US20010001600A1 - Method of controlling the conduction of the access transistors of a load less, four transistor memory cell - Google Patents

Method of controlling the conduction of the access transistors of a load less, four transistor memory cell Download PDF

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US20010001600A1
US20010001600A1 US09/732,535 US73253500A US2001001600A1 US 20010001600 A1 US20010001600 A1 US 20010001600A1 US 73253500 A US73253500 A US 73253500A US 2001001600 A1 US2001001600 A1 US 2001001600A1
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voltage
constant current
temperature dependent
bias
transistors
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US6388933B2 (en
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Ken Marr
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Marr Ken W.
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C11/00Digital stores characterised by the use of particular electric or magnetic storage elements; Storage elements therefor
    • G11C11/21Digital stores characterised by the use of particular electric or magnetic storage elements; Storage elements therefor using electric elements
    • G11C11/34Digital stores characterised by the use of particular electric or magnetic storage elements; Storage elements therefor using electric elements using semiconductor devices
    • G11C11/40Digital stores characterised by the use of particular electric or magnetic storage elements; Storage elements therefor using electric elements using semiconductor devices using transistors
    • G11C11/41Digital stores characterised by the use of particular electric or magnetic storage elements; Storage elements therefor using electric elements using semiconductor devices using transistors forming static cells with positive feedback, i.e. cells not needing refreshing or charge regeneration, e.g. bistable multivibrator or Schmitt trigger
    • G11C11/413Auxiliary circuits, e.g. for addressing, decoding, driving, writing, sensing, timing, power reduction
    • G11C11/417Auxiliary circuits, e.g. for addressing, decoding, driving, writing, sensing, timing, power reduction for memory cells of the field-effect type
    • G11C11/418Address circuits

Abstract

The present invention is a current-mirror-based bias generator for a load less four transistor SRAM as well as associated methods of controlling or modifying the current conducted by the access transistors of such an SRAM. The present invention may be thought of as an adjustable temperature coefficient, bias generator that references, via a current mirror, a reference bank of SRAM cells. The bank of reference cells provides an indication of the necessary conduction characteristics (e.g., gate to source voltage) of the access transistors under various conditions. By applying a bias voltage to the word line the desired current is sourced from the digit line. The bank of reference SRAM cells inherently compensates for process variations. The adjustable temperature coefficient bias generator allows the current sourced by the digit lines to vary greatly as a result of temperature variations. Thus, the present invention compensates for both process variations and temperature variations.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention [0001]
  • The invention relates generally to static-random-access-memory (SRAM) devices and, more particularly, to SRAM's utilizing a four transistor design. [0002]
  • 2. Description of the Background [0003]
  • To meet customer demand for smaller and more power efficient integrated circuits (ICs), manufacturers are designing newer ICs that operate with lower supply voltages and that include smaller internal subcircuits such as memory cells. Many ICs, such as memory circuits or other circuits such as microprocessors that include onboard memory, include arrays of SRAM cells for data storage. SRAM cells are popular because they operate at a higher speed than dynamic-random-access-memory (DRAM) cells, which must be periodically refreshed. [0004]
  • FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram of a conventional 6-transistor (6-T) SRAM cell [0005] 10, which can operate at a relatively low supply voltage, for example 1.5V-3.3V, but which is relatively large. A pair of NMOS access transistors 12 and 14 allow complementary bit values D and {overscore (D)} on digit lines 16 and 18, respectively, to be read from and to be written to a storage circuit 20 of the cell 10. The storage circuit 20 includes NMOS pull-down transistors 22 and 26, which are coupled in a positive-feedback configuration with PMOS pull-up transistors 24 and 28, respectively. Nodes A and B are the complementary inputs/outputs of the storage circuit 20, and the respective complementary logic values at these nodes represent the state of the cell 10. For example, when the node A is at logic 1 and the node B is at logic 0, then the cell 10 is storing a logic 1. Conversely, when the node A is at logic 0 and the node B is at logic 1, then the cell 10 is storing a logic 0. Thus, the cell 10 is bistable, i.e., the cell 10 can have one of two stable states, logic 1 or logic 0.
