.
  • Instead of using patterns of alternating high and low reflectance or transmission, it is also possible to construct the modulators with substantially orthogonal modulation functions that are not digitized but are “analog” in nature. Thus neutral density filters may be used for this purpose, where the filters are formed by sputtering a light reflective material onto a transparent substrate. Depending on the thickness of the material sputtered, the amount of transmission can be controlled to achieve a particular substantially continuous and smooth transmittance function. [0063]
  • Instead of using modulator [0064] 70 of FIG. 7 to obtain a first derivative between the wavelengths λ1, λ2, the same result may be obtained using the modulator 22 a or 22 b. The amplitude of the component at a first wavelength λ1 encoded according to the function sin2(mθ+pπ/4) and the amplitude of the component at a second wavelength λ2 encoded according to the function sin2(mθ+pπ/4) are obtained, where p1-p2 is an even integer and p1 and p2 having one of the values 0, 1, 2 and 3. The computer then derives the difference between the modulated amplitudes of the components at λ1 and λ2 to obtain a first derivative value at (λ22)/2.
  • In cross-modulation fluorescence excitation/emission analysis, it is important to be able to lock the phase of the modulation functions used for the excitation beam to the phase of the modulation functions used for the emission beam. Still better, is the ability to control the relative phase between the modulation functions used for the excitation beam to the phase of the modulation functions used for the emission beam. Another aspect of the invention is directed to the recognition that, by placing the appropriate dispersion radiation filters on one side of the disc for encoding the excitation beam and the appropriate filters for emission analysis on the other side of the disc, where the filters on both sides of the disc are spatially correlated, the modulation functions for the excitation and emission modulation processes can be phase-locked and the relative phase controlled in a very simple manner. [0065]
  • FIG. 9A is a schematic view of a cross-modulation fluorescence excitation/emission analyzer [0066] 100. An excitation beam 102 from excitation source 104 is reflected by folding mirror 34 and reflected and focused by grating 36 as before towards the filters suitable for encoding the excitation beam on the top side of the modulator 106. After being modulated, the encoded excitation beam is reflected by the modulator 106 back towards the grating 36 which focuses the encoded excitation beam 108 towards a fluorescent sample 110 after reflection by mirror 34. The fluorescent beam 112 emitted by the sample in response to the encoded excitation beam is reflected by mirror 34′ toward a second grating 36′ which disperses and focuses the beam towards dispersed radiation filters adapted for fluorescence encoding present on the bottom side of modulator disc 106. After being modulated, the encoded fluorescent beam 118 is reflected, collected and focused by grating 36′ towards a detector 120 after reflection by mirror 34′. As indicated in FIG. 9A, the fluorescent sample 110 is in the plane of the page or paper, the excitation source 104 is displaced into the page and the fluorescence detector 120 is displaced out of the page. The side view of analyzer 100 along the arrows 9B-9B in FIG. 9A is illustrated in FIG. 9B. As before, a computer 28 (not shown) connected to detector 120 is used to analyze a time-based signal generated by the detector. The patterns on the top side of disc 106 for encoding the excitation beam may have a pattern that is a digitized replica of sin2(mθ+pπ/4) and that for encoding the emission beam is a digitized replica of sin2(nθ+qπ/4) where m, n, p, q are positive integers. Computer 28 may then analyze the detector output to determine the amplitude of sum and difference frequency terms resulting from phase-locked cross-modulation according to the general trigonometric relation:
  • sin2(Mθ+π/4)*sin2(nθ+qπ/4)=(⅛*/cos[2(m+n)θ+(p+q)π/2]+cos[2(m−n)θ+(p−qπ/2]}  (13)
  • In order to permit phase locking of the modulation functions of the filters on the top and bottom sides of disc [0067] 106, timing marks are provided that can be used for both sides of the disc. This is illustrated more clearly in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6. As shown in all three figures, timing marks 150 at regular angular intervals in reference to axis 40 are provided on a circle near the circumference of the disc 22 a, 22 b or 22 c and a timing mark 152 is provided at a non-regular angular interval or position to mark the zeroth degree rotation angle. As shown in FIG. 1A, a radiation source 154 provides abeam towards the location of time marks 150, 152 of the discs 22 a, 22 b, 22 c and a photodetector 156 on the other side of the disc is positioned to detect the radiation beam provided by source 154. In the preferred embodiment, the substrate is transmissive to the timing beam and timing marks obstruct timing beam alternately, the substrate is opaque to the timing signal and timing marks are milled or etched through substrate. Therefore, the output of photodetector 156 may supply through a connection (not shown) to computer 28 to mark the zero rotational angle and to also mark the instances of the passage of each of the timing marks 150. Such instances may be utilized by computer 28 for taking the M samples when the disc is rotated from 0 to 360°. The above-described scheme for cross-modulation of excitation and emission can also be applied to cross-modulation of excitation and scattering. For this purpose, the fluorescent sample 110 is replaced by a sample that scatters the excitation beam. The scattered beam is then encoded and measured in the same manner as the emission beam described above. The above scheme using the timing marks 150, 152, source 154, photodetector 156 may also be used for controlling the timing of the taking of samples in other embodiments of this invention.
