US1995072A - Method and means for removing sedimentation from bottled liquids - Google Patents

Method and means for removing sedimentation from bottled liquids Download PDF

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US1995072A
US1995072A US633837A US63383732A US1995072A US 1995072 A US1995072 A US 1995072A US 633837 A US633837 A US 633837A US 63383732 A US63383732 A US 63383732A US 1995072 A US1995072 A US 1995072A
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bottle
neck
liquid
body
means
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US633837A
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Perley B Mills
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Perley B Mills
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12GWINE; PREPARATION THEREOF; ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; PREPARATION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES NOT PROVIDED FOR IN SUBCLASSES C12C OR C12H
    • C12G1/00Preparation of wine or sparkling wine
    • C12G1/08Removal of yeast ["degorgeage"]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S215/00Bottles and jars
    • Y10S215/08Mixing

Description

March .19, 1935. P. B. MILLS 1,995,072

METHOD AND MEANS FOR REMOVING SEDIMENTATION FROM BOTTLED LIQUIDS Filed Sept. 19, 1952 BBL/MI; Us

Patented Mar. 19, 1935 METH DAND MEANS FoR ssnovmsm. MEDITATION rnoM BOTTLED LIQUIDS Perl'ey {13. Mill s, Sabina, Ohio Applieation-Se ptember 19, 1932,:Serial No.'633,837

' 1 Claim;

which matter precipitates after the bottled liquidsl i have been allowed to stand for some considerable time. These solids are oftenobjectionable when the liquidis removed from the bottles for beverage or other purposes, and the present in- V ventionrresides largely inthe provision of a sim- 2'0 plemechanical device which may be inserted in the bottles during the filling thereof with the liquid containing the objectionable solidmatter and=retained against displacement by the removable closures, caps or stoppers used in the sealing of" such bottles, whereby upon thesubsequent removal of the closures, the said deviceninay be actuated'to mechanically withdraw the suspended solid matter from-the liquid so that the latter will be'left substantially free from such-solid matter for any desired use. 1

In the preferred form of the invention, I employ a sediment remover which comprises a soft, yieldable and pliable body, preferably formed from material such as sponge rubber, to which is connected a harmllemember extending upwardly and axially therefrom, the said yieldable body being so proportioned that normally it possesses a greater diameter than the neck of a bottle, butv upon the actuation of the handle, the said body may be compressed and withdrawn from the bottle through the open neck thereof, the withdrawal of the body serving to mechanically expel the un desired solid matter from the bottle and the liquid containing the same.

For a further understanding of the invention, reference is to be had to the following description and the accompanying drawing, wherein i Fig. l is a perspective view of the improved sediment remover comprising the present invention;

' Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken through a bottle, disclosing the position of the remover in the bottle during storage of the liquid, wherein the bottle is shown in an inverted position permitting ofthe accumulation lofsedimentationin I the neck thereof; 7

Fig. 3 is a similar view disclosing 'thebottl in its normal upright position and in an uncapped state, with the flexible body of the device compressed in the neck of the-"bottle and expelling sedimentation through'the neckof-the bottle;

Fig. 4 is a'perspective view, partly vertical section,,'of a modified form of the invention where in 'the sediment remover isdirectly connected with'a'bottle closure or stopper; 1

Fig. 5 is a View of a bottle stored right side up, showing thers'ediment collected at the upper end thereof; 3 t I Fig. "6 is a view showing a slightly modified form: of the invention in use. i l a I Referring more particularly to-thedrawing, the

numeral 1- designates the improved sediment remover device'comprising the'present invention in its entirety and in the form thereofdisclosed in Figs. 1 :to 3,:the saiddevice;preferably".provides v a body 2 composed of a soft yieldablematerial, such'as' sponge rubber; In this instanca the body isofdislz-like form, although. it may 'be'of other forms and yet attain the ends of the. invention, as well as being made from materials of a flexible character other thansponge'rubber. Connected with the 'b'odyand extending upwardly therefrom is-a handle 3 in the form ofa suitable length of wire or rubber rod, :which is anchored to'f-he body asin'dicatedat-. The'upper end of'the'han'die maybe provided with a loop or thelike-li to facilitateits manipulation. Preferably,.the body 2 pos-. sesses a" diameter normally greater than that of. the restricted: neck 6-;of ,a standardbottle 7; so that when the body is drawn through the neck, it is to some degree compressed in order to closely engage with the inner walls of the neck to substantially prevent seepage of matter between the body and neck Walls, andto serve in a piston-like capacity in expelling the undesired matter.