  • In operation during a read of the cell [0006] 10, a word-line WL, which is coupled to the gates of the transistors 12 and 14, is driven to a voltage approximately equal to Vcc to activate the transistors 12 and 14. For example purposes, assume that Vcc=logic 1=5V and Vss=logic 0=0V, and that at the beginning of the read, the cell 10 is storing a logic 0 such that the voltage level at the node A is 0V and the voltage level at the node B is 5V. Also, assume that before the read cycle, the digit lines 16 and 18 are equilibrated to approximately Vcc-Vt. Therefore, the NMOS transistor 12 couples the node A to the digit line 16, and the NMOS transistor 14 couples the node B to the digit line 18. For example, assume that the threshold voltages of the transistors 12 and 14 are both 1V, then the transistor 14 couples a maximum of 4V from the digit line 18 to the node B. The transistor 12, however, couples the digit line 16 to the node A, which pulls down the voltage on the digit line 16 enough (for example, 100-500 millivolts) to cause a sense amp (not shown) coupled to the lines 16 and 18 to read the cell 10 as storing a logic 0.
  • In operation during a write, for example, of a logic 1 to the cell [0007] 10, and making the same assumptions as discussed above for the read, the transistors 12 and 14 are activated as discussed above, and logic 1 is driven onto the digit line 16 and a logic 0 is driven onto the digit line 18. Thus, the transistor 12 couples 4V (the 5V on the digit line 16 minus the 1V threshold of the transistor 12) to the node A, and the transistor 14 couples 0V from the digit line 18 to the node B. The low voltage on the node B turns off the NMOS transistor 26, and turns on the PMOS transistor 28. Thus, the inactive NMOS transistor 26 allows the PMOS transistor 28 to pull the node A up to 5V. This high voltage on the node A turns on the NMOS transistor 22 and turns off the PMOS transistor 24, thus allowing the NMOS transistor 22 to reinforce the logic 0 on the node B. Likewise, if the voltage written to the node B is 4V and that written to the node A is 0V, the positive-feedback configuration ensures that the cell 10 will store a logic 0.
  • Because the PMOS transistors [0008] 24 and 28 have low on resistances (typically on the order of a few kilohms), they can pull the respective nodes A and B virtually all the way up to Vcc often in less than 10 nanoseconds (ns), and thus render the cell 10 relatively stable and allow the cell 10 to operate at a low supply voltage as discussed above. But unfortunately, the transistors 26 and 28 cause the cell 10 to be approximately 30%-40% larger than a 4-transistor (4-T) SRAM cell, which is discussed next.
  • FIG. 2 is a circuit diagram of a conventional 4-T SRAM cell [0009] 30, where elements common to FIGS. 1 and 2 are referenced with like numerals. A major difference between the 6-T cell 10 and the 4-T cell 30 is that the PMOS pull-up transistors 24 and 28 of the 6-T cell 10 are replaced with conventional passive loads 32 and 34, respectively. For example, the loads 32 and 34 are often polysilicon resistors. Otherwise the topologies of the 6-T cell 10 and the 4-T cell 30 are the same. Furthermore, the 4-T cell 30 operates similarly to the 6-T cell 10. Because the loads 32 and 34 are usually built in another level above the access transistors 12 and 14 and the NMOS pull-down transistors 22 and 26, the 4-T cell 30 usually occupies much less area than the 6-T cell 10.
  • Additional, complex steps are required to form the load elements [0010] 32 and 34 such that 4-T cells present the usual complexity versus cost tradeoff. The high resistance values of the loads 32 and 34 can substantially lower the stability margin of the cell 30 as compared with the cell 10. Thus, under certain conditions, the cell 30 can inadvertently become monostable or read unstable instead of bistable. Also, the cell 30 consumes more power than the cell 20 because there is always current flowing from Vcc to Vss through either the load 32 and the NMOS transistor 26 or the load 34 and the NMOS transistor 22. In contrast, current flow from Vcc to Vss in the cell 20 is always blocked by one of the NMOS/PMOS transistor pairs 22/24 and 26/28. Efforts to eliminate load elements 32 and 34 have lead to the development of a load-less four transistor SRAM cell as shown in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of a conventional load-less 4-T SRAM cell, where elements common to FIGS. 2 and 3 are referenced with like numerals. The difference between the load-less cell [0011] 36 and the cell 30 is the elimination of load elements 32 and 34 and the replacement of NMOS transistors 12 and 14 with PMOS transistors 38 and 40, respectively.