  • In reference to FIGS. 9A, 9B, the same timing marks and radiation source/photodetector system (not shown) described above may be employed in analyzer [0068] 100 for performing the encoding of the excitation beam and of the emission/scattered beam by reference to the same timing marks on the same disc.
  • FIG. 10A is a schematic view of a spectrum analyzer where the position of a folding mirror may be controlled to compensate for alignment and other errors in the system. Thus as shown in FIG. 10A, where the folding mirror is in position [0069] 34(1), the input beam 202 is not properly focused onto the modulator 22. For this purpose, the folding mirror 34 is connected to a translation-rotation stage controlled by a controller for moving the folding mirror to position 34(2), so that input beam 202′ is properly focused onto the modulator 22. FIG. 10B is a schematic view of an analyzer with the translation stage and the feedback mechanism used for controlling the position of the folding mirror to dynamically align the system. The folding mirror is mounted on a stage which facilitates translations along the x axis and rotations about the y axis. The background dielectric spectra for various configurations of the folding mirror has been previously analyzed and recorded into software. The real-time background dielectric spectrum is compared with the stored spectra to gauge the misalignment of the dispersed image on the modulator. This information is transformed into a command set which is sent to the translation stage to reposition the folding mirror. The process is repeated as necessary for a given application. In reference to FIGS. 1A, 10B, the output of the detector 26 is sampled and then demodulated by demodulation algorithm 400 a, compared to background dielectric spectrum 400 b by comparator 400 c, and then analyzed by analyzer 400 c. Hardware driver 401 positions the folding mirror 34 in response to instructions from computer 28.
  • FIG. 11A is a schematic view illustrating an instrument for making the spatial radiation modulators [0070] 22, such as modulators 22 a-22 c described above. For this purpose, a curing/ablation laser 250 is used. A photoresist 252 is placed on top of a gold coated substrate. The photoresist and the substrate are both rotated and the signal supplied to the laser is controlled in accordance with a predetermined laser intensity data shown in FIG. 11B. After the photoresist has been so exposed, the gold coated substrate may be processed in a conventional manner to form the patterns of alternating high and low reflectance and/or transmissivity on the gold coated substrate to form the spatial radiation modulators.
  • While the invention has been described above by reference to various embodiments, it will be understood that different changes and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention which is to be defined only by the appended claims (including the specific placement of a sample cell in the beam path. [0071]

Claims (73)

  1. 1. An radiation spectrum analyzer comprising:
    a source providing radiation of a plurality of selected wavelength components;
    first means for collecting and focusing a beam of radiation from the source to form an elongated image dispersed by wavelength along a length of the image onto a plane,
    a two dimensional spatial light modulator rotated about an axis and positioned in said plane so that said image is dispersed along a radial direction, said modulator having dispersed radiation filters at different radii from said axis, said filters modulating the amplitudes of said wavelength components to provide encoded components, wherein said amplitudes of the encoded components changes between three or more distinct levels of contrast when the modulator is rotated about the axis;
    a detector;
    second means for collecting and directing said encoded beam onto said detector; and
    means for analyzing signals generated by said detector in response to the encoded beam.
