US1990972A - Diagnostic instrument - Google Patents

Diagnostic instrument Download PDF

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US1990972A
US1990972A US666835A US66683533A US1990972A US 1990972 A US1990972 A US 1990972A US 666835 A US666835 A US 666835A US 66683533 A US66683533 A US 66683533A US 1990972 A US1990972 A US 1990972A
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lens
carrier
tubular
cap
instrument
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US666835A
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Walter A Arnesen
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Walter A Arnesen
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/307Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for the urinary organs, e.g. urethroscopes, cystoscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/06Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor with illuminating arrangements
    • A61B1/0661Endoscope light sources
    • A61B1/0669Endoscope light sources at proximal end of an endoscope
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/227Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for ears, i.e. otoscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/31Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for the rectum, e.g. proctoscopes, sigmoidoscopes, colonoscopes

Description

Feb. 12, 1935. w. A. ARNEsEN .1,990,972

DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENT Filed April `19,A 1935 INVENTOR- haY/er A. Arnesen Patented Feb. 12, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 14 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in diagnostic instruments and more particularly to improvements in illuminated diagnostic instruments.

In making an aural, urethral, proctoscopic and similar examinations, it is customary to make use of a suitable instrument provided with illumination for aiding in the examination. Various types of illuminating mechanisms have been utilized, but considerable disadvantages reside in the majority thereof. In some types of de-- vices, it is necessary to make use of a prism for bending the'rays of light into proper direction. In other types of devices, rays directly from a source are utilized, but again it becomes necessary to provide some arrangement to prevent Y other rays from affecting the line of sight of the one making the examination. Special sources of rays become necessary, such sources in the majority of cases being relatively expensive and lof delicate nature. i

v.An object of the invention is to provide a new,

simple, inexpensive, and efficient light mechanism for use in connection with diagnostic instruments.

Another object of the invention is to provide an illuminating mechanism of such a character that ordinary flashlight electric bulbs can be used therein.

A further object of the invention is to provide illuminating mechanism for diagnostic instruments of such a character that concentrated rays directly from the iilament of a flashlight bulb are thrown into the region to be examined without interfering with the line of visual inspection.

A further object of the invention is to provide a diagnostic instrument carrier of such a character that the improved illuminating mechanism of the invention can be consolidated therewith.

Another object of the invention is to provide diagnostic instrument carriers with arms extending substantially parallel to the line of direction oflight rays which are projected toward the area to be examined.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a socket for diagnostic instruments of such a character that the instruments are held in position by frictional contact.

Another object of the invention is to provide an instrument carrier of such type that tongue depressors of different sizes and shapes can be se- 'cured thereto.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an attaching member for diagnosticinstruments, which member adapts the instrument to be used as an insuiiiator.

The illuminating mechanism ofthe present invention consists of a tubular member having a socket in one' end thereof for the reception of an electric light bulb of the type ordinarily used in hand ashlights. Associated with this tubular bulb carrier is a lens cap in the nature principally of a closed end tube, through the top of which extends a smaller tube having one end closed and having a condensing or collecting lens mounted in the other end thereof. This smaller tube extends preferably at an angle of 110 degrees to the axis of the-tube through which it passes. Due to this construction, the closed end of the cap when inserted upon the bulb vcarrying tube rests directly upon the bulb so that the filament o f the bulb is in position to project light rays directly against the condensing lens. Consequently, vthe rays projected from the lens carrying tube are of maximum intensity and are substantially shadowless. Since the cap is rotatable relative to the bulb carrying tube, these parts can be rotated so that the iilamentv is positioned most advantageously relative to the condensing lens.

In conjunction with this type of illuminating mechanism, use is made of diagnostic instrument carriers of Various types, all of which, however, possessl some common features of construction. All types of carriers will have as a part thereof a hollow tubular member of such internal diameter as to t closely around the bulb carrying tube and the lens cap. Set screws or other locking means are provided to fasten both carrying tube and the lens cap in whatever position is desired. Extending outwardly from the hollow tubular member of the instrument carrier is an arm. In Yone type of carrier this arm is a simple bar having an elbow at one end thereof, which elbow is connected directly with a ring-like socket for the reception of diagnostic instruments such as auriscopes, proctoscopes and the like. The elbow and the connection of the ring-like socket are split so that the socket can be expanded a slight amount whereby the resiliency thereof will serve to retain the -instrument by frictional contact.