In practice, the device is placed in the bottle 7 after the latter has been filled to a desired extent with a suitable liquid or beverage and the bottle is capped as at 8 in the ordinary manner. The length of the handle rod 3 is such that when the bottle is capped, the said handle rod will be flexed or bowed, whereby when the bottle is subsequently uncapped, the said rod by reason of its resiliency will straighten so that the looped end thereof will project above the neck of the bottle where it may be graspeclto actuate the device. After the device has been inserted in a bottle filled with a given liquid containing solid matter in suspension therein, the bottle is capped and is then inverted, as shown in Fig. 2, which during a period of storage or other inactivity, permits the solid matter to precipitate and collect in the neck of the bottle as indicated at 9. Where the sediment is lighter than the liquid and during storage rises to the top of the liquid, the bottle is stored on its base, as shown in Fig. 5 of the drawing. When it is desired to withdraw the liquid from the bottle, the latter is placed upright and the cap or other closure 8 removed,

permitting the looped end 5 of the handle 3 to project beyond the open upper end of the bottle where it may be at once grasped. Since the solid matter is comparatively light in most instances, it does'not immediately settle to the base of the bottle but remains for an appreciable period suspended in the liquid in the neck of the bottle. wardly through the bottle neck, by the use of the handle3, the flexible rubber body 2 is compressed and crowded through the neck of the bottle, expelling the solid matter or sedimentation which collects above it, so that substantially all of such-sedimentation is removed, leaving the liquid in a clear bright state suitable for consumption as a beverage or'for other purposes.

' Moreover, if the liquid contains carbon dioxideor other effervescence creating gas,.a portion of the gas accumulates above the surface of the liquid and since it is greatly desirable that some liquids and beverages be highly charged with these gases at the time of consumption, it follows that in place of these gases escaping as takes place when thebottle is opened as in normal bottling, the act of placing-the bottle in an upright position to properly actuate the device, causes the gas to rise and diffuse through the liquid, thereby causing the liquid to absorb a substantial portion of these gases, thereby" creating a more desirable highly -carbonated :liquid or beverage.

Further, the movement of the. body 2 through the neck, or its momentaryretention in the neck, serves to r tain the effervescence producing gas contained in the bottle, preventing its violent and sudden release, so that the liquid when subsequentlypoured Then, by drawing the device out- In Fig. 6, there is disclosed a slightly different form of the invention wherein the sediment receiving deyicelB is made entirely of rubber and is formed so that it will float on top of the liquid.

Preferably, the elongated stem or handle 14 thereof is of a length greater than the diameter of the bottle so that the end of the handle will engage the side of the bottle and hold the device substantially vertical therein. It will be seen that in turning the bottle right side up, the device will rise to the upper end thereof and the handle l lwill thus extend through the neck of the bottle where it may be readily grasped and the device removed from the, bottle neck.

In view of the foregoing, it will. be seen that by virtue of the construction described, as well as by following the method set forth, bottled liquids containing solid matter of an objectionable character may be freed from such matter prior to the discharge of the liquid from the bottle. The de-- vice is essentially simple in character, may be produced at low costs and its materials are such that the liquid will not be deleteriously afiected thereby.

What is claimed is:

A .device for removing sedimentation from bottled liquids comprising a body of compressible material chemically inert to a bottled liquid, said body being adapted to be positioned within a bottle in contact with the base of the bottle, the said body normally possessing a diameter greater than that of the neck of the bottle in which it is placed and capable of being compressed to pass through the bottle neck when drawn outwardly, and a flexible handle member for-said body, said handle member being of a length in excess of that of the bottle andarranged to engage with a removable closure for the bottle whereby said handle 50 PERLEY B. MILLS.

US633837A 1932-09-19 1932-09-19 Method and means for removing sedimentation from bottled liquids Expired - Lifetime US1995072A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2533806A (en) * 1949-07-06 1950-12-12 Harry R Holzapfel Bottle
US2715465A (en) * 1952-04-21 1955-08-16 Ira E Wood Beverage brewing crock
US3972812A (en) * 1975-05-08 1976-08-03 Becton, Dickinson And Company Blood serum separation filter disc
IT201700010191A1 (en) * 2017-01-31 2018-07-31 Bronzetti Filippo Cap for bottles with liquids sediment

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2533806A (en) * 1949-07-06 1950-12-12 Harry R Holzapfel Bottle
US2715465A (en) * 1952-04-21 1955-08-16 Ira E Wood Beverage brewing crock
US3972812A (en) * 1975-05-08 1976-08-03 Becton, Dickinson And Company Blood serum separation filter disc
IT201700010191A1 (en) * 2017-01-31 2018-07-31 Bronzetti Filippo Cap for bottles with liquids sediment

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