  2. 2. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , wherein said amplitudes of the encoded components are functions of time, said analyzing means analyzing said signals to determine the amplitude of each encoded component.
  3. 3. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters has a modulation function along an azimuthal axis, said function modulating the amplitude of a corresponding component according to a function of time having three or more distinct levels of contrast when the modulator is rotated about said axis.
  4. 4. The analyzer of
    claim 3
    , wherein said function is a substantially smooth function or a digitized replica thereof.
  5. 5. The analyzer of
    claim 3
    , wherein at least two of said dispersed radiation filters having substantially orthogonal modulation functions along azimuthal axes.
  6. 6. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , wherein said analyzing means computes said amplitudes of the encoded components from the signals generated by said detector in response to the encoded beam.
  7. 7. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , wherein each filter defines a separate modulated channel and has a duty cycle which is independent of the number of modulated channels.
  8. 8. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said first or second means including a folding mirror for projecting said dispersed image onto the modulator.
  9. 9. The analyzer of
    claim 8
    , said folding mirror including a diffraction grating for correcting chromatic aberration
  10. 10. The analyzer of
    claim 8
    , said folding mirror including a conical section for correcting spherical aberration
  11. 11. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , further comprising a translation-rotation stage for moving the mirror.
  12. 12. The analyzer of
    claim 11
    , further comprising control means for controlling the stage to move the folding mirror.
  13. 13. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said control means analyzing a background dielectric spectrum, said control means including feedback means for controlling the stage so as to position the mirror in response to said spectrum.
  14. 14. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said modulator including a disc, said first means focusing two incident radiation beams directed to opposite sides of the disc, said dispersed filters disposed on both sides of the disc for modulating the two incident radiation beams directed to opposite sides of the disc.
  15. 15. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said filters including annular segments at different radii from said axis
  16. 16. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters modulates the amplitude of the component according to a function given by a combination of one or more terms of the form sin2(m*θ+pπ/4) or digital replicas thereof, where θ is the rotational angle of said modulator, m is an integer corresponding to a particular wavelength component within said plurality of wavelength components and p has the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3.
  17. 17. The analyzer of
    claim 16
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters modulates the amplitude of the component at a first wavelength according to the function sin2(m*θ+p1π/4), and another one of said dispersed radiation filters modulate the amplitude of the component at a second wavelength according to the function sin2(m*θ+p2π/4), where p1-p2 is an even integer, p1 and p2 having the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3, said analyzing means deriving the difference between the modulated amplitudes of the first and second wavelength components to obtain a first derivative value at an intermediate wavelength.
  18. 18. The analyzer of
    claim 16
    , wherein said dispersed radiation filters comprise N sets of filters for N channels, N being a positive integer, where m ranges from 1 to N.
  19. 19. The analyzer of
    claim 18
    , wherein the detector obtains M measurements at M values of θ when the modulator is rotated from 0 to 360 degrees, M being a positive integer, said analyzing means including a N row by M column matrix look up table, said analyzing means deriving the amplitude of each of the wavelength components in the N channels by summing the products of the M measurements with entries in a corresponding row in the table for such channel.
  20. 20. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , further comprising an entrance aperture for filtering radiation from the source and providing filtered radiation from the source to the first means.
  21. 21. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said modulator further comprising timing marks, said analyzer further including a light source and photodetector for detecting the passing of the timing marks when the modulator is rotated.
  22. 22. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said timing marks being at regular angular intervals and non-regular angular intervals, said analyzing means responsive to an output of the photodetector indicative of the timing marks at regular angular intervals for triggering the sampling of the detector output, and responsive to an output of the photodetector indicative of the timing marks at non-regular angular intervals for marking a zero rotational angle.
  23. 23. The analyzer of
    claim 1
    , said modulator including a disc, said source providing two incident radiation beams directed to opposite sides of the disc, said dispersed filters disposed on both sides of the disc for modulating the two incident radiation beams, said analyzer comprising two detectors, each of the two detectors detecting an encoded beam from a corresponding side of the disc.