The only requirement is that the instrument havev an annular portion of external diameter slightly greater than the minimum internal diameter of the ring-like socket member. This arm extends outwardly in a plane substantially parallel to the axis of the lens carrying tube, while theringlike socket member extends substantially at right angles to the arm. Due to this arrangement, it is possible to raise or lower the light mechanism relative to the instrument held in the socket until the proper illumination can be secured. In this manner compensation may be made for variations in length and diameter in the diagnostic instruments. At the same time visual inspection -is not interfered. with and a's is'customary, use may be made of a magnifying lens to aid such examination. In this 'arrangement the magnifying lenses whether they be of simple character or telescopic character, are supportedon the closed end portion of the light carrying tube. I'he -magnifying lens holder may be made if desired in the shape substantially of a figure 8. with one loop split so that this loop becomes resilient enough to nrmly grip the tube.'

When examination with a diagnostic instrument located in the ring-like socket requires insuillation, use may be made of the attachment shown in the drawing, which attachment consists of a cylindrical member having a clear transparent window secured therein in an inclined position. One end of the cylinder is externally threaded for engagement with internal threads provided in the annular portion of the diagnostic instrument gripped by the socket member. In order that air or gas can be intro- .duced into the chamber formed by the diagnostic instrument and the cylinder, an aperture is provided in the window into which aperture is fitted one end of a small tube fastened to the wall of the cylinder. The other end of the tube is bent into an elbow and is provided withv a nipple for the attachment of the customary rubber tubing. This insuiiiator attachment is secured to the diagnostic instrument after the instrument has been seated in its socket, so that no change of focus is effected by this attachment, with the result that the inclined window can be of plain transparent glass. In some other types of insufiiators at present known to the, art, the attachment necessarily causes a change of focus with the result that the window must be a special prepared lens, usually of negative value.

In another type of instrument carrier, the arm which extends from the tubular portion is in the nature of a bowed plate having its side edges bent downwardly to form ilanges through which is secured a pin. A two-ended leaf spring member is held at an intermediate point by the pin so that the yends are forced directly against the bowed plate. A tongue depressor, usually ofwood, of lany ordinary size and shape can be iirmly held by this instrument carrier.the only manipulation necessary being a simple sliding of one end of the tongue depressor between the curved plate at the top. and the two ends of the leaf spring at the bottom. When so introduced, the tongue depressor is held against undesired movement and can ybe removed readily by simple withdrawal from engagement with the carrier. arm, which is the bowed plate, extends from the tubular part of the carrier in a plane substantially parallel to the axis of the lens carrying tube. In use, the illuminating mechanism can be raised .or lowered to any desired position for best illumination of the mouth or throat of the patient, or even if desired, the lens cap can be made to illuminate portions of the patients mouth out of line with the tongue depressor.

Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent byreierence to the following detail description read in the light of the accompanying drawing, wherein F18. 1 is a side view'of an embodiment of the invention showing the illuminating device combined with an instrument carrier.

Fig. 2 is a different view of the same assembly.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section taken substantially on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 44 is a view of separate parts which are combined in the invention.

Pig. 5 is a view of another modiiication of the invention showing the illuminating mechanism combined with an instrument carrier of slightly Here again the taken substantially on the' to Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, 10 indicates a cylindrical member made of some suitable metal which is provided at one end with a socket for the reception of an electric light bulb 11 of the character commonly used in ashlights. The otherend of the member is provided with threads 12 yand a contact 13, this end of the member being adapted to make threaded engagement with an internally threaded contact element 14. As shown in Fig. 3, the member 10 is made as a hollow member and has positioned therein an insulator 15 through which extends a contact rod 16 carrying the contact 13 on one end thereof. A second contact 17 is secured to the end of a rod 18 around which is coiled a spring 19. 'I'he enlarged part of the contact element 16 is hollowed out for the reception of the rod 18 while the spring 19 has one end secured directly to the upper end of the member -16. An insulating disk 20 serves to maintain the contact 17 in proper alignment.