  • With the load-less 4-T SRAM cell of FIG. 3, like all SRAM cells, leakage currents and/or subthreshold currents are generated by transistors [0012] 22 and 26 when in the off state, and one will always be in the off state. To prevent the cell 36 from spontaneously changing state, the transistors 38 and 40 must source sufficient load current from the digit lines 16 and 18, respectively, to offset the leakage and subthreshold currents. The needed load current can vary over many orders of magnitude due to temperature and process variations. However, the load current cannot be too large because the cumulative (along the digit lines 16 and 18) load current needs to be significantly less than the cell current for proper noise margin for proper operation of the sense amps.
  • Wide temperature variations resulting from cold-data retention testing and burn-in testing are also causes of wide variations in leakage and subthreshold currents, thereby causing wide variations in the load current that must be sourced by transistors [0013] 38 and 40. Such testing, coupled with normal process variations, sense amp margin requirements, as well as yield requirements (e.g., read/write stability requirements, power consumption requirements, etc.) have made the manufacturing of load-less 4-T SRAM's a difficult matter.
  • SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed generally to a bias generator used in conjunction with one of the word line or digit line to set the desired level of load current as a function of temperature (or test being performed) to satisfy the simultaneous constraints of yield, sense amp margin, and load current even during cold-data retention testing or burn-in. [0014]
  • The present invention is also directed to a method of modifying the level of current conducted by the access transistors of a load-less, four transistor memory cell when the access transistors are in an off state. The method is comprised of the step of generating a temperature dependent bias voltage and connecting that bias voltage to the gate terminals of the access transistors. [0015]
  • The present invention is also directed to a current-mirror-based bias generator for a load-less four transistor SRAM as well as associated methods of controlling or modifying the current conducted by the access transistors of such an SRAM. The present invention may be thought of as an adjustable temperature coefficient, bias generator that references, via a current mirror, a reference bank of SRAM cells. The bank of reference cells provides an indication of the necessary conduction characteristics (e.g., gate to source voltage) of the access transistors under various conditions. By applying a bias voltage to the word line the desired current is sourced from the digit line. The bank of reference SRAM cells inherently compensates for process variations. The adjustable temperature coefficient bias generator allows the current sourced by the digit lines to vary greatly as a result of temperature variations. Thus, the present invention compensates for both process variations and temperature variations. Those benefits, and others, will become apparent from the description of the preferred embodiment hereinbelow. [0016]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For the present invention to be easily understood and readily practiced, the invention will now be described for purposes of illustration and not limitation, in conjunction with the following figures wherein: [0017]
  • FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram of a conventional 6-T SRAM cell; [0018]
  • FIG. 2 is a circuit diagram of a conventional 4-T SRAM cell; [0019]
  • FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of a conventional load-less 4-T SRAM cell; [0020]
  • FIG. 4 is a circuit diagram of a load-less 4-T SRAM cell in conjunction with a bias generator constructed according to the teachings of the present invention; [0021]
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a portion of an array of 4-T SRAM cells incorporating the bias generator of the present invention; [0022]
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a load-less 4-T SRAM incorporating the bias generator of the present invention; [0023]
  • FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a computer system that includes the 4-T SRAM of FIG. 6; [0024]
  • FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment of the present invention; and [0025]
  • FIG. 9 is a block diagram illustrating how the bias voltage on the global bus can be forced to any value. [0026]
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • FIG. 4 is a circuit diagram of a load-less [0027] 4 transistor SRAM cell 36 in conjunction with a bias generator 42 constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. The cell 36 illustrated in FIG. 4 is identical to the cell 36 illustrated in FIG. 3. The bias generator 42 is comprised of a bank of transistors 44 connected in parallel with each other and connected in series with a temperature dependent constant current source 46. The bank of transistors 44 is fabricated at the same time, and in the same manner, as access transistors 38 and 40. In that manner, the voltage drop from the gate terminal to the source terminal of each of the transistors 44 should be substantially the same as the gate to source terminal drop of access transistors 38 and 40. Thus, the voltage drop across the gate and source terminals of each of the transistors 44 is representative of the voltage drop across the gate and source terminals of the transistors 38 and 40. As an alternative to separately fabricating the bank of transistors 44, a bank of cells 36 could carry additional wiring so that the gate to source voltage of the access transistors 38 and 40 can be sensed.