  24. 24. The analyzer of
    claim 23
    , further comprising means for locking the relative phase of the modulation functions on both sides of the disc for encoding the two beams.
  25. 25. The analyzer of
    claim 23
    , said phase locking means including matching timing marks on both sides of the disc to identify zero degree rotation of the filters on both sides of the disc relative to the two incident radiation beams.
  26. 26. The modulator of
    claim 23
    , said phase locking means including timing marks accessible from either side of the disc to identify zero degree rotation of the filters on both sides of the disc relative to two incident radiation beams.
  27. 27. The analyzer of
    claim 25
    , said phase locking means further including means for synchronizing measurements of the two detectors by reference to the matching timing marks.
  28. 28. A two dimensional spatial light modulator adapted to be rotated about an axis, said modulator having a plurality of dispersed radiation filters at different radii from said axis for modulating amplitudes of different wavelength components of an incident radiation beam to encode said beam, the amplitude of each component being a smooth unction or a digitized replica of a smooth function of a rotational angle of the modulator about the axis.
  29. 29. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters has a modulation function along an azimuthal axis, said function modulating the amplitude of a corresponding component according to a function of time having three or more distinct levels of contrast when the modulator is rotated about said axis.
  30. 30. The modulator of
    claim 29
    , wherein said function is a substantially periodic or smooth function or a digitized replica thereof.
  31. 31. The modulator of
    claim 29
    , wherein at least two of said dispersed radiation filters have substantially orthogonal modulation functions along azimuthal axes.
  32. 32. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , wherein each filter defines a separate modulated channel and has a duty cycle which is independent of the number of modulated channels.
  33. 33. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , said filters including annular segments at different radii from said axis.
  34. 34. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters modulates the amplitude of the component according to a function given by a combination of one or more terms of the form sin2(m*θ+pπ/4) or digital replicas thereof, where θ is the rotational angle of said modulator, m is an integer corresponding to a particular wavelength component within said plurality of wavelength components and p has the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3.
  35. 35. The modulator of
    claim 34
    , wherein said dispersed radiation filters comprise N sets of filters for N channels, N being a positive integer, where m ranges from 1 to N.
  36. 36. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters includes a two dimensional pattern of alternating high transmittance and substantially opaque areas.
  37. 37. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed filters includes two dimensional patterns of alternating high reflectance areas and substantially non-reflective areas.
  38. 38. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , each of said filters comprising an array of differentially reflective or transmissive pixels.
  39. 39. The modulator of
    claim 38
    , said array comprising a substrate with low reflectivity or transmissivity and a patterned layer of high reflectivity or transmissivity material on the substrate.
  40. 40. The modulator of
    claim 38
    , said array comprising a substrate with moderate reflectivity or transmissivity, a patterned layer of low reflectivity or transmissivity material and a patterned layer of high reflectivity or transmissivity material on the substrate.
  41. 41. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , said modulator including at least one grating whose diffraction characteristics are functions of radius of the grating and the rotational position of the grating.
  42. 42. The modulator of
    claim 28
    , said modulator further comprising timing marks at regular angular intervals and non-regular angular intervals.
  43. 43. The modulator of
    claim 42
    , said modulator including matching timing marks on both sides of the disc to identify zero degree rotation of the filters on both sides of the disc relative to two incident radiation beams.
  44. 44. The modulator of
    claim 42
    , said modulator including timing marks accessible from either side of the disc to identify zero degree rotation of the filters on both sides of the disc relative to two incident radiation beams.
  45. 45. A two dimensional spatial light modulator adapted to be rotated about an axis, said modulator having at least one dispersed radiation filter between two different radii from said axis modulating amplitudes of components of an incident radiation beam at or between two different wavelengths when the modulator is rotated about said axis.
  46. 46. The modulator of
    claim 45
    , said at least one filter being in the shape of a serpentine band surrounding said axis.