'I'he contact member 14 is constructed in a manner similar to the arrangement Just previously described in that it is provided with an insulator 21 through which extends a co'ntact member 22. A contact 24 secured to a rod 25 is positioned with the member 14. A spring 26 is coiled around this rod while a disk 27 of insulating material serves to align the contact 24 and also to prevent shorting thereof. An electric con- -ductor 28 is secured to the lower end of the contact 22 as at 29, while the other conductor 30 is secured as by soldering to a sleeve 31 fitting closely within the lower end oi' the member 14. Thus one conductor is in effect grounded to the instrument itself while the other conductor is insulated from the instrument.

Associated with the member 10 is a lens cap indicated generally at 35, such cap being made up of a tubular portion 36 of size to fit around the upper part of the member 10. tubular section 37 extends outwardly from the cap at an angle of substantially 110 degrees from the axis of the portion 36. A similar smaller tubular portion 38"extends from the opposite side of the member 36. If desired the members 37 and 38 may be formed from a single tube of material passing through the top of the closed-end tube 36. The outer end oi the member 38 is closed as at 39. A condensing lens 40 is secured in the outer end of the tubular part 37 for a purpose to be explained hereinafter.

The member 38 serves as a support for a lens mount 'of suitable characten In the form illustrated, the lens mount 41 is in the shape substantially of a figure 8 with the lower loop split as at 42. A magnifying lens 43 is mounted in the upper loop of the lens holder. lThe internal diameter of thelower loop ot this holder is slightly less than the diameter of the lens mount 41, so that due to the split 42 the lower loop can be forced upon the member 38, and when so positioned will be held thereon byi'rictional contact.

A smaller The invention, of course, is not to be limited to this type of lens holder or by this particular type of magnifying lens, since with certain types of diagnostic instruments it--Will be necessary to makev use of telescopic lenses. These lenses,

naturally, can be ymounted in a support which Y can ilt around the member 38.

The tubular section 36 of the lens cap 35 is oi such length that when it is slipped over the electric lamp 1l the top of the cap can rest directly upon this lamp, as shown in Fig. 3. A part of the member 10 is of reduced diameter as shown to accommodate the cap, so that when the cap is in place, it and the enlarged part of member 10 have exterior vsurfaces which are in substantial alignment. The cap can be moved longitudinally on the member 10 to cause the lens therein to become properly focused relative to the filament of a light bulb, such movement being desirable due to variations in filament positions in different bulbs.

In conjunction with this type of illuminating mechanism, use is made of diagnostic instrument carriers of different types as shown in the drawing. Each carrier, however, has lparts which are identical in construction. These parts consist of a hollow tubular member having an upper rib 5l and a lower rib 52. 'Ihe upper' rib 5l has a threaded aperture therein in which fits a set screw 54. The lower rib 52 has a threaded aperture therein in which fits a set screw 55. These parts of the instrument carriers are similar and are given the same reference characters in all figures of the drawing.

In the carrier shown in Figures 1 to 3, inclusive, an arm 56 extends angularly upwardly from the rib 51 in a plane substantially parallel to the axis of the tubular parts 37 and 38, or in other words, at an .angle of substantially 110 degrees relative to the axis of the tubular part 50. The arm 56 has an elbow part 57 which is split as shown at 58 in Fig. 8, and which is enlarged into a ring 59. This split in the elbow extending upwardly through the ring part 59 permits a slight expansion of the ring so that diagnostic instruments can be forced into the ring to be held by frictional contact.

In conjunction with this -ring-like socket, use may be made of a diagnostic instrument of the type shown in Figures l and 2, or of any other suitable type, varying in length and diameter from that shown. The instrument illustrated is included as being merely illustrative of the uses to which the carrier can be put Without intending any limitation whatever on the device. This instrument as shown has a funnel-like part 60, a fiange 61 and an annular part 62. 'This annular part 62 is of such external diameter that when it is inserted into the ring-like socket, it will spread the ring an amount suiiiciently to cause the spring action thereof to grip the part 62 firmly. The interior of this part 62 is threaded as indicated at 64 in `Figure, 2 for a purpose to be explained hereinafter.

In the form shown in Figures 5 to 7, the rib 51 has extending outwardly therefrom a tongue depressor carrier in the nature of a bowed metallic arm 65 which is substantially parallel to the axis of the members 37 and 38. The edges of arm 65 are bent downwardly as at 66 and a pin 67 extends through both parts 66, being locked to these parts in any suitable manner. A leaf spring 68 is bowed as shown in Figure 5 and is provided with a central depression 69 which ts under the pin 67. The ends of the spring 68 are forced toward the bowed metal member 65. A tongue depressor 70 of some suitable material (preferably wood), can be inserted between the ends of the spring 68 and the bowed top 65 as shown in Figures 5 to 7.