  • Returning to the bias generator [0028] 42, the current source 46 may be constructed using any known techniques which provide a temperature dependent constant current source. The constant current source will produce one value of current under, for example, cold data-retention test conditions, and another value of current under burn-in test conditions. Thus, for each value of current produced by the temperature dependent constant current source 46, a different voltage drop across the gate and source terminals of the transistors 44 is produced. That voltage drop is averaged and sensed by an operational amplifier 48. Although the bias generator 42 would operate if only one transistor for the bank of transistors 44 was provided, by providing a plurality of transistors within bank 44, a voltage drop which is more representative of the voltage drop experienced in the cells is produced. The voltage drop sensed by the operational amplifier 48 may then be applied to the word line which, as seen in the figure, is connected to the gate terminals of the access transistors 38 and 40. Thus, when the cell 36 is in the off-state, i.e., transistors 38 and 40 are nonconductive, the bias voltage applied by the operational amplifier 48 may be used to control the conduction characteristics of the access transistors 38 and 40 so as to enable the transistors 38 and 40 to source current from the digit lines 16 and 18. Because the bias voltage is directly related to the current which is produced by the constant current source 46, and the current is temperature dependent, the bias voltage is also temperature dependent. Thus, the conduction characteristics of the access transistors 38 and 40 are controlled according to the temperature such that the current required by the cell 36, for a given temperature, may be properly sourced.
  • The temperature dependent constant current source may receive inputs from a programmable device [0029] 45. The programmable device 45 may contain laser trimmable devices, fuses, or antifuses, which allow manipulation of a value adjust signal (VA) and a temperature coefficient adjust signal (TCA) to provide some degree of control over the bias voltage post fabrication.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a portion of an array [0030] 50 of four transistor SRAM cells 36 incorporating the bias generator 42 of the present invention. In FIG. 5, a plurality of digit lines D, {overscore (D)}, and a plurality of word lines WL1-WL4 are used to interconnect individual memory cells 36. The bias generator 42, constructed as shown in FIG. 4, globally provides the bias voltage to the array via global bus 54. The bias generator 42 may be coupled to each of the word lines WL1-WL4 through a transistor pair 52. Each transistor pair 52 is comprised of a PMOS and an NMOS transistor. The PMOS transistor may be connected between the bias generator 42 and a word line, e.g., WL1. The NMOS transistor may be connected between the word line, e.g. WL1, and ground. Each transistor is responsive to a word line select signal, e.g. Sel WL1.
  • In operation, only one word line will be active at a time. For word lines not selected, the NMOS transistor of the transistor pair [0031] 52 will be off while the PMOS transistor will be on thereby coupling the bias voltage to each of the non-selected word lines. When a word line is selected, e.g., WL1, the word line select signal, e.g., Sel WL1, will cause the transistors to change state. Specifically, the NMOS transistor will turn on connecting the word line to ground thereby rendering the word line active while the PMOS transistor will turn off thereby ending the application of the bias voltage to the active word line.
  • To provide a particular voltage for a test mode, a voltage source [0032] 56 may be coupled to the global bus 54 through a transistor 58. The voltage source may be capable of outputting different voltages depending upon one or more control signals 60. Upon assertion of the signal {overscore (Tm)}, the bias generator 42 is disabled and the output of the voltage source 56 is applied to the global bus 54. Voltage source 56 may include a constant current source as well as a laser trimmable device, fuses, or antifuses as discussed above for the purpose of giving the manufacturer some degree of control over the voltage(s) produced by the voltage source 56 post fabrication.
  • Another way to implement the functionality described in the previous paragraph is through the use of more than one constant current source in the bias generator [0033] 42 as shown in FIG. 8. For example, a second constant current source 46′ could be operatively connected through a switch 66 to the remainder of the circuit for producing a voltage input to op amp 48. The constant current source 46′ is responsive to a particular test mode instead of being responsive to the temperature.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 9. In FIG. 9, a pad [0034] 62 is connected to the global bus 54 through a transistor 64. Whenever the signal {overscore (Tm)}-force is asserted, the bias generator 42 is disabled and the voltage available at the pad 62 is placed on the global bus 54. Thus, the voltage on global bus 54 may be forced to any value. When the signal {overscore (Tm)}-measure is asserted, the voltage on bus 54 can be measured at pad 62. This functionality is useful for characterization purposes as well as yield and reliability screening.
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a memory circuit [0035] 70 which can include cells 36 and the bias generator 42 as previously described. In one embodiment, the memory circuit 70 may be a synchronous SRAM.