  47. 47. The modulator of
    claim 46
    , said at least one filter having a radius from the axis given by:
    r(θ)=r1+(r2−r1)*sin2(m*θ)
    where θ is the rotational angle of said disc, r1, r2 are the two different radii and m is an integer.
  48. 48. A two dimensional spatial light modulator adapted to be rotated about an axis, said modulator having at least one dispersed radiation filter, said at least one filter in the shape of a continuous band around the axis, wherein said band has a width that varies as a function of a rotational angle of the modulator about the axis.
  49. 49. The modulator of
    claim 48
    , said band having a width given by:
    Δr(θ)=Δr1+(Δr2−Δr1)*sin2(mθ)
    where θ is the rotational angle of said modulator about the axis, r1, r2 are two different radii from the axis, m is an integer and p has the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3.
  50. 50. A method for analyzing an radiation spectrum, comprising:
    providing radiation of a plurality of selected wavelength components;
    collecting and focusing a beam of radiation from the source to form an elongated image dispersed by wavelength along a length of the image onto a plane,
    positioning a two dimensional spatial light modulator in said plane and rotating the modulator about an axis so that said image is dispersed along a radial direction, said modulator having dispersed radiation filters at different radii from said axis, said filters modulating the amplitudes of said wavelength components to provide encoded components of an encoded beam, wherein said amplitudes of the encoded components changes between three or more distinct levels of contrast when the modulator is rotated about the axis;
    collecting and directing said encoded beam onto a detector; and
    analyzing signals generated by said detector.
  51. 51. The method of
    claim 50
    , wherein said amplitudes of the encoded components are functions of time, wherein said analyzing said signals to determine the amplitude of each encoded component.
  52. 52. The method of
    claim 50
    , wherein said collecting and focusing or collecting and directing includes projecting an image from or onto the modulator by means of a folding mirror.
  53. 53. The method of
    claim 52
    , further comprising moving said mirror by a translation-rotation stage to adjust focus of said beam onto the modulator or re-collimation of the encoded beam onto the detector.
  54. 54. The method of
    claim 52
    , further comprising analyzing a background dielectric spectrum, and positioning the mirror in response to said spectrum.
  55. 55. The method of
    claim 50
    , said modulator including a disc, said dispersed filters disposed on both sides of the disc, wherein said collecting and focusing focuses two incident radiation beams directed to opposite sides of the disc, so that the two beams are modulated by the filters on opposite sides of the disc.
  56. 56. The method of
    claim 55
    , said modulator further comprising timing marks, said method further including:
    providing a light source and photodetector for detecting the passing of the timing marks when the modulator is rotated; and
    generating timing signals corresponding to angular rotational angles of the modulator relative to the timing marks.
  57. 57. The method of
    claim 56
    , further comprising sampling the signals generated by the detector in synchronism with the timing signals.
  58. 58. The method of
    claim 57
    , said timing marks being at regular angular intervals and non-regular angular intervals, further comprising determining a zero rotational angle from output of the photodetector indicative of the timing marks at non-regular angular intervals.
  59. 59. The method of
    claim 50
    , wherein at least one of said dispersed radiation filters modulates the amplitude of the component at a first wavelength according to the function sin2(m*θ+p1π/4), and another one of said dispersed radiation filters modulate the amplitude of the component at a second wavelength 12 according to the function sin2(m*θ+p2π/4), where p1-p2 is an even integer, p1 and p2 having the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3, wherein said analyzing derives the difference between the modulated amplitudes of the first and second wavelength components to obtain a first derivative value at an intermediate wavelength.
  60. 60. The analyzer of
    claim 59
    , further comprising using the detector to obtain M measurements at M values of θ when the modulator is rotated from 0 to 360 degrees, M being a positive integer, said analyzing means including a N row by M column matrix look up table, wherein said analyzing derives the amplitude of each of the wavelength components in the N channels by summing the products of the M measurements with entries in a corresponding row in the table for such channel.
  61. 61. The method of
    claim 60
    , further comprising:
    sequentially altering each of the wavelength components of said beam from the modulator or said encoded beam of radiation from the detector to obtain N altered signals from the detector;
    comparing each of the N altered signals to the signal generated by the detector without altering any of the components to derive interference correction terms; and
    correcting a detector output using said interference correction terms.