The use and operation of the mechanism hereinbefore described is substantially as follows: Regardless of the type of instrument carrier used, the operation will be the same. The member 10 is screwed into engagement with the contact member 14 and an electric light bulb 11 is seated in the top of the member 10. This member 10 can then4 be inserted into the tubular member 50 until the light bulb extends above the upper edge of the member 50. The lens cap 35 is then placedin position shown in Figure 3, part thereof naturally tting within the tubular member 50. If an instrument carrier of the type shown in Figures 1 to 3 is used, the light carrier and the lens cap are moved until the condensing lens 40 in the member 37 is in proper position to illuminate the opening in the instrument 60. Proper positioning of the light carrier will be aided materially by energizing the bulb l1 while the adjustment is being made. When the light carrier has been positioned at the proper height relative to the member 50, it can be locked in place by tightening the set screws 54 and 55. Set screw 54 serves to lock I the lens carrier in place while set screw serves to lock the member 10 in place. With a magnifying lens 43 in position, examination may be made through the instrument held in the instrument carrier. In practice, it has been found that the lamp carrier can be adjusted to illuminate portions of the anatomy being examined through the diagnostic instrument without interfering with the inspection thereof through the proper magnifying lens. 'This isdue primarily to the angle at which the tubular members 37 and 38 extend relative to the member 36 of the lens cap and also due to the fact that the arm 56 is substantially parallel to the axis of members 37- and 38 while the socket 59 is at substantially right angles to the arm 56.

If insufllation is desired, use may be made of an attachment' similar to that shown in Figure 9. This attachment consists of a parallel cylindrical member 70 provided with threads 71 at one end thereof, and provided with an inclined window 72 of plain transparent glass. The window 72 can be positioned in the cylinder 70 in any desired manner so long as the arrangement provides an airtight seal around the window. An opening 74 is provided in the window near the wall of the cylinder 70 into which opening nts an end of a tube 75 secured to the wall of mein-L ber 70 in any suitable manner, such as by soldering. The tube 75 is provided with an elbow and with a nipple 76 at-the end thereof for the attachment of rubber tubing. The threads 71 are designed for engagement with the threads 64 in the interior of the annular part 62 of the diagnostic instrument. 'I'hus with this diagnostic instrument in place the insuiliator attachment can be secured thereto by merely engaging threads 64 and 7l. member 70 aids in forming an airtight seal with the end of the member 62.

The advantage of this type of insuiliator attachment resides in the fact that it can be attached to a diagnostic instrument without affecting the focus of the light' rays and of the 'magnifying lens through which the examination is carried out. Since the focus' is not affected in any way, it is not necessary that the window '72 be other than plain transparent glass.

If it becomes desirable to use a tongue depressor withillumination, the carrier shown in Figures 5 to 7 is used, the members 10 and 35 being fastened within the tubular part 50 of this carrier in the manner just previously described. 'I'he condensing lens with the light bulb directly therebehind can be raised or lowered to effect the desired illumination of the patients mouth or throat when the depressor is in use. If desired the member can be'fastened permanently in part `50 or even made integrally therewith.

The illuminating device of this invention possesses the advantages not found in prior art instruments. Due to its construction it is possible to utilize ordinary flashlight bulbs which can be purchased at a very moderate cost. Furthermore, due tothe fact that the lens .cap can be adjusted to cause the filament of this bulb to be in `a direct line with the condensing lens, the greatest quantity of rays from the filament can be projected outwardly in concentrated form by the condensing lens. Since the capand the filament carrier are rotatable independently of each other when in position within the member 50 of an instrument carrier, it is possible to properly align the condensing lens with the diagnostic instrument', and then if desired, the lamp carrier can be moved until the filament is in the most favorable position relative to the condensing lens, thereby eliminating objectionable shadows.

The instrument carrier which is utilized as a holder for a tongue depressor, possesses advantages in that it is yof such size as to accommodate tongue depressors of varying sizes. Since the actual tongue depressor is held firmly by the action of the spring in the carrier, no adjustment of set screws or of any other. fastening mechanism is necessary. Consequently, a tongue depressor can' be positioned in the carrier with maximum -simplicity and can be removed therefrom with equalease.