  • The memory circuit [0036] 70 includes an address register 72, which receives an address from an ADDRESS bus (not shown). A control logic circuit 74 receives a clock (CLK) signal, and receives enable and write signals on a COMMAND bus (not shown), and communicates with the other circuits of the memory circuit 70. A burst counter 75 causes the memory circuit 70 to operate in a burst address mode in response to a MODE signal.
  • During a write cycle, write driver circuitry [0037] 76 writes date to a memory array 78. The array 78 is the component of the memory circuit 70 that can include the cells 36 and bias generator 42. The array 78 also includes an address decoder 80 for decoding the address from the address register 72. Alternately, the address decoder 80 may be separate from the array 78.
  • During a read cycle, sense amplifiers [0038] 82 amplify and provide the data read from the array 78 to a data input/output (I/O) circuit 84. The I/O circuit 84 includes output circuits 86, which provide data from the sense amplifiers 82 to a DATA bus (not shown) during a read cycle. The I/O circuit 84 also includes input circuits 88, which provide data from the DATA bus to the write drivers 76 during a write cycle. The input and output circuits 88 and 86, respectively, may include conventional registers and buffers. Furthermore, the combination of the write driver circuitry 76 and the sense amplifiers 82 can be referred to as read/write circuitry. The various components shown in FIG. 6, with the exception of the array 78, constitute a plurality of components for reading information out of, and writing information into, the array 80.
  • FIG. 7 is a block diagram of an electronic system [0039] 90, such as a computer system, that incorporates the memory circuit 70 of FIG. 6. The system 90 includes computer circuitry 92 for performing computer functions, such as executing software to perform desired calculations and tasks. The circuitry 92 typically includes a processor 94 and the memory circuit 70, which is coupled to the processor 94. One or more input devices 96, such as a keyboard or a mouse, are coupled to the computer circuitry 92 and allow an operator (not shown) to manually input data thereto. One or more output devices 98 are coupled to the computer circuitry 92 to provide to the operator data generated by the computer circuitry 92. Examples of such output devices 98 include a printer and a video display unit. One or more data-storage devices 100 are coupled to the computer circuitry 92 to store data on or retrieve data form external storage media (not shown). Examples of the storage devices 100 and the corresponding storage media include drives that accept hard and floppy disks, tape cassettes, and compact disk read-only memories (CD-ROMs). Typically, the computer circuitry 92 includes address, data, and command buses and a clock line that are respectively coupled to the ADDRESS, DATA and COMMAND buses, and the CLK line of the memory circuit 70.
  • The present invention is also directed to a method of controlling the load current in a load-less four transistor memory cell. The method is comprised of the step of providing a temperature dependent bias voltage to one of the word line or the digit line. The providing step may be comprised of the steps of generating a temperature dependent constant current, generating a voltage drop across two terminals of a transistor representative of the transistors in the memory cell with the temperature dependent constant current, and sensing the voltage drop to produce the bias voltage. The voltage drop may be generated across a plurality of transistors to provide an average value for the voltage drop. By connecting or applying the bias voltage to one of the word line or digit line, the conduction of the access transistors of the memory cell may be controlled. However, because of the different function which the digit line performs in the context of a memory cell, it is considered preferable to apply the bias voltage to the word line. The present invention is also directed to a method of regulating a voltage difference between the word line and the digit line in a load-less four transistor memory cell by applying a temperature dependent bias voltage to one of the word line or the digit line. [0040]
  • While the present invention has been described in conjunction with preferred embodiments thereof, those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that many modifications and variations are possible. For example, the type of transistors used to construct the cell may be varied such that the terminals in issue need not be the gate and source terminals. As previously mentioned, the same result can be achieved by varying the voltage on the digit line or, alternatively, controlling the voltage differential between the word line and the digit line. The foregoing disclosure and the following claims are intended to encompass all such modifications and variations. [0041]

Claims (42)

What is claimed is:
1. A voltage generator for providing a bias voltage to a word line, comprising:
a constant current source for producing different levels of current in response to different conditions;
at least one transistor connected in series with said constant current source;
an amplifier responsive to a voltage across two terminals of said transistor; and
a drive circuit responsive to said amplifier for biasing a word line.
2. The voltage generator of
claim 1
wherein said constant current source is responsive to different temperature conditions.
3. The voltage generator of
claim 1
additionally comprising a laser trimmable device connected with said constant current source.