  62. 62. A spectrum analyzer for analyzing a sample, comprising:
    a source to provide excitation radiation comprised of a first plurality of wavelength components,
    means for collecting and focusing a beam of radiation from said excitation source to form a first image dispersed by wavelength onto a first plane,
    a first two dimensional spatial light modulator positioned in said first plane, said modulator modulating the amplitude of said first plurality wavelength components to encode said excitation beam,
    said amplitudes being periodically modulated using three or more distinct levels of contrast;
    means for collecting and refocusing said encoded excitation beam onto said sample,
    means for collecting and focusing an emission or scattered beam of radiation from said sample comprised of a second plurality of wavelength components caused by the excitation beam to form a second image dispersed by wavelength onto a second plane,
    a second two dimensional spatial light modulator positioned in said second plane,
    said modulator modulating the amplitude of said second plurality of wavelength components to encode said emission or scattered beam, said amplitudes being periodically modulated using three or more distinct levels of contrast;
    a detector,
    means for collecting and focusing said encoded emission or scattered beam onto said optical detector, and
    means for analyzing a time-based signal generated by said detector.
  63. 63. The spectrum analyzer of
    claim 62
    , wherein the excitation beam and the emission or scattered beam are encoded with the same spatial light modulator to facilitate phase-locked cross-modulation analysis.
  64. 64. The spectrum analyzer of
    claim 63
    , wherein the modulator is a differentially reflective disc which is patterned on the first side to encode the excitation beam and patterned on the second side to encode the emission or scattered beam.
  65. 65. The spectrum analyzer of
    claim 62
    , wherein said patterns encoding the excitation beam are continuation tone or digitized replicas of sin2(mθ+pπ/4) and said patterns encoding the emission beam are continuation tone or digitized replicas of sin2(nθ+qπ/4), where m, n, p, q are positive integers.
  66. 66. The spectrum analyzer of
    claim 62
    , wherein said analyzing means analyzes said signal to determine the amplitude of sum and difference frequency terms resulting from phase-locked cross modulation according to:
    sin2(mθ+pπ/4)*sin2(nθ+qπ/4)=(⅛)*{cos[2(m+n)θ+(p+q)π/2]+cos[2(m−n)θ+(p−q)π/2]}
  67. 66. The method of
    claim 50
    , wherein at least two of said wavelength components are collectively modulated according to the function sin2(mθ+pπ/4), where p1-p2 is an even integer, p1 and p2 having the value of 0, 1, 2 or 3, using dispersed radiation filters with identical azimuthal modulation patterns at different radii.
  68. 67. A spectrum analyzer comprising:
    a source to provide radiation comprised of a plurality of wavelength components,
    a means for collecting and focusing a beam of radiation from said source to form an image dispersed by wavelength onto a plane,
    a two dimensional spatial radiation modulator positioned in said plane, said modulator modulating the amplitude of said wavelength components to encode said beam, said amplitudes being modulated with smooth functions or digitized replicas of smooth functions having three or more distinct levels of contrast,
    a detector,
    means for collecting and refocusing said encoded beam onto said detector, and
    means for analyzing a time-based signal generated by said detector.
  69. 68. The analyzer of
    claim 67
    , wherein said analyzing means analyzing said signals to determine the amplitude of each encoded component.
  70. 69. The analyzer of
    claim 67
    , wherein each said digitized replica of a smooth periodic function defines a separate modulated channel and has a duty cycle which is independent of the number of modulated channels.
  71. 70. The analyzer of
    claim 67
    , wherein said smooth periodic functions are phase-locked to one another.
  72. 71. The analyzer of
    claim 67
    , wherein said smooth periodic functions are orthogonal to one another.
  73. 72. The analyzer of
    claim 67
    wherein said digitized replicas of smooth periodic functions are substantially orthogonal to one another.
US09846583 1998-06-26 2001-05-01 Method and apparatus for spectrum analysis and encoder Expired - Lifetime US6388794B2 (en)

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