Y In both types of instrument carriers shown, it will be noted that' the actual instrument will extend at a particular angle from the tubular part of the carrier. This angle which has been mentioned as being approximately 110 degrees, is the angle which makes it possible to utilize an illuminating device in which rays are projected outwardly in a line fromthe source of the rays. This angle also makes it possible to'utilize direct rays without interfering with the visual inspection with that part of the anatomy under examination by the user. y

Theringsocketoftheinstrumentcarrierhas the advantagev that careful machining of parts of diagnostic instruments to nt the sockets is eliminated due to the split in-the connection of the ring to the arm through the elbow, which imparts some degree of. resiliency to the ring. Consequently, the diagnostic instrument can be inserted into the ring socket and held therein by frictional contact so long as the exterior diameter of the diagnostic instrument is slightly great- .er than the minimum internal diameter of the From the foregoing, it will be seen that the present invention provides a combined illuminating mechanism and diagnostic instrument carrier which is capable of many and varied uses, and which can be modified to a considerable extent. In view of this it is to be understood that the claims are not to be limited to the illustrated embodiments but are to be limited only by the scope of `the following claims.

I claim:

l. A device of the type described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier, a member having alight bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, means fitting over said bulb for projecting light rays directly therefrom in any upwardly'I and outwardly inclined direction relative to said member, means for adjustably securing said light projecting mechanism to said instrument carrier, and an arm extending from part of said carrier in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of the projected light rays.

.2. A device of the type described comprising cap being slideable longitudinally of and rotatable about said member, means for adjustably securing said lens cap to said instrument carrier, an arm extending from part of said carrier in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of the projected light rays,v and a resiliently expansible ring-like socket extending substantially at right angles from saidarm for the reception of annular portions of instruments, said socket holding instruments in the path of projected light rays.

3. A device of the type'described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier. a member having a light bulb secured directlyto and extending beyond one .end thereof, Vmeans fitting over said bulb for projecting light rays directly therefrom in an upwardly and outwardly inclined direction relative to said member, means for adjustably securing saldfllght projecting lmechanism to said instrument carrier, an arm extendingfrompartofsaidcarrlerinadirectionsubstantially parallel to the axis of the projected light rays, a resilientl! expanible ring-like socket extending substantially at right angles fromsaidarmandaninstrumen'thavinganam nular part in engagement with said socket, said annular part of said instrument beinginternally threadedforthereceptionofanexternally threaded cylinder having` an inclined window therein and having a tube in communication with a part thereof through the opening in saidwindow. s

4. A device of the type described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier. means at the top of said carrier for directing light rays outwardlyl from the carrier, an arm extending from part of said carrier in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of the projected light rays,

said arm consisting of a plate, and a leaf spring mounted beneath said plate with the ends of the spring resiliently forced' toward said plate.

5. In a device of the type described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier, means for'securing thereto light projection mechanism, said carrier having an arm extending outwardly and upwardly from the part of the carrier to which the light projecting mechanism is secured, said arm constituting a plate having longitudinal downwardly extending flanges, a pin secured between said iianges, and a leaf spring retained by said pin with the ends of the spring resiliently forced toward the plate.

6. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member having alight bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said light bulb, a condensing lens carrying tube extending upwardly and outwardly from said cap and from the top thereof, an inspection lens supporting tube extending outwardly and downwardly from said cap with its axis substantially parallel to the axis of said lens carrying tube, a diagnostic instrument carrier secured to said tubular member, means for adjustably locking said lens cap to said tubular member, and an arm extending outwardly and upwardly from said carrier at substantially the same angle as the angle at which the lens carrying tube extends from the lens cap.

7. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof,

, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and light bulb, a condensing lens carrying tube extending upwardly and outwardly from said cap and from the top thereof, an inspection lens supporting tube extending outwardly and downwardly from said cap from the opposite' side of said cap, a diagnostic instrument carrier secured to said tubular member, means for adjustably locking said lens cap to said tubular member, an arm extending outwardly and upwardly from carrier at substantially the same angle as the angle at which the lens carrying tube extends from the lens cap, and a resiliently expansible ring-like socket extending substantialLv at right. angles to said arm.

8. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and light bulb, a condensing lens carrying tube extending upwardly and outwardly from said cap and from the top thereof, an inspection lens supporting tube extending outwardly and downwardly from the opposite sideof said cap, a diagnostic instrument carrier secured to said tubular member, means for adjustably locking said lens cap to said tubular member, an arm extending outwardly and upwardly from said carrier at substantially the same angle as the angle at which the lens carrying tube extends from the lens cap, a resiliently expansible ring-like socket extending substantially at right angles to said arm, and an instrument having an annular part held in said socket.

9. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof. a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and light bulb, a' condensing lens carrying tube extending upwardly and outwardly from said cap and from the top thereof, an inspection lens supporting tube extending, outwardly and downwardly from the opposite side of said cap, a diagnostic instrument carrier secured to said tubular member, means for adiustably locking said lens cap `to said tubular member, and an arm extending outwardly and upwardly from said carrier at substantially the same angle as the angle at which the lens carrying tube extends from the lens cap,

said arm constituting a plate and spaced members resiliently forced toward the bottom of said plate for holding a tongue depressor between said members and the plate. l.

10. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member, a source of light rays secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said source of light rays, said cap having a lens therein for projecting rays of light directly from said source outwardly at an angle to the axis of said tubular member, and an instrument carrier secured to said tubular member.

11. A device of the type described comprising a tubular member having a source of light rays secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said source of light rays, a cylinder extending upwardly and outwardly near the top of said lens cap, a condensing lens in said cylinder for projecting light rays directly from said source, and an instrument carrier secured to said tubular member.

12. A device of the type described comprising aA secured to said carrier and having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said bulb, said lens cap being slideable longitudinally of and rotatable about said tubular member, meansfor adjustably securing said lens cap to said tubular member, and a condensing lens in said lens cap for projecting rays directly from said bulb in an upwardly and outwardly direction relative to the axis of said tubular member.

13. A device of the type described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier, a tubular member secured to'said carrier and having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said bulb, a condensing lens carrying ltube extending upwardly and outwardly from said cap for projecting light rays directly from said bulb, an inspection lens support secured to said cap, and an inspection lens in said support with the axis of said inspection lens substantially parallel to the axis of said lensvcarrying tube.

14. A device of the type described comprising a diagnostic instrument carrier having a cylindrical portion, a tubular member secured to said carrier and having a light bulb secured directly to and extending beyond one end thereof, a lens cap fitting over said tubular member and said bulb, a condensing lens carrying tube extending WALTER A. AaNEsEN.

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2485766A (en) * 1944-02-15 1949-10-25 Winifred H Parcher Otoscope or the like
US2678041A (en) * 1951-05-21 1954-05-11 American Optical Corp Handle connection for diagnostic instruments
US3087050A (en) * 1960-06-13 1963-04-23 Engelhard Hanovia Inc Instrument for inspecting locks
US3435820A (en) * 1966-02-16 1969-04-01 Stanley Taub Illuminating endoscope with detachable shield
US3592199A (en) * 1970-02-09 1971-07-13 Medical Products Corp Autoclavable surgical instrument illumination
US4766886A (en) * 1985-05-17 1988-08-30 Juhn Steven K Method and apparatus for viewing and collecting specimens
US5501652A (en) * 1994-09-15 1996-03-26 Woods; William A. Self-examination otoscope
US6520909B1 (en) * 2000-05-16 2003-02-18 Robert C. Rankins Adjustable tongue blade holder for endoscope

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2485766A (en) * 1944-02-15 1949-10-25 Winifred H Parcher Otoscope or the like
US2678041A (en) * 1951-05-21 1954-05-11 American Optical Corp Handle connection for diagnostic instruments
US3087050A (en) * 1960-06-13 1963-04-23 Engelhard Hanovia Inc Instrument for inspecting locks
US3435820A (en) * 1966-02-16 1969-04-01 Stanley Taub Illuminating endoscope with detachable shield
US3592199A (en) * 1970-02-09 1971-07-13 Medical Products Corp Autoclavable surgical instrument illumination
US4766886A (en) * 1985-05-17 1988-08-30 Juhn Steven K Method and apparatus for viewing and collecting specimens
US5501652A (en) * 1994-09-15 1996-03-26 Woods; William A. Self-examination otoscope
US6520909B1 (en) * 2000-05-16 2003-02-18 Robert C. Rankins Adjustable tongue blade holder for endoscope

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