4. The voltage generator of
claim 1
additionally comprising a plurality of fuses connected with said constant current source.
5. The voltage generator of
claim 1
additionally comprising a plurality of antifuses connected with said constant current source.
6. A temperature dependent voltage generator, comprising:
a temperature dependent constant current source for producing different levels of current in response to different temperatures;
at least one transistor connected in series with said constant current source;
an amplifier responsive to a voltage across certain terminals of said transistor; and
a drive circuit responsive to said amplifier for providing a voltage.
7. The voltage generator of
claim 6
wherein said amplifier is responsive to a voltage across a gate terminal and a source terminal.
8. The voltage generator of
claim 6
additionally comprising means connected with said constant current source for controlling the voltage post fabrication.
9. A temperature compensated bias generator for use with an array of load-less four transistor memory cells interconnected by bit lines and word lines, said bias generator comprising:
a temperature dependent constant current source;
a plurality of transistors connected in parallel with one another and in series with said constant current source;
an amplifier responsive to an average voltage across two terminals of said plurality of transistors; and
a drive circuit responsive to said amplifier for providing a bias voltage.
10. The bias generator of
claim 9
wherein said average voltage across two terminals includes the average voltage across a gate terminal and a source terminal of each transistor in said plurality of transistors.
11. A bias generator, comprising:
a temperature dependent constant current source,
a constant current source,
a circuit for producing a bias voltage in response to one of said current sources; and
a switch for connecting one of said constant current sources to said circuit.
12. The bias generator of
claim 11
wherein said switch is responsive to a test mode signal.
13. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a laser trimmable device connected to said temperature dependent constant current source.
14. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a plurality of fuses connected to said temperature dependent constant current source.
15. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a plurality of antifuses connected to said temperature dependent constant current source.
16. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a laser trimmable device connected to said constant current source.
17. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a plurality of fuses connected to said constant current source.
18. The bias generator of
claim 11
additionally comprising a plurality of antifuses connected to said constant current source.
19. A combination comprising:
an array of memory cells each comprised of not more than four transistors;
a plurality of digit lines and word lines interconnecting said array of memory cells; and
a bias generator for producing different levels of current in response to different conditions, said bias generator for providing a bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines.
20. The combination of
claim 19
wherein said bias generator is responsive to temperature.
21. The combination of
claim 19
wherein said bias generator is responsive to different test modes.
22. A combination comprising:
an array of memory cells each comprised of not more than four transistors;
a plurality of digit lines and word lines interconnecting said array of memory cells;
a bias generator for providing a temperature sensitive bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines in response to a control signal;
a voltage source for providing a fixed bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines; and
a switch responsive to the control signal for connecting said voltage source to one of said word lines and digit lines when the control signal disconnects said bias generator.
23. A combination comprising:
an array of memory cells each comprised of not more than four transistors;
a plurality of digit lines and word lines interconnecting said array of memory cells;
a bias generator for providing a temperature sensitive bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines;
an input/output pad; and
a switch responsive to the control signal for selectively connecting said pad to one of said word lines and digit lines in response to a control signal.
24. A static random access memory, comprising:
an array of memory cells each comprised of not more than four transistors;
a plurality of digit lines and word lines interconnecting said array of memory cells;
a bias generator for producing different levels of current in response to different conditions, said bias generator for providing a bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines; and
a plurality of peripheral devices, responsive to said digit lines and said word lines for controlling the input of information to, and output of information from, said array of memory cells.
25. The memory of
claim 24
wherein said bias generator is responsive to temperature.
26. The memory of
claim 24
wherein said bias generator is responsive to different test modes.
27. A system, comprising:
a microprocessor;
a plurality of memory devices in communication with said microprocessor, each of said memory devices comprising:
an array of memory cells each comprised of not more than four transistors;
a plurality of digit lines and word lines interconnecting said array of memory cells;
a bias generator for producing different levels of current in response to different conditions, said bias generator for providing a bias voltage to one of said word lines and digit lines; and
a plurality of peripheral devices, responsive to said digit lines and said word lines for controlling the input of information to, and output of information from, said array of memory cells.
28. A method of controlling the load current in a load less four transistor memory cell, comprising:
providing a temperature dependent bias voltage to one of the word line and the digit line.
29. The method of
claim 28
wherein said step of providing a bias voltage includes the steps of:
generating a temperature dependent constant current;
generating a voltage drop across two terminals of a transistor representative of the access transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current; and
sensing said voltage drop to produce the bias voltage.
30. The method of
claim 29
additional comprising the steps of generating a plurality of voltage drops across two terminals of a plurality of transistors representative of the access transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current, and averaging said voltage drops before said sensing step.
31. A method of controlling the conduction of the access transistors of a load-less, four transistor memory cell, comprising:
applying a temperature dependent bias voltage to control terminals of the access transistors.
32. The method of
claim 31
additionally comprising the steps of:
generating a temperature dependent constant current;
generating a voltage drop across two terminals of a transistor representative of the access transistors with said temperature dependent constant current; and
sensing said voltage drop to produce the temperature dependent bias voltage.
33. The method of
claim 32
additionally comprising the steps of generating a plurality of voltage drops across two terminals of a plurality of transistors representative of the access transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current, and averaging said voltage drops before said amplifying step.
34. A method of modifying the level of current conducted by the access transistors of a load-less, four transistor memory cell when said transistors are in an off-state, comprising:
generating a temperature dependent bias voltage;
providing a test mode bias voltage; and
connecting one of said temperature dependent bias voltage and test mode bias voltage to control terminals of the access transistors.
35. The method of
claim 34
wherein said step of generating a temperature dependent bias voltage includes the steps of:
generating a temperature dependent constant current; and
sensing a voltage drop across two terminals of a transistor representative of the access transistors as a result of the application of said temperature dependent constant current to generate the temperature dependent bias voltage.
36. The method of
claim 35
additionally comprising the steps of generating a plurality of voltage drops across two terminals of a plurality of transistors representative of the transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current, and averaging said voltage drops.
37. A method of regulating a voltage difference between the word line and digit line of a load-less four transistor memory cell, comprising:
applying one of a temperature dependent bias voltage and a test mode bias voltage to one of the word line and digit line.
38. The method of
claim 37
additionally comprising the step of generating said test mode bias voltage.
39. The method of
claim 37
wherein said test mode bias voltage is applied from an input/output pad.
40. The method of
claim 37
additionally comprising the steps of:
generating a temperature dependent constant current;
generating a voltage drop across two terminals of a transistor representative of the transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current; and
sensing said voltage drop to produce the temperature dependent bias voltage.
41. The method of
claim 40
additionally comprising the steps of generating a plurality of voltage drops across two terminals of a plurality of transistors representative of the transistors in the memory cell with said temperature dependent constant current, and averaging said voltage drops before said amplifying step.
42. A method, comprising:
generating a temperature dependent constant current;
generating a fixed constant current;
selecting one of said temperature dependent and fixed constant currents;
generating a plurality of voltage drops representative of the voltage drops across the gate and source terminals of access transistors in a loadless, four transistor cell using said selected constant current;
averaging said voltage drops to produce an average voltage; and
applying said average voltage to the gate terminals of the access transistors.
US09/732,535 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Method of controlling the conduction of the access transistors of a load less, four transistor memory cell Expired - Fee Related US6388933B2 (en)

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US09/732,535 Expired - Fee Related US6388933B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Method of controlling the conduction of the access transistors of a load less, four transistor memory cell
US09/732,631 Expired - Fee Related US6373756B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Memory structure utilizing four transistor load less memory cells and a bias generator
US09/732,634 Expired - Fee Related US6496422B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Memory structure utilizing four transistor load less memory cells and a bias generator
US09/732,533 Expired - Fee Related US6337813B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Method of regulating a voltage difference between a word line and a digit line of a load less, four transistor memory cell
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US09/732,533 Expired - Fee Related US6337813B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Method of regulating a voltage difference between a word line and a digit line of a load less, four transistor memory cell
US09/732,633 Expired - Fee Related US6330195B2 (en) 1999-06-22 2000-12-08 Bias generator for a four transistor load less memory cell

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US20010000307A1 (en) 2001-04-19
US6198670B1 (en) 2001-03-06
US20010001599A1 (en) 2001-05-24
US6288966B2 (en) 2001-09-11
US6388933B2 (en) 2002-05-14
US20010000213A1 (en) 2001-04-12
US6337813B2 (en) 2002-01-08
US6330195B2 (en) 2001-12-11
US20010000308A1 (en) 2001-04-19
US6373756B2 (en) 2002-04-16
US20010002890A1 (en) 2001-06-